emergency food pantry open today near me

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Basic Needs

Welcome to the Food Pantry!

The Food Pantry is an emergency food relief supply for all UC Berkeley students (undergraduate and graduate), staff, visiting scholars, student researchers, postdocs, and faculty. We are currently located on the 1st floor of the MLK Student Union, moving back to our previous location in  BNorth next year. We are currently open for walk ups only during open hours. If you currently have to quarantine due to COVID-19 and cannot come in person, please see our external delivery request form below open hours.

We offer items such as rice, pasta, milk, cereal, freezer items, and fresh produce!

Students and staff are welcome to come up to once per week, take as much as needed whenever needed while being mindful that it is a shared community resource for emergencies. 

The Pantry operates on a self-assessed need basis. There are no eligibility requirements and all you need is your Cal ID or Cal ID # (if you don't have your physical card yet).

Источник: https://basicneeds.berkeley.edu/pantry

Soup kitchen

Place where food is available at no cost as charity

For the former restaurant, see Soup Kitchen International.

A soup kitchen, food kitchen, or meal center, is a place where food is offered to the hungry usually for free or sometimes at a below-market price (such as via coin donations upon visiting). Frequently located in lower-income neighborhoods, soup kitchens are often staffed by volunteer organizations, such as church or community groups. Soup kitchens sometimes obtain food from a food bank for free or at a low price, because they are considered a charity, which makes it easier for them to feed the many people who require their services.

Many historical and modern soup kitchens serve only soup, or just soup with bread. But other establishments which refer to themselves as a "soup kitchen" also serve a wider range of food, so social scientists sometimes discuss them together with similar hunger relief agencies that provide more varied hot meals, like food kitchens and meal centers.

While societies have been using various methods to share food with the hungry for millennia, the first soup kitchens in the modern sense may have emerged in the late 18th century. By the late 19th century, they were located in several American and European cities. In the United States and elsewhere, they became more prominent in the 20th century, especially during the Great Depression. With the much improved economic conditions that immediately followed World War II, soup kitchens became less widely used, at least in the advanced economies. In the United States, there was a resurgence in the use of soup kitchens following the cutbacks in welfare that were implemented in the early 1980s.

In the 21st century, the use of soup kitchens expanded in both the United States and Europe, following lasting global increases in the price of food which began in late 2006. Demand for their services grew as the Great Recession began to worsen economic conditions for those with lower incomes. In much of Europe, demand further increased after the introduction of austerity-based economic policies from 2010.[citation needed]

History[edit]

The earliest occurrences of soup kitchens are difficult to identify. Throughout history, societies have invariably recognized a moral obligation to feed the hungry. The philosopher Simone Weil wrote that feeding the hungry when one has resources to do so is the most obvious obligation of all. She also said that as far back as Ancient Egypt, it was believed that people needed to show they had helped the hungry in order to justify themselves in the afterlife.[1] Soup has long been one of the most economical and simple ways to supply nutritious food to large numbers of people.[2][3]

The Christian church had been providing food to the hungry since St Paul's day, and since at least the early middle ages such nourishment was sometimes provided in the form of soup.[4] From the 14th to the 19th centuries, Islamic soup kitchens, called Imarets, were built throughout the Ottoman Empire. Soup and bread were often the main food served, though sometimes also rice, meat, fruit and sweet puddings.[5]

Social historian Karl Polanyi wrote that before markets became the world's dominant form of economic organisation in the 19th century, most human societies would generally either starve all together or not at all; because, communities would naturally share their food. As markets began to replace the older forms of resource allocation such as redistribution, reciprocity, and autarky, society's overall level of food security would typically rise. But food insecurity could become worse for the poorest section of society, and the need arose for more formal methods for providing them with food.[6]

Emergence of the modern soup kitchen[edit]

The earliest modern soup kitchens were established by the inventor Sir Benjamin Thompson, who was employed as an aide-de-camp to the Elector of Bavaria in the 1790s. Thompson was an American loyalist refugee from New England and an inventor who was ennobled by Bavaria as Count Rumford. The Count was a prominent advocate of hunger relief, writing pamphlets that were widely read across Europe.[4][7][8]

