https www merriam webster com word of the day

That observation may shed some light on vicissitude, a word that can refer simply to the fact of change, Get Word of the Day delivered to your inbox! Examples of day one in a Sentence These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word '. Check out all of the new words added to Merriam-Webster in October 2021, from 'dad bod' to 'deplatform' to 'Oobleck.'.
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Welcome to Merriam-Webster's Developer Center!

The Merriam-Webster Dictionary API gives developers access to a comprehensive resource of dictionary and thesaurus content as well as specialized medical, Spanish, ESL, and student-friendly vocabulary. Make your applications better by integrating our authoritative definitions, etymologies, audio pronunciations, synonyms and antonyms, and more. Our robust API empowers developers to enhance word games and create educational, language learning, and other word-related applications for the digital environment. We look forward to seeing all of the new, innovative products powered by Merriam-Webster's trusted references.

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Did You Know?

Time was, people talked about doffing and donning articles of clothing with about the same frequency. But in the mid-19th century the verb don became significantly more popular and left doff to flounder a bit in linguistic semi-obscurity. Doff and don have been a pair from the start: both date to the 14th century, with doff arising as a Middle English contraction of the phrase "to do off" and don as a contraction of "to do on." Shakespeare was among the first, as far as we know, to use the word as it's defined in the more general sense of "to rid oneself of" or "put aside." He has Juliet give voice to this sense when she says, "What's in a name? That which we call a rose / By any other name would smell as sweet. / … Romeo, doff thy name; / And for that name, which is no part of thee, / Take all myself."



Quiz

Fill in the blanks to complete a synonym of doff that more commonly means “to drench”: d _ _ se.

VIEW THE ANSWER


Источник: https://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/doff-2021-09-02
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Welcome to the new Merriam-Webster's Word Central now reprogrammed for superior word power and language fun.

Introducing…Alpha-bot! The word-spelling robot hosts the latest amazing word game and challenges spellers of all ages.

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Please follow these word-to-word trajectories for the ultimate Word Central experience:

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Источник: http://wordcentral.com/

We Added New Words to the Dictionary for October 2021

455 new words and definitions

Among the new additions: Oobleck, air fryer, whataboutism, FTW, and fourth trimester.

Just as the language never stops evolving, the dictionary never stops expanding. Https www t mobile com pay my bill terms and new uses for existing terms are the constant in a living language, and our latest list brings together both new and likely familiar words that have shown extensive and established use.

Words from Online Culture and Communication

We’ve been communicating online for decades now, and pandemic-related circumstances have only increased the practice. The quick and informal nature of messaging, texting, and tweeting has contributed to a vocabulary newly rich in efficient and abbreviated expression.

  • TBH : an abbreviation for "to be honest." TBH is frequently used in social media and text messaging.
  • because : by reason of : because of — https www merriam webster com word of the day used in a humorous way to convey vagueness about the exact reasons for something. This preposition use of because is versatile; it can be used, for example, to avoid delving into the overly technical (“the process works because science”) or to dismiss explanation altogether (“they left because reasons”).
  • amirite : slang used in writing for "am I right" to represent or imitate the use of this phrase as a tag question in informal speech. An example: “English spelling is consistently inconsistent, amirite?”
  • FTW : an abbreviation for "for the win" —used especially to express approval or support. In social media, FTW is often used to acknowledge a clever or funny response to a question or meme.
  • deplatform : to remove and ban (a registered user) from a mass communication medium (such as a social networking or blogging website) broadly : to prevent from having or providing a platform to communicate.
  • digital nomad : someone who performs their occupation entirely over the Internet while traveling; especially : such a person who has no permanent fixed home address.

More Coronavirus Words

As we all know, the pandemic story isn’t over, and neither is the need for more vocabulary to describe the https www merriam webster com word of the day and research developments connected to COVID-19.

  • breakthroughmedical : infection occurring in someone who is fully vaccinated against an infectious agent — often used before another noun (as in “breakthrough cases” or “breakthrough infection”).
  • super-spreader : an event or location at which a significant number of people contract the same communicable disease — often used before another noun (as in a “super-spreader event”). The term super-spreader originally referred to a highly contagious person capable of passing on a disease to many others, and now can also refer to a single place or occasion where many others are infected.
  • long COVID : a condition that is marked by the presence of symptoms (such as fatigue, cough, shortness of breath, headache, or brain fog) https www merriam webster com word of the day persist for an extended period of time (such as weeks or months) following a person's initial recovery from COVID-19 infection.
  • vaccine passport : a physical or digital document providing proof of vaccination against one or more infectious diseases (such as COVID-19).

