open up a free checking account online

Checking Accounts. With account features such as free debit cards, online and mobile banking, we offer the personal checking options you desire to bank with. Altra Federal Credit Union's free checking account includes no minimum balance and no monthly fee, free debit card, online banking and bill pay. The checking account that earns like a money market account. Earn 0.05% APY on all balances PLUS 0.95% APY on your monthly average balance up to $100,000 when.

Open up a free checking account online -

Not FDIC Insured

Open a Checking Account Online

1Loans, lines of credit and credit card products are subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply. Certain fees and restrictions may also apply. Ask your banker for details.

2Deposits include direct deposit, mobile deposit, ATM deposit or in branch deposit of any amount. Does not include fund transfers between Bank of the West accounts or any credits from Bank of the West.

3Foreign transaction fees may apply.

8Those applying online for a Premier Checking account must have a working mobile phone.

*Securities and variable annuities are offered through BancWest Investment Services, a registered broker/dealer Member FINRA/SIPC, and SEC Registered Investment Adviser. Financial Advisors are Registered Representatives of BancWest Investment Services. Fixed annuities/insurance products are offered through BancWest Insurance Agency in California (License #0C52321) and through BancWest Investment Services, Inc. in all other states where it is licensed to do business. This is not an offer or solicitation in any jurisdiction where we are not authorized to do business. Bank of the West and its various affiliates and subsidiaries are not tax or legal advisors. Please consult your tax or legal advisor for more information regarding your personal situation.

BancWest Investment Services is a wholly owned subsidiary of Bank of the West. Bank of the West is a wholly owned subsidiary of BNP Paribas.

Investment and Insurance Products:

  • NOT FDIC INSURED
  • NOT BANK GUARANTEED
  • MAY LOSE VALUE
  • NOT A DEPOSIT
  • NOT INSURED BY ANY FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AGENCY
Источник: https://www.bankofthewest.com/open-account/personal-checking-accounts.html

Free Checking

Free Checking

Checking doesn’t get simpler than this. Free Checking has absolutely no monthly service fee when you choose online statements, and is packed with full service benefits!

Open Now

Schedule an Appointment

Checking Accounts Are All the Same. Or…Are They?

At Bank of Texas, you get all the benefits you expect from a checking account, like an easy-to-use app, the ability to turn your debit card off and on, and free access to more than 32,000 MoneyPass ATMs nationwide. But who’s counting? Not only that, but Free Checking comes with no monthly service fee when you enroll in online statements.

See the Simple Guide to Free Checking.

Account Features

  • Debit Card

    Totally Free Access

    With Free Checking, you get a free Visa® Debit Card and unlimited transactions, so you can make purchases in store or online to your heart's content. Your debit card also doubles as an ATM card, allowing you to make deposits at any Bank of Texas ATM. And, you get free access to more than 32,000 ATMs nationwide.

    Find ATMs

  • Convenience

    Convenience at Your Fingertips – For Free

    You won’t be charged a monthly service fee when you choose to receive online statements. Get 24/7 access to your account in online and mobile banking to view transactions, get instant alerts, pay bills, transfer funds or make mobile deposits through our app.

    Learn More

  • Savings Goals

    Reach Your Savings Goals Faster with QuickSave

    Our Free Checking account comes with access to QuickSave, a tool designed to help you save money faster. If you enroll, every time you use your Visa® Debit Card to make a qualifying purchase, or complete an Online Bill Pay transaction, we'll automatically transfer an amount of your choosing into savings.

    QuickSave

Enjoy These Perks with Your Account

Free Checking is free when you sign up for online statements, and comes packed with convenient features and enhancements designed to help you live your best financial life. How you shop, spend, budget, save, pay bills or send money should be up to you. After all, it’s your money. We’re just here to make it at all a little easier for you.

  • Deposit checks, set account alerts, transfer funds, pay bills, send and receive money between friends with Zelle®, access your account statements, manage your debit and credit cards, and even your mortgage and personal loans all from our mobile app. Schedule an appointment to speak with a banker, or use our 24-hour automated ExpressBank to manage your account.

  • Send and receive money between friends and family with Zelle®, pay bills securely online or through our mobile app, make external transfers to your account at another bank, and transfer funds between your accounts with us. Use Apple Pay1 and Samsung Pay2 to easily and securely pay in-store, in-app, or online.

  • Easily find our banking centers and ATMs near you. You can use Bank of Texas ATMs to deposit checks, transfer funds, check your balances and more. Plus get free access to more than 32,000 additional no-fee ATMs nationwide.