Count Rumford's message was especially well received in Great Britain, where he had previously held a senior government position for several years and was known as "the Colonel". An urgent need had recently arisen in Britain for hunger relief, due to her leading role in driving the Industrial Revolution. While technological development and economic reforms were rapidly increasingly overall prosperity, conditions for the poorest were often made worse, as traditional ways of life were disrupted. In the closing years of the 18th century, soup kitchens run on the principles pioneered by Rumford were to be found throughout England, Wales, and Scotland, with about 60,000 people being fed by them daily in London alone.[4][7]

While soup kitchens were initially well regarded, they attracted criticism from some, for encouraging dependency, and sometimes on a local level for attracting vagrants to an area. In Britain, they were made illegal, along with other forms of aid apart from workhouses, by the Poor Law Amendment Act 1834.[a]

During the Irish famine of the 19th century, in which as many as one million people may have died, the British government passed the Temporary Relief Act (also known as the Soup Kitchen Act) in February 1847. The Act amended the restrictions on the provision of aid outside the workhouses for the duration of the famine and expressly allowed the establishment of soup kitchens in Ireland to relieve pressure from the overstretched Poor Law system, which was proving to be totally inadequate in coping with the disaster.[9]

Prohibition against soup kitchens was soon relaxed on mainland Britain too, though they never again became as prevalent as they had been in the early 19th century, partly as from the 1850s onwards, economic conditions generally began to improve even for the poorest. For the first few decades after the return of soup kitchens to mainland Britain, they were at first heavily regulated, run by groups like the Charity Organization Society. Even in the early 20th century, campaigning journalists like Bart Kennedy would criticize them for their long queues, and for the degrading questions staff would ask the hungry before giving out any soup.[4]

Spread to the United States[edit]

The concept of soup kitchens spread to the United States from Ireland after the Great famine and the concomitant wave of Irish emigration to the New World.[9] The earliest ones were established in the 1870s. A sharp rise in the number of hungry people resulting from an industrial recession coincided with the success of the AICP, and the American branch of the Charity Organization Society, in getting various forms of "outdoor relief"[b] banned. This resulted in civil society establishing soup kitchens, to help feed those of the poor who did not wish to subject themselves to the regimented organisation of the Almshouses favored by the charitable societies.[10]

It is believed the term “breadline” entered the popular lexicon in the 1880s. It was during those years that a noteworthy bakery in New York City’s Greenwich Village, “Fleischmann Model Viennese Bakery,” instituted a policy of distributing unsold baked goods to the poor at the end of their business day.[11] By the late 19th century soup kitchens were to be found in several US cities.[7][12] The concept of soup kitchens hit the mainstream of United States consciousness during the Great Depression. One soup kitchen in Chicago was even sponsored by American mobster Al Capone in an effort to clean up his image.[13]

With the improved economic conditions that followed the Second World War, there was less need for soup kitchens in advanced economies.[14] However, with the scaling back of welfare provision in the 1980s under president Reagan's administration, there was a rapid rise in activity from grass roots hunger relief agencies such as soup kitchens. According to a comprehensive government survey completed in 2002, over 90% of food banks, about 80% of emergency kitchens, and all known food rescue organisations, were established in the US after 1981.[14][15] Presently, Catholic Charities USA of Colorado Springs, Colorado, founded by The Sisters of Loretto, provides food to upwards of 600-700 persons or more per day, and has been doing so since 1985.[16]

In the 21st century[edit]

Use of soup kitchens has grown rapidly across the world, following the lasting global inflation in the cost of food that began in late 2006. The financial crisis of 2007–2008 further increased the demand for soup kitchens, as did the introduction of austerity policies that have become common in Europe since 2010. Modern soup kitchens are generally well regarded, though like their historical counterparts they are sometimes disliked by local residents for lowering the tone of a neighborhood.[15][17][18][19]

Sikh temple soup kitchens[edit]

Every Sikh shrine has a religiously sanctioned moral and humanitarian obligation to serve and provide hospitality, provisions, nourishments and meals to any man, regardless of race, creed, religious profession, identification, or affiliation. At the Langar (the temple's community run free kitchen), food is served to all visitors regardless of faith, religion, or background. Only vegetarian food is served and people eat together as equals. The institution of the Sikh langar was started by the first Sikh Guru, Guru Nanak. It was designed to uphold the principle of equality between all people regardless of religion, caste, colour, creed, age, gender, or social status. In addition to the ideals of equality, the tradition of langar expresses the ethics of sharing, community, inclusiveness, and oneness of humankind.