Words from Tech and Science

We have arrived at the stage in digital technology when we require words for the decay of files, opportunistic attacks on computer programs, super shortcuts, and massive quantities of data storage. The promised ubiquitous jetpacks have yet to arrive, but at least we do have small private satellites and shapeshifting puddles named by Dr. Seuss.

  • bit rot : the tendency for digital information to degrade or become unusable over time. This kind of data degradation or corruption can make images and audio recordings distort and documents impossible to read or open.
  • zero-day : of, relating to, or being a vulnerability (as in a computer or computer system) that is discovered and exploited (as by cybercriminals) before it is known to or addressed by the maker or vendor.
  • copypasta : data (such as a block of text) that has been copied and spread widely online. Copypasta can be a lighthearted meme or it can have a more serious intent, with a political or cultural message.
  • teraflop : a unit of measure for the calculating speed of a computer equal to one trillion. The flop in teraflop stands for “floating-point operation”; tera- means “trillion.” Fast computer speed makes for quicker computer response and better graphics for video games.
  • CubeSat : an artificial satellite typically designed with inexpensive components that fit into a cube with a volume of 1 cubic meter. These small satellites are typically used for academic, commercial, or amateur research projects in orbit.
  • Oobleck : a mixture of corn starch and water that behaves like a liquid when at rest and like a solid when pressure is applied. Oobleck gets its name from the title of a story by Dr. Seuss, Bartholomew and the Oobleck, and is a favorite component in kids’ science experiments.

Words from Politics

The words connected with how we advocate for political positions and engage with opponents tell us much about the state of partisan politics today. Terms of blame and deception are notable in this batch of terminology.

  • whataboutism : the act or practice of responding clone ssd to m 2 an accusation of wrongdoing by claiming that an offense committed by another is similar or worse also : the response itself. The synonymous term whataboutery is more common in British English.
  • vote-a-ramaU.S. government : an unusually large number of debates and votes that happen in one day on a single piece of legislation to which an unlimited number of amendments can be introduced, debated, and voted on.
  • astroturf union savings bank com falsely made to appear grassroots. This figurative use of astroturf (in capitalized form it is a trademark for artificial turf) is used to describe political efforts, campaigns, or organizations that appear to be funded and run by ordinary people but are in fact backed by powerful groups.

Words About Food

Many new food terms come from the cuisines of cultures that speak a language other than English, but this batch also features a venerable and all-American regionalism, along with new ways of cooking and organizing food preparation.

  • fluffernutter : a sandwich made with peanut butter and marshmallow crème between two slices of white sandwich bread.
  • horchata : a cold sweetened beverage made from ground rice or almonds and usually flavorings such as cinnamon or vanilla.
  • chicharron : a small piece of pork belly or pig skin that is fried and eaten usually as a snack : pork rind also : a piece of food that resembles a chicharron.
  • Goetta : meat (such as pork) mixed with oats, onions, and spices and fried in the form of a patty.
  • air fryer : an airtight, usually small electrical appliance for quick cooking of foods by means of convection currents circulated rapidly by a fan.
  • ghost kitchen : a commercial cooking facility used for the preparation of food consumed off the premises — called also cloud kitchen, dark kitchen.

Words from the World of Medicine

  • fourth trimester : the three month period immediately following giving birth in which the mother typically recovers from childbirth and adjusts to caring for her infant; especially : the first three months of an infant's life.
  • halotherapy : the therapeutic use of salt usually by inhalation of an aerosol composed chiefly of fine salt particles and circulated in an enclosed area. Halotherapy is used as a treatment for asthma, bronchitis, and allergies.
  • titer : a measure of the concentration of a substance (such as an antibody) in a blood sample that is obtained by subjecting the sample to serial dilutions (as with saline) to determine the maximum dilution at which the sample retains a specific activity (such as neutralizing an antigen) and that is often expressed as a ratio (such as 1:200).

Words from Pop Culture

Fan culture, enduring slang terms, and fashions that may come and go while leaving terms that live on in references: these are just some of the ways that words that aren’t used in news coverage or scientific journals make their way https www merriam webster com word of the day the dictionary.

  • otaku : a person having an intense or obsessive interest especially in the fields of anime and manga —often used before another noun.
  • faux-hawk : a hairstyle resembling a Mohawk in having a central ridge of upright hair but with the sides gathered or slicked upward or back instead of https www merriam webster com word of the day bodinformal : a physique regarded as typical of an average father; especially : one that is slightly overweight and not extremely muscular.

Other Notable Terms

From business to sports to home security.

  • blank check company : a corporate shell set up by investors for the sole purpose of raising money through an initial public offering to acquire another business yet to be determined — called also special purpose acquisition company.
  • doorbell camera : a small camera that is designed for use on an exterior door, that includes or connects to a doorbell, and that often has a built-in microphone and speaker.
  • small ball1abaseball : an offensive strategy that involves at bats that advance one or more base runners into scoring position; bbasketball : a game strategy based on speed and agility of players as opposed to height and physicality; 2 : a strategy for progressing towards a goal by proceeding in small steps or by addressing small matters.

For the https www merriam webster com word of the day batch of new words, check out our January 2021 additions.

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Источник: https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/new-words-in-the-dictionary
Merriam-Webster

Dictionary company Merriam-Webster unveiled its word of the year for 2021, and it is "vaccine." That is a logical follow-up to its 2020 word of the year, "pandemic," and it matches the Oxford English Dictionary's word for 2021, "vax." But "while other dictionary companies choose words of the year by committee," The Associated Press reports, "Merriam-Webster bases its selection on lookup data, paying close attention to spikes and, more recently, year-over-year increases in searches after weeding out evergreens."

And searchers for "vaccine" increased prefab shipping container homes for sale in north carolina percent over 2020 and 1,048 percent over 2019, Merriam-Webster said. "This was a word that was extremely high in our data every single day in 2021," Peter Sokolowski, Merriam-Webster's editor-at-large, told AP. "It really represents two different stories. One is the science story, which is this remarkable speed with which the vaccines were developed. But there's also the debates regarding policy, politics, and political affiliation. It's one word that carries these two huge stories."

"Few words can express so much about one moment in time," Merriam-Webster said.

The dictionary editors updated Merriam-Webster's definition of vaccine earlier this year to encompass the mRNA breakthroughs, but the word itself "is a relatively recent one in English, dating back to the 1880s," the company explained. "Vaccine comes from the Latin word for 'cow,' vacca, because the term was initially used to refer to inoculation using doses of cowpox that, it was discovered, protect humans against smallpox."

Merriam-Webster's runner-up for 2021 was "insurrection," thanks to the Jan. 6 siege of the U.S. Capitol by supporters of former President Donald Trump. "Arrests continue, as do congressional hearings over the attack," AP says. "Searches for the word increased by 61,000 percent over 2020."

The other words rounding out the runners-up were "perseverance," "woke," "nomad," "infrastructure," "cicada," "Murraya," "cisgender," "guardian," and "meta." You can read about why those words were big in 2021, what they mean now and their etymology, and how much searches for them increased this year at Merriam-Webster.

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Источник: https://www.yahoo.com/now/merriam-websters-2021-word-vaccine-101016467.html
\ ˈdik-shə-ˌner-ēHow to pronounce dictionary (audio), -ˌne-rē\

1: a reference source in print or electronic form containing words usually first financial bank texas customer service number arranged along with information about their forms, pronunciations, functions, etymologies, meanings, and syntactic and idiomatic uses

2: a reference book listing alphabetically terms or names important to a particular subject or activity along with discussion of their meanings and applications

3: a reference book listing alphabetically the words of one language and showing their meanings or translations in another language

4: a computerized list (as of items of data or words) used for reference (as for information retrieval or word processing)

Источник: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dictionary

What It Means

1 : designed for or understood by those with specific knowledge or training : difficult to understand

2 a : limited to a small circle

b :private, confidential

3 : of special, rare, or unusual interest

Examples

The judge's decisions were difficult to parse because they were loaded with esoteric legal terminology.

"It turned out Sanford probably knew more about jai alai … than he did coaching football. But give him credit for guiding the Rebels to 5-7 finishes in 2008 and 2009—and for making a young beat writer's day by acknowledging his esoteric reference to a nearly forgotten game." — Ron Kantowski, The Las Vegas Review-Journal, 19 Dec. 2020

Did You Know?

The opposite of esoteric is exoteric, which means "suitable to be imparted to the public." According to one account, those who were deemed worthy to attend the Greek philosopher Aristotle's learned discussions b cup known as his "esoterics," his confidants, while those who merely attended his popular evening lectures were called his "exoterics." Since material that is geared toward a target audience is often not as easily comprehensible to outside observers, esoteric acquired an extended meaning of "difficult to understand." Both esoteric and exoteric started appearing in English in the 17th century; esoteric traces back to ancient Greek by way of the Late Latin esotericus. The Greek esōterikos is based on the comparative form of esō, which means "within."



Name That Synonym

Unscramble the letters to create a synonym of esoteric: EEIAFRDR.

VIEW THE ANSWER


Источник: https://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/esoteric-2021-02-02

Https www merriam webster com word of the day -

Merriam-Webster

Dictionary company Merriam-Webster unveiled its word of the year for 2021, and it is "vaccine." That is a logical follow-up to its 2020 word of the year, "pandemic," and it matches the Oxford English Dictionary's word for 2021, "vax." But "while other dictionary companies choose words of the year by committee," The Associated Press reports, "Merriam-Webster bases its selection on lookup data, paying close attention to spikes and, more recently, year-over-year increases in searches after weeding out evergreens."

And searchers for "vaccine" increased 601 percent over 2020 and 1,048 percent over 2019, Merriam-Webster said. "This was a word that was extremely high in our data every single day in 2021," Peter Sokolowski, Merriam-Webster's editor-at-large, told AP. "It really represents two different stories. One is the science story, which is this remarkable speed with which the vaccines were developed. But there's also the debates regarding policy, politics, and political affiliation. It's one word that carries these two huge stories."

"Few words can express so much about one moment in time," Merriam-Webster said.

The dictionary editors updated Merriam-Webster's definition of vaccine earlier this year to encompass the mRNA breakthroughs, but the word itself "is a relatively recent one in English, dating back to the 1880s," the company explained. "Vaccine comes from the Latin word for 'cow,' vacca, because the term was initially used to refer to inoculation using doses of cowpox that, it was discovered, protect humans against smallpox."

Merriam-Webster's runner-up for 2021 was "insurrection," thanks to the Jan. 6 siege of the U.S. Capitol by supporters of former President Donald Trump. "Arrests continue, as do congressional hearings over the attack," AP says. "Searches for the word increased by 61,000 percent over 2020."

The other words rounding out the runners-up were "perseverance," "woke," "nomad," "infrastructure," "cicada," "Murraya," "cisgender," "guardian," and "meta." You can read about why those words were big in 2021, what they mean now and their etymology, and how much searches for them increased this year at Merriam-Webster.

You may also like

7 scathingly funny cartoons about Thanksgiving inflation

Who pays America's taxes?

Neal Stephenson recommends 6 books on information manipulation

Источник: https://www.yahoo.com/now/merriam-websters-2021-word-vaccine-101016467.html

Get the most trusted, up-to-date definitions from Merriam-Webster. Find word meaning, pronunciation, origin, synonyms, and more.

Looking for synonyms & antonyms instead? Browse the Thesaurus

dic·​tio·​nary

Welcome to Merriam-Webster's Developer Center!

The Merriam-Webster Dictionary API gives developers access to a comprehensive resource of dictionary and thesaurus content as well as specialized medical, Spanish, ESL, and student-friendly vocabulary. Make your applications better by integrating our authoritative definitions, etymologies, audio pronunciations, synonyms and antonyms, and more. Our robust API empowers developers to enhance word games and create educational, language learning, and other word-related applications for the digital environment. We look forward to seeing all of the new, innovative products powered by Merriam-Webster's trusted references.

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The Merriam-Webster Dictionary API is free as long as it is for non-commercial use, usage does not exceed 1000 queries per day per API key, and use is limited to two reference APIs.

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Источник: https://dictionaryapi.com/

Did You Know?

In 1703, the dedication of the City and County Purchaser and Builders Dictionary included the following words: "These your extraordinary Favours … seem to Postulate from me … a Publick Recognition." That sense of postulate, a synonym of claim or demand, has been used by English speakers since the early 1600s. (The word's Latin grandparent, postulare, has the same meaning, but postulate first appeared earlier in the 1500s in senses restricted to ecclesiastical law.) Postulate was also used as a noun in the late 1500s, with the meaning "demand" or "stipulation." That sense is now considered archaic, but we still use the noun postulate. Today, it usually means "a hypothesis advanced as an essential presupposition, condition, or premise of a train of reasoning."



Name That Synonym

What 5-letter word beginning with "p" is a synonym of postulate that can also mean "to set firmly"?

VIEW THE ANSWER


Источник: https://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/postulate-2017-03-06

Did You Know?

Time was, people talked about doffing and donning articles of clothing with about the same frequency. But in the mid-19th century the verb don became significantly more popular and left doff to flounder a bit in linguistic semi-obscurity. Doff and don have been a pair from the start: both date to the 14th century, with doff arising as a Middle English contraction of the phrase "to do off" and don as a contraction of "to do on." Shakespeare was among the first, as far as we know, to use the word as it's defined in the more general sense of "to rid oneself of" or "put aside." He has Juliet give voice to this sense when she says, "What's in a name? That which we call a rose / By any other name would smell as sweet. / … Romeo, doff thy name; / And for that name, which is no part of thee, / Take all myself."



Quiz

Fill in the blanks to complete a synonym of doff that more commonly means “to drench”: d _ _ se.

VIEW THE ANSWER


Источник: https://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/doff-2021-09-02

2021 Word of the Year unveiled: Merriam-Webster's word of the years for the past 5 years

Oxford Dictionary declares 'youthquake' word of the year 2017

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Words related to the pandemic have dominated online searches this year, as people turn to dictionary definitions to find clarity in such uncertain times. This year’s Covid-related Word of the Year will not come as a surprise to many.

Merriam-Webster is an American company that publishes the US dictionary.

Every year it analyses word usage to find out which has been the most significant word of the year.

The publisher has just unveiled its Word of the Year for 2021, and unsurprisingly it's coronavirus related.

The Word of the Year for 2021 is “vaccine”.

READ MORE: Anti-vaxxer and wagwan among words added to Oxford English Dictionary

Word of the Year: The Word of the Year for 2021 is “vaccine” (Image: GETTY)
Word of the Year: Words related to the pandemic have dominated online searches this year (Image: GETTY)

Merriam-Webster chose this word based on lookup data, notable spikes in its usage, and year-over-year increases in searches for the word.

The Oxford English Dictionary has also opted for a similar word of the year.

For 2021 it chose “vax,” as they said it was rarely used before the pandemic, but by September this year, its usage had skyrocketed.

In 2020, “pandemic” was chosen by Merriam-Webster as the word of the year.

Word of the Year: Oxford English Dictionary chose "vax" as their Word of the Year (Image: GETTY)

Merriam-Webster’s online dictionary is a go-to site for many when it comes to looking up the meaning of words.

Searches for “vaccine” on the site jumped by 601 percent over 2020, especially toward the end of the year when the first US vaccine was administered in December.

There was a whopping 1,048 percent increase in searches on the site for the word vaccine this year, compared with the pre-pandemic days of 2019.

This August, lookups of "vaccine" jumped 535 percent due to widespread distribution in parts of the world and major stories about policy, approval and vaccination rates.

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Word of the Year: In 2020, “pandemic” was chosen by Merriam-Webster as the word of the year (Image: GETTY)

Peter Sokolowski, Merriam-Webster’s editor-at-large, told the Associated Press: “This was a word that was extremely high in our data every single day in 2021.”

He added: “It really represents two different stories. One is the science story, which is this remarkable speed with which the vaccines were developed.

“But there’s also the debates regarding policy, politics and political affiliation. It’s one word that carries these two huge stories.”

Before the pandemic, Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Year were very different.

In 2019 Merriam-Webster's word of the year was “they", in 2018 it was “justice” and in 2017 it was “feminism”.

The winner of Merriam-Webster's Word of the Year is a reflection of the most significant event or events of the year.

One notable runner-up for this year’s completion was the word “insurrection".

Searches for this word surged by a staggering 61,000 percent on January 7, the day after the storming of the US Capitol on January 6.

Mr Sokolowski said: The dictionary is a way to achieve a consensus and clarity in times of uncertainty, which "doesn't mean that we agree with each other on the policies, but that we agree with the words that we use as carrying meaning and having a specific meaning."

Источник: https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/life/1528981/2021-Word-of-the-Year-Merrian-Webster-vaccine-evg

4 Replies to “Https www merriam webster com word of the day”

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