  • Get free overdraft protection transfers3 from your linked savings, money market account or personal line of credit. Visa's Zero Liability4 covers unauthorized charges on your debit card when promptly reported. Instantly block and unblock your debit card if lost or stolen, and set account alerts to stay in the know on your account activity.

More about Free Checking

  • Free Visa debit card
  • Free online and mobile banking with Bill Pay
  • Free access to more than 32,000 ATMs nationwide
  • QuickSaveSM
  • One complimentary overdraft fee refund per calendar year (upon request)
  • Overdraft Protection*
  • Free online statements
  • ExpressBank 24-hour telephone automated account information

A $50 opening deposit is required.

*If you are enrolled in Overdraft Protection, we will automatically transfer any available funds at no charge to you from your linked Bank of Texas savings, money market account or personal line of credit into your checking account at the end of any business day on which your Available Balance is less than zero. Limited to one linked savings or money market account or personal line of credit as a source of funding. Accounts are not automatically linked. Please notify your banker which account should be linked. To the extent the funds in your designated funding account are insufficient to cover all overdrafts in your checking account, an Overdraft Fee or Returned Item Fee may be charged for each overdraft not covered by the transfer, under the terms of the Depository Agreement for Transaction Accounts. Transfers from your savings or money market account may be subject to an excessive withdrawal fee. See Summary of Fees and Definitions for pricing.

  • There is no monthly service fee for this account.
  • If you choose to receive a monthly statement via postal mail, a statement fee of $1.50 will be assessed each month. To avoid this fee, you can turn off paper statements by logging in to Online or Mobile Banking, selecting “online only”, and accepting the Online Statements Terms and Conditions. Opting out of paper statements will terminate the mailing of your monthly statement.
Источник: https://www.bankoftexas.com/personal/products-and-services/personal-banking/checking-accounts/free-checking
May Go Down In Value

Banking Products and Services provided by First Horizon Bank. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender. Equal Housing Lender   Member FDIC

Insurance Products and Annuities: May be purchased from any agent or company, and the customer’s choice will not affect current or future credit decisions.

First Horizon Advisors is the trade name for wealth management products and services provided by First Horizon Bank and its affiliates. Trust services provided by First Horizon Bank.

Investment management services, investments, annuities and financial planning available through First Horizon Advisors, Inc., member FINRA, SIPC, and a subsidiary of First Horizon Bank. Arkansas Insurance License # 416584.

Insurance products are provided by First Horizon Insurance Services, Inc. (“FHIS”), a Tennessee corporation, and a subsidiary of First Horizon Bank. The principal place of business of FHIS is 165 Madison Ave., Memphis, TN 38103. California Insurance License # OD12174. Arkansas Insurance License # 100110355.

First Horizon Advisors, Inc., FHIS, and their agents may transact insurance business or offer annuities only in states where they are licensed or where they are exempted or excluded from state insurance licensing requirements.

The contents of this website are for informational purposes only. Nothing on this website should be considered investment advice; or, a recommendation or offer to buy or sell a security or other financial product or to adopt any investment strategy.

First Horizon Advisors does not offer tax or legal advice. You should consult your personal tax and/or legal advisor concerning your individual situation.

 First Horizon Bank.

Источник: https://www.firsthorizon.com/Products-and-Services/Banking/Checking-Accounts

What Are the 6 Different Types of Checking Accounts?

Checking accounts are an important part of the banking system. These deposit accounts give consumers a place to deposit their money, make transfers, write checks, pay bills, and do other routine banking transactions. The money in checking accounts is safe, as accounts are insured for up to $250,000 per depositor by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). However, with so many different options available, how do you know which account is right for you?

Key Takeaways

  • Checking accounts are an important part of the banking system, giving consumers a place to do routine banking transactions. 
  • Before you open a checking account, you should know your options and consider things such as monthly balances, fees, interest, and convenience.
  • Regular checking accounts are the most common, giving you all the features you’d expect from a checking account.
  • Premium accounts offer many perks but often require you to keep high balances.
  • Free checking accounts may not come with a monthly service charge, but they still incur fees for other services, such as overdrafts or out-of-network ATM usage.

Know Your Situation

Before you open a checking account, you should know your options. After all, not all checking accounts are created alike. The same applies to your financial situation—it’s unique to you, so your checking account should complement it. Here are a few things you’ll need to think about before you head into the bank to open up your account.

Monthly Balance

How much you plan on keeping on average every month will help you decide which type of checking account to open up. Will this balance be consistent throughout the lifetime of the account? Or will you only have a large balance at certain times during the year? Some accounts come with minimum balance requirements—which justify some of their perks—so you should keep that in mind.

Fees

Consider the fees associated with each type of account. You can avoid monthly service charges if you maintain a certain balance every month. Check to see if an account you’re interested in charges extra for things such as debit transactions and in-branch transactions. Maybe you can avoid certain fees by having automatic payments deducted for bills from your account or by setting up direct deposits. Knowing about the bank and its fee structures for each account can mean the difference between saving a lot of money or spending hundreds of unnecessary dollars in fees each year.

Interest

Although you may not collect much, some checking accounts do pay interest. If you want to earn a little more—remember, that’s a little more—you can find a bank that gives you interest along with a place from which you can do your everyday banking. Interest is generally calculated on a daily basis and deposited directly into the checking account at the end of each month.

Convenience

If you’re the kind of person who prefers personal interaction, you’ll probably want a checking account at a bank that has a lot of branches. However, if you can do without, you’ll fare well with an online bank. These institutions don’t have very many brick-and-mortar locations—some don’t have any at all—but they offer the convenience of online and mobile banking with a debit card. Because they don’t offer teller service, many of these banks allow you to use different banks’ automated teller machines (ATMs) as well, which makes cash withdrawals easier and cheaper.

Now that we’ve outlined some of the basic considerations that go into choosing a checking account, here’s a list of some of the different types offered by most banks.

Regular Checking Accounts

A regular checking account simply lets you do all the things you’d expect from a checking account: deposit and withdraw money from an ATM, write checks, pay bills, and make purchases using a debit card. You may have to pay a monthly fee for the privilege of being an account holder, but many banks waive the fee if you keep enough money in your account.

A regular checking account usually pays little or no interest on your balance. So if you’re looking for a little income, you may consider opening up a companion savings account to your checking account.

Premium Checking Accounts

If you have a five-figure sum or more to keep in a checking account, a premium checking account may be right for you. Having that high a balance in your account should allow you to avoid paying a monthly fee and provide perks such as ATM fee reimbursements, free checks, and earning a little bit of interest. You may also receive discounts on other services from the bank, such as a slightly lower mortgage interest rate or free financial advice. Still, that doesn’t mean a premium checking account is your best option, even if you can easily meet the minimum balance requirement.

The extra perks definitely sound great, but other options could work out even better. For example, you may earn a higher return on your excess cash while still keeping it accessible for emergencies by putting it in a money market account, government bonds, or a certificate of deposit (CD). Most people only need to keep high balances in their checking accounts if they have large, regular outflows, such as a high mortgage payment, large student loan payment, estimated tax payments, and/or hefty insurance premiums. As for the discounted services and free advice, you may get a better rate on services or better advice with another institution.

A premium checking account may not be your best option, even if you can easily meet the minimum balance requirement.

Interest-Bearing Checking Accounts

Interest-bearing checking accounts give you a small return every month for the balance in your account. Some accounts pay a flat interest rate regardless of your balance, while others pay more on higher balances. The interest rate will almost certainly be below the inflation rate, but it might be comparable to what some savings accounts pay, giving you the best of both worlds—unlimited transactions and monthly interest payments—in a single account. However, you may not come out ahead with an interest-bearing checking account if its fees are too high. You may be better off with a free checking account, even if it pays less or no interest.

Free Checking Accounts

Free checking means that the account doesn’t charge a recurring fee, such as a monthly maintenance fee, and doesn’t have a minimum balance requirement to avoid a fee. Nevertheless, that doesn’t mean that every single service associated with the checking account will be free. You may still have to pay for other services, including out-of-network ATM fees, check fees, overdraft fees, stop payment fees, and foreign transaction fees. These accounts may not pay any interest, as you’re already getting the benefit of not paying a monthly fee. That said, some free checking accounts do pay interest.

Low-Balance Checking Accounts

Low-balance checking accounts, sometimes called “lifeline accounts,” are for customers who can only maintain a small balance but want to receive banking services. In exchange for allowing you to keep an account with a very low or no minimum balance requirement, the bank may require you to do other things that save it money, such as writing only a limited number of checks each month and receiving monthly statements electronically instead of by mail. Some of these accounts may not even have check-writing privileges—permitting only online or debit-card payments—and may not allow overdrafts. Rather than let you go below a $0 balance, they will decline any transaction that exceeds your available balance.

Second-Chance Checking Accounts

If a bank has closed your checking account in the past because of an unpaid negative balance and you’re ready to start over, a second-chance checking account may give you that opportunity. In exchange, you may have to pay a monthly fee of up to $20, and your account may have restrictions that other checking accounts don’t have, such as not allowing overdrafts. These accounts are available in all 50 states through banks and credit unions. Once you’ve maintained your account in good standing for a certain period—perhaps a year—you may become eligible for a regular checking account.

How will a bank know if you’ve had a checking account closed in the past? Just as credit card issuers look at your credit report before letting you open an account, banks look at ChexSystems and Early Warning Services reports before letting you open an account. If banks are denying your checking account applications and you don’t know why, order copies of your bank credit reports and review them for errors.

The Bottom Line

Whatever your financial situation, there’s a checking account for you—as long as you don’t have a history of fraud and meet basic account-opening requirements such as proof of identity. If you’re looking for a specific feature, such as an account for someone who always has a low balance or an account that pays interest, start by looking for accounts specifically marketed toward people with those requirements.

Always keep in mind that checking account names are just marketing labels. A free checking account might serve you just as well as a low-balance checking account, and an interest-bearing checking account may pay more than a premium checking account. Changing checking accounts is a time-consuming chore, so choose carefully and try to get an account you’ll be happy with for years. In the case of a second-chance account, choose a bank you can see yourself staying with in the long term.

Источник: https://www.investopedia.com/personal-finance/6-different-types-checking-accounts/
open up a free checking account online

Open up a free checking account online -

Not FDIC Insured Not Guaranteed By The Bank Or Its Affiliates

What Are the 6 Different Types of Checking Accounts?

Checking accounts are an important part of the banking system. These deposit accounts give consumers a place to deposit their money, make transfers, write checks, pay bills, and do other routine banking transactions. The money in checking accounts is safe, as accounts are insured for up to $250,000 per depositor by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). However, with so many different options available, how do you know which account is right for you?

Key Takeaways

  • Checking accounts are an important part of the banking system, giving consumers a place to do routine banking transactions. 
  • Before you open a checking account, you should know your options and consider things such as monthly balances, fees, interest, and convenience.
  • Regular checking accounts are the most common, giving you all the features you’d expect from a checking account.
  • Premium accounts offer many perks but often require you to keep high balances.
  • Free checking accounts may not come with a monthly service charge, but they still incur fees for other services, such as overdrafts or out-of-network ATM usage.

Know Your Situation

Before you open a checking account, you should know your options. After all, not all checking accounts are created alike. The same applies to your financial situation—it’s unique to you, so your checking account should complement it. Here are a few things you’ll need to think about before you head into the bank to open up your account.

Monthly Balance

How much you plan on keeping on average every month will help you decide which type of checking account to open up. Will this balance be consistent throughout the lifetime of the account? Or will you only have a large balance at certain times during the year? Some accounts come with minimum balance requirements—which justify some of their perks—so you should keep that in mind.

Fees

Consider the fees associated with each type of account. You can avoid monthly service charges if you maintain a certain balance every month. Check to see if an account you’re interested in charges extra for things such as debit transactions and in-branch transactions. Maybe you can avoid certain fees by having automatic payments deducted for bills from your account or by setting up direct deposits. Knowing about the bank and its fee structures for each account can mean the difference between saving a lot of money or spending hundreds of unnecessary dollars in fees each year.

Interest

Although you may not collect much, some checking accounts do pay interest. If you want to earn a little more—remember, that’s a little more—you can find a bank that gives you interest along with a place from which you can do your everyday banking. Interest is generally calculated on a daily basis and deposited directly into the checking account at the end of each month.

Convenience

If you’re the kind of person who prefers personal interaction, you’ll probably want a checking account at a bank that has a lot of branches. However, if you can do without, you’ll fare well with an online bank. These institutions don’t have very many brick-and-mortar locations—some don’t have any at all—but they offer the convenience of online and mobile banking with a debit card. Because they don’t offer teller service, many of these banks allow you to use different banks’ automated teller machines (ATMs) as well, which makes cash withdrawals easier and cheaper.

Now that we’ve outlined some of the basic considerations that go into choosing a checking account, here’s a list of some of the different types offered by most banks.

Regular Checking Accounts

A regular checking account simply lets you do all the things you’d expect from a checking account: deposit and withdraw money from an ATM, write checks, pay bills, and make purchases using a debit card. You may have to pay a monthly fee for the privilege of being an account holder, but many banks waive the fee if you keep enough money in your account.

A regular checking account usually pays little or no interest on your balance. So if you’re looking for a little income, you may consider opening up a companion savings account to your checking account.

Premium Checking Accounts

If you have a five-figure sum or more to keep in a checking account, a premium checking account may be right for you. Having that high a balance in your account should allow you to avoid paying a monthly fee and provide perks such as ATM fee reimbursements, free checks, and earning a little bit of interest. You may also receive discounts on other services from the bank, such as a slightly lower mortgage interest rate or free financial advice. Still, that doesn’t mean a premium checking account is your best option, even if you can easily meet the minimum balance requirement.

The extra perks definitely sound great, but other options could work out even better. For example, you may earn a higher return on your excess cash while still keeping it accessible for emergencies by putting it in a money market account, government bonds, or a certificate of deposit (CD). Most people only need to keep high balances in their checking accounts if they have large, regular outflows, such as a high mortgage payment, large student loan payment, estimated tax payments, and/or hefty insurance premiums. As for the discounted services and free advice, you may get a better rate on services or better advice with another institution.

A premium checking account may not be your best option, even if you can easily meet the minimum balance requirement.

Interest-Bearing Checking Accounts

Interest-bearing checking accounts give you a small return every month for the balance in your account. Some accounts pay a flat interest rate regardless of your balance, while others pay more on higher balances. The interest rate will almost certainly be below the inflation rate, but it might be comparable to what some savings accounts pay, giving you the best of both worlds—unlimited transactions and monthly interest payments—in a single account. However, you may not come out ahead with an interest-bearing checking account if its fees are too high. You may be better off with a free checking account, even if it pays less or no interest.

Free Checking Accounts

Free checking means that the account doesn’t charge a recurring fee, such as a monthly maintenance fee, and doesn’t have a minimum balance requirement to avoid a fee. Nevertheless, that doesn’t mean that every single service associated with the checking account will be free. You may still have to pay for other services, including out-of-network ATM fees, check fees, overdraft fees, stop payment fees, and foreign transaction fees. These accounts may not pay any interest, as you’re already getting the benefit of not paying a monthly fee. That said, some free checking accounts do pay interest.

Low-Balance Checking Accounts

Low-balance checking accounts, sometimes called “lifeline accounts,” are for customers who can only maintain a small balance but want to receive banking services. In exchange for allowing you to keep an account with a very low or no minimum balance requirement, the bank may require you to do other things that save it money, such as writing only a limited number of checks each month and receiving monthly statements electronically instead of by mail. Some of these accounts may not even have check-writing privileges—permitting only online or debit-card payments—and may not allow overdrafts. Rather than let you go below a $0 balance, they will decline any transaction that exceeds your available balance.

Second-Chance Checking Accounts

If a bank has closed your checking account in the past because of an unpaid negative balance and you’re ready to start over, a second-chance checking account may give you that opportunity. In exchange, you may have to pay a monthly fee of up to $20, and your account may have restrictions that other checking accounts don’t have, such as not allowing overdrafts. These accounts are available in all 50 states through banks and credit unions. Once you’ve maintained your account in good standing for a certain period—perhaps a year—you may become eligible for a regular checking account.

How will a bank know if you’ve had a checking account closed in the past? Just as credit card issuers look at your credit report before letting you open an account, banks look at ChexSystems and Early Warning Services reports before letting you open an account. If banks are denying your checking account applications and you don’t know why, order copies of your bank credit reports and review them for errors.

The Bottom Line

Whatever your financial situation, there’s a checking account for you—as long as you don’t have a history of fraud and meet basic account-opening requirements such as proof of identity. If you’re looking for a specific feature, such as an account for someone who always has a low balance or an account that pays interest, start by looking for accounts specifically marketed toward people with those requirements.

Always keep in mind that checking account names are just marketing labels. A free checking account might serve you just as well as a low-balance checking account, and an interest-bearing checking account may pay more than a premium checking account. Changing checking accounts is a time-consuming chore, so choose carefully and try to get an account you’ll be happy with for years. In the case of a second-chance account, choose a bank you can see yourself staying with in the long term.

Источник: https://www.investopedia.com/personal-finance/6-different-types-checking-accounts/

Checking Account Massachusetts

1The following benefits can be obtained in a given monthly statement cycle when the statement cycle conditions noted below are met: Payment of a higher interest rates and refund for nationwide ATM surcharge transaction fees to a maximum of $25 per cycle. Statement cycle conditions: Must have a minimum of 8 debit card purchase transactions that post and settle to the account during the statement cycle (not all purchase transactions post or settle on the day they occur); and maintain active enrollment in eStatements. Limit of one account per customer holding the position of primary account holder. Fees may reduce earnings on the account. The account does not have a maximum deposit limit. See Deposit Rates for further e by UniBank account details.

2Non-UniBank ATM fee waivers apply to UniBank fees charged for use of non-UniBank ATMs. Customers may be charged ATM surcharge fees by the bank that owns the ATM, unless the ATM is in the Allpoint or MoneyPass networks. Waivers do not apply to international ATM transactions.

3Non-UniBank ATM surcharges are those fees charged by the bank that owns the non-UniBank ATM used.

4UniBank does not charge for using our Mobile Banking service. Your mobile carrier may charge for text messages, data transfer fees, and/or web access. Check your wireless plan for details.

5Must have a UniBank Deposit Account, Online Banking, and Mobile Banking. Additional requirements apply, inquire for details.

6Proof of service required: For active military service members, please provide a military ID. For veterans please provide form DD214 as proof of service status to qualify. To be eligible for free checks, one signer on the account must be a current military service member or veteran. Free standard specialty blue wallet checks.

7To be eligible for free checks, the primary account holder on the account must be 65 years of age or older or 18 years of age or younger. Free standard specialty blue wallet checks.

8Must present valid student ID and be at the age of 22 and under. Individual accounts available for students 16 to 22, under 16 must open with a parent or legal guardian. Enrollment in eStatements is required. 

Open an Account

Overdraft Coverage

Источник: https://www.unibank.com/personal/checking

Open a Checking Account Online

1Loans, lines of credit and credit card products are subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply. Certain fees and restrictions may also apply. Ask your banker for details.

2Deposits include direct deposit, mobile deposit, ATM deposit or in branch deposit of any amount. Does not include fund transfers between Bank of the West accounts or any credits from Bank of the West.

3Foreign transaction fees may apply.

8Those applying online for a Premier Checking account must have a working mobile phone.

*Securities and variable annuities are offered through BancWest Investment Services, a registered broker/dealer Member FINRA/SIPC, and SEC Registered Investment Adviser. Financial Advisors are Registered Representatives of BancWest Investment Services. Fixed annuities/insurance products are offered through BancWest Insurance Agency in California (License #0C52321) and through BancWest Investment Services, Inc. in all other states where it is licensed to do business. This is not an offer or solicitation in any jurisdiction where we are not authorized to do business. Bank of the West and its various affiliates and subsidiaries are not tax or legal advisors. Please consult your tax or legal advisor for more information regarding your personal situation.

BancWest Investment Services is a wholly owned subsidiary of Bank of the West. Bank of the West is a wholly owned subsidiary of BNP Paribas.

Investment and Insurance Products:

  • NOT FDIC INSURED
  • NOT BANK GUARANTEED
  • MAY LOSE VALUE
  • NOT A DEPOSIT
  • NOT INSURED BY ANY FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AGENCY
Источник: https://www.bankofthewest.com/open-account/personal-checking-accounts.html
May Go Down In Value

Banking Products and Services provided by First Horizon Bank. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender. Equal Housing Lender   Member FDIC

Insurance Products and Annuities: May be purchased from any agent or company, and the customer’s choice will not affect current or future credit decisions.

First Horizon Advisors is the trade name for wealth management products and services provided by First Horizon Bank and its affiliates. Trust services provided by First Horizon Bank.

Investment management services, investments, annuities and financial planning available through First Horizon Advisors, Inc., member FINRA, SIPC, and a subsidiary of First Horizon Bank. Arkansas Insurance License # 416584.

Insurance products are provided by First Horizon Insurance Services, Inc. (“FHIS”), a Tennessee corporation, and a subsidiary of First Horizon Bank. The principal place of business of FHIS is 165 Madison Ave., Memphis, TN 38103. California Insurance License # OD12174. Arkansas Insurance License # 100110355.

First Horizon Advisors, Inc., FHIS, and their agents may transact insurance business or offer annuities only in states where they are licensed or where they are exempted or excluded from state insurance licensing requirements.

The contents of this website are for informational purposes only. Nothing on this website should be considered investment advice; or, a recommendation or offer to buy or sell a security or other financial product or to adopt any investment strategy.

First Horizon Advisors does not offer tax or legal advice. You should consult your personal tax and/or legal advisor concerning your individual situation.

 First Horizon Bank.