World's largest soup kitchen[edit]

Main article: Harmandir Sahib

The world's largest (and longest running) soup kitchen is run at the Sikhs' holiest shrine, Golden Temple in Punjab, India, which according to Croatian Times can serve free food for up to 100,000 - 300,000 people every day.[20] (This number has since increased.) It was started in circa 1481 A.D by Guru Nanak and has continued ever since, except for two brief breaks.

Comparison with front line food banks and pantries[edit]

In some countries such as Great Britain, increased demand from hungry people has largely been met by food banks, operating on the "front line" model, where they give food out directly to the hungry. In the USA, such establishments are called "food pantries"; Americans generally reserve the term "food bank" for entities which perform a warehouse-like function, distributing food to front line agencies, but not directly to the hungry themselves. Instead of providing hot meals, front line food banks and pantries hand out packages of groceries so that recipients can cook themselves several meals at home. This is often more convenient for the end user. They can receive food for up to a dozen or so meals at once, whereas with a soup kitchen, they typically only receive a single meal with each visit.[c]

Food banks typically have procedures needed to prevent unscrupulous people taking advantage of them, unlike soup kitchens which will usually give a meal to whoever turns up with no questions asked. The soup kitchen's greater accessibility can make it more suitable for assisting people with long-term dependence on food aid. Soup kitchens can also provide warmth, companionship, and the shared communal experience of dining with others, which can be especially valued by people such as disabled, pensioners, widowers, homeless and ex-homeless. In some countries such as Greece, soup kitchens have become the most widely used form of food aid, with The Guardian reporting in 2012, that an estimated 400,000 Greeks visit a soup kitchen each day.[9][15][21][22][23]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^Note that criticism of soup kitchens was only a minor driver of the 1834 law - the move was driven more by free market ideology and discontent with other forms of "outdoor" aid like the much more widely disliked Speemhanland system, see Hunger in the United Kingdom.
  2. ^In the main, this meant ending the practice where municipal officials would give out small sums of cash to the poor. Unlike in Britain a few decades earlier, the US did not pass nationwide laws restricting private individuals from giving food to the hungry.
  3. ^Although some soup kitchens also like to give visitors a second "carry out" meal.

References[edit]

  1. ^Simone Weil (2002) [1942]. The Need for Roots. Routledge. p. 6. ISBN .
  2. ^Victoria R. Rumble (2009). "Chpt 29, Soup Kitchens". Soup Through the Ages. McFarland. ISBN .
  3. ^Pat Thane (30 April 2011). "There Has Always Been a 'Big Society'". historyworkshop.org.u. Retrieved 9 February 2013.
  4. ^ abcdVictoria R. Rumble (2009). "Chpt 29, Soup Kitchens". Soup Through the Ages. McFarland. ISBN .
  5. ^Amy Singer (historian) (2005). "Serving Up Charity: The Ottoman Public Kitchen". Journal of Interdisciplinary History. 35: 481–500. doi:10.1162/0022195052564252.
  6. ^Karl Polanyi (2002) [1942]. "chpt. 1-5". The Great Transformation. Beacon Press. ISBN .
  7. ^ abcLisa Bramen (29 December 2010). "Count Rumford and the History of the Soup Kitchen". Smithsonian. Retrieved 9 February 2013.
  8. ^"The Shadow Behind Our Founding Fathers: A traitor, a scientist, a womanizer and an enigma" review of Nicholas Delbanco's The Count of ConcordBook World p. 9, June 22, 2008, The Washington Post.
  9. ^ abcGwendolyn Mink and Alice O'Connor (2004). Poverty in the United States. ABC-CLIO. pp. 321–323. ISBN .
  10. ^Todd DePastino (2005). Citizen Hobo: How a Century of Homelessness Shaped America. University of Chicago Press. p. 22. ISBN .
  11. ^Wetsteon, Ross (2003). Republic of Dreams: Greenwich Village, the American Bohemia, 1910–1960. Simon & Schuster. preface. ISBN .
  12. ^James Vernon (2007). "Chpts. 1-3". Hunger: A Modern History. Harvard University Press. ISBN .
  13. ^"Soup Kitchens"Social Security Online History Page.
  14. ^ abJanet Poppendieck (1999). "Introduction, Chpt 1". Sweet Charