captain america movies in order

List of Marvel Movies in Order: The Release Watch · Iron Man (2008) · The Incredible Hulk (2008) · Iron Man 2 (2010) · Thor (2011) · Captain America. Iron Man (2008) · The Incredible Hulk (2008) · Iron Man 2 (2010) · Thor (2011) · Captain America: The First Avenger (2011) · Marvel's The Avengers . Making household names of heroes including Iron Man, Captain America, Thor and Captain Marvel, the MCU has become the biggest movie series.
captain america movies in order

Captain america movies in order -

Transporting to a different universe where superheroes are real has never been more enticing than in 2021. Luckily, travel rates to the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) are cheaper than ever: costing just about one Disney+ subscription and some change. (Looking at you, Sony-owned Spider-Man movies and Universal Pictures-owned IncredibleHulk)

With a cinematic universe spanning decades and worlds, all intermingling with crossovers and easter eggs, it can be difficult to know where to start. For some, the only way to experience the MCU is by following its internal chronology, beginning in WWII with Captain America: The First Avenger. However, due to Marvel’s affinity for narratological lacing there’s all kinds of cliff-hangers, callbacks, and clues in its original release order. There's also that whole post-credits scene, which will really through you for a loop if you're trying to watch them in real time order. Watching in chronological order can sort of throw a wrench into this intended viewing experience, so we recommend watching in order of release date.

Beginning with Iron Man from 2008, and ending with the 2021 Black Widow, we’ve got the full list of every Marvel release to date. Now is a great time to get yourself immersed, as the MCU is expected to expand this year with releases of The Eternals and Shang-Chi and the Legend of Ten Rings.

Just remember to take some breaks from your marathon to dip back into the IRLU (In Real Life Universe) every once in a while.

(*Since Marvel is Disney-owned, almost all of these can be found on Disney+, aside from The Incredible Hulk, Spider-Man: Homecoming, and Spider-Man: Far From Home, which can all be streamed on Prime Video.)

Iron Man (2008)

The one that started it all, where a rich guy builds a superhero suit and spawns likely decades of blockbuster franchise filmmaking.

Watch

The Incredible Hulk (2008)*

In the MCU's second outing, the Hulk gets another telling of his origin story. Sure, The Incredible Hulk is a bit of a strange watch in the 2020s, with Mark Ruffalo having long replaced Ed Norton. But we'll see the Abomination again soon, so that's worth a throwback to Norton Hulk.

Watch on Amazon

Iron Man 2 (2010)

Iron Man 2 got a little too superhero for its own good, but the second go-round with Tony Stark is still a fun one, Elon Musk cameo be damned.

Watch

Thor (2011)

Thor refused to let us know how funny Chris Hemsworth could actually be under that golden-blonde wig, but it did give us a brilliantly Shakespeare-feeling intro to the God of Thunder.

Watch

Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)

Captain America: The First Avenger gave America's ass a proper intro to the world—and a compelling look at WWI in the process.

Watch

The Avengers (2012)

The Avengers did the unthinkable, bringing heroes from separate movies, wow! all together for one adventure. We were so young.

Watch

Iron Man 3 (2013)

The underrated Iron Man 3 bravely shows the effects of PTSD on Tony Stark, ending the Iron Man trilogy on a sweet note—all during the holidays, no less.

Watch

Thor: The Dark World (2013)

Thor: The Dark World, where Thor battles the Dark Elves, is the subpar MCU entry we don't really talk about.

Watch

Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014)

In what is one of the best MCU outings, Captain America: The Winter Soldier links Cap and Black Widow up for the espionage drama of our dreams.

Watch

Guardians of the Galaxy (2014)

Guardians of the Galaxy somehow made a group of ragtag antiheroes into fan favorites. Guess that's the power of '80s music.

Watch

Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015)

Avengers: Age of Ultron made good on its title, pitting the Avengers against Mr. Robot for two and a half hours. That's how long the age of the titular Ultron lasted. And we're OK with that.

Watch

Ant-Man (2015)

In Ant-Man, Paul Rudd plays a good-bad dude who gets his hands on a shrinking suit. Frankly, the relatively small stakes (ha!) in this romp are refreshing.

Watch

Captain America: Civil War (2016)

Captain America: Civil War, gasp, turned our heroes against each other. Well, at least until they forgive each other so they can fight the bad guy.

Watch

Doctor Strange (2016)

Doctor Strange shows the journey of surgeon Stephen Strange into one of the MCU's wisest heroes. We'll see how he fares when the multiverse explodes in the sequel.

Watch

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017)

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 wasn't quiet the romp its predecessor was, but more time with Rocket Raccoon and (teenage) Groot is never a bad thing.

Watch

Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017)*

At long last: Spider-Man: Homecoming gave us the baby-faced Peter Parker from the comics, giving a faithful and sweet tale of the Queens native's coming of age.

Watch

Thor: Ragnarok (2017)

Thor: Ragnarok enlisted the wild, weird, and wonderful Taika Waititi as its director. The result? A rock n' rollin, planet-hopping Thor adventure.

Watch

Black Panther (2018)

Black Panther, which tells the story of a young king learning how to truly become a leader, was a landmark film for diversity in Hollywood.

Watch

Avengers: Infinity War (2018)

Avengers: Infinity War marked the beginning of the most epic superhero team-up in the genre's history. Even if we knew Endgame would leave our heroes on top, you have to give Avengers: Infinity War credit for the gut-punch of letting Thanos win.

Watch

Ant-Man and the Wasp (2018)

Ant-Man and the Wasp gave us another round of antics from the size-changing supeheroes. We'll never get tired of the visual gags in the Ant-Man and the Wasp series, even if the action doesn't always have an impact on the larger MCU.

Watch

Captain Marvel (2019)

In Captain Marvel, Brie Larson goes full Maverick in a Top Gun-esque, fighter-pilot, '90s-as-hell superhero epic.

Watch

Avengers: Endgame (2019)

The culmination of what Iron Man started, Avengers: Endgame lived up to all of the hype—and then some. RIP Tony. (And our bladders.)

Watch

Spider-Man: Far From Home (2019)*

Spider-Man: Far From Home follows our boy Peter as he goes on a Eurotrip with his classmates. Someday, we'll talk about Jake Gyllenhaal's Mysterio as one of the GOAT Marvel villains. The world just isn't ready for unhinged superhero villain JG. Yet.

Watch

Black Widow (2021)

At long last, Black Widow serves up Scarlett Johansson's solo outing as the Russian warrior-spy-badass.

Watch Now

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Источник: https://www.esquire.com/entertainment/movies/g32492706/how-to-watch-marvel-movies-in-order/

Captain America

Real Name

Samuel Thomas Wilson

"I'm a black man carrying the stars and stripes. What don't I understand? Every time I pick this thing up, I know there are millions of people who are gonna hate me for it. Even now, here... I feel it. The stares, the judgment. And there's nothin' I can do to change it. Yet, I'm still here. No super serum, no blond hair, or blue eyes. The only power I have is that I believe we can do better."
―Captain America[src]

Samuel Thomas "Sam" Wilson is a former United States Air Force pararescue airman who wielded an experimental military wingsuit, operating under the callsign Falcon. After his wing-man Riley was killed in action, Wilson decided to leave an active duty, instead choosing to help other veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. At this time, Wilson had met Steve Rogers and was drawn to his conflict with HYDRA, as Rogers needed help from anyone not associated with S.H.I.E.L.D. since they had been infiltrated by HYDRA. Retaking his old wings, Wilson had then assisted with destroying all of Alexander Pierce's schemes of world domination. Following their victory against Pierce's HYDRA units, Falcon then agreed to assist Rogers in tracking down the Winter Soldier, who was in fact Rogers' close friend who had been brainwashed by HYDRA.

As Falcon continued searching for the Winter Soldier, he was then recruited into the Avengers, since their original team had been disbanded following the defeat of Ultron. During his time with the Avengers, Falcon briefly encountered Ant-Man before assisting in defeating Crossbones. In the aftermath of several incidents that caused casualties within civilians, the Avengers were then forced into following the Sokovia Accords, putting them all under the government's full control. However, as the Winter Soldier was blamed for terrorist attacks by Helmut Zemo, Falcon stood by Captain America with protecting the Winter Soldier, which had then caused the Avengers Civil War. In the wake of this clash, Falcon, and several other Avengers who were loyal to Captain America, were defeated by Iron Man, and locked into the Raft, until Captain America freed them as they became fugitives.

While the Avengers were still disbanded, Earth had come under attack by Thanos and his Black Order, bringing Falcon and his allies out of hiding. Learning that Thanos intended to steal the Mind Stone from Vision, Falcon joined the Avengers in taking Vision to Wakanda for his protection, while they had then tried to keep Thanos' forces back. However, they were eventually defeated as Thanos claimed the Infinity Stones and used them to cause the Snap, killing trillions including Falcon. Five years later, the victims of the Snap were resurrected by the surviving Avengers, and Falcon rejoined their battles against Thanos as they finally defeated him at the cost of Tony Stark's life. In the aftermath of the battle, Falcon learned that Captain America returned to the past and had lived a full life with Peggy Carter, and seeing him return as an old man, was given the shield by Rogers.

Initially declining the shield and giving it up to the Smithsonian Institution under the impression that it would remain a display piece, Wilson was disgusted when the Government had then appointed John Walker as their next Captain America. Wilson instead refocused on fighting the Flag Smashers, forming an unlikely alliance with Bucky Barnes and Helmut Zemo to track them down. However, as Walker began to lose control, due to taking the Super Soldier Serum, and brutally murdered one of the Flag Smashers, Nico, in public, Wilson retook the shield to prevent further murders. Following some soul searching and a discussion with Isaiah Bradley, Wilson had finally taken up the mantle of Captain America in time to intervene with the Flag Smashers' attack on the GRC, stopping Karli Morgenthau, as he convinced the GRC to treat refugee communities created by the Blip fairly, and inspiring a new generation of heroes.

Biography

Early Life

Wilson Family Seafood

"We made a deal before Daddy died. You're out there. I do things my way here."
―Sarah Wilson to Sam Wilson[src]

Sam Wilson was born on September 23, 1978 in Harlem[8] to Paul and Darlene Wilson. He was raised in Louisiana along with his sister, Sarah.[9] Wilson's father would often take him to go fishing at a spot in Grand Isle.[10] Wilson had an aunt, whom he referred to as his TT, whom he was very close to. When his TT passed away, Wilson attended her funeral, which was well attended and continued for many days, celebrating her life.[11]

Military Career

Serving Two Tours

"When I was over there, I'd sleep on the ground, use rock for the pillows, like a caveman. Now I'm home, lying in my bed, and it's like—"
"Lying on a marshmallow. Feel like I'm gonna sink right to the floor."
―Sam Wilson and Steve Rogers[src]

Sam Wilson joined the United States Air Force after qualifying and passing all the requirements for pararescue. He served two combat tours in the Global War on Terrorism campaign, being sent out to Afghanistan during his service. Assigned onto the 58th Rescue Squadron, Wilson was a test pilot for the EXO-7 Falcon along with his wingman, Riley. During his time serving in the Air Force, Wilson often found that he would be the most comfortable when he was sleeping on the ground while using rocks as pillows, since there were few other options.[1]

Losing Riley

"You lose someone?"
"My wingman, Riley. Flying a night mission, standard PJ rescue op. Nothing we hadn't done a thousand times before. 'Til an RPG knocked Riley's dumb ass out of the sky. Nothing I could do. Like I was up there just to watch."
―Steve Rogers and Sam Wilson[src]

One of Wilson's missions involved successfully capturing Khalid Khandil in Bakhmala, Afghanistan, being once again teamed up with Riley. However, during a night rescue mission, Riley was killed after his EXO-7 Falcon was hit by an RPG and Wilson could do nothing to save him. Having lost his close friend, Wilson had a hard time finding a reason to continue serving and soon left the Air Force, deciding to focus his efforts on helping veterans recovering from combat Post-traumatic stress disorder back home.[1]

Meeting Captain America

Surprise Running Companion

"Alright, Sam, duty calls. Thanks for the run. If that's what you wanna call 'running'."
"Oh, that's how it is?"
―Steve Rogers and Sam Wilson[src]

Having returned home from the United States Air Force, Wilson was hired by the Department of Veterans Affairs, with the intention of counseling the veterans who had been suffering from Post-traumatic stress disorder. While out for his morning jog across Washington, D.C., Wilson soon found his early morning exercise being interrupted by Steve Rogers, who had managed to casually run by Wilson several times, teasing him as he went, much to Wilson's annoyance.

With Rogers having run past him multiple times throughout their jog, Wilson eventually stopped to catch his breath as Rogers came over to rejoin him. Commenting on how fast he had run, Wilson jokingly challenged Rogers to run another lap, questioning if he could do it in the blink of an eye. Rogers had then questioned what branch of the Air Force Wilson was a part of, and Wilson explained his situation before introducing himself as Rogers helped him back onto his feet.

As Rogers introduced himself, Wilson had then made it clear that he already knew who he was based upon his incredible running abilities. He then questioned what it was like for Rogers to have been woken up in 2011 after living in the 1940s during World War II, to which Rogers only claimed that it was taking some getting used to. Before Rogers could walk away, Wilson had then noted that most other Armed Forces veterans, himself included, had struggled to get used to sleeping on a comfortable bed upon returning home, which Rogers related to. The pair then bonded about their experiences while serving in the military and similarities in readjusting without a war zone.

Once Wilson asked Rogers about the differences between living now compared to the 1940s, he listened to Rogers explain why it was not so bad, commenting on all the improvements with their food and technology in the modern day, including the internet. Hearing that Rogers was still trying to catch up on everything that he missed, Wilson then recommended Marvin Gaye for him to listen to, and Rogers added it to his To-Do List.

The conversation was cut short, however, as Rogers was called away on a S.H.I.E.L.D. mission by Natasha Romanoff. Wilson encouraged Rogers to visit him at the VA some day, ostensibly so Wilson could impress the women who also worked there, while Rogers teased him over his jogging abilities. As Romanoff had arrived to collect Rogers in her car, joking that they would put him in the Smithsonian as an exhibit, Wilson gave her a flirtatious greeting before watching her drive away with Rogers.[1]

Advising Steve Rogers

"The number of people giving me orders is down to about zero. So, hell yeah. Are you thinking about getting out?"
"No. I don't know. To be honest, I don't know what I would do with myself if I did."
―Sam Wilson and Steve Rogers[src]

Wilson held a group session with Armed Forces veterans who were suffering from PTSD as he helped Garcia, who was struggling with visions of IEDs in the roads. Once Garcia had finished her confessions, Wilson spoke to the group about what they kept with them from their experiences with war and what they left behind. He used a metaphor of carrying the memories in a bag as he offered advice in separating their time in the military from their time being at home, where they were trying to relive as civilians.

With their meeting over, Wilson once again met with Steve Rogers, who complimented him on his insights to Garcia, having arrived to listen to the last few minutes of his meeting. Wilson then told Rogers about his time in Afghanistan and how he lost his friend, Riley, during a mission. Wilson explained that once Riley died, he had lost his own passion for serving in the military but found a new purpose in his life by helping these veterans readjust after returning to their homes.

Rogers admitted to Wilson that he was struggling with the idea of what to do with himself if he was not a soldier, since he also didn't know how to leave S.H.I.E.L.D. and just live a normal life, to which Wilson jokingly suggested that he could join Ultimate Fighting due to his Super Soldier Serum. However, Wilson got serious once again as he then assured Rogers that he could do whatever he wanted, before questioning what it was that actually made him happy in life.[1]

Helping the Fugitives

"I can't ask you to do this, Sam. You got out for a good reason."
"Dude, Captain America needs my help. There's no better reason to get back in."
―Steve Rogers and Sam Wilson[src]

Having returned to his apartment after jogging through Washington, D.C., Wilson heard a knock at his door and was surprised to find a disheveled Steve Rogers and Natasha Romanoff, who had come seeking refuge as they claimed that everybody they knew was currently attempting to kill them. Despite having little context to their current situation, Wilson offered them both help without a second thought, opening his door for Rogers and Romanoff to come inside.

While they were inside his home, Wilson made the pair breakfast and allowed them to use his shower in order to clean themselves up, as they had been involved in an explosion at Camp Lehigh. Despite his own choice to leave the United States Air Force, Wilson had felt that being called upon by Captain America simply meant he had to return. Having finished making breakfast, Wilson came upstairs as he informed Rogers and Romanoff that it was ready if they wanted it.

As the group ate together, Wilson learned of the full details of Rogers' and Romanoff's current predicament, as he was informed about how S.H.I.E.L.D. had been infiltrated by HYDRA for decades, resulting in them being betrayed by Alexander Pierce who had order the assassination of themselves as well as Director Nick Fury. Having learned how dangerous their situation was if Pierce succeeded in his plans with Project Insight, Wilson had then offered his assistance.

Although Rogers was reluctant to accept, Wilson had insisted before then revealing to them that he was part of a military project that used the EXO-7 Falcon, with Romanoff recognizing their unit as the one that captured Khalid Khandil in Afghanistan. Rogers had also noticed a picture of Wilson and Riley. Seeing that Wilson could be beneficial to the mission to capture and question Jasper Sitwell, Rogers accepted his help as they all agreed to steal the EXO-7 Falcon together.[1]

Kidnapping of Agent Sitwell

"You're gonna go around the corner to your right. There's a gray car two spaces down. You and I are gonna take a ride."
"And why would I do that?"
"Because that tie looks really expensive, I'd hate to mess it up."
―Sam Wilson and Jasper Sitwell[src]

Having retrieved the EXO-7 Falcon from Fort Meade, Wilson traveled with both Steve Rogers and Natasha Romanoff to find and interrogate Jasper Sitwell. Wilson called Sitwell on the phone after he had a meeting with Senator Stern and threatened to have him shot if he did not do exactly as instructed; he ordered Sitwell to go into a car that drove him to a nearby building to be questioned by Rogers and Romanoff on the roof.

During his initial interrogation by Rogers, Sitwell denied any knowledge of HYDRA's takeover of S.H.I.E.L.D.. As they grew tired of his lies, Romanoff had instead resorted to kicking Sitwell off the building, in order to scare him into finally giving the answers they needed. After Sitwell fell several stories, Falcon then flew in at the last moment, caught him in mid-air, and brought Sitwell back onto the top of the building, dropping him with some force on the ground.

As Falcon retracted his wings and rejoined Rogers and Romanoff, he watched as Sitwell confessed, since the fall scared him so much. Falcon listened while Sitwell revealed how Arnim Zola's algorithm was in fact their plan to locate any potential threats to HYDRA in the future, and that Alexander Pierce intended to use Project Insight in order to assassinate these people of interest the moment the Insight Helicarriers were launched.[1]

Encountering Winter Soldier

Having learned of Alexander Pierce's sinister plans of the worldwide massacre, Wilson drove Jasper Sitwell towards the Triskelion, where they planned to use his clearances to gain access to, and shut down Project Insight before Pierce could activate it. Sitwell, however, insisted that this concept was a terrible idea but Wilson ordered that he keep quiet while they were driving there as Steve Rogers and Natasha Romanoff then continued to discuss the fine details of their new plan.

However, before the group could get to the Triskelion, someone suddenly landed on their roof as a robotic arm ripped Sitwell out of the window and into the path of a speeding truck, killing him. As the attacker began shooting into the car, Wilson slammed on the breaks, launching him off the vehicle, and they were faced with the Winter Soldier. Before the group could react, another vehicle had slammed into the back of their car, which drove Wilson and the others towards the Winter Soldier.

With Wilson unable to do anything, the Winter Soldier proceeded to rip the steering wheel out of his hands in an attempt to cause a fatal crash. While the car spun out of control, Rogers then grabbed Wilson and Romanoff and threw them all out, using his shield to protect them as they skidded on the road at high speed. When they recovered from the crash, a fight then erupted in the streets, in which Wilson dove for cover while Rogers was knocked off the bridge by a grenade.

Once Romanoff was also thrown off the bridge because of the Winter Soldier's grenade launcher, Wilson had managed to remain hidden as the HYDRA mercenaries then began repelling off the bridge in order to continue the fight, shooting at Rogers with a mini-gun. Surprising one mercenary, Wilson was able to knock him off the bridge and take his gun, using it to give Rogers covering fire. Wilson then instructed Rogers to help keep the Winter Soldier away from Romanoff.

Eventually, Wilson had managed to defeat the unit of HYDRA soldiers from the bridge and then went in search of Rogers and Romanoff on the streets of Washington, D.C., taking his EXO-7 Falcon with him as protection. Before long, Falcon discovered Rogers battling the Winter Soldier and flew in to assist, coming in just as their fight had briefly paused due to a moment's confusion. Falcon was able to kick the Winter Soldier aside just before he could shoot Rogers.

While Falcon had landed on the streets, the Winter Soldier recovered from the assault and had attempted to shoot at Rogers again, only for Romanoff to then shoot a grenade launcher at him, which caused him to flee. Before they could get away, however, Rogers, Romanoff and Wilson were then surrounded and captured by some of HYDRA's infiltrators within S.H.I.E.L.D., led by Brock Rumlow. As Wilson was pinned against the car at gunpoint, he had his Exo-7 Falcon removed while Rumlow and Jack Rollins secured Rogers. The three of them were put in the back of a van to be executed later, with Romanoff wounded from being shot at by the Winter Soldier earlier.[1]

Meeting Nick Fury

"Look, whoever he used to be, the guy he is now, I don't think he's the kind you save. He's the kind you stop."
"I don't know if I can do that."
―Sam Wilson and Steve Rogers[src]

Under the watchful eyes of HYDRA's soldiers, Wilson and the others were transported towards a secret location where Brock Rumlow intended to have them all killed. During their journey, Steve Rogers explained that Winter Soldier was in fact his friend, Bucky Barnes, who seemingly died in World War II. Wilson wondered how this could be possible, and Rogers explained that Arnim Zola had experimented on Barnes, which helped him to survive his apparent death.

As they drove along, Wilson noticed that Natasha Romanoff

Источник: https://marvelcinematicuniverse.fandom.com/wiki/Captain_America

2020 marked a landmark in the history of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. For the first time since 2009, there was be no feature film entry in the MCU canon. And while that was a loss for fans of the most expansive world-building franchise in cinema history, we can also choose to see some silver linings. It marked a particularly great chance for some to rewatch and refresh memories; for some others, it might be a chance to take in the entire MCU for the first time. 2021, then, marked a shift. The MCU successfully migrated to streaming television with five event limited series:WandaVision, The Falcon and the Winter Soldier, Loki, What If... , and Hawkeyeall landed in the year 2021.

And then there's movies on the big screen. July marked the long-awaited release of Black Widow, the 24th movie in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, followed by Shang-Chi and the Legend of the 10 Rings in September and Eternals in November (Spider-Man: No Way Home will cap the year off in mid-December, withplenty more already in development that we know of ). If you're someone who's been along for the ride for the past decade plus, it might be a little difficult to plot a full rewatch of the whole saga; 26 films is a tough lift, and we can't blame you for wanting to watch Thor: Ragnarokhere or Captain America: The Winter Soldier there. And if anyone just wants to watch the first film in a series—say, Black Panther or Guardians of the Galaxy—the movies tend to stand very nicely on their own.

But at the end of the day, these movies are unique because of the way they all fit together. If you're planning to really watch the MCU through, all the way, whether it's for the first time or the sixth time, there's only one right way to do it.

The only way to watch the Marvel movies, is in the order in which they were released.

That's right. Just like with Star Wars, the now-discontinued X-Men movies, and the DC Extended Universe,we're going to advocate watching these in one very specific way: in order. Sure, some people might have theories about watching something one way, to better understand one thing, and better frame this, and get a better handle for that. But we're going to go ahead and call that a bunch of hogwash—these movies were designed for in-theater viewing, which would mean its designed for people who have seen every movie at that given moment. Reveals are meant to be seen as if that is the latest movie in the series. When Stephen Strange is briefly mentioned in Captain America: The Winter Soldier, for example, that's meant to be a bit of foreshadowing for the character's introduction in his own solo film a few years later. Just a hint. Just a little bit.

If you've already seen every Marvel movie, you might want to rewatch them in chronological timeline order.

Meaning, the event that occurred first in the timeline—say, Steve Rogers/Captain America living during WWII—comes first. If you wanted to watch this way, though we wouldn't recommend it, this would be the order:

  1. Captain America: The First Avenger
  2. Captain Marvel
  3. Iron Man
  4. Iron Man 2
  5. The Incredible Hulk
  6. Thor
  7. The Avengers
  8. Iron Man 3
  9. Thor: The Dark World
  10. Captain America: The Winter Soldier
  11. Guardians of the Galaxy
  12. Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2
  13. Avengers: Age of Ultron
  14. Ant-Man
  15. Captain America: Civil War
  16. Spider-Man: Homecoming
  17. Doctor Strange
  18. Black Panther
  19. Thor: Ragnarok
  20. Black Widow
  21. Avengers: Infinity War
  22. Ant-Man and the Wasp
  23. Avengers: Endgame
  24. Spider-Man: Far From Home
  25. Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings
  26. Eternals

But, again, that's not what we would recommend; if you're choosing to watch these movies in that "chronological order," you'll be missing out on key reveals in favor of just seeing things "in order." It's not worth the trade-off. If you can follow Infinity Stones and intergalactic travel, you can follow a timeline that jumps around here and there. We promise.

Here's the correct order you should watch the Marvel movies in—the order in which they were released.

All that being said, [deep breath], here's the real order you should watch the movies. The order in which they were released:

Iron Man (2008)

Marvel Studios

Every Marvel watch through should begin with Iron Man, the movie that started it all. Sure, Tony Stark—a snarky, billionaire, playboy arms dealeris something of a relic from the late Bush era. But the movie plants all the seeds of what the MCU will eventually become—and that post-credits scene is a tease for the ages. If you don't watch this first, you lose all the excitement of the enormous, expansive world that is only just beginning.

Stream It Here

The Incredible Hulk (2008)

Universal

The Incredible Hulk is the closest thing to an exception of anything on this entire list in that...if you want to, you can probably skip the whole thing entirely. The most obvious disconnect is that Edward Norton plays Bruce Banner/The Hulk here (he's replaced by Mark Ruffalo for all subsequent appearances), but the movie also has a number of story hints that were never followed up on (Tim Blake Nelson gets an introduction and a transformation scene as classic comic character The Leader...and it has never been followed up on).

But if you're going to watch all the movies, you've got to watch The Incredible Hulk. And the connective tissue is there—Robert Downey Jr. has a fun cameo, and William Hurt's General Ross turns out to be a character who shows up throughout the series.

Stream It Here

Iron Man 2 (2010)

Marvel Studios


Another one that is...not exactly the shining jewel of the MCU. But Iron Man 2 has pivotal pieces for what would become the future of the franchise, including the first substantial role for Samuel L. Jackson as Nick Fury, and the introduction of Scarlett Johansson as Black Widow. Mickey Rourke's villain is...well, it's bad, and he's bad. But Sam Rockwell as secondary antagonistJustin Hammer is a delight (and they should bring him back!), and Garry Shandling's cameo as a pesky Senator winds up tying in quite nicely a bit down the line.

Stream It Here

Thor (2011)

Marvel Studios

The introduction of one of the MCU's most iconic characters came in 2011's Thor. It's perfectly solid, and sets the table for Chris Hemsworth's many appearances in films throughout the next decade. The movie also introduces the MCU's best villain in Loki (Tom Hiddleston) and even provides the first glimpse at Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner) in a brief cameo. There are also glimpses of some of Chris Hemsworth's comedic ability, which he puts on great display down the line in Thor: Ragnarok and Avengers: Endgame.

Stream It Here

Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)

Marvel Studios

The first appearance of Chris Evans as Cap, and his true origin story. Also, some minor references that you get out of context, like the presence of Tony Stark's father, Howard. Also, one of the best endings in the entire MCU—and leads directly into The Avengers.

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The Avengers (2012)

Marvel Studios

The Avengers was the first big payoff for all the world-building that Marvel had done over the past several years (and marked the first appearance of Mark Ruffalo as Bruce Banner/Hulk). The movie is vital to the universe, and its events are referenced consistently throughout the rest of the franchise—even to this day.

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Iron Man 3 (2013)

Marvel Studios

Iron Man 3 is the first movie of what the MCU refers to as "Phase 2," which essentially means it shows the aftermath of the events of The Avengers. Throughout the entire movie—which is the last solo Iron Man outing—we see Tony Stark as he deals with PTSD from the Avengers battle of New York. This movie has a big twist about 2/3 through that split audiences—but for our money, it's expertly done.

Stream It Here

Thor: The Dark World (2013)

Marvel Studios

So, Thor: The Dark World is another that is...not exactly the best in the MCU. Yet it's still vital to the overall story being told, expanding the character of both Thor and Loki and providing another of the franchise's very best endings. Just put up with this movie's extremely lackluster villain and get it into your system for the important parts.

Stream It Here

Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014)

Marvel Studios

Not only is Captain America: The Winter Soldier very possibly the best movie in the entire MCU—it's a brilliant take on an espionage film—but it's perhaps the most essential reason that you need to watch these movies in order. On the off-chance that you haven't seen it yet, we'll just say that something you previously took for granted changes in a major, major way for the MCU's plot going forward, here. Plus, we get our first look at Anthony Mackie as Falcon, and the real introduction to Sebastian Stan's titular character. We're still feeling the aftershocks of this one.

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Guardians of the Galaxy (2014)

Marvel Studios

Another of the MCU's best. They really started to hit their stride at a certain point, huh? The Guardians movies perhaps more than any others in the MCU stand out as movies that tell their own stories; if you want to watch this without any that come before or after, you'll be perfectly all right. That being said, once the Guardians characters are introduced into the larger storyline (in Avengers: Infinity War), you'll be happy to have the extra context. Not to mention that it's just a fun, badass story. James Gunn knows what he's doing.

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Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015)

Marvel Studios

The second full-team Avengers outing isn't the greatest movie on its own, but, in the spirit of this list, is a fairly important piece to set up all the movies that come after. If we're talking WandaVision, well, both Wanda (Scarlet Witch) and Vision (previously known as J.A.R.V.I.S.) are introduced here. There are also some fun "Superheroes just hanging out" moments, where Don Cheadle and Anthony Mackie really shine—and a joke about the Avengers all trying to pick up Mjolnir leads up to a wonderful payoff that will come four full years down the line.

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Ant-Man (2015)

Marvel Studios


Rather than end with the bang of Avengers: Age of Ultron, Marvel decided to close out its Phase 2 with the small-scale fun of Ant-Man. And it's a great choice—the Ant-Man movies prove that the entire universe doesn't need to be at stake for a Marvel movie to be fun; these are basically just heist movies with a bit of superpowers and radiation added in. Ant-Man is another that you could basically watch on its own, but Scott Lang (Paul Rudd) is great in the role (as always), and winds up figuring fairly strongly into the overarching story. So you'd be helping yourself if you consider the full picture.

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Captain America: Civil War (2016)

Marvel Studios

At 11 films, Phase 3 of the Marvel Cinematic Universe was its biggest yet—and it kicked things off with Civil War, which had major impact on the entire world. Not only did it introduce Black Panther (played by the late Chadwick Boseman) to the world, but it brought the MCU's version of Spider-Man (Tom Holland) into the fold for the first time. The plot around government intervention felt more mature than a typical Marvel through line, and the characters seriously developed in ways that changed them for several movies. Some of Chris Evans and Robert Downey Jr.'s best work comes here, and the plot is essential to lay the groundwork for some of the major events in Avengers: Infinity War and Endgame.

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Doctor Strange (2016)

Marvel Studios

In addition to advancing (and, in most ways, wrapping up) the overarching MCU's plot, Phase 3 also set out to introduce a number of new heroes who could carry on the torch when the OGs (Iron Man, Thor, Captain America, etc) are no longer around. One of those was the titular Doctor Strange, played to perfection by Benedict Cumberbatch. This origin story does actually serve OK to watch on its own if you so chose, but it fits really nicely as a puzzle piece into the larger picture if you already know the world in which this all exists. A sequel, Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness, is expected to be released in 2022.

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Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017)

Marvel Studios

The two Guardians movies basically work in a vacuum; if you want to watch Vol 2 (and see Kurt Russell as Star-Lord's father), you'll absolutely need to have seen Guardians of the Galaxy first. Likewise, you'll need to see this one before you meet up again a few years down the line with the Guardians when they show up in Avengers: Infinity War.

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Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017)

Marvel Studios

Tom Holland might just be the best Spider-Man ever (sorry Tobey and Andrew!), and for the most part, his first MCU installment lives in is own vacuum as well. Homecoming skips the origin story we already know (and thank god we don't have to watch poor Uncle Ben die again), and instead drops us right into teenage science nerd Peter Parker's every day life as he's mentored by that Tony Stark guy. Michael Keaton plays one of Marvel's best villains here.

Since Sony still owns the rights to Spider-Man (the character exists in the MCU thanks to a smart deal between the two studios), the Spider-Man series doesn't live on Disney+.

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Thor: Ragnarok (2017)

Marvel Studios

Directed by Academy Award winner Taika Waititi (Jojo Rabbit), Thor: Ragnarok is easily a top-tier MCU movie, and could easily make a case for being the very best. Not only does the movie have the great action and adventure that fans of the Marvel world have come to expect, but Waititi brings his humor and pacing to a franchise that used his infusion of energy perfect. Mark Ruffalo co-stars as Banner/Hulk, Tessa Thompson's Valkyrie is introduced, and villains played by Jeff Goldblum and Cate Blanchett are great. The movie leads directly into the events of Avengers: Infinity War, so there's that, too. Waititi will be returning to the Thor franchise when he directs the upcoming Thor: Love & Thunder, and we simply cannot wait for that.

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Black Panther (2018)

Marvel Studios

Another one that can absolutely exist in its own bubble is Black Panther, which you can basically watch whenever you want (there are some minor references to the events of Captain America: Civil War, and Andy Serkis' character first appeared in Ultron, but its nothing that will take you out of the movie if unfamiliar). The movie features great acting from the whole cast, and is directed by Ryan Coogler, who had shown his talent before with movies like Creed and Fruitvale Station, but gets his chance to really shine with a big Marvel budget here.

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Avengers: Infinity War (2018)

Marvel Studios

The story to wrap up what Marvel calls "The Infinity Saga"—basically, everything you've seen up to this point—was so epic that it couldn't fit into just one movie. So the first, Empire Strikes Back-esque part is Infinity War, which is an absolutely massive crossover of basically every Marvel character and world you've seen to this point. And it helps that they go against the series' most powerful villain, Thanos (Josh Brolin), who had been built up at this point through several previous appearances of his own. That's part of what's great about the MCU; we know Thanos is scary because we've been hearing about him for years by the point he's finally deployed. He was first teased in a credits scene of the original Avengers, in 2012, and he's finally at full strength in 2018. Now that's planning.

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Ant-Man & The Wasp (2018)

Marvel Studios

Paul Rudd, Evangeline Lily, and Michael Douglas return here (along with more friends from the first Ant-Man) for another smaller-scale tale that also adds Walton Goggins and Michelle Pfeiffer to its fun cast. The movie could basically take place at any time—until its ending, which leads us right into Avengers: Endgame.

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Captain Marvel (2019)

Marvel Studios

Captain Marvel is another that you can basically watch at any time, but its clear that its titular character is one that's going to be around for quite some time. Brie Larson stars as Carol Danvers, who is training in another galaxy with Jude Law until she lands in 1990s United States, and meets a younger Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) and Phil Coulson (Clark Gregg) than we're used to. A cat (or a flerken?) and Ben Mendelsohn, along with a '90s soundtrack and aesthetic make this a fun one for any time.

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Avengers: Endgame (2019)

Marvel Studios

It's harder than you might think to stick a landing—just ask Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, or, *gulp* Game of Thrones. Luckily, Endgame is nothing like any of those; somehow, this movie deploys time travel, about a million different flashbacks and callbacks, and an enormous cast—and still manages to wrap "The Infinity Saga" up in a brilliant, perfect way. You'll get chills, you'll laugh, you'll cry, and you'll want to watch the whole damn thing over again.

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Spider-Man: Far From Home (2019)

Sony Pictures

Just like with the last phase and Ant-Man, Phase 3 of Marvel instead decided to go out not with the big bang (which would've obviously been Endgame here), but instead a bit of an aftermath and a view of things to come. Far From Home looks directly at the trauma of Endgame's finale, and sees a cast of old friends (Holland, Jackson, Zendaya, Cobie Smulders, Jon Favreau) joined by an amazing newcomer in Jake Gyllenhaal, who has made bizarre characters his thing in the last few years (see: Nightcrawler, Prisoners, Velvet Buzzsaw, among others), and similarly Goes For It here.

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WandaVision (2021)

Disney

No, not a movie, but actually would rank among Marvel's best if it was. WandaVision was the MCU's first foray into streaming TV, and it hit all the right beats, bringing movie star talent (in Elizabeth Olsen as Wanda Maximoff/Scarlet Witch and Paul Bettany as Vision) to the small screen for a series that's interesting, committed, and, most importantly, did something really unique and different. Bonus points for Kathryn Hahn, because, well, she just rules.

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The Falcon and the Winter Soldier (2021)

Disney

The Falcon and the Winter Soldier picks up right where Avengers: Endgame left off. We learn what happened after Steve Rogers handed the shield off to Sam Wilson, and we learn how the burgeoning bromance of Sam and Bucky Barnes could possibly go on without their mutual pal Steve. The show smartly brings both Sharon Carter and Zemo back into the mix, but the real highlight is Wyatt Russell as John Walker—a super soldier who wants so badly to be Steve Rogers, but never quite does it right.

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Loki (2021)

Marvel Studios

Loki gives the MCU's greatest villain his own showcase for the first time, and this six-part limited series is unafraid of having a bizarre tone. Set up directly by the time-travel hijinx of Endgame, Loki finds Tom Hiddleston in peak form, and sharing many scenes with a new pal played by Owen Wilson. A lot of time travel, a lot of mischief, and one of Marvel's best projects in a while, overall.

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Black Widow (2021)

Marvel Studios

The MCU returns to the big screen for the first time in more than two years with the release of the oft-delayed (due to Covid-19) Black Widow. The solo story set around Scarlett Johansson's assassin tells its primary story in the set period of time between Captain America: Civil War and Avengers: Infinity War, when she was ostensibly on the run. But the movie also tells more of her background and origin story than fans have ever heard before, and introduces her "sister" (played by Florence Pugh), "mother," (played by Rachel Weisz) and "father," (played by David Harbour). Add a banger of a credits scene to the mix, and the MCU is finally cooking with gas again. Full speed ahead.

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What If...? (2021 - ?)

Marvel Studios

What If...? is an anthology series of sorts, and doesn't feel totally essential to the overall story of the MCU—at least not yet. This series, Marvel Studios' first foray into animation, follows The Watcher (voiced by Jeffrey Wright) as he looks down upon numerous hypothetical scenarios of situations that Marvel fans will remember from earlier movies. The show frames these moments as "different universes," and it's a fun watch—just not one you need for understanding of the larger franchise just yet.

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Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings (2021)

Marvel Studios

Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings was going to need to be really good; it's titular character isn't one with a built in cultural cache like Captain America, Thor, or Spider-Man. In fact, in the Men's Health cover story on star Simu Liu, Kevin Feige even said that Shang-Chi came from a binder of “great characters who could make great movies regardless of how famous they were,” the implication being, well, that Shang-Chi was not famous.

Luckily, Feige's suspicion was correct. Shang-Chi is a movie not dissimilar from other 'first movies in the MCU,' but it's done exceptionally well. A great villain (Tony Leung), a fun supporting cast (including Awkwafina and newcomer Meng'er Zhang), and incredible fight sequences make this one for the top half of anyone's MCU rankings. We're eager to see where this character fits into the future of everything, but this first movie is one worth watching by itself.

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Eternals (2021)

Marvel Studios

As far as the MCU goes, Eternals is something of a tough watch. It's long (2 hours 37 minutes) and introduces a ton of new characters (including 10 of those titular Eternals and Kit Harington's Dane Whitman). Chloé Zhao—who just won the Best Director Oscar for her work on Nomadland—takes a big swing for Eternals to be an epic for the ages. And while the movie doesn't always connect, it's still enjoyable enough to be more than worth a watch; Lauren Ridloff, Barry Keoghan, Brian Tyree Henry, Kumail Nanjiani, and Harington in particular are standouts you'll want to see more from. And the credits scenes are great, so make sure you keep watching until the very end. While this movie is polarizing, we're certainly interested in seeing where everything established here goes in the future.

Once you've reached this point, well, we've got good news and bad news. The good news? You have watched every Marvel movie and series, and all in the right order, too. The bad news? Well, you're all out of movies to watch. Sorry about that. Bring on Spider-Man: No Way Home and Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness. You may be all caught up for now, but there's plenty more on the way.

Evan RomanoEvan is an associate editor for Men’s Health, with bylines in The New York Times, MTV News, Brooklyn Magazine, and VICE.

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Источник: https://www.menshealth.com/entertainment/a34426217/marvel-movies-mcu-in-order/

Marvel Movies In Order: How To Watch The MCU By Release Date And Chronologically

Growing since 2008, the Marvel Cinematic Universe has established itself as one of the great blockbuster feats of all time – doing more than any franchise ever to establish a big screen continuity unlike anything audiences have ever seen. Mixing both period and contemporary stories, the movies have allowed fans to have a fascinating perspective on the history of the fictional world, with each new release adding a bit more to the larger picture. Of course, after more than 20 films things have gotten pretty damn complex as far as the timeline goes, and watching the Marvel movies in order is not a totally straight-forward process. For those of you who get a bit lost in all of it, we’ve specially designed this feature.

There are basically two ways to enjoy the timeline of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and we will take a look at both in this piece. The first approach is to take in all of the stories in the order in which they were released in theaters, a.k.a. Release Order, and the second is to watch all of the movies based on the times they are respectively set, a.k.a. Chronological Order. Read about both below, and you can choose the methodology that best suits you as you dive into the films.

If You’ve Never Seen The Marvel Movies Before

If the Marvel Cinematic Universe has never been your thing, but you now find yourself curious about the experience, your best bet is to go the Release Order route. After all, it was how the first die hard fans watched the films, and that eventually turned them into die hard fans. This is definitely the best approach to go if you're an MCU novice.

If You’ve Seen The Marvel Movies Before

The situation is a bit different if you've seen all of the Marvel movies before, as that opens the door to get creative with the rewatch experience. If you've seen all of the films released thus far, but are ready to dive back in again, Chronological Order is a fun way to mix things up and gain a new perspective. The franchise on the whole has been very good about maintaining continuity, so you may discover certain threads that weren't obvious to you before.

Marvel Movies In Order: Release Date

In the establishment of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Marvel Studios made specific choices regarding what characters they wanted to introduce to audiences and when, and if this is the part of their specific creative process that you personally take into consideration when watching the movies, then Release Order is probably the best choice for you.

  • Iron Man (2008)
  • The Incredible Hulk (2008)
  • Iron Man 2 (2010)
  • Thor (2011)
  • Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)
  • The Avengers (2012)
  • Iron Man 3 (2013)
  • Thor: The Dark World (2013)
  • Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014)
  • Guardians Of The Galaxy (2014)
  • Avengers: Age Of Ultron (2015)
  • Ant-Man (2015)
  • Captain America: Civil War (2016)
  • Doctor Strange (2016)
  • Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017)
  • Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017)
  • Thor: Ragnarok (2017)
  • Black Panther (2018)
  • Avengers: Infinity War (2018)
  • Ant-Man And The Wasp (2018)
  • Captain Marvel (2019)
  • Avengers: Endgame (2019)
  • Spider-Man: Far From Home (2019)
  • WandaVision (2021)
  • The Falcon And The Winter Soldier (2021)
  • Loki (2021)
  • Black Widow (2021)
  • What If (2021)
  • Shang-Chi And The Legend Of The Ten Rings (2021)
  • Eternals (2021)

Marvel Movies In Order: Chronologically

While watching the Marvel Studios releases in the order they came out makes plenty of sense, it should be noted that doing so results in viewers bouncing all around the franchise timeline with very little rhyme or reason from a larger narrative perspective. In contrast, there is a way to watch the movies linearly – you just have to know the proper order. Fortunately, we have you covered, and can guide you through the process of watching the Marvel Cinematic Universe chronologically.

Captain America: The First Avenger (Set in the 1940s)

Technically the furthest back in time we’ve seen in the canon are the flashback sequences at the start of Thor: The Dark World (2988 B.C.) and Thor (965 A.D.), but the full story set furthest into the past is Captain America: The First Avenger – an adventure that entirely takes place towards the end of World War II. Spanning about two years (1943-1945), the story takes us from the transformation of Steve Rogers into Captain America, to his bold sacrificial move in the Arctic Circle that led him to being frozen in ice for decades. It’s in this film that we are introduced to not only the incredibly important titular hero, but also key supporting characters like James Buchanan “Bucky” Barnes, Peggy Carter, Howard Stark, Johann Schmidt a.k.a. Red Skull, and Arnim Zola, all of whom have key roles to play in later movies. It's also the first of many stories to involve the Tesseract a.k.a. The Space Stone.

Captain Marvel (Set in the 1990s)

There are flashbacks in Ant-Man, Ant-Man And The Wasp, Captain America: Civil War, and Black Panther that give audiences a peek into events that occurred after World War II in the MCU timeline, but the truth is that most of the 20th century remains open for exploration in future movies. The one part of the period that is an exception to this, however, is the mid-1990s, which is when the events of Captain Marvel take place (specifically 1995). Naturally, this is where audiences get to meet Carol Danvers for the first time, and it’s also the introduction of the shape-shifting Skrull Talos, but from a chronological perspective this also marks the debut of Phil Coulson and Nick Fury (in the latter’s case, not counting the flash-forward ending of Captain America: The First Avenger or its trailer-esque post-credits scene).

Iron Man (Set in 2010)

The opening scene of Iron Man 3 shows what it was like for the Marvel Cinematic Universe to experience the 2000 New Year’s celebration, but the timeline zooms ahead to 2010ish for the next big arc, and that’s the movie that started it all: Iron Man. It’s in this story that we get to watch Tony Stark transform into an armor-clad superhero, but also get to know James “Rhodey” Rhodes, Pepper Potts, and Happy Hogan. Plus it’s an opportunity to check in with Nick Fury and Phil Coulson more than 15 years after Captain Marvel).

Iron Man 2 (Set in 2010)

The reason why the setting of Iron Man is a couple of years after its release date is because the story directly dovetails with the events of Iron Man 2, which is set in 2010. The film begins with the same scene that ended the previous movie – Tony Stark declaring to the world that he is Iron Man – and gives fans a chance to catch up with James “Rhodey” Rhodes (who becomes War Machine), Pepper Potts, Happy Hogan, Nick Fury, and Phil Coulson. This is the movie that also marks the first appearance of Natasha Romanoff a.k.a. Black Widow, who is operating as an undercover S.H.I.E.L.D. agent spying on Tony as he struggles with a life-threatening illness, confronts the possibility of his technology being proliferated, and weighs entrance to the Avengers.

Thor (Set in 2010)

In Iron Man 2 we see Phil Coulson leave his assignment babysitting Tony Stark for a developing situation in New Mexico, and it winds up being revealed that the situation in question is the arrival of Thor on Earth a.k.a. Midgard (which means that it too is set in 2010ish). The first Thor movie is big on introductions, as we get to meet not only key Asgardians like the God of Thunder himself, Loki, Odin, Frigga, Heimdall, Sif, and the Warriors Three, but also notable humans such as Jane Foster, Darcy Lewis, Erik Selvig, S.H.I.E.L.D. agent Jasper Sitwell, and Clint Barton a.k.a. Hawkeye.

The Incredible Hulk (Set in 2010)

If you are paying attention during the second to last scene in Iron Man 2, you’ll notice a familiar broadcast playing on one of the monitors – specifically a news report about a rampage by the Hulk at a college. This is because The Incredible Hulk is yet another story that takes place around 2010. It’s not the most significant movie on the MCU timeline, as it only features two characters who go on to be really important (not counting the Tony Stark cameo), but it is noteworthy that those two individuals are Bruce Banner a.k.a. Hulk and future Secretary of State Thaddeus E. "Thunderbolt" Ross, who is on a global hunt for the green monster.

The Avengers (Set in 2012)

Following the Iron Man 2/Thor/Incredible Hulk cluster there is a small gap in the timeline, but things pick back up with The Avengers, which is set in 2012. This particular adventure was obviously notable for bringing Marvel’s established ensemble of characters together, with an alien invasion bringing together Iron Man, Captain America, Thor, Hulk, Hawkeye, Black Widow, Nick Fury, Loki, Erik Selvig, Pepper Potts, and Phil Coulson in the same story, but the movie also marks the arrival of both Maria Hill and Thanos to the live-action canon.

Iron Man 3 (Set in 2012)

Immediately post-Avengers both the chronological and release date timelines sync up for the most part. Iron Man 3 was the first movie to come out after the 2012 blockbuster, and it’s also the first story in-universe to follow it – taking place around Christmas of that year. Given that it is a more introspective story, with Tony Stark gaining a larger understanding of what it means to be Iron Man, the only important new character we meet is The Mandarin… who turns out to be a fake anyway. That being said, the film does also bring James “Rhodey” Rhodes, Pepper Potts, Happy Hogan and Howard Stark (albeit in video form) back into the action.

Thor: The Dark World (Set in 2013)

Thor: The Dark World is set during an unspecified season of 2013, and while it doesn’t expand the Marvel Cinematic Universe at all with new characters, it does update audiences on what has been happening with almost the entire ensemble that was featured in the first movie, including Thor, Loki, Jane Foster, Odin, Frigga, Heimdall, Sif, the Warriors Three, Darcy Lewis, and Erik Selvig. Plus it has an adventure that centers around one of the most significant elements in the canon: the Reality Stone.

Captain America: The Winter Soldier (Set in 2014)

It’s in the calendar year of 2014 that the events of Captain America: The Winter Soldier play out, as audiences primarily catch up with Captain America and Black Widow as they sniff out a conspiracy within the goings-on at S.H.I.E.L.D. The blockbuster notably also brings back Bucky Barnes (now the Winter Soldier), Nick Fury, Maria Hill, Jasper Sitwell, Peggy Carter (now in her 90s), and Arnim Zola (now a computer), but also has fans get to know Sam Wilson a.k.a. Falcon, Sharon Carter a.k.a. Agent 13, S.H.I.E.L.D. Secretary Alexander Pierce, and strike team operative Brock Rumlow a.k.a. Crossbones.

Guardians Of The Galaxy (Set in 2014)

Thanks to particular title cards in the beginning of the movie, we know for a fact that Guardians of the Galaxy takes place in the year 2014, though the narrative that unfolds in the movie couldn’t be set further away from the main action in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. This is, of course, the story that brought the likes of Peter Quill a.k.a. Star-Lord, Gamora, Drax, Rocket, Groot, Nebula, Yondu, and Kraglin into the live-action canon, while also seeing Thanos conspire with Ronan The Accuser to find The Power Stone.

Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2 (Set in 2014)

Because of the release schedule, most Marvel Cinematic Universe sequels are set at least a couple years after their predecessor, but that’s not the case with Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, which is set just a few months after the first movie – letting it come directly after it in chronological order. This adventure is very different than the last, centering on the titular group as they meet a being who claims to be Peter Quill’s father, and a great new addition is made to the team with the arrival of Mantis.

Avengers: Age Of Ultron (Set in 2015)

Back on Earth in the year 2015, the Avengers reunited for a world-threatening crisis of their very own making – namely Tony Stark’s creation of the deadly artificial intelligence known as Ultron. Avengers: Age Of Ultron not only brings back together Iron Man, Captain America, Thor, Hulk, Hawkeye, Black Widow, Falcon, War Machine, Nick Fury, and Erik Selvig for the first time since 2012, but also has a huge impact on the future of the franchise. This is the movie that initially put Scarlet Witch in action (not counting her Captain America: The Winter Soldier post-credits cameo), features the creation of Vision, has a role for Ulysses Klaue, and also involves two Infinity Stones: the Mind Stone and the Space Stone.

Ant-Man (Set in 2015)

Thanks to a particular line about the Avengers dropping cities out of the sky, we know that Ant-Man is set after the events of Avengers: Age Of Ultron, and as a result it’s pretty easy to pin it to its release year: 2015. It’s an important chapter for the MCU, as while the story about the heist of top secret technology doesn’t have much of an impact on the larger continuity of the franchise, it is the first movie for a lot of recurring characters, including Scott Lang a.k.a. Ant-Man, Hope van Dyne (pre-Wasp), Hank Pym, Luis, Kurt, Dave, Paxton, and Cassie and Maggie Lang. It also has cameos from Falcon, Howard Stark, and Peggy Carter.

Captain America: Civil War (Set in 2016)

It’s in the year 2016 of the Marvel Cinematic Universe that a monumental change begins to take effect in regards to the way in which people of the world view superheroes. Understanding that there’s a serious risk in having costumed vigilantes operating without oversight, the Sokovia Accords are ratified globally, and it’s an issue that causes a great divide between members of the Avengers. This is obviously one of the most significant stories in the franchise timeline, both bringing together the likes of Iron Man, Captain America, Hawkeye, Black Widow, Scarlet Witch, War Machine, Falcon, Vision, Winter Soldier, Agent 13, Ant-Man, Thaddeus E. “Thunderbolt” Ross, Crossbones, and Howard Stark, while introducing T’Challa a.k.a. Black Panther, Peter Parker a.k.a. Spider-Man, Helmut Zemo, May Parker, the Dora Milaje Ayo, and Everett Ross.

Black Panther (Set in 2016)

While there were four Marvel movies released between Captain America: Civil War and Black Panther, the latter is much closer on the timeline to the former than any other feature. With the 2016 blockbuster featuring the death of the Wakandan ruler T’Chaka, Black Panther is a film set in the aftermath as T’Challa returns home. While dealing with a challenge to the titular hero’s throne from a previously-unknown cousin, the new film brings in a couple of familiar faces with Everett Ross, Ayo, and Ulysses Klaue, but mostly features new characters, including Ramonda (T'Challa's mother), Shuri (T'Challa's sister), Okoye, M'Baku, Nakia, W'Kabi, and Ayo.

Spider-Man: Homecoming (Set in 2016)

Like Black Panther, Spider-Man: Homecoming is also very much set in the aftermath of Captain America: Civil War, but a little more time has passed in between the stories. While the plot has Peter Parker struggling to be the best Spider-Man he can be while operating under certain restrictions from Iron Man, the film also introduces audiences to all of the important people in the hero’s life, including his classmates Ned Leeds, Flash Thompson, Michelle, a.k.a. M.J., and Betty Brant, and teachers like Mr. Harrington. May Parker also makes his second MCU appearance, while there is also a part to play for Happy Hogan, and a cameo from Pepper Potts.

Black Widow (Set in 2016)

Cate Shortland's Black Widow may have been released as the first title in the Marvel Cinematic Universe's Phase Four, but it's a chapter that is still embedded amidst the various events that comprised the latter years of the Infinity Saga. While the blockbuster isn't set as close to the events of Captain America: Civil War as either Black Panther or Spider-Man: Homecoming, the plot is very much tied to that period – specifically in the sense that it picks up with the titular heroine on the run due to her disobeying the orders in the Sokovia Accords.

Doctor Strange (Set in 2016)

Dr. Stephen Strange gets specifically name dropped in Captain America: Civil War, but evidence suggests it’s because of his advanced skills as a brain surgeon – not because he eventually becomes one of the most magically gifted individuals on Earth. On the Marvel Cinematic Universe timeline, Doctor Strange doesn’t actually go through his whole origin story until after the events of both Black Panther and Spider-Man: Homecoming - which pins the start of his journey in late 2016. While watching him do so, though, audiences get to meet characters like Wong, the Ancient One, Mordo, Dr. Christine Palmer, and Dormammu, all of whom either already have important parts to play in the MCU, or surely soon will.

Thor: Ragnarok (Set in 2018)

Where Thor: Ragnarok sits on the Marvel Cinematic Universe timeline is most easily perceived by its proximity to Avengers: Infinity War – which is evident from the post-credits scene that directly ties into the massive blockbuster. Without any specific dates available, the best guess is that the bulk of the movie takes place in the year 2018, with the God of Thunder going on a wild adventure that sees him travel to a garbage planet while his sister, Hela, takes over Asgard. This movie is important to the canon in that it refreshes audiences on the whereabouts of Hulk, Loki, and Heimdall, while also showing the fates of the Warriors Three and Odin. There's also a fun supporting role played by Doctor Strange, who is shown to possess very skilled control over magiks, and the introduction of fun new players including Valkyrie, Korg, Meik, and The Grandmaster.

Ant-Man And The Wasp (Set in 2018)

Like Thor: Ragnarok, we know that Ant-Man And The Wasp takes place very close to the events of Avengers: Infinity War because of what is shown during the end credits (namely the effects of The Blip). However, because the story plays out over less time, and goes further into the future than the third God of Thunder film, we’re putting it next chronologically. While tracing a plot that finds its main characters working to rescue the long-missing Janet van Dyne, this movie catches fans up with all the key Ant-Man players, including Scott Lang, Hope Van Dyne (who finally becomes Wasp), Hank Pym, Luis, Kurt, Dave, Paxton, and Cassie and Maggie Lang.

Avengers: Infinity War (Set in 2018)

Taking place in the spring of 2018, Avengers: Infinity War plays out the first chapter in a two-part saga that Marvel Studios planned over the course of more than a decade. Following Thanos’ journey to collect all six of the Infinity Stones, the film features far too many characters to list here… and at the end of the day winds up killing approximately half of them.

Avengers: Endgame (Set in 2023)

As for Avengers: Endgame, the most significant events of the blockbuster take place in the year 2023, five years after the devastating ending of Avengers: Infinity War… but it’s also a hard title to specifically put on a timeline specifically because of the time travel antics that are featured. To get into all of the details here would be a touch too confusing, not to mention the crazy number of heroes and villains who appear, but the fact that the movie jumps the MCU canon into the near future is really the big takeaway from a timeline perspective.

WandaVision (Set in 2023)

The Marvel Cinematic Universe entered a new era with the release of WandaVision, not only because it's the first title in Phase 4, but also because it's the franchise's first Disney+ series. It's also an interesting story to consider in the Marvel timeline, as it's actually set between the events of Avengers: Endgame and Spider-Man: Far From Home. It's specifically said in dialogue on the show that the plot really begins about three weeks after the final battle against Thanos, and head writer Jac Schaeffer has confirmed that the events that play out happen over the course of about a week.

Spider-Man: Far From Home (Set in 2023)

Thus far, only one Marvel Cinematic Universe movie has been set in the aftermath of Avengers: Endgame, and that’s Spider-Man: Far From Home – which takes place in the summer of 2023 following the defeat of Thanos. The fact that Tony Stark is dead weighs heavily on the minds of characters in this story, but once again we get to reconnect with the important people in Peter Parker’s circle, including Ned Leeds, Flash Thompson, M.J., Betty Brant, Mr. Harrington, May Parker, Happy Hogan. And to bring things full circle, we even get new appearances from both Talos and Nick Fury, who we learn are working together on a mysterious mission.

The Falcon And The Winter Soldier (Set in 2023)

Beyond being clearly set in the aftermath of Avengers: Endgame, The Falcon And The Winter Soldier Disney+ series doesn't really provide too many anchors regarding where it sits in the timeline, but given the featured animosity regarding political restructuring after The Blip, it seems fair to say that a few months have past, putting it after Spider-Man: Far From Home.

Shang-Chi And The Legend Of The Ten Rings (Set In 2023)

Thanks to its central antagonist having lived for a millenia Shang-Chi And The Legend Of The Ten Rings is a movie that features scenes that go way back in the history of the Marvel Cinematic Universe – but the vast majority is set in “present” (by which I mean the near future). It’s not made specifically clear when the story takes place in regards to the aftermath of Avengers: Endgame, but release order feels like the right move.

Eternals (Set in 2023)

While many Marvel movies have featured flashbacks that are set centuries in the past, Eternals is a special case in that it goes back a remarkable 7,000 years in history, chronicling its characters' journey shepherding human society. That being said, the bulk of the action takes place in the post-Blip "present," and while there aren't really any specific seasonal markers it feels safe to line it up in release order and say that events transpire around the time or after what happens in Shang-Chi And The Legend Of The Ten Rings.

Intense as it already is to keep track of everything in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, things are getting even more complicated. As the franchise dives into the concept of the multiverse, new stories are being told that are still part of the larger canon, but also exist outside of the timeline detailed above. Allow me to explain...

Loki

Technically a spin-off from Avengers: Endgame, the Disney+ series Loki chronicles the version of the titular God of Mischief who managed to escape from the grasp of the Avengers thanks to a misplaced Tesseract. Having messed with the time stream, he is arrested as a Variant by the Time Variance Authority – and when he is brought to their headquarters, he finds himself in a location that exists outside of normal time and space. It doesn't really fit on the chronological timeline, but it is at the very least best watched only after the aforementioned 2019 blockbuster.

What If

Debuting on Disney+ in summer 2021, What If is a series that is developed by Marvel Studios that exclusively focuses on stories that play out on alternate timelines that are similar to the events featured in the Marvel Cinematic Universe... but with special changes altering everything. What if Peggy Carter had gotten the super soldier serum instead of Steve Rogers? What if the Ravagers kidnapped T'Challa instead of Peter Quill? What if Ant-Man and Wasp accidentally unleashed a zombie plague from the Quantum Realm? All those stories and more are told in this multiverse-centric animated series. 

All of that is certainly a lot of information to process, so to help sort it out even further, we've also designed this infographic with the chronological timeline of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, including which movies introduce which key characters and feature appearances from Infinity Stones:

No matter the order in which you decide to watch the films, one thing that’s for certain is the fact that the Marvel Cinematic Universe has spun an epic big screen story so far in its decade-plus existence – and it’s not stopping any time soon. To learn about everything that is set to arrive on both the big screen and the small screen from the comic book franchise, head on over to our Upcoming Marvel Movies and Upcoming Marvel TV guides.

NJ native who calls LA home; lives in a Dreamatorium. A decade-plus CinemaBlend veteran; endlessly enthusiastic about the career he’s dreamt of since seventh grade.

Источник: https://www.cinemablend.com/news/2467680/a-marvel-movies-timeline-to-watch-from-beginning-to-endgame

How to watch the Marvel movies in order

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By Nick Pino , Tom Power last updated

Here's a chronological guide to the Marvel Cinematic Universe

(Image: © Walt Disney/Marvel Studios)

Are you wondering how to watch the Marvel movies in order? That's becoming something of a tall order in 2021. Not only are there 26 movies to watch if you're planning a marathon, there are now five Disney Plus shows to take into account, too. That means you'll be spending more time than ever watching your favorite entertainment franchise.

If you're stuck with where to start, though, allow us to help you navigate this ever-growing superhero universe. 

First, you'll need to know whether you're going to watch the Marvel movies in chronological or release order. Whichever list you follow, both currently end with Eternals, the 26th Marvel movie that's now screening in theaters. Hawkeye's TV series has just launched on Disney Plus as well but, if you're only concerned about films in the MCU, you don't need to worry about that yet.

We'll show you how to watch the Marvel movies in both orders in this guide, including the five canonical MCU shows on Disney Plus. We'll break down the MCU timeline as it stands, so you don't have to. We're nice like that, you see.

After taking a pandemic-induced break in 2020, Marvel movies are having a busy 2021. With Black Widow, Shang-Chi and Eternals having released, and Spider-Man: No Way Home swinging into cinemas in December, Phase 4 is officially in full flow.

Marvel did, however, recently announced a major delay that would affect a number of movies in Phase 4: Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness will now be released in early May instead of March; Thor: Love and Thunder is due out in July instead of May, and Black Panther 2: Wakanda Forever is going from a July release date to November. The Marvels and Ant-Man 3 have also been shunted back – the latter as just finished its principal photography, though – but Guardians of the Galaxy 3 hasn't.

So, how will you binge all these superhero movies while you wait? The Marvel movies chronological order starts kicks off with Captain America fighting the Red Skull, while the MCU release order starts with Tony Stark becoming Iron Man in the 2008 movie. Whichever you pick, you're in for a fun journey through some of the best superhero movies ever made.

How to watch the Marvel movies in order: chronological order

Let's start with a Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) timeline, now including Black Widow, Shang-Chi and Eternals. 

Below, we explain how to watch the 26 Marvel movies in chronological order, starting with Captain America's origin in WWII, and ending with the introduction of Eternals in the latest MCU flick. The arrival of the Eternals make things a little murky, as there are flashbacks to periods in time that precede Captain America's WWII origins. But, in order to help from going mad at the prospect of pausing Eternals, watching three or four Marvel movies, and then returning to Eternals to pick up events again after every flashback, we've slotted it in at the end of our list.

This is how you'll want to watch the Marvel movies in order if you're a continuity buff – it lets you enjoy the sequence of events as they happened. We've listed the MCU shows order below, too, so you can see how they fit around the movies. 

Here's the chronological viewing order of the Marvel movies as of 2021:

  • Captain America: The First Avenger – takes place during WWII
  • Captain Marvel – occurs in 1995
  • Iron Man – takes place in 2010
  • Iron Man 2 – takes place after Iron Man
  • The Incredible Hulk – time unspecified, pre-Avengers
  • Thor – events occur six months before Avengers
  • The Avengers – takes place in 2012
  • Iron Man 3 – takes place six months after The Avengers
  • Thor: Dark World – post-Avengers, pre-Ultron
  • Captain America: Winter Soldier – post-Avengers, pre-Ultron
  • Guardians of the Galaxy – sometime in 2014
  • Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 – set after Guardians
  • Avengers: Age of Ultron – occurs in 2015
  • Ant-Man – takes place in 2015
  • Captain America: Civil War – post-Ultron, pre-Infinity War
  • Black Widow – takes place right after Civil War
  • Spider-Man: Homecoming – post-Civil War, pre-Infinity War
  • Doctor Strange – takes place in 2016
  • Black Panther – takes place in 2017
  • Thor: Ragnarok – post-Ultron, pre-Infinity War
  • Avengers: Infinity War – occurs in 2017
  • Ant-Man and The Wasp – ambiguous, but fits nicely between IW and Endgame
  • Avengers: Endgame – starts in 2017, finishes in 2022
  • Spider-Man: Far From Home – set eight months after Endgame
  • Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings – set in the present day of the MCU
  • Eternals – set in the present day of the MCU, though it does flash back through 7,000 years of human history

Some timing is ambiguous – for example, Black Widow, Spider-Man: Homecoming, Black Panther and Doctor Strange all take place at roughly the same time, and they're set across varying lengths of time, which makes ordering them tricky. 

Black Widow, though, technically takes place entirely within the events of Captain America: Civil War, which means it comes first out of those. Shang-Chi director Destin Daniel Cretton, meanwhile, revealed the martial arts hero's film takes place within the "present day". Eternals, too, is set well before Cap's origins story, as well as during the present day. So the timeline, as we mentioned, is getting messier as time goes on.

Now for the Marvel shows order: WandaVision takes place mere weeks after Endgame. Meanwhile, The Falcon and the Winter Soldier is set six months after Endgame – so both shows take place before Spider-Man: Far From Home. Loki, meanwhile, is technically set after the events of The Avengers, but in another timeline – we'd advise watching it after Avengers: Endgame.

The MCU's first animated series – What If...? – is like Loki. It's set in the wider multiverse, so it plays out around events that we've seen on the big and small screens. Finally, Hawkeye's solo adventure (well, paired adventure with Kate Bishop) is set two years post-Endgame, which means it takes place in 2024.

  • WandaVision – three weeks after Endgame
  • The Falcon and the Winter Soldier – around six months after Endgame
  • Loki – technically post-The Avengers in 2012, but best watched after Endgame
  • What If...? season 1 – technically, this spans the entire multiverse, but it's best watched after Endgame
  • Hawkeye – two years after Endgame

How to watch the Marvel movies in order: release date

Want to watch the MCU movies in release order instead? Try this list. 

Watching the Marvel movies in this order is how Marvel Studios intended you to see the story play out, and you'll get to enjoy how the movies got bigger and better over the years – especially as Disney took over ownership and started pumping up the budgets. You'll also find Marvel movies release dates for Phase 4 below, or you can check out our official Marvel Phase 4 hub if you want more information on each upcoming movie and TV show.

Phase 1 

  • Iron Man (2008)
  • The Incredible Hulk (2008)
  • Iron Man 2 (2010)
  • Thor (2011)
  • Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)
  • Marvel’s The Avengers (2012)

Phase 2

  • Iron Man 3 (2013)
  • Thor: The Dark World (2013)
  • Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014)
  • Guardians of the Galaxy (2014)
  • Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015)
  • Ant-Man (2015)

Phase 3

  • Captain America: Civil War (2016)
  • Doctor Strange (2016)
  • Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017)
  • Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017)
  • Thor: Ragnarok (2017)
  • Black Panther (2018)
  • Avengers: Infinity War (2018)
  • Ant-Man and the Wasp (2018)
  • Captain Marvel (2019)
  • Avengers: Endgame (2019)
  • Spider-Man: Far From Home (2019)

Phase 4

  • WandaVision (TV show)
  • The Falcon and the Winter Soldier (TV show)
  • Loki (TV show)
  • Black Widow (2021)
  • Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings (2021)
  • Eternals (2021)
  • Hawkeye (TV show)

Upcoming Marvel movies and TV shows: Phase 4 and beyond release dates

  • Spider-Man: No Way Home (December 17, 2021)
  • Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness (May 6, 2022) 
  • Thor: Love and Thunder (July 8, 2022)
  • Ms Marvel (TV show – expected summer 2022)
  • Black Panther: Wakanda Forever (November 11, 2022)
  • The Marvels (February 17, 2023)
  • Guardians of the Galaxy: Vol. 3 (May 5, 2023)
  • Ant-Man and the Wasp Quantumania (July 28, 2023)
  • Blade (TBD)
  • Fantastic Four (TBD)
  • She-Hulk (TV show – TBA)
  • Moon Knight (TV show – TBA)
  • Secret Invasion (TV show – TBA)
  • Ironheart (TV show – TBA)
  • Armor Wars (TV show – TBA)
  • Wakanda series (TV show – TBA)
  • What If...? season 2 (TV show – TBA)
  • Loki season 2 (TV show – TBA)
  • I Am Groot (TV show – TBA)
  • Echo (TV show – TBA)

Marvel movies on Disney Plus

Wondering which Marvel movies are on Disney Plus? The Incredible Hulk and the Spider-Man films are the only MCU films that aren't on Disney Plus, and that's because Universal and Sony own the distribution rights to them respectively. You'll have to buy or rent them on DVD, Blu-Ray or digital right now if you want a full Marvel movie marathon. 

These are the Marvel movies on Disney Plus in the US, UK and Australia:

  • Iron Man
  • Thor
  • Iron Man 2
  • Captain America: The First Avenger
  • The Avengers
  • Iron Man 3
  • Captain America: The Winter Soldier
  • Thor: The Dark World
  • Guardians of the Galaxy
  • Avengers: Age of Ultron
  • Ant-Man
  • Captain America: Civil War
  • Doctor Strange
  • Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2
  • Captain Marvel
  • Avengers: Infinity War
  • Avengers: Endgame
  • Thor: Ragnarok
  • Black Panther
  • Ant-Man and the Wasp
  • Black Widow
  • Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings

These are the Marvel TV shows available on Disney Plus, meanwhile:

  • WandaVision
  • The Falcon and the Winter Soldier
  • Loki season 1
  • What If...?
  • Hawkeye

Marvel movies, ranked best to worst

What are the best Marvel movies? For us on TechRadar, the Avengers movies mark the peak of the MCU, but the whole thing is incredibly subjective.

Below, we've ranked the Marvel movies based on user scores from IMDb. The peoples' votes are spot-on with some things (Thor: The Dark World and The Incredible Hulk are no one's favorite Marvel films), and other things extremely wrong (Ant-Man and the Wasp is surely worse than Captain America: The First Avenger?). 

Notably, fans don't seem to love Black Widow as much as some of the others, while Shang-Chi has drawn a much better response. Meanwhile, Eternals is actually viewed as better than The Incredible Hulk, which isn't the case on other sites including Rotten Tomatoes.

  • Avengers: Infinity War (2018) – Rating: 8.4
  • Avengers: Endgame (2019) – Rating: 8.4
  • The Avengers (2012) – Rating: 8.0
  • Guardians of the Galaxy (2014) – Rating: 8.0
  • Iron Man (2008) – Rating: 7.9
  • Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings (2021) – Rating: 7.9
  • Thor: Ragnarok (2017) – Rating: 7.9
  • Captain America: Civil War (2016) – Rating: 7.8
  • Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014) – Rating: 7.7
  • Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017) – Rating: 7.6
  • Spider-Man: Far From Home (2019) – Rating: 7.5
  • Doctor Strange (2016) – Rating: 7.5
  • Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017) – Rating: 7.4
  • Black Panther (2018) – Rating: 7.3
  • Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015) – Rating: 7.3
  • Ant-Man (2015) – Rating: 7.3 
  • Iron Man 3 (2013) – Rating: 7.2 
  • Ant-Man and the Wasp (2018) – Rating: 7.1 
  • Thor (2011) – Rating: 7.0 
  • Iron Man 2 (2010) – Rating: 7.0 
  • Captain America: The First Avenger (2011) – Rating: 6.9
  • Thor: The Dark World (2013) – Rating: 6.9
  • Captain Marvel (2019) – Rating: 6.9 
  • Black Widow (2021) – Rating: 6.8
  • Eternals (2021) – Rating: 6.8
  • The Incredible Hulk (2008) – Rating: 6.7

Today's best Marvel Studios Collector's Edition Box Set - Phase 1 [Blu-ray] deals

How to download Marvel movies

If you want to download Marvel movies for watching on the go, you can save offline copies via the Disney Plus app on your portable device (smartphone or tablet). You can't do this on a desktop PC or laptop, though.

You'll need enough storage space, but just look for the download symbol on any title in the Disney Plus app:

Downloaded content on your phone will stay in your device's main memory if it doesn’t have an external microSD card slot. That includes all Apple iPhone smartphones, iPad tablets and a few others handsets (like the Google Pixel 3a).

A 1-hour download takes about 400MB of storage depending on your download quality, Meanwhile, high quality is six times better than standard quality, and medium is 50% better than standard quality (which is the Disney Plus app’s default).

If you're happy to buy the movies, too, say through Amazon Prime, that'll also allow you to download Marvel movies locally.

Источник: https://www.techradar.com/how-to/how-to-watch-the-marvel-movies-in-order

Are the Marvel movies on Netflix? Where to watch the Marvel movies in order

With Black Widowcoming out in early July 2021, fans all over the world are trying to figure out the best place to watch the Marvel movies in order.

It’s been a really long time since we’ve seen a new Marvel movie, so we know fans will want to watch and re-watch the Marvel movies before Black Widow premieres.

We shared everything you need to know about where to watch the Marvel movies in order.

Does Netflix have the Marvel movies?

Netflix used to have quite a few Marvel movies. The movies were added to Netflix as a part of Netflix’s deal with Disney. It ended a while back before Disney Plus launched, so over time, the Marvel movies have been removed from Netflix.

So, no, you won’t be able to watch the Marvel movies on Netflix. Eventually, there are some Marvel movies that will return to Netflix, but it won’t be for a while.

Where to watch the Marvel movies in order

Fortunately, MOST of the Marvel movies are available to stream on Disney Plus. That’s where they moved after the streaming deal with Netflix ended. Over time, Disney Plus has collected most of the movies for you to stream.

We shared the list of Marvel movies in order below.

  • Iron Man
  • The Incredible Hulk
  • Iron Man 2
  • Thor
  • Captain America: The First Avenger
  • The Avengers
  • Iron Man 3
  • Thor: Dark World
  • Captain America: The Winter Soldier
  • Guardians of the Galaxy
  • Avengers: Age of Ultron
  • Ant-Man
  • Captain America: Civil War
  • Doctor Strange
  • Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2
  • Spider-Man: Homecoming
  • Thor: Ragnarok
  • Black Panther
  • Avengers: Infinity War
  • Ant-Man and the Wasp
  • Captain Marvel
  • Avengers: Endgame
  • Spider-Man: Far From Home
  • Black Widow

As mentioned, almost all of the Marvel movies are available to stream on Disney Plus. Aside from Black Widow, which will be on Disney Plus shortly, the only Marvel movies that are part of the MCU that aren’t on Disney Plus right now are The Incredible Hulk, Spider-Man: Homecoming, and Spider-Man: Far From Home. 

Where to watch Spider-Man: Homecoming

Unfortunately, Spider-Man: Homecoming is not on Netflix and it’s not on Disney Plus, either.

At the time of publishing, Spider-Man: Homecoming is only available to stream on-demand. Hopefully, it will be added to a subscription streaming service soon.

Where to watch Spider-Man: Far From Home

As mentioned, Spider-Man: Far From Home is another one of the Marvel movies that is not available to stream on Netflix or Disney Plus.

You can watch Spider-Man: Far From Home on Starz for the time being. That was part of Sony’s deal with Starz.

Hopefully, the Spider-Man movies will be added to Netflix and Disney Plus in the near future. We know Spider-Man: No Way Home will be on Netflix.

Happy streaming!

Источник: https://netflixlife.com/2021/06/29/where-to-watch-the-marvel-movies-in-order-netflix/

How to Watch Marvel Movies in Order Online

If you're going to watch Marvel movies, you should watch them in chronological order (that is, in the order that events take place in the story) or in order of release.

Where to Watch Marvel Movies

Most of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) movies are available to stream on Disney+; some are on Amazon Prime and cable channel websites like FX.

If you don't have one of those accounts, or a cable subscription, you can rent nearly all the Marvel movies from iTunes, Amazon, Vudu, and other online movie rental services.

This article only covers the core MCU theatrical releases that are connected the overall Avengers storyline, starting with Iron Man. Pre-MCU Marvel movies, like Spider-Man (either the Toby McGuire or Andrew Garfield versions) aren't included, and neither are the Spider-Man spinoffs that don't cross over with the MCU, like Venom.

Watch Marvel Movies in Chronological Order

Want to watch the movies of the Marvel Cinematic Universe in the order that the story takes place in the world of the characters? Then here's the order you should follow.

MovieChronologyWhere to Watch
Captain America: The First AvengerTakes place in 1940sAmazon PrimeDisney+EPIX
Captain MarvelTakes place in 1995Disney+
Iron ManTakes place in 2010Disney+
Iron Man 2Time not specified, but before AvengersAmazon PrimeDisney+
The Incredible HulkTime not specified, but before AvengersAmazon PrimeVudu
ThorTakes place 6 months before AvengersAmazon PrimeDisney+EPIX
The AvengersTakes place in 2012Amazon PrimeDisney+EPIX
Iron Man 3Takes place 6 months after AvengersDisney+
Thor: The Dark WorldTakes place after Avengers, but before Age of UltronDisney+
Captain America: Winter Soldier Takes place after Avengers, but before Age of UltronDisney+
Guardians of the GalaxyTakes place in 2014Disney+
Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Takes place after vol. 1Disney+
Avengers: Age of UltronTakes place in 2015Disney+
Ant-ManTakes place in 2015Disney+
Captain America: Civil WarTakes place after Age of Ultron, but before Infinity WarDisney+TBSTNT
Spider-Man: HomecomingTakes place after Civil WarAmazon Prime
Doctor Strange Takes place in 2016Disney+
Black PantherTakes place in 2017Disney+TBSTNT
Thor: RagnarokTakes place after Age of Ultron, but before Infinity WarDisney+
Avengers: Infinity WarTakes place in 2017Disney+TBSTNT
Ant-Man and the WaspTakes place before EndgameDisney+
Avengers: EndgameTakes place in 2017 and 2022Disney+
Spider-Man: Far From HomeTakes place after EndgameStarz

Watch Marvel Movies in Order of Release

Prefer to watch Marvel movies in release order, just like those of us who went to the theater to see them? Then here's the order you should follow.

Marvel Movies Phase 1

Marvel Movies Phase 2


Movie
Release DateWhere to Watch
Iron Man 3May 2013Disney+
Thor: The Dark WorldNovember 2013Disney+
Captain America: The Winter SoldierApril 2014Disney+
Guardians of the GalaxyAugust 2014Disney+
FX
Avengers: Age of UltronMay 2015Disney+
Ant-ManJuly 2015Disney+

Marvel Movies Phase 3

MovieRelease DateWhere to Watch
Captain America: Civil WarMay 2016Disney+
TBS
TNT
Doctor StrangeNovember 2016Disney+
Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2May 2017Disney+
Spider-Man: HomecomingJuly 2017FX
Thor: RagnarokNovember 2017Disney+
Black Panther February 2018Disney+
TBS
TNT
Avengers: Infinity WarApril 2018Disney+
TBS
TNT
Ant-Man and the WaspJuly 2018Disney+
Captain Marvel March 2019Disney+
Avengers: EndgameApril 2019Disney+
Spider-Man: Far From HomeJuly 2019Starz

Marvel Movies Phase 4

The next set of Marvel Movies—Phase 4—will expand the Marvel Cinematic Universe in numerous ways. These titles aren't available for streaming yet because they haven't even been released in theaters yet.

MovieRelease DateWhere to Watch
Black Widow November 2020not yet released
The Eternals February 2021not yet released
Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten RingsMay 2021not yet released
Untitled Spider-Man movieDecember 2021not yet released
Thor: Love and ThunderFebruary 2022not yet released
Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of MadnessMarch 2022not yet released

Marvel Movies Beyond Phase 4

The set of Marvel movies beyond Phase 4 is a little hazy right now. There are just basic names and rough release dates, so a lot of this might change. We'll update this as Marvel confirms more details.

MovieRelease DateWhere to Watch
Black Panther 2May 2022not yet released
Captain Marvel 2July 2022not yet released
Untitled Marvel movie2022not yet released
BladeTBDnot yet released
Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3TBDnot yet released
Untitled Fantastic Four filmTBDnot yet released

Thanks for letting us know!

Источник: https://www.lifewire.com/watch-marvel-movies-in-order-online-5077381
captain america movies in order

2020 marked a landmark in the history of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. For the first time since 2009, there was be no feature film entry in the MCU canon. And while that was a loss for fans of the most expansive world-building franchise in cinema history, we can also choose to see some silver linings. It marked a particularly great chance for some to rewatch and refresh memories; for some others, it might be a chance to take in the entire MCU for the first time. 2021, then, marked a shift. The MCU successfully migrated to streaming television with five event limited series:WandaVision, The Falcon and the Winter Soldier, Loki, What If. , and Hawkeyeall landed in the year 2021.

And then there's movies on the big screen. July marked the long-awaited release of Black Widow, the 24th movie in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, followed by Shang-Chi and the Legend of the 10 Rings in September and Eternals in November (Spider-Man: No Way Home will cap the year off in mid-December, withplenty more already in development that we know of ). If you're someone who's been along for the ride for the past decade plus, it might be a little difficult to plot a full rewatch of the whole saga; 26 films is a tough lift, and we can't blame you for wanting to watch Thor: Ragnarokhere or Captain America: The Winter Soldier there. And if anyone just wants to watch the first film in a series—say, Black Panther or Guardians of the Galaxy—the movies tend to stand very nicely on their own.

But at the end of the day, these movies are unique because of the way they all fit together. If you're planning to really watch the MCU through, all the way, whether it's for the first time or the sixth time, there's only one right way to do it.

The only way to watch the Marvel movies, is in the order in which they were released.

That's right. Just like with Star Wars, the now-discontinued X-Men movies, and the DC Extended Universe,we're going to advocate watching these in one very specific way: in order. Sure, some people might have theories about watching something one way, to better understand one thing, and better frame this, and get a better handle for that. But we're going to go ahead and call that a bunch of hogwash—these movies were designed for in-theater viewing, which would mean its designed for people who have seen every movie at that given moment. Reveals are meant to be seen as if that is the latest movie in the series. When Stephen Strange is briefly mentioned in Captain America: The Winter Soldier, for example, that's meant to be a bit of foreshadowing for the character's introduction in his own solo film a few years later. Just a hint. Just a little bit.

If you've already seen every Marvel movie, you might want to rewatch them in chronological timeline order.

Meaning, the event that occurred first in the timeline—say, Steve Rogers/Captain America living during WWII—comes first. If you wanted to watch this way, though we wouldn't recommend it, this would be the order:

  1. Captain America: The First Avenger
  2. Captain Marvel
  3. Iron Man
  4. Iron Man 2
  5. The Incredible Hulk
  6. Thor
  7. The Avengers
  8. Iron Man 3
  9. Thor: The Dark World
  10. Captain America: The Winter Soldier
  11. Guardians of the Galaxy
  12. Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2
  13. Avengers: Age of Ultron
  14. Ant-Man
  15. Captain America: Civil War
  16. Spider-Man: Homecoming
  17. Doctor Strange
  18. Black Panther
  19. Thor: Ragnarok
  20. Black Widow
  21. Avengers: Infinity War
  22. Ant-Man and the Wasp
  23. Avengers: Endgame
  24. Spider-Man: Far From Home
  25. Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings
  26. Eternals

But, again, that's not what we would recommend; if you're choosing to watch these movies in that "chronological order," you'll be missing out on key reveals in favor of just seeing things "in order." It's not worth the trade-off. If you can follow Infinity Stones and intergalactic travel, you can follow a timeline that jumps around here and there. We promise.

Here's the correct order you should watch the Marvel movies in—the order in which they were released.

All that being said, [deep breath], here's the real order you should watch the movies. The order in which they were released:

Iron Man (2008)

Marvel Studios

Every Marvel watch through should begin with Iron Man, the movie that started it all. Sure, Tony Stark—a snarky, billionaire, playboy arms dealeris something of a relic from the late Bush era. But the movie plants all the seeds of what the MCU will eventually become—and that post-credits scene is a tease for the ages. If you don't watch this first, you lose all the excitement of the enormous, expansive world that is only just beginning.

Stream It Here

The Incredible Hulk (2008)

Universal

The Incredible Hulk is the closest thing to an exception of anything on this entire list in that.if you want to, you can probably skip the whole thing entirely. The most obvious disconnect is that Edward Norton plays Bruce Banner/The Hulk here (he's replaced by Mark Ruffalo for all subsequent appearances), but the movie also has a number of story hints that were never followed up on (Tim Blake Nelson gets an introduction and a transformation scene as classic comic character The Leader.and it has never been followed up on).

But if you're going to watch all the movies, you've got to watch The Incredible Hulk. And the connective tissue is there—Robert Downey Jr. has a fun cameo, and William Hurt's General Ross turns out to be a character who shows up throughout the series.

Stream It Here

Iron Man 2 (2010)

Marvel Studios


Another one that is.not exactly the shining jewel of the MCU. But Iron Man 2 has pivotal pieces for what would become the future of the franchise, including the first substantial role for Samuel L. Jackson as Nick Fury, and the introduction of Scarlett Johansson as Black Widow. Mickey Rourke's villain is.well, it's bad, and he's bad. But Sam Rockwell as secondary antagonistJustin Hammer is a delight (and they should bring him back!), and Garry Shandling's cameo as a pesky Senator winds up tying in quite nicely a bit down the line.

Stream It Here

Thor (2011)

Marvel Studios

The introduction of one of the MCU's most iconic characters came in 2011's Thor. It's perfectly solid, and sets the table for Chris Hemsworth's many appearances in films throughout the next decade. The movie also introduces the MCU's best villain in Loki (Tom Hiddleston) and even provides the first glimpse at Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner) in a brief cameo. There are also glimpses of some of Chris Hemsworth's comedic ability, which he puts on great display down the line in Thor: Ragnarok and Avengers: Endgame.

Stream It Here

Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)

Marvel Studios

The first appearance of Chris Evans as Cap, and his true origin story. Also, some minor references that you get out of context, like the presence of Tony Stark's father, Howard. Also, one of the best endings in the entire MCU—and leads directly into The Avengers.

Stream It Here

The Avengers (2012)

Marvel Studios

The Avengers was the first big payoff for captain america movies in order the world-building that Marvel had done over the past several years (and marked the first appearance of Mark Ruffalo as Bruce Banner/Hulk). The movie is vital to the universe, and its events are referenced consistently throughout the rest of the franchise—even to this day.

Stream It Here

Iron Man 3 (2013)

Marvel Studios

Iron Man 3 is the first movie of what the MCU refers to as "Phase 2," which essentially means it shows the aftermath of the events of The Avengers. Throughout the entire movie—which is the last solo Iron Man outing—we see Tony Stark as he deals with PTSD from the Avengers battle of New York. This movie has a big twist about 2/3 through that split audiences—but for our money, it's expertly done.

Stream It Here

Thor: The Dark World (2013)

Marvel Studios

So, Thor: The Dark World is another that is.not exactly the best in the MCU. Yet it's still vital to the overall story being told, expanding the character of both Thor and Loki and providing another of the franchise's very best endings. Just put up with this movie's extremely lackluster villain and get it into your system for the important parts.

Stream It Here

Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014)

Marvel Studios

Not only is Captain America: The Winter Soldier very possibly the best movie in the entire MCU—it's a brilliant take on an espionage film—but it's perhaps the most essential reason that you need to watch these movies in order. On the off-chance that you haven't seen it yet, we'll just say that something you previously took for granted changes in a major, major way for the MCU's plot going forward, here. Plus, we get our first look at Anthony Mackie as Falcon, and the real introduction to Sebastian Stan's titular character. We're still feeling the aftershocks of this one.

Stream It Here

Guardians of the Galaxy (2014)

Marvel Studios

Another of the MCU's best. They really started to hit their stride at a certain point, huh? The Guardians movies perhaps more than any others in the MCU stand out as movies that tell their own stories; if you want to watch this without any that come before or after, you'll be perfectly all right. That being said, once the Guardians characters are introduced into the larger storyline (in Avengers: Infinity War), you'll be happy to have the extra context. Not to mention that it's just a fun, badass story. James Gunn knows what he's doing.

Stream It Here

Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015)

Marvel Studios

The second full-team Avengers outing isn't the greatest movie on its own, but, in the spirit of this list, is a fairly important piece to set up all the movies that come after. If we're talking WandaVision, well, both Wanda (Scarlet Witch) and Vision (previously known as J.A.R.V.I.S.) are introduced here. There are also some fun "Superheroes just hanging out" moments, where Don Cheadle and Anthony Mackie really shine—and a joke about the Avengers all trying to pick up Mjolnir leads up to a wonderful payoff that will come four full years down the line.

Stream It Here

Ant-Man (2015)

Marvel Studios


Rather than end with the bang of Avengers: Age of Ultron, Marvel decided to close out its Phase 2 with the small-scale fun of Ant-Man. And it's a great choice—the Ant-Man movies prove that the entire universe doesn't need to be at stake for a Marvel movie to be fun; these are basically just heist movies with a bit of superpowers and radiation added in. Ant-Man is another that you could basically watch on its own, but Scott Lang (Paul Rudd) is great in the role (as always), and winds up figuring fairly strongly into the overarching story. So you'd be helping yourself if you consider the full picture.

Stream It Here

Captain America: Civil War (2016)

Marvel Studios

At 11 films, Phase 3 of the Marvel Cinematic Universe was its biggest yet—and it kicked things off with Civil War, which had major impact on the entire world. Not only did it introduce Black Panther (played by the late Chadwick Boseman) to the world, but it brought the MCU's version of Spider-Man (Tom Holland) into the fold for the first time. The plot around government intervention felt more mature than a typical Marvel through line, and the characters seriously developed in ways that changed them for several movies. Some of Chris Evans and Robert Downey Jr.'s best work comes here, and the plot is essential to lay the groundwork for some of the major events in Avengers: Infinity War and Endgame.

Stream It Here

Doctor Strange (2016)

Marvel Studios

In addition to advancing (and, in most ways, wrapping up) the overarching MCU's plot, Phase 3 also set out to introduce a number of new heroes who could carry on the torch when the OGs (Iron Man, Thor, Captain America, etc) are no longer around. One of those was the titular Doctor Strange, played to perfection by Benedict Cumberbatch. This origin story does actually serve OK to watch on its own if you so chose, but it fits really nicely as a puzzle piece into the larger picture if you already know the world in which this all exists. A sequel, Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness, is expected to be released in 2022.

Stream It Here

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017)

Marvel Studios

The two Guardians movies basically work in a vacuum; if you want to watch Vol 2 (and see Kurt Russell as Star-Lord's father), you'll absolutely need to have seen Guardians of the Galaxy first. Likewise, you'll need to see this one before you meet up again a few years down the line with the Guardians when they show up in Avengers: Infinity War.

Stream It Here

Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017)

Marvel Studios

Tom Holland might just be the best Spider-Man ever (sorry Tobey and Andrew!), and for the most part, his first MCU installment lives in is own vacuum as well. Homecoming skips the origin story we already know (and thank god we don't have to watch poor Uncle Ben die again), and instead drops us right into teenage science nerd Peter Parker's every day life as he's mentored by that Tony Stark guy. Michael Keaton plays one of Marvel's best villains here.

Since Sony still owns the rights to Spider-Man (the character exists in the MCU thanks to a smart deal between the two studios), the Spider-Man series doesn't live on Disney+.

Stream It Here

Thor: Ragnarok (2017)

Marvel Studios

Directed by Academy Award winner Taika Waititi (Jojo Rabbit), Thor: Ragnarok is easily a top-tier MCU movie, and could easily make a case for being the very best. Not only does the movie have the great action and adventure that fans of the Marvel world have come to expect, but Waititi brings his humor and pacing to a franchise that used his infusion of energy perfect. Mark Ruffalo co-stars as Banner/Hulk, Tessa Thompson's Valkyrie is introduced, and villains played by Jeff Goldblum and Cate Blanchett are great. The movie leads directly into the events of Avengers: Infinity War, so there's that, too. Waititi will be returning to the Thor franchise when he directs the upcoming Thor: Love & Thunder, and we simply cannot wait for that.

Stream It Here

Black Panther (2018)

Marvel Studios

Another one that can absolutely exist in its own bubble is Black Panther, which you can basically watch whenever you want (there are some minor references to the events of Captain America: Civil War, and Andy Serkis' character first appeared in Ultron, but its nothing that will take you out of the movie if unfamiliar). The movie features great acting from the whole cast, and is directed by Ryan Coogler, who had shown his talent before with movies like Creed and Fruitvale Station, but gets his chance to really shine with a big Marvel budget here.

Stream It Here

Avengers: Infinity War (2018)

Marvel Studios

The story to wrap up what Marvel calls "The Infinity Saga"—basically, everything you've seen up to this point—was so epic that it couldn't fit into just one movie. So the first, Empire Strikes Back-esque part is Infinity War, which is an absolutely massive crossover of basically every Marvel character and world you've seen to this point. And it helps that captain america movies in order go against the series' most powerful villain, Thanos (Josh Brolin), who had been built up at this point through several previous appearances of his own. That's part of what's great about the MCU; we know Thanos is scary because we've been hearing about him for years by the point he's finally deployed. He was first teased in a credits scene of the original Avengers, in 2012, and he's finally at full strength in 2018. Now that's planning.

Stream It Here

Ant-Man & The Wasp (2018)

Marvel Studios

Paul Rudd, Evangeline Lily, and Michael Douglas return here (along with more friends from the first Ant-Man) for another smaller-scale tale that also adds Walton Goggins and Michelle Pfeiffer to its fun cast. The movie could basically take place at any time—until its ending, which leads us right into Avengers: Endgame.

Stream It Here

Captain Marvel (2019)

Marvel Studios

Captain Marvel is another that you can basically watch at any time, but its clear that its titular character is one that's going to be around for quite some time. Brie Larson stars as Carol Danvers, who is training in another galaxy with Jude Law until she lands in 1990s United States, and meets a younger Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) and Phil Coulson (Clark Gregg) than we're used to. A cat (or a flerken?) and Ben Mendelsohn, along with a '90s soundtrack and aesthetic make this a fun one for any time.

Stream It Here

Avengers: Endgame (2019)

Marvel Studios

It's harder than you might think to stick a landing—just ask Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, or, *gulp* Game of Thrones. Luckily, Endgame is nothing like any of those; somehow, this movie deploys time travel, about a million different flashbacks and callbacks, and an enormous cast—and still manages to wrap "The Infinity Saga" up in a brilliant, perfect way. You'll get chills, you'll laugh, you'll cry, and you'll want to watch the whole damn thing over again.

Stream It Here

Spider-Man: Far From Home (2019)

Sony Pictures

Just like with the last phase and Ant-Man, Phase 3 of Marvel instead decided to go out not with the big bang (which would've obviously been Endgame here), but instead a bit of an aftermath and a view of things to come. Far From Home looks directly at the trauma of Endgame's finale, and sees a cast of old friends (Holland, Jackson, Zendaya, Cobie Smulders, Jon Favreau) joined by an amazing newcomer in Jake Gyllenhaal, who has made bizarre characters his thing in the last few years (see: Nightcrawler, Prisoners, Velvet Buzzsaw, among others), and similarly Goes For It here.

Stream It Here

WandaVision (2021)

Disney

No, not a movie, but actually would rank among Marvel's best if it was. WandaVision was the MCU's first foray into streaming TV, and it hit all the right beats, bringing movie star talent (in Elizabeth Olsen as Wanda Maximoff/Scarlet Witch and Paul Bettany as Vision) to the small screen for a series that's interesting, committed, and, most importantly, did something really unique and different. Bonus points for Kathryn Hahn, because, well, she just rules.

Stream It Here

The Falcon and the Winter Soldier (2021)

Disney

The Falcon and the Winter Soldier picks up right where Avengers: Endgame left off. We learn what happened after Steve Rogers handed the shield off to Sam Wilson, and we learn how the burgeoning bromance of Sam and Bucky Barnes could possibly go on without their mutual pal Steve. The show smartly brings both Sharon Carter and Zemo back into the mix, but the real highlight is Wyatt Russell as John Walker—a super soldier who wants so badly to be Steve Rogers, but never quite does it right.

Stream It Here

Loki (2021)

Marvel Studios

Loki gives the MCU's greatest villain his own showcase for the first time, and this six-part limited series is unafraid of having a bizarre tone. Set up directly by the time-travel hijinx of Endgame, Loki finds Tom Hiddleston in peak form, and sharing many scenes with a new pal played by Owen Wilson. A lot of time travel, a lot of mischief, and one of Marvel's best projects in a while, overall.

Stream It Here

Black Widow (2021)

Marvel Studios

The MCU returns to the big screen for the first time in more than two years with the release of the oft-delayed (due to Covid-19) Black Widow. The solo story set around Scarlett Johansson's assassin tells its primary story in the set period of time between Captain America: Civil War and Avengers: Infinity War, when she was ostensibly on the run. But the movie also tells more of her background and origin story than fans have ever heard before, and introduces her "sister" (played by Florence Pugh), "mother," (played by Rachel Weisz) and "father," (played by David Harbour). Add a banger of a credits scene to the mix, and the MCU is finally cooking with gas again. Full speed ahead.

Stream It Here

What If.? (2021 - ?)

Marvel Studios

What If.? is an anthology series of sorts, and doesn't feel totally essential to the overall story of the MCU—at least not yet. This series, Marvel Studios' first foray into animation, follows The Watcher (voiced by Jeffrey Wright) as he looks down upon numerous hypothetical scenarios of situations that Marvel fans will remember from earlier movies. The show frames these moments as "different universes," and it's a fun watch—just not one you need for understanding of the larger franchise just yet.

Stream It Here

Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings (2021)

Marvel Studios

Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings was going to need to be really good; it's titular character isn't one with a built in cultural cache like Captain America, Thor, or Spider-Man. In fact, in the Men's Health cover story on star Simu Liu, Kevin Feige even said that Shang-Chi came from a binder of “great characters who could make great movies regardless of how famous they were,” the implication being, well, captain america movies in order Shang-Chi was not famous.

Luckily, Feige's suspicion was correct. Shang-Chi is a movie not dissimilar from other 'first movies in the MCU,' but it's done exceptionally well. A great villain (Tony Leung), a fun supporting cast (including Awkwafina and newcomer Meng'er Zhang), and incredible fight sequences make this one for the top half of anyone's MCU rankings. We're eager to see where this character fits into the future of everything, but this first movie is one worth watching by itself.

Stream It Here

Eternals (2021)

Marvel Studios

As far as the MCU goes, Eternals is something of a tough watch. It's long (2 hours 37 minutes) and introduces a ton of new characters (including 10 of those titular Eternals and Kit Harington's Dane Whitman). Chloé Zhao—who just won the Best Director Oscar for her work on Nomadland—takes a big swing for Eternals to be an epic for the ages. And while the movie doesn't always connect, it's still enjoyable enough to be more than worth a watch; Lauren Ridloff, Barry Keoghan, Brian Tyree Henry, Kumail Nanjiani, and Harington in particular are standouts you'll want to see more from. And the credits scenes are great, so make sure you keep watching until the very end. While this movie is polarizing, we're certainly interested in seeing where everything established here goes in the future.

Once you've reached this point, well, we've got good news and bad news. The good news? You have watched every Marvel movie and series, and all in the right order, too. The bad news? Well, you're all out of movies to watch. Sorry about that. Bring on Spider-Man: No Way Home and Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness. You may be all caught up for now, but there's plenty more on the way.

Evan RomanoEvan is an associate editor for Men’s Health, with bylines in The New York Times, MTV News, Brooklyn Magazine, and VICE.

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Источник: https://www.menshealth.com/entertainment/a34426217/marvel-movies-mcu-in-order/

Transporting to a different universe where superheroes are real has never been more enticing than in 2021. Luckily, travel rates to the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) are cheaper than ever: costing just about one Disney+ subscription and some change. (Looking at you, Sony-owned Spider-Man movies and Universal Pictures-owned IncredibleHulk)

With a cinematic universe spanning decades and worlds, all intermingling with crossovers and easter eggs, it can be difficult to know where to start. For some, the only way to experience the MCU is by following its internal chronology, beginning in WWII with Captain America: The First Avenger. However, due to Marvel’s affinity for narratological lacing there’s all kinds of cliff-hangers, callbacks, and clues in its original release order. There's also that whole post-credits scene, which will really through you for a loop if you're trying to watch them in real time order. Watching in chronological order can sort of throw a wrench into this intended viewing experience, so we recommend watching in order of release date.

Beginning with Iron Man from 2008, and ending with the 2021 Black Widow, we’ve got the full list of every Marvel release to date. Now is a great time to get yourself immersed, as the MCU is expected to expand this year with releases of The Eternals and Shang-Chi and the Legend of Ten Captain america movies in order remember to take some breaks from your marathon to dip back into the IRLU (In Real Life Universe) every once in a while.

(*Since Marvel is Disney-owned, almost all of these can be found on Disney+, aside from The Incredible Hulk, Spider-Man: Homecoming, and Spider-Man: Far From Home, which can all be streamed on Prime Video.)

Iron Man (2008)

The one that started it all, where a rich guy builds a superhero suit and spawns likely decades of blockbuster franchise filmmaking.

Watch

The Incredible Hulk (2008)*

In the MCU's second outing, the Hulk gets another telling of his origin story. Sure, The Incredible Hulk is a bit of a strange watch in the 2020s, with Mark Ruffalo having long replaced Ed Norton. But we'll see the Abomination again soon, so that's worth a throwback to Norton Hulk.

Watch on Amazon

Iron Man 2 (2010)

Iron Man 2 got a little too superhero for its own good, but the second go-round with Tony Stark is still a fun one, Elon Musk cameo be damned.

Watch

Thor (2011)

Thor refused to let us know how funny Chris Hemsworth could actually be under that golden-blonde wig, but it did give us a brilliantly Shakespeare-feeling intro to the God of Thunder.

Watch

Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)

Captain America: The First Avenger gave America's ass a proper intro to the world—and a compelling look at WWI in the process.

Watch

The Avengers (2012)

The Avengers did the unthinkable, bringing heroes from separate movies, wow! all together for one adventure. We were so young.

Watch

Iron Man 3 (2013)

The underrated Iron Man 3 bravely shows the effects of PTSD on Tony Stark, ending the Iron Man trilogy on a sweet note—all during the holidays, no less.

Watch

Thor: The Dark World (2013)

Thor: The Dark World, where Thor battles the Dark Elves, is the subpar MCU entry we don't really talk about.

Watch

Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014)

In what is one of the best MCU outings, Captain America: The Winter Soldier links Cap and Black Widow up for the espionage drama of our dreams.

Watch

Guardians of the Galaxy (2014)

Guardians of the Galaxy somehow made a group of ragtag antiheroes into fan favorites. Guess that's the power of '80s music.

Watch

Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015)

Avengers: Age of Ultron made good on its title, pitting the Avengers against Mr. Robot for two and a half hours. That's how long the age of the titular Ultron lasted. And we're OK with that.

Watch

Ant-Man (2015)

In Ant-Man, Paul Rudd plays a good-bad dude who gets his hands on a shrinking suit. Frankly, the relatively small stakes (ha!) in this romp are refreshing.

Watch

Captain America: Civil War (2016)

Captain America: Civil War, gasp, turned our heroes against each other. Well, at least until they forgive each other so they can fight the bad guy.

Watch

Doctor Strange (2016)

Doctor Strange shows the journey of surgeon Stephen Strange into one of the MCU's wisest heroes. We'll see how he fares when the multiverse explodes in the sequel.

Watch

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017)

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 wasn't quiet the romp its predecessor was, but more time with Rocket Raccoon and (teenage) Groot is never a bad thing.

Watch

Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017)*

At long last: Spider-Man: Homecoming gave us the baby-faced Peter Parker from the comics, giving a faithful and sweet tale of the Queens native's coming of age.

Watch

Thor: Ragnarok (2017)

Thor: Ragnarok enlisted the wild, weird, and wonderful Taika Waititi as its director. The result? A rock n' rollin, planet-hopping Thor adventure.

Watch

Black Panther (2018)

Black Panther, which tells the story of a young king learning how to truly become a leader, was a landmark film for diversity in Hollywood.

Watch

Avengers: Infinity War (2018)

Avengers: Infinity War marked the beginning of the most epic superhero team-up in the genre's history. Even if we knew Endgame would leave our heroes on top, you have to give Avengers: Infinity War credit for the gut-punch of letting Thanos win.

Watch

Ant-Man and the Wasp (2018)

Ant-Man and the Wasp gave us another round of antics from the size-changing supeheroes. We'll never get tired of the visual gags in the Ant-Man and the Wasp series, even if the action doesn't always have an impact on the larger MCU.

Watch

Captain Marvel (2019)

In Captain Marvel, Brie Larson goes full Maverick in a Top Gun-esque, fighter-pilot, '90s-as-hell superhero epic.

Watch

Avengers: Endgame (2019)

The culmination of what Iron Man started, Avengers: Endgame lived up to all of the hype—and then some. RIP Tony. (And our bladders.)

Watch

Spider-Man: Far From Home (2019)*

Spider-Man: Far From Home follows our boy Peter as he goes on a Eurotrip with his classmates. Someday, we'll talk about Jake Gyllenhaal's Mysterio as one of the GOAT Marvel villains. The world just isn't ready for unhinged superhero villain JG. Yet.

Watch

Black Widow (2021)

At long last, Black Widow serves up Scarlett Johansson's solo outing as the Russian warrior-spy-badass.

Watch Now

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Are the Marvel movies on Netflix? Where to watch the Marvel movies in order

With Black Widowcoming out in early July 2021, fans all over the world are trying to figure out the best place to watch the Marvel movies in order.

It’s been a really long time since we’ve seen a new Marvel movie, so we know fans will want to watch and re-watch the Marvel movies before Black Widow premieres.

We shared everything you need to know about where to watch the Marvel movies in order.

Does Netflix have the Marvel movies?

Netflix used to have quite a few Marvel movies. The movies were added to Netflix as a part of Netflix’s deal with Disney. It ended a while back before Disney Plus launched, so over time, the Marvel movies have been removed from Netflix.

So, no, you won’t be able to watch the Marvel movies on Netflix. Eventually, there are some Marvel movies that will return to Netflix, but it won’t be for a while.

Where to watch the Marvel movies in order

Fortunately, MOST of the Marvel movies are available to stream on Disney Plus. That’s where they moved after the streaming deal with Netflix ended. Over time, Disney Plus has collected most of the movies for you to stream.

We shared the list of Marvel movies in order below.

  • Iron Man
  • The Incredible Hulk
  • Iron Man 2
  • Thor
  • Captain America: The First Avenger
  • The Avengers
  • Iron Man 3
  • Thor: Dark World
  • Captain America: The Winter Soldier
  • Guardians of the Galaxy
  • Avengers: Age of Ultron
  • Ant-Man
  • Captain America: Civil War
  • Doctor Strange
  • Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2
  • Spider-Man: Homecoming
  • Thor: Ragnarok
  • Black Panther
  • Avengers: Infinity War
  • Ant-Man and the Wasp
  • Captain Marvel
  • Avengers: Endgame
  • Spider-Man: Far From Home
  • Black Widow

As mentioned, almost all of the Marvel movies are available to stream on Disney Plus. Aside from Black Widow, which will be on Disney Plus shortly, the only Marvel movies that are part of the MCU that aren’t on Disney Plus right now are The Incredible Hulk, Spider-Man: Homecoming, and Spider-Man: Far From Home. 

Where to watch Spider-Man: Homecoming

Unfortunately, Spider-Man: Homecoming is not on Netflix and it’s not on Disney Plus, either.

At the time of publishing, Spider-Man: Homecoming is only available to stream on-demand. Hopefully, it will be added to a subscription streaming service soon.

Where to watch Spider-Man: Far From Home

As mentioned, Spider-Man: Far From Home is another one of the Marvel movies that is not available to stream on Netflix or Disney Plus.

You can watch Spider-Man: Far From Home on Starz for the time being. That was part of Sony’s deal with Starz.

Hopefully, the Spider-Man movies will be added to Netflix and Disney Plus in the near future. We know Spider-Man: No Way Home will be on Netflix.

Happy streaming!

Источник: https://netflixlife.com/2021/06/29/where-to-watch-the-marvel-movies-in-order-netflix/

Marvel Movies In Order: How To Watch The MCU By Release Date And Chronologically

Growing since 2008, the Marvel Cinematic Universe has established itself as one of the great blockbuster feats of all time – doing more than any franchise ever to establish a big screen continuity unlike anything audiences have ever seen. Mixing both period and contemporary stories, the movies have allowed fans to have a fascinating perspective on the history of the fictional world, with each new release adding a bit more to the larger picture. Of course, after more than 20 films things have gotten pretty damn complex as far as the timeline goes, and watching the Marvel movies in order is not a totally straight-forward process. For those of you who get a bit lost in all of it, we’ve specially designed this feature.

There are basically two ways to enjoy the timeline of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and we will take a look at both in this piece. The first approach is to take in all of the stories in the order in which they were released in theaters, a.k.a. Release Order, and the second is to watch all of the movies based on the times they are respectively set, a.k.a. Chronological Order. Read about both below, and you can choose the methodology that best suits you as you dive into the films.

If You’ve Never Seen The Marvel Movies Before

If the Marvel Cinematic Universe has never been your thing, but you now find yourself curious about the experience, your best bet is to go the Release Order route. After all, it was how the first die hard fans watched the films, and that eventually turned them into die hard fans. This is definitely the best approach to go if you're an MCU novice.

If You’ve Seen The Marvel Movies Before

The situation is a bit different if you've seen all of the Marvel movies before, as that opens the door to get creative with the rewatch experience. If you've seen all of the films released thus far, but are ready to dive back in again, Chronological Order is a fun way to mix things up and gain a new perspective. The franchise on the whole has been very good about maintaining continuity, so you may discover certain threads that weren't obvious to you before.

Marvel Movies In Order: Release Date

In the establishment of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Marvel Studios made specific choices regarding what characters they wanted to introduce to audiences and when, and if this is the part of their specific creative process that you personally take into consideration when watching the movies, then Release Order is probably the best choice for you.

  • Iron Man (2008)
  • The Incredible Hulk (2008)
  • Iron Man 2 (2010)
  • Thor (2011)
  • Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)
  • The Avengers (2012)
  • Iron Man 3 (2013)
  • Thor: The Dark World (2013)
  • Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014)
  • Guardians Of The Galaxy (2014)
  • Avengers: Age Of Ultron (2015)
  • Ant-Man (2015)
  • Captain America: Civil War (2016)
  • Doctor Strange (2016)
  • Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017)
  • Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017)
  • Thor: Ragnarok (2017)
  • Black Panther (2018)
  • Avengers: Infinity War (2018)
  • Ant-Man And The Wasp (2018)
  • Captain Marvel (2019)
  • Avengers: Endgame (2019)
  • Spider-Man: Far From Home (2019)
  • WandaVision (2021)
  • The Falcon And The Winter Soldier (2021)
  • Loki (2021)
  • Black Widow (2021)
  • What If (2021)
  • Shang-Chi And The Legend Of The Ten Rings (2021)
  • Eternals (2021)

Marvel Movies In Order: Chronologically

While watching the Marvel Studios releases in the order they came out makes plenty of sense, it should be noted that doing so results in viewers bouncing all around the franchise timeline with very little rhyme or reason from a larger narrative perspective. In contrast, there is a way to watch the movies linearly – you just have to know the proper order. Fortunately, we have you covered, and can guide you through the process of watching the Marvel Cinematic Universe chronologically.

Captain America: The First Avenger (Set in the 1940s)

Technically the furthest back in time we’ve seen in the canon are the flashback sequences at the start of Thor: The Dark World (2988 B.C.) and Thor (965 A.D.), but the full story set furthest into the past is Captain America: The First Avenger – an adventure that entirely takes place towards the end of World War II. Spanning about two years (1943-1945), the story takes us from the transformation of Steve Rogers into Captain America, to his bold sacrificial move in the Arctic Circle that led him to being frozen in ice for decades. It’s in this film that we are introduced to not only the incredibly important titular hero, but also key supporting characters like James Buchanan “Bucky” Barnes, Peggy Carter, Howard Stark, Johann Schmidt a.k.a. Red Skull, and Arnim Zola, all of whom have key roles to play in later movies. It's also the first of many stories to involve the Tesseract a.k.a. The Space Stone.

Captain Marvel (Set in the 1990s)

There are flashbacks in Ant-Man, Ant-Man And The Wasp, Captain America: Civil War, and Black Panther that give audiences a peek into events that occurred after World War II in the MCU timeline, but the truth is that most of the 20th century remains open for exploration in future movies. The one part of the period that is an exception to this, however, is the mid-1990s, which is when the events of Captain Marvel take place (specifically 1995). Naturally, this is where audiences get to meet Carol Danvers for the first time, and it’s also the introduction of the shape-shifting Skrull Talos, but from a chronological perspective this also marks the debut of Phil Coulson and Nick Fury (in the latter’s case, not counting the flash-forward ending of Captain America: The First Avenger or its trailer-esque post-credits scene).

Iron Man (Set in 2010)

The opening scene of Iron Man 3 shows what it was like for the Marvel Cinematic Universe to experience the 2000 New Year’s celebration, but the timeline zooms ahead to 2010ish for the next big arc, and that’s the movie that started it all: Iron Man. It’s in this story that we get to watch Tony Stark transform into an armor-clad superhero, but also get to know James “Rhodey” Rhodes, Pepper Potts, and Happy Hogan. Plus it’s an opportunity to check in with Nick Fury and Phil Coulson more than 15 years after Captain Marvel).

Iron Man 2 (Set in 2010)

The reason why the setting of Iron Man is a couple of years after its release date is because the story directly dovetails with the events of Iron Man 2, which is set in 2010. The film begins with the same scene that ended the previous movie – Tony Stark declaring to the world that he is Iron Man – and gives fans a chance to catch up with James “Rhodey” Rhodes (who becomes War Machine), Pepper Potts, Happy Hogan, Nick Fury, and Phil Coulson. This is the movie that also marks the first appearance of Natasha Romanoff a.k.a. Black Widow, who is operating as an undercover S.H.I.E.L.D. agent spying on Tony as he struggles with a life-threatening illness, confronts the possibility of his technology being proliferated, and weighs entrance to the Avengers.

Thor (Set in 2010)

In Iron Man 2 we see Phil Coulson leave his assignment babysitting Tony Stark for a developing situation in New Mexico, and it winds up being revealed that the situation in question is the arrival of Thor on Earth a.k.a. Midgard (which means that it too is set in 2010ish). The first Thor movie is big on introductions, as we get to meet not only key Asgardians like the God of Thunder himself, Loki, Odin, Frigga, Heimdall, Sif, and the Warriors Three, but also notable humans such as Jane Foster, Darcy Lewis, Erik Selvig, S.H.I.E.L.D. agent Jasper Sitwell, and Clint Barton a.k.a. Hawkeye.

The Incredible Hulk (Set in 2010)

If you are paying attention during the second to last scene in Iron Man 2, you’ll notice a familiar broadcast playing on one of the monitors – specifically a news report about a rampage by the Hulk at a college. This is because The Incredible Hulk is yet another story that takes place around 2010. It’s not the most significant movie on the MCU timeline, as it only features two characters who go on to be really important (not counting the Tony Stark cameo), but it is noteworthy that those two individuals are Bruce Banner a.k.a. Hulk and future Secretary of State Thaddeus E. "Thunderbolt" Ross, who is on a global hunt for the green monster.

The Avengers (Set in 2012)

Following the Iron Man 2/Thor/Incredible Hulk cluster there is a small gap in the timeline, but things pick back up with The Avengers, which is set in 2012. This particular adventure was obviously notable for bringing Marvel’s established ensemble of characters together, with an alien invasion bringing together Iron Man, Captain America, Thor, Hulk, Hawkeye, Black Widow, Nick Fury, Loki, Erik Selvig, Pepper Potts, and Phil Coulson in the same story, but the movie also marks the arrival of both Maria Hill and Thanos to the live-action canon.

Iron Man 3 (Set in 2012)

Immediately post-Avengers both the chronological and release date timelines sync up for the most part. Iron Man 3 was the first movie to come out after the 2012 blockbuster, and it’s also the first story in-universe to follow it – taking place around Christmas of that year. Given that it is a more introspective story, with Tony Stark gaining a larger understanding of what it means to be Iron Man, the only important new character we meet is The Mandarin… who turns out to be a fake anyway. That being said, the film does also bring James “Rhodey” Rhodes, Pepper Potts, Happy Hogan and Howard Stark (albeit in video form) back into the action.

Thor: The Dark World (Set in 2013)

Thor: The Dark World is set during an unspecified season of 2013, and while it doesn’t expand the Marvel Cinematic Universe at all with new characters, it does update audiences on what has been happening with almost the entire ensemble that was featured in the first movie, including Thor, Loki, Jane Foster, Odin, Frigga, Heimdall, Sif, the Warriors Three, Darcy Lewis, and Erik Selvig. Plus it has an adventure that centers around one of the most significant elements in the canon: the Reality Stone.

Captain America: The Winter Soldier (Set in 2014)

It’s in the calendar year of 2014 that the events of Captain America: The Winter Soldier play out, as audiences primarily catch up with Captain America and Black Widow as they sniff out a conspiracy within the goings-on at S.H.I.E.L.D. The blockbuster notably also brings back Bucky Barnes (now the Winter Soldier), Nick Fury, Maria Hill, Jasper Sitwell, Captain america movies in order Carter (now in her 90s), and Arnim Zola (now a computer), but also has fans get to know Sam Wilson a.k.a. Falcon, Sharon Carter a.k.a. Agent 13, S.H.I.E.L.D. Fnba cd rates Alexander Pierce, and strike team operative Brock Rumlow a.k.a. Crossbones.

Guardians Of The Galaxy (Set in 2014)

Thanks to particular title cards in the beginning of the movie, we know for a fact that Guardians of the Galaxy takes place in the year 2014, though the narrative that unfolds in the movie couldn’t be set further away from the main action in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. This is, of course, the story that brought the likes of Peter Quill a.k.a. Star-Lord, Gamora, Drax, Rocket, Groot, Nebula, Yondu, and Kraglin into the live-action canon, while also seeing Thanos conspire with Ronan The Accuser to find The Power Stone.

Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2 (Set in 2014)

Because of the release schedule, most Marvel Cinematic Universe sequels are set at least a couple years after their predecessor, but that’s not the case with Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, captain america movies in order is set just a few months after the first movie – letting it come directly after it in chronological order. This adventure is very different than the last, centering on the titular group as they meet a being who claims to be Peter Quill’s father, and a great new addition is made to the team with the arrival of Mantis.

Avengers: Age Of Ultron (Set in 2015)

Back on Earth in the year 2015, the Avengers reunited for a world-threatening crisis of their very own making – namely Firstcitizens com gb bb Stark’s creation of the deadly artificial intelligence known as Ultron. Avengers: Age Of Ultron not only brings back together Iron Man, Captain America, Thor, Hulk, Hawkeye, Black Widow, Falcon, War Machine, Nick Fury, and Erik Selvig for the first time since 2012, but also has a huge impact on the future of the franchise. This is the movie that initially put Scarlet Witch in action (not counting her Captain America: The Winter Soldier post-credits cameo), features the creation of Vision, has a role for Ulysses Klaue, and also involves two Infinity Stones: the Mind Stone and the Space Stone.

Ant-Man (Set in 2015)

Thanks to a particular line about the Avengers dropping cities out of the sky, we know that Ant-Man is set after the events of Avengers: Age Of Ultron, and as a result it’s pretty easy to pin it to its release year: 2015. It’s an important chapter for the MCU, as while the story about the heist of top secret technology doesn’t have much of an impact on the larger continuity of the franchise, it is the first movie for a lot of recurring characters, including Scott Lang a.k.a. Ant-Man, Hope van Dyne (pre-Wasp), Hank Pym, Luis, Kurt, Dave, Paxton, and Cassie and Maggie Lang. It also has cameos from Falcon, Howard Stark, and Peggy Carter.

Captain America: Civil War (Set in 2016)

It’s in the year 2016 of the Marvel Cinematic Universe that a monumental change begins to take effect in regards to the way in which people of the world view superheroes. Understanding that there’s a serious risk in having costumed vigilantes operating without oversight, the Sokovia Accords are ratified globally, and it’s an issue that causes a great divide between members of the Avengers. This is obviously one of the most significant stories in the franchise timeline, both bringing together the likes of Iron Man, Captain America, Hawkeye, Black Widow, Scarlet Witch, War Machine, Falcon, Vision, Winter Soldier, Agent 13, Ant-Man, Thaddeus E. “Thunderbolt” Ross, Crossbones, and Howard Stark, while introducing T’Challa a.k.a. Black Panther, Peter Parker a.k.a. Spider-Man, Helmut Zemo, May Parker, the Dora Milaje Ayo, and Everett Ross.

Black Panther (Set in 2016)

While there were four Marvel movies released between Captain America: Civil War and Black Panther, the latter is much closer on the timeline to the former than any other feature. With the 2016 blockbuster featuring the death of the Wakandan ruler T’Chaka, captain america movies in order Panther is a film set in the aftermath as T’Challa returns home. While dealing with a challenge to the titular hero’s throne from a previously-unknown cousin, the new film brings in a couple of familiar faces with Everett Ross, Ayo, and Ulysses Klaue, but mostly features new characters, including Ramonda (T'Challa's mother), Shuri (T'Challa's sister), Okoye, M'Baku, Nakia, W'Kabi, and Ayo.

Spider-Man: Homecoming (Set in 2016)

Like Black Panther, Spider-Man: Homecoming is also very much set in the aftermath of Captain America: Civil War, but a little more time has passed in between the stories. While the plot has Peter Parker struggling to be the best Spider-Man he can be while operating under certain restrictions from Iron Man, the film also introduces audiences to all of the important people in the hero’s life, including his classmates Ned Leeds, Flash Thompson, Michelle, a.k.a. M.J., and Betty Brant, and teachers like Mr. Harrington. May Parker also makes his second MCU appearance, while there is also a part to play for Happy Hogan, and a cameo from Pepper Potts.

Black Widow (Set in 2016)

Cate Shortland's Black Widow may have been released as the first title in the Marvel Cinematic Universe's Phase Four, but it's a chapter that is still embedded amidst the various events that comprised the latter years of the Infinity Saga. While the blockbuster isn't set as close to the events of Captain America: Civil War as either Black Panther or Spider-Man: Homecoming, the plot is very much tied to that period – specifically in the sense that it picks up with the titular heroine on the run due to her disobeying the orders in the Sokovia Accords.

Doctor Strange (Set in 2016)

Dr. Stephen Strange gets specifically name dropped in Captain America: Civil War, but evidence suggests it’s because of his advanced skills as a brain surgeon – not because he eventually becomes one of the most magically gifted individuals on Earth. On the Marvel Cinematic Universe timeline, Doctor Strange doesn’t actually go through his whole origin story until after the events of both Black Panther and Spider-Man: Homecoming - which pins the start of his journey in late 2016. While watching him do so, though, audiences get to meet characters like Wong, the Ancient One, Mordo, Dr. Christine Palmer, and Dormammu, all of whom either already have important parts to play in the MCU, or surely soon will.

Thor: Ragnarok (Set in 2018)

Where Thor: Ragnarok sits on the Marvel Cinematic Universe timeline is most easily perceived by its proximity to Avengers: Infinity War – which is evident from the post-credits scene that directly ties into the massive blockbuster. Without any specific dates available, the best guess is that the bulk of the movie takes place in the year 2018, with the God of Thunder going on a wild adventure that sees him travel to a garbage planet while his sister, Hela, takes over Asgard. This movie is important to the canon in that it refreshes audiences on the whereabouts of Hulk, Loki, and Heimdall, while also showing the fates of the Warriors Three and Odin. There's also a fun supporting role played by Doctor Strange, who is shown to possess very skilled control over magiks, and the introduction of fun new players including Valkyrie, Korg, Meik, and The Grandmaster.

Ant-Man And The Wasp (Set in 2018)

Like Thor: Ragnarok, we know that Ant-Man And The Wasp takes place very close to the events of Avengers: Infinity War because of what is shown during the end credits (namely the effects of The Blip). However, because the story plays out over less time, and goes further into the future than the third God of Thunder film, we’re putting it next chronologically. While tracing a plot that finds its main characters working to rescue the long-missing Janet van Dyne, this movie catches fans up with all the key Ant-Man players, including Scott Lang, Hope Van Dyne (who finally becomes Wasp), Hank Pym, Luis, Kurt, Dave, Paxton, and Cassie and Maggie Lang.

Avengers: Infinity War (Set in 2018)

Taking place in the spring of 2018, Avengers: Infinity War plays out the first chapter in a two-part saga that Marvel Studios planned over the course of more than a decade. Following Thanos’ journey to collect all six of the Infinity Stones, the film features far too many characters to list here… and at the end of the day winds up killing approximately half of them.

Avengers: Endgame (Set in 2023)

As for Avengers: Endgame, the most significant events of the blockbuster take place in the year 2023, five years after the devastating ending of Avengers: Infinity War… but it’s also a hard title to specifically put on a timeline specifically because of the time travel antics that are featured. To get into all of the details here would be a touch too confusing, not to mention the crazy number of heroes and villains who appear, but the fact that the movie jumps the MCU canon into the near future is really the big takeaway from a timeline perspective.

WandaVision (Set in 2023)

The Marvel Cinematic Universe entered a new era with the release of WandaVision, not only because it's the first title in Phase 4, but also because it's the franchise's first Disney+ series. It's also an interesting story to consider in the Marvel timeline, as it's actually set between the events of Avengers: Endgame and Spider-Man: Far From Home. It's specifically said in dialogue on the show that the plot really begins about three weeks after the final battle against Thanos, and head writer Jac Schaeffer has confirmed that the events that play out happen over the course of about a week.

Spider-Man: Far From Home (Set in 2023)

Thus far, only one Marvel Cinematic Universe movie has been set in the aftermath of Avengers: Endgame, and that’s Spider-Man: Far From Home – which takes place in the summer of 2023 following the defeat of Thanos. The fact that Tony Stark is dead weighs heavily on the minds of characters in this story, but once again we get to reconnect with the important people in Peter Parker’s circle, including Ned Leeds, Flash Thompson, M.J., Betty Brant, Mr. Harrington, May Parker, Happy Hogan. And to bring things full circle, we even get new appearances from both Talos and Nick Fury, who we learn are working together on a mysterious mission.

The Falcon And The Winter Soldier (Set in 2023)

Beyond being clearly set in the aftermath of Avengers: Endgame, The Falcon And The Winter Soldier Disney+ series doesn't really provide too many anchors regarding where it sits in the timeline, but given the featured animosity regarding political restructuring after The Blip, it seems fair to say that a few months have past, putting it after Spider-Man: Far From Home.

Shang-Chi And The Legend Of The Ten Rings (Set In 2023)

Thanks to its central antagonist having lived for a millenia Shang-Chi And The Legend Of The Ten Rings is a movie that features scenes that go way back in the history of the Marvel Cinematic Universe – but the vast majority is set in “present” (by which I mean the near future). It’s not made specifically clear when the story takes place in regards to the aftermath of Avengers: Endgame, but release order feels like the right move.

Eternals (Set in 2023)

While many Marvel movies have featured flashbacks that are set centuries in the past, Eternals is a special case in that it goes back a remarkable 7,000 years in history, chronicling its characters' journey shepherding human society. That being said, the bulk of the action takes place in the post-Blip "present," and while there aren't really any specific seasonal markers it feels safe to line it up in release order and say that events transpire around the time or after what happens in Shang-Chi And The Legend Of The Ten Rings.

Intense as it already is to keep track of everything in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, things are getting even more complicated. As the franchise dives into the concept of the multiverse, new stories are being told that are still part of the larger canon, but also exist outside of the timeline detailed above. Allow me to explain.

Loki

Technically a spin-off from Avengers: Endgame, the Disney+ series Loki chronicles the version of the titular God of Mischief who managed to escape from the grasp of the Avengers thanks to a misplaced Tesseract. Having messed with the time stream, he is arrested as a Variant by the Time Variance Authority – and when he is brought to their headquarters, he finds himself in a location that exists outside of normal time and space. It doesn't really fit on the chronological timeline, but it is at the very least best watched only after the aforementioned 2019 blockbuster.

What If

Debuting on Disney+ in summer 2021, What If is a series that is developed by Marvel Studios that exclusively focuses on stories that play out on alternate timelines that are similar to the events featured in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. but with special changes altering everything. What if Peggy Carter had gotten the super soldier serum instead of Steve Rogers? What if the Ravagers kidnapped T'Challa instead of Peter Quill? What if Ant-Man and Wasp accidentally unleashed a zombie plague from the Quantum Realm? Is apple cider vinegar good for you mayo clinic those stories and more are told in this multiverse-centric animated series. 

All of that is certainly a lot of information to process, so to help sort it out even further, we've also designed this infographic with the chronological timeline of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, including which movies introduce which key characters and feature appearances from Infinity Stones:

No matter the order in which you decide to watch the films, one thing that’s for certain is the fact that the Marvel Cinematic Universe has spun an epic big screen story so far in its decade-plus existence – and it’s not stopping any time soon. To learn about everything that is set to arrive on both the big screen and the small screen from the comic book franchise, head on over to our Upcoming Marvel Movies and Upcoming Marvel TV guides.

NJ native who calls LA home; lives in a Dreamatorium. A decade-plus CinemaBlend veteran; endlessly enthusiastic about the career he’s dreamt of since seventh grade.

Источник: https://www.cinemablend.com/news/2467680/a-marvel-movies-timeline-to-watch-from-beginning-to-endgame

How to Watch Marvel Movies in Order Online

If you're going to watch Marvel movies, you should watch them in chronological order (that is, in the order that events take place in the story) or in order of release.

Where to Watch Marvel Movies

Most of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) movies are available to stream on Disney+; some are on Amazon Prime and cable channel websites like FX.

If you don't have one of those accounts, or a cable subscription, you can rent nearly all the Marvel movies from iTunes, Amazon, Vudu, and other online movie rental services.

This article only covers the core MCU theatrical releases that are connected the overall Avengers storyline, starting with Iron Man. Pre-MCU Marvel movies, like Spider-Man (either the Toby McGuire or Andrew Garfield versions) aren't included, and neither are the Spider-Man spinoffs that don't cross over with the MCU, like Venom.

Watch Marvel Movies in Chronological Order

Want to watch the movies of the Marvel Cinematic Universe in the order that the story takes place in the world of the characters? Then here's the order you should follow.

MovieChronologyWhere to Watch
Captain America: The First AvengerTakes place in 1940sAmazon PrimeDisney+EPIX
Captain MarvelTakes place in 1995Disney+
Iron ManTakes place in 2010Disney+
Iron Man 2Time not specified, but before AvengersAmazon PrimeDisney+
The Incredible HulkTime not specified, but before AvengersAmazon PrimeVudu
ThorTakes place 6 months before AvengersAmazon PrimeDisney+EPIX
The AvengersTakes place in 2012Amazon PrimeDisney+EPIX
Iron Man 3Takes place 6 months after AvengersDisney+
Thor: The Dark WorldTakes place after Avengers, but before Age of UltronDisney+
Captain America: Winter Soldier Takes place after Avengers, but before Age of UltronDisney+
Guardians of the GalaxyTakes place in 2014Disney+
Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Takes place after vol. 1Disney+
Avengers: Age of UltronTakes place in 2015Disney+
Ant-ManTakes place in 2015Disney+
Captain America: Civil WarTakes place after Age of Ultron, but before Infinity WarDisney+TBSTNT
Spider-Man: HomecomingTakes place after Civil WarAmazon Prime
Doctor Strange Takes place in 2016Disney+
Black PantherTakes place in 2017Disney+TBSTNT
Thor: RagnarokTakes place after Age of Ultron, but before Infinity WarDisney+
Avengers: Infinity WarTakes place in 2017Disney+TBSTNT
Ant-Man and the WaspTakes place before EndgameDisney+
Avengers: EndgameTakes place in 2017 and 2022Disney+
Spider-Man: Far From HomeTakes place after EndgameStarz

Watch Marvel Movies in Order of Release

Prefer to watch Marvel movies in release order, just like those of us who went to the theater to see them? Then here's the order you should follow.

Marvel Movies Phase 1

Marvel Movies Phase 2


Movie
Release DateWhere to Watch
Iron Man 3May 2013Disney+
Thor: The Dark WorldNovember 2013Disney+
Captain America: The Winter SoldierApril 2014Disney+
Guardians of the GalaxyAugust 2014Disney+
FX
Avengers: Age of UltronMay 2015Disney+
Ant-ManJuly 2015Disney+

Marvel Movies Phase 3

MovieRelease DateWhere to Watch
Captain America: Civil WarMay 2016Disney+
TBS
TNT
Doctor StrangeNovember 2016Disney+
Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2May 2017Disney+
Spider-Man: HomecomingJuly 2017FX
Thor: RagnarokNovember 2017Disney+
Black Panther February 2018Disney+
TBS
TNT
Avengers: Infinity WarApril 2018Disney+
TBS
TNT
Ant-Man and the WaspJuly 2018Disney+
Captain Marvel March 2019Disney+
Avengers: EndgameApril 2019Disney+
Spider-Man: Far From HomeJuly 2019Starz

Marvel Movies Phase 4

The next set of Marvel Movies—Phase 4—will expand the Marvel Cinematic Universe in numerous ways. These titles aren't available for streaming yet because they haven't even been released in theaters yet.

MovieRelease DateWhere to Watch
Black Widow November 2020not yet released
The Eternals February 2021not yet released
Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten RingsMay 2021not yet released
Untitled Spider-Man movieDecember 2021not yet released
Thor: Love and ThunderFebruary 2022not yet released
Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of MadnessMarch 2022not yet released

Marvel Movies Beyond Phase 4

The set of Marvel movies beyond Phase 4 is a little hazy right now. There are just basic names and rough release dates, so a lot of this might change. We'll update this as Marvel confirms more details.

MovieRelease DateWhere to Watch
Black Panther 2May 2022not yet released
Captain Marvel 2July 2022not yet released
Untitled Marvel movie2022not yet released
BladeTBDnot yet released
Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3TBDnot yet released
Untitled Fantastic Four filmTBDnot yet released

Thanks for letting us know!

Источник: https://www.lifewire.com/watch-marvel-movies-in-order-online-5077381

Captain America

Real Name

Samuel Thomas Wilson

"I'm a black man carrying the stars and stripes. What don't I understand? Every time I pick this thing up, I know there are millions of people who are gonna hate me for it. Even now, here. I feel it. The stares, the judgment. And there's nothin' I can do to change it. Yet, I'm still here. No super serum, no blond hair, or blue eyes. The only power I have is that I believe we can do better."
―Captain America[src]

Samuel Thomas "Sam" Wilson is a former United States Air Force pararescue airman who wielded an experimental military wingsuit, operating under the callsign Falcon. After his wing-man Riley was killed in action, Wilson decided to leave an active duty, instead choosing to help other veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. At this time, Wilson had met Steve Rogers and was drawn to his conflict with HYDRA, as Rogers needed help from anyone not associated with S.H.I.E.L.D. since they had been infiltrated by HYDRA. Retaking his old wings, Wilson had then assisted with destroying all of Alexander Pierce's schemes of world domination. Following their victory against Pierce's HYDRA units, Falcon then agreed to assist Rogers in tracking down the Winter Soldier, who was in fact Rogers' close friend who had been brainwashed by HYDRA.

As Falcon continued searching for the Winter Soldier, he was then recruited into the Avengers, since their original team had been disbanded following the defeat of Ultron. During his time with the Avengers, Falcon briefly encountered Ant-Man before assisting in defeating Crossbones. In the aftermath of several incidents that caused casualties within civilians, the Avengers were then forced into following the Sokovia Accords, putting them all under the government's full control. However, as the Winter Soldier was blamed for terrorist attacks by Helmut Zemo, Falcon stood by Captain America with protecting the Winter Soldier, which had then caused the Avengers Civil War. In the wake of this clash, Falcon, and several other Avengers who were loyal to Captain America, were defeated by Iron Man, and locked into the Raft, until Captain America freed them as they became fugitives.

While the Avengers were still disbanded, Earth had come under attack by Thanos and his Black Order, bringing Falcon and his allies out of hiding. Learning that Thanos intended to steal the Mind Stone from Vision, Falcon joined the Avengers in taking Vision to Wakanda for his protection, while they had then tried to keep Thanos' forces back. However, they were eventually defeated as Thanos claimed the Infinity Stones and used them to cause the Snap, killing trillions including Falcon. Five years later, the victims of the Snap were resurrected by the surviving Avengers, and Falcon rejoined their battles against Thanos as they finally defeated him at the cost of Tony Stark's life. In the aftermath of the battle, Falcon learned that Captain America returned to the past and had lived a full life with Peggy Carter, and seeing him return as an old man, was given the shield by Rogers.

Initially declining the shield and giving captain america movies in order up to the Smithsonian Institution under the impression that it would remain a display piece, Wilson was disgusted when the Government had then appointed John Walker as their next Captain America. Wilson instead refocused on fighting the Flag Smashers, forming an unlikely alliance with Bucky Barnes and Helmut Zemo to track them down. However, as Walker began to lose control, due to taking the Super Soldier Serum, and brutally murdered one of the Flag Smashers, Nico, in public, Wilson retook the shield to prevent further murders. Following some soul searching and a discussion with Isaiah Bradley, Wilson had finally taken up the mantle of Captain America in time to intervene with the Flag Smashers' attack on the GRC, stopping Karli Morgenthau, as he convinced the GRC to treat refugee communities created by the Blip fairly, and inspiring a new generation of heroes.

Biography

Early Life

Wilson Family Seafood

"We made a deal before Daddy died. You're out there. I do things my way here."
―Sarah Wilson to Sam Wilson[src]

Sam Wilson was born on September 23, 1978 in Harlem[8] to Paul and Darlene Wilson. He was raised in Louisiana along with his sister, Sarah.[9] Wilson's father would often take him to go fishing at a spot in Grand Isle.[10] Wilson had an aunt, whom he referred to as his TT, whom he was very close to. When his TT passed away, Wilson attended her funeral, which was well attended and continued for many days, celebrating her life.[11]

Military Career

Serving Two Tours

"When I was over there, I'd sleep on the ground, use rock for the pillows, like a caveman. Now I'm home, lying in my bed, and it's like—"
"Lying on a marshmallow. Feel like I'm gonna sink right to the floor."
―Sam Wilson and Steve Rogers[src]

Sam Wilson joined the United States Air Force after qualifying and passing all the requirements for pararescue. He served two combat tours in the Global War on Terrorism campaign, being sent out to Afghanistan during his service. Assigned onto the 58th Rescue Squadron, Wilson was a test pilot for the EXO-7 Falcon along with his wingman, Riley. During his time serving in the Air Force, Wilson often found that he would be the most comfortable when he was sleeping on the ground while using rocks as pillows, since there were few other options.[1]

Losing Riley

"You lose someone?"
"My wingman, Riley. Flying a night mission, standard PJ rescue op. Nothing we hadn't done a thousand times before. 'Til an RPG knocked Riley's dumb ass out of the sky. Nothing I could do. Like I was up there just to watch."
―Steve Rogers and Sam Wilson[src]

One of Wilson's missions involved successfully capturing Khalid Khandil in Bakhmala, Afghanistan, being once again teamed up with Riley. However, during a night rescue mission, Riley was killed after his EXO-7 Falcon was hit by an RPG and Wilson could do nothing to save him. Having lost his close friend, Wilson had a hard time finding a reason to continue serving and soon left the Air Force, deciding to focus his efforts on helping veterans recovering from combat Post-traumatic stress disorder back home.[1]

Meeting Captain America

Surprise Running Companion

"Alright, Sam, duty calls. Thanks for the run. If that's what you wanna call 'running'."
"Oh, that's how it is?"
―Steve Rogers and Sam Wilson[src]

Having returned home from the United States Air Force, Wilson was hired by the Department of Veterans Affairs, with the intention of counseling the veterans who had been suffering from Post-traumatic stress disorder. While out for his morning jog across Washington, D.C., Wilson soon found his early morning exercise being interrupted by Steve Rogers, who had managed to casually run by Wilson several times, teasing him as he went, much to Wilson's annoyance.

With Rogers having run past him multiple times throughout their jog, Wilson eventually stopped to catch his breath as Rogers came over to rejoin him. Commenting on how fast he had run, Wilson jokingly challenged Rogers to run another lap, questioning if he could do it in the blink of an eye. Rogers had then questioned what branch of the Air Force Wilson was a part of, and Wilson explained his situation before introducing himself as Rogers helped him back onto his feet.

As Rogers introduced himself, Wilson had then made it clear that he already knew who he was based upon his incredible running abilities. He then questioned what it was like for Rogers to have been woken up in 2011 after living in the 1940s during World War II, to which Rogers only claimed that it was taking some getting used to. Before Rogers could walk away, Wilson had then noted that most other Armed Forces veterans, himself included, had struggled to get used to sleeping on a comfortable bed upon returning home, which Rogers related to. The pair then bonded about their experiences while serving in the military and similarities in readjusting without a war zone.

Once Wilson asked Rogers about the differences between living now compared to the 1940s, he listened to Rogers explain why it was not so bad, commenting on all the improvements with their food and technology in the modern day, including the internet. Hearing that Rogers was still trying to catch up on everything that he missed, Wilson then recommended Marvin Gaye for him to listen to, and Rogers added it to his To-Do List.

The conversation was cut short, however, as Rogers was called away on a S.H.I.E.L.D. mission by Natasha Romanoff. Wilson encouraged Rogers to visit him at the VA some day, ostensibly so Wilson could impress the women who also worked there, while Rogers teased him over his jogging abilities. As Romanoff had arrived to collect Rogers in her car, joking that they would put him in the Smithsonian as an exhibit, Wilson gave her a flirtatious greeting before watching her drive away with Rogers.[1]

Advising Steve Rogers

"The number of people giving me orders is down to about zero. So, hell yeah. Are you thinking about getting out?"
"No. I don't know. To be honest, I don't know what I would do with myself if I did."
―Sam Wilson and Steve Rogers[src]

Wilson held a group session with Armed Forces veterans who were suffering from PTSD as he helped Garcia, who was struggling with visions of IEDs in the roads. Once Garcia had finished her confessions, Wilson spoke to the group about what they kept with them from their experiences with war and what they left behind. He used a metaphor of carrying the memories in a bag as he offered advice in separating their time in the military from their time being at home, where they were trying to relive as civilians.

With their meeting over, Wilson once again met with Steve Rogers, who complimented him on his insights to Garcia, having arrived to listen to the last few minutes of his meeting. Wilson then told Rogers about his time in Afghanistan and how he lost his friend, Riley, during a mission. Wilson explained that once Riley died, he had lost his own passion for serving in the military but found a new purpose in his life by helping these veterans readjust after returning to their homes.

Rogers admitted to Wilson that he was struggling with the idea of what to do with himself if he was not a soldier, since he also didn't know how to leave S.H.I.E.L.D. and just live a normal life, to which Wilson jokingly suggested that he could join Ultimate Fighting due to his Super Soldier Serum. However, Wilson got serious once again as he then assured Rogers that he could do whatever he wanted, before questioning what it was that actually made him happy in life.[1]

Helping the Fugitives

"I can't ask you to do this, Sam. You got out for a good reason."
"Dude, Captain America needs my help. There's no better reason to get back in."
―Steve Rogers and Sam Wilson[src]

Having returned to his apartment after jogging through Washington, D.C., Wilson heard a knock at his door and was surprised to find a disheveled Steve Rogers and Natasha Romanoff, who had come seeking refuge as they claimed that everybody they knew was currently attempting to kill them. Despite having little context to their current situation, Wilson offered them both help without a second thought, opening his door for Rogers and Romanoff to come inside.

While they were inside his home, Wilson made the pair breakfast and allowed them to use his shower in order to clean themselves up, as they had been involved in an explosion at Camp Lehigh. Despite his own choice to leave the United States Air Force, Wilson had felt that being called upon by Captain America simply meant he had to return. Having finished making breakfast, Wilson came upstairs as he informed Rogers and Romanoff that it was ready if they wanted it.

As the group ate together, Wilson learned of the full details of Rogers' and Romanoff's current predicament, as he was informed about how S.H.I.E.L.D. had been infiltrated by HYDRA for decades, resulting in them being betrayed by Alexander Pierce who had order the assassination of themselves as well as Director Nick Fury. Having learned how dangerous their situation was if Pierce succeeded in his plans with Project Insight, Wilson had then offered his assistance.

Although Rogers was reluctant to accept, Wilson had insisted before then revealing to them that he was part of a military project that used the EXO-7 Falcon, with Romanoff recognizing their unit as the one that captured Khalid Khandil in Afghanistan. Rogers had also noticed a picture of Wilson and Riley. Seeing that Wilson could be beneficial to the mission to capture and question Jasper Sitwell, Rogers accepted his help as they all agreed to steal the EXO-7 Falcon together.[1]

Kidnapping of Agent Sitwell

"You're gonna go around the corner to your right. There's a gray car two spaces down. You and I are gonna take a ride."
"And why would I do that?"
"Because that tie looks really expensive, I'd hate to mess it up."
―Sam Wilson and Jasper Sitwell[src]

Having retrieved the EXO-7 Falcon from Fort Meade, Wilson traveled with both Steve Rogers and Natasha Romanoff to find and interrogate Jasper Sitwell. Wilson called Sitwell on the phone after he had a meeting with Senator Stern and threatened to have him shot if he did not do exactly as instructed; he ordered Sitwell to go into a car that drove him to a nearby building to be questioned by Rogers and Romanoff on the roof.

During his initial interrogation by Rogers, Sitwell denied any knowledge of HYDRA's takeover of S.H.I.E.L.D. As they grew tired of his lies, Romanoff had instead resorted to kicking Sitwell off the building, in order to scare him into finally giving the answers they needed. After Sitwell fell several stories, Falcon then flew in at the last moment, caught him in mid-air, and brought Sitwell back onto the top of the building, dropping him with some force on the ground.

As Falcon retracted his wings and rejoined Rogers and Romanoff, he watched as Sitwell confessed, since the fall scared him so much. Falcon listened while Sitwell revealed how Arnim Zola's algorithm was in fact their plan to locate any potential threats to HYDRA in the future, and that Alexander Pierce intended to use Project Insight in order to assassinate these people of interest the moment the Insight Helicarriers were launched.[1]

Encountering Winter Soldier

Having learned of Alexander Pierce's sinister plans of the worldwide massacre, Wilson drove Jasper Sitwell towards the Triskelion, where they planned to use his clearances to gain access to, and shut down Project Insight before Pierce could activate it. Sitwell, however, insisted that this concept was a terrible idea but Wilson ordered that he keep quiet while they were driving there as Steve Rogers and Natasha Romanoff then continued to discuss the fine details of their new plan.

However, before the group could get to the Triskelion, someone suddenly landed on their roof as a robotic arm ripped Sitwell out of the window and into the path of a speeding truck, killing him. As the attacker began shooting into the car, Wilson slammed on the breaks, launching him off the vehicle, and they were faced with the Winter Soldier. Before the group could react, another vehicle had slammed into the back of their car, which drove Wilson and the others towards the Winter Soldier.

With Wilson unable to do anything, the Winter Captain america movies in order proceeded to rip the steering wheel out of his hands in an attempt to cause a fatal crash. While the car spun out of control, Rogers then grabbed Wilson and Romanoff and threw them all out, using his shield to protect them as they skidded on the road at high speed. When they recovered from the crash, a fight then erupted in the streets, in which Wilson dove for cover while Rogers was knocked off the bridge by a grenade.

Once Romanoff was also thrown off the bridge because of the Winter Soldier's grenade launcher, Wilson had managed to remain hidden as the HYDRA mercenaries then began repelling off the bridge in order to continue the fight, shooting at Rogers with a mini-gun. Surprising one mercenary, Wilson was able to knock him off the bridge and take his gun, using it to give Rogers covering fire. Wilson then instructed Rogers to help keep the Winter Soldier away from Romanoff.

Eventually, Wilson had managed to defeat the unit of HYDRA soldiers from the bridge and then went in search of Rogers and Romanoff on the streets of Washington, D.C., taking his EXO-7 Falcon with him as protection. Before long, Falcon discovered Rogers battling the Winter Soldier and flew in to assist, coming in just as their fight had briefly paused due to a moment's confusion. Falcon was able to kick the Winter Soldier aside just before he could shoot Rogers.

While Falcon had landed on the streets, the Winter Soldier recovered from the assault and had attempted to shoot at Rogers again, only for Romanoff to then shoot a grenade launcher at him, which caused him to flee. Before they could get away, however, Rogers, Romanoff and Wilson bank of america sunday hours near me then surrounded and captured by some of HYDRA's infiltrators within S.H.I.E.L.D., led by Brock Rumlow. As Wilson was pinned against the car at gunpoint, he had his Exo-7 Falcon removed while Rumlow and Jack Rollins secured Rogers. The three of them were put in the back of a van to be executed later, with Romanoff wounded from being shot at by the Winter Soldier earlier.[1]

Meeting Nick Fury

"Look, whoever he used to be, the guy he is now, I don't think he's the kind you save. He's the kind you stop."
"I don't know if I can do that."
―Sam Wilson and Steve Rogers[src]

Under the watchful eyes of HYDRA's soldiers, Wilson and the others were transported towards a secret location where Brock Rumlow intended to have them all killed. During their journey, Steve Rogers explained that Winter Soldier was in fact his friend, Bucky Barnes, who seemingly died in World War II. Wilson wondered how this could be possible, and Rogers explained that Arnim Zola had experimented on Barnes, which helped him to survive his apparent death.

As they drove along, Wilson noticed that Natasha Romanoff

Источник: https://marvelcinematicuniverse.fandom.com/wiki/Captain_America

Marvel movies in chronological order

If you want to watch the Marvel movies in chronological order, you’ve got your work cut out for you. With 26 movies and counting, the MCU is a vast cinematic universe with stories that span different time periods, timelines and galaxies. Keeping all that straight in your head would be hard enough for a Watcher. That’s where we come in…

We’ve outlined captain america movies in order Marvel movie in chronological order so you can watch them all from start to finish without worrying you’ve missed anything. Join Captain America as he fights HYDRA and helps win the war, before meeting Captain Marvel in a Blockbuster video shop. Then you’ll get to rewatch the very first MCU movie, Iron Man and follow his journey to becoming part of The Avengers, before Thanos ultimately wipes out half of the universe. It doesn’t stop there though, after Iron Man brings everyone back you’ve still got three movies to go, ending with the latest release, Eternals, before you’re all up-to-date with the MCU. 

Phew, we’re exhausted just thinking about watching all the Marvel movies in chronological order! The good news is that most of them can be found on Disney+ so you only need one little subscription to get started.  After that, well, you just need to find The Incredible Hulk and the Spider-Man movies elsewhere, before watching Eternals in the cinema and you’re all sorted.  Check out our Marvel streaming guide for all the details.

The MCU is the biggest cinematic universe ever created, and with more than a few of the best space movies within that universe, it’s definitely worth rewatching. But if you’re planning on bingeing them all before Spider-Man: No Way Home is released, you better get started.

Marvel movies in chronological order

  • Captain America: The First Avenger
  • Captain Marvel
  • Iron Man
  • Iron Man 2
  • The Incredible Hulk
  • Thor
  • The Avengers
  • Thor: The Dark World
  • Iron Man 3
  • Captain America: The Winter Soldier
  • Guardians of the Galaxy
  • Guardians of the Galaxy 2
  • Avengers: Age of Ultron
  • Ant-Man
  • Captain America: Civil War
  • Black Widow
  • Spider-Man: Homecoming
  • Black Panther
  • Doctor Strange
  • Thor: Ragnarok
  • Ant-Man and the Wasp
  • Avengers: Infinity War
  • Avengers: Endgame
  • Spider-Man: Far From Home
  • Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings
  • Eternals

1. Captain America: The First Avenger

  • Release date: July 22, 2011
  • Cast: Chris Evans, Hayley Atwell, Hugo Weaving

If you want to watch all the Marvel movies in chronological order then you have to start with Captain America: The First Avenger. Not the best Marvel movie by a long shot, but given it takes place during World War 2, in 1942 to be exact, its setting is certainly the oldest. Travel back in time to watch Cap fight HYDRA masquerading as Nazis and fall for Peggy Carter, only to be frozen in ice so he could conveniently leapfrog through time to the present day and eventually team up with the Avengers. This is where it all began.


2. Captain Marvel

  • Release date: March 8, 2019
  • Cast: Brie Larson, Samuel L. Jackson, Jude Law

Next you’ll jump forward in time to the 90s where Captain Marvel discovers grunge as well as a community of Skrulls hiding in plain sight on Earth. Set in 1995, Marvel gave us a strong blast of nostalgia with this origin movie, which saw appearances from 90s icons such as Blockbuster, payphones, and Nine Inch Nails. Plus, it was the first Marvel movie to have one of its main characters de-aged using some impressive CGI so a young Nick Fury could kick ass right alongside one of the most powerful superheroes in the franchise.


3. Iron Man

  • Release date: May 2, 2008
  • Cast: Robert Downey Jr., Gwyneth Paltrow, Terrence Howard

That brings us to Iron Man, the very first Marvel movie made, but the third in chronological order. Set in 2010, this origin movie started it all for the Marvel Cinematic Universe as Tony Stark creates the Iron Man suit to escape his captors and then become a powerful but arrogant superhero. With his P.A. Pepper Potts and friend Col. James “Rhodey” Rhodes along for the ride, Tony eventually takes down baddie Obadiah Stane who arranged Tony’s kidnapping so he could take over Stark Industries.


4. Iron Man 2

  • Release date: May 7, 2010
  • Cast: Robert Downey Jr., Mickey Rourke, Gwyneth Paltrow

Less than a year later Tony is back in hot water as the son of a former Stark Industries employee, Ivan Vanko, tries to kill him using his own version of Tony’s Iron Man suit technology. And, as if that wasn’t bad enough, Tony finds out that the palladium core in the Arc Reactor that keeps him alive and powers his suit is actually killing him. All in all, Tony isn’t having a great year, but thanks to a little help from Nick Fury and Natasha Romanoff, aka S.H.I.E.L.D. agent Black Widow, he eventually cures himself and takes down Vanko.


5. The Incredible Hulk

  • Release date: June 13, 2008
  • Cast: Edward Norton, Liv Tyler, Tim Roth

At the same time, Bruce Banner is trying to find a cure for his condition which sees him turn into a big, raging, green monster anytime he feels a bit irritated. Set in 2011, Banner is being hunted by General Thaddeus “Thunderbolt” Ross who sends special forces soldier Emil Blonsky to take him down. Unfortunately, Blonsky is no match for the Hulk which is why he agrees to be injected with a similar serum to the one that turned Banner into the Hulk. The problem is, it also makes him insane. Eventually becoming Abomination and going on a killing rampage, Banner convinces Ross to let him stop Blonsky and save the day.

Whether this movie counts as part of the MCU is up for debate - Disney/Marvel say no, but it was very clearly meant to be in the MCU when it was created, as evidenced by Tony Stark's post credits cameo.


6. Thor

  • Release date: May 6, 2011
  • Cast: Chris Hemsworth, Anthony Hopkins, Natalie Portman

Also at the same time (yes, seriously, 2011 was a busy year for the MCU), God of Thunder Thor is banished to Earth by his dad Odin and discovers he’s no longer worthy enough to lift his favorite hammer. There he meets scientist Jane Foster and learns how to live as a mortal for a while. Meanwhile on Asgard, Thor’s brother Loki, the God of Mischief, finds out he’s actually adopted and doesn’t take it particularly well. Eventually, Thor proves himself worthy enough to once again wield his hammer and returns to Asgard to stop Loki from causing anymore trouble, only to witness his brother supposedly die.


7. Avengers Assemble

  • Release date: May 4, 2012
  • Cast: Robert Downey Jr., Chris Evans, Scarlett Johansson

Surprise! A year after Loki’s ‘death’ and he’s back trying to take over Earth, which leads to the creation of the Avengers in 2012. A recently unfrozen Cap, Iron Man (who’s trying to be slightly more of a team player), a reluctant Banner/Hulk, and Thor (who’s traveled to Earth to stop his brother) all team up to stop Loki. They’re also joined by Black Widow and her pal Clint Barton, aka Hawkeye. Long story short, a huge battle ensues destroying most of New York, but eventually ends with Loki being captured and taken back to Asgard for a spanking.


8. Thor: The Dark World

  • Release date: November 8, 2013
  • Cast: Chris Hemsworth, Natalie Portman, Tom Hiddleston

Fresh off the back of taking down his brother, Thor returns to Earth and runs into Jane who has accidentally absorbed a dangerous substance called the Aether, and is more than a little upset Thor didn’t call her when he was in town. After discovering that the Aether will kill Jane, Thor enlists the help of his wayward brother to trick dark elf Malekith into drawing the Aether out of Jane. Loki is, once again, supposedly killed during the confrontation and Malekith tries to use the Aether to wreak havoc on Earth, but is stopped by Thor and Jane.


9. Iron Man 3

  • Release date: May 3, 2013
  • Cast: Robert Downey Jr., Guy Pearce, Gwyneth Paltrow

While this is all happening, Tony is struggling given his experiences during the Battle of New York. Convinced that the only way to protect Earth and the ones he loves is with more Iron Man suits, he spends the better half of 2012 creating suit after suit after suit, only for bombs to start going off all over the place, allegedly orchestrated by the Mandarin. During his investigation into the Mandarin, Tony discovers that scientist Aldrich Killian is really behind the attacks and that he’s kidnapped the President. Tony teams up with Rhodey to save the President, eventually destroying all his suits and promising Pepper he’ll tone down the superhero thing for a while.


10. Captain America: The Winter Soldier

  • Release date: March 26, 2014
  • Cast: Chris Evans, Sebastian Stan, Scarlett Johansson

After the events of Avengers Assemble, Captain America is spending 2014 continuing to adjust to present-day life when an assassin called the Winter Soldier starts causing trouble for S.H.I.E.L.D. It turns out that the Winter Soldier is actually Cap’s old friend Bucky from 1942 who’s been brainwashed and periodically kept on ice by HYDRA. Oh, and HYDRA has taken over S.H.I.E.L.D. as well. Cap, along with Black Widow and his new friend Sam Wilson, aka Falcon, help bring HYDRA/S.H.I.E.L.D. down, but Bucky ends up on the run.


11. Guardians of the Galaxy

  • Release date: July 31, 2014
  • Cast: Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Lee Pace

That same year Star-Lord is roaming the galaxy trying to find a buyer for a powerful Infinity Stone he’s stolen when he gets ambushed by Thanos’s adopted daughter, Gamora, and bounty hunters, Rocket and Groot, who are also all after the stone. After being sent to prison and meeting Drax, the unlikely friends team up, break out, and decide to sell the stone to keep it from baddie Ronan, who wants to use it to destroy Xandar. All doesn’t quite go to plan and they end up in a big battle with Ronan, which ends with an awkward dance off and victory for the Guardians of the Galaxy.

Notably, Guardians of the Galaxy sent the MCU into space for the first time (if you don't count Iron Man's very brief spaceflight in Avengers Assemble).


12. Guardians of the Galaxy: Vol. 2

  • Release date: May 5, 2017
  • Cast: Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Kurt Russell

No sooner had the Guardians of the Galaxy defeated Ronan, then they were faced with another big baddie in the same year, this time with some added family drama. Star-Lord’s estranged, but very powerful daddy, Ego, turns up and announces he wants to teach Star-Lord his skills. But, before they can get very far with the lessons, it turns out that Ego is a mass-murdering psychopath and the Guardians have to destroy him, which isn’t as easy as it sounds. At least they made a new friend in the form of empath Mantis.


13. Avengers: Age of Ultron

  • Release date: May 1, 2015
  • Cast: Robert Downey Jr., Chris Evans, Chris Hemsworth

2015 saw the Avengers having to reform to defeat another villain, except this time it was one of their own making. Well, Tony’s anyway. Still desperately trying to protect humanity, he creates an A.I. robot called Ultron who’s more interested in enslaving humanity than saving it. The heroes have to work together – along with some new friends in the form of Quicksilver and Scarlet Witch – to stop Ultron, but it comes at a high price, with the destruction of Sokovia.


14. Ant-Man

  • Release date: July 17, 2015
  • Cast: Paul Rudd, Michael Douglas, Evangeline Lilly

While the Avengers were taking down Ultron, ex-con Scott Lang was breaking into Hank Pym’s house and accidentally stealing his Ant-Man suit. After getting caught, Hank reveals he set up the whole thing to see if Scott was good enough to become the next Ant-Man. The good news is he passed, the bad news is that Hank needs his help to stop his former protégé and all round jerk, Darren Cross, from developing his own suit. After training with Hank and his daughter Hope, Scott finally gets the shrinking thing down and saves the day.


15. Captain America: Civil War

  • Release date: May 6, 2016
  • Cast: Chris Evans, Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

After the events of Avengers: Age of Ultron, the U.N. asks the Avengers to sign the Sokovia Accords and promise not to do any superhero-ing until they’re told to. Unfortunately, only half the Avengers think it’s a good idea, with Iron Man and Captain America on opposing sides. To make matters worse, King T’Chaka is killed, supposedly by Cap’s old buddy Bucky/the Winter Soldier, causing an international incident involving Black Panther. The Avengers end up having a big bust up, but Cap and Bucky track down the real murderer, Zemo, and discover that he coordinated the whole thing to split the Avengers up. That’s when Zemo reveals Bucky killed Iron Man’s parents, and Cap and Tony’s friendship is officially over.


16. Black Widow

  • Release date: July 9, 2021
  • Cast: Scarlett Johansson, Florence Pugh, David Harbour

Later that same year, Natasha is on the run for breaking the Sokovia Accords when she finds out that the Red Room organization that tortured and trained her to be a Black Widow is still up and running. With an antidote to the Black Widow mind-control, and her former fake family in tow, Natasha tracks down the head of the Red Room, Dreykov who’s turned his own daughter into the perfect soldier, Taskmaster. Natasha and co use the antidote to save her and the other Black Widows and make plans to rescue the rest, all around the world.


17. Spider-Man: Homecoming

  • Release date: July 7, 2017
  • Cast: Tom Holland, Michael Keaton, Robert Downey Jr.

After teaming up with Iron Man in Captain America: Civil War, Peter Parker/Spider-Man is back in his old neighborhood when he discovers that weapons made from alien tech are being sold by Adrian Toomes. He tries to stop him, but has to be saved by Iron Man, who eventually confiscates the suit he made for Peter when he thinks he’s become too reckless. Trying to get back to normal life, Peter asks his crush, Liz, to the prom, only to discover that her dad is Toomes. Awkward. Realizing Toomes is going to try and steal a plane full of alien weapons, Peter abandons his prom date to stop him.


18. Black Panther

  • Release date: February 13, 2018
  • Cast: Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o

After the death of his father in Captain America: Civil War, T’Challa returns to Wakanda to take his rightful place as king, but quickly discovers that Wakandan artifacts are being stolen. In his attempt to apprehend the man responsible, black market arms dealer Ulysses Klaue, C.I.A. agent Everett K. Ross is badly hurt. Meanwhile, Klaue is double-crossed by his accomplice Erik Stevens/Killmonger who kills him, brings his body to Wakanda, and reveals himself to be T’Challa’s cousin. He challenges T’Challa to ritual combat for the throne and wins. Planning to send Wakanda weapons to his operatives around the world, T’Challa must gather his remaining allies to stop him and become king once again.


19. Doctor Strange

  • Release date: November 4, 2016
  • Cast: Benedict Cumberbatch, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Rachel McAdams

Brilliant but arrogant surgeon Dr. Stephen Strange is in a car accident that destroys his hands. Devastated that he can no longer wield a scalpel, he travels the world attempting to find a cure and eventually meets The Ancient One. After agreeing to train him in the mystic arts, Strange is learning how to become a sorcerer when a former pupil, Kaecilius, attacks looking for magic that will help him contact Dormammu of the Dark Dimension. Killing The Ancient One, Kaecilius succeeds in contacting Dormammu, and Strange creates a time loop prison for Dormammu until he agrees to leave Earth forever.


20. Thor: Ragnarok

  • Release date: November 3, 2017
  • Cast: Chris Hemsworth, Tom Hiddleston, Cate Blanchett

In 2017, Thor returns to Asgard to discover his brother Loki is alive and impersonating their father, Odin. They find their dad, only to discover he’s dying and that they apparently have a terrible older sister, Hela, who’s only kept caged by Odin’s magic. Once he dies Hela appears and takes over Asgard, promising to wage war on the rest of the universe. Thor and Loki escape to Sakaar and are reunited with the Hulk (who’s been missing since Age of Ultron) and make friends with Valkyrie. They band together to return to Asgard and defeat Hela by bringing about Ragnarok/the apocalypse, escaping with most of Asgard’s people on a spaceship.


21. Ant-Man and the Wasp

  • Release date: July 6, 2018
  • Cast: Paul Rudd, Evangeline Lilly, Michael Peña

At the same time, Scott/Ant-Man is under house arrest thanks to his involvement in Captain America: Civil War when he runs into Hope and Hank who are on the run because the authorities think they also had something to do with it. They need his help to rescue Hope’s mom Janet from the Quantum Realm, but they’re not the only ones trying to master the Quantum Realm. Ghost tries to steal Hank’s lab, but Ant-Man and the Wasp team up to stop her while Hank successfully brings Janet back from the Quantum Realm. Everything works out fine, captain america movies in order everyone mysteriously disintegrates, except for Ant-Man, who’s trapped in the Quantum Realm.

There's a lot of quantum physics stuff going on here, and if you want to know more about it we've done a dive into just how realistic Ant-Man's quantum science is.


22. Avengers: Infinity War

  • Release date: April 27, 2018
  • Cast: Robert Downey Jr., Chris Hemsworth, Chris Evans

Thanos, who’s already in possession of the Power Stone, destroys the Asgardian ship, killing Loki (for real this time), to get the Space Stone. He then sends his adopted children to Earth in search of the Mind and Time Stones, as he goes off to find the Reality and Soul Stones. The Avengers, the Guardians of the Galaxy, and almost every other superhero in the MCU try their hardest to stop Thanos from getting the Infinity Stones, but one by one he claims them all and the movie climaxes with him snapping his figures to whipping out half of the universe. Bummer.


23. Avengers: Endgame

  • Release date: April 26, 2019
  • Cast: Robert Downey Jr., Chris Hemsworth, Chris Evans

Five years later and the world is still trying to readjust to life after losing so much when Ant-Man returns from the Quantum Realm with an idea to bring everyone back. Using his knowledge, Tony and smart Hulk find a way to time travel and they, along with the remaining heroes, go rockland nissan route 303 blauvelt ny to different points in time to find the Infinity Stones before Thanos. When they return (minus Black Widow who’s killed, R.I.P), they use the stones to bring everyone back – but Thanos is back too and ALL the Avengers must assemble to stop him. Iron Man saves the day with a click of his fingers, but dies in the attempt.


24. Spider-Man: Far from Home

  • Release date: July 2, 2019
  • Cast: Tom Holland, Samuel L. Jackson, Jake Gyllenhaal

The following year, Peter is still grieving Tony’s death when he goes on a school trip to Europe just as it’s attacked by Elemental monsters. Nick Fury appears and gives him Tony’s old glasses that have access to all of Stark Industries resources, and Peter teams up with Beck, a superhero from across the multiverse, to defeat the Elementals. Believing Beck is the hero the world needs, Peter gives him Tony’s glasses, only to discover that he’s not a superhero at all but an ex-Stark employee who was after the glasses all along. Peter and his friends eventually stop Beck, but not before he lands Spider-Man in hot water.


25. Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings

  • Release date: September 3, 2021
  • Cast: Simu Liu, Awkwafina, Tony Chiu-Wai Leung

During these events, Shaun/Shang-Chi is in San Francisco when he’s attacked by his dad’s criminal organization, the Ten Rings. He goes to find his sister, Xialing, but the Ten Rings also show up there and take both of them to their dad, who reveals he’s going to find their dead mother in a place called Ta Lo. Once in Ta Lo, their aunt tells them that their dad is being manipulated by the Dweller-in-Darkness monster into setting him free, and they have to work together to try and stop him. Unfortunately, the Dweller-in-Darkness escapes, but with the help of a dragon they manage to defeat him and save the day. Yay!


26. Eternals

  • Release date: November 5, 2021
  • Cast: Gemma Chan, Richard Madden, Angelina Jolie

It turns out that a race of immortals called the Eternals have been living on Earth in secret since the dawn of time, protecting humanity from the divergents. They think that’s their only job but actually, they’re just supposed to make sure humanity develops enough so that a giant Celestial can be born from the Earth’s core. 

Unfortunately, this will kill all the humans the Eternals have come to know and love over the last few thousand years, so most of them decide to kill the Celestial instead. After fighting amongst themselves and fighting more divergents, the Eternals manage to kill the Celestial and save the world, but their boss, the Celestial, Arishem, isn’t too happy about it. 

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Источник: https://www.space.com/marvel-movies-in-order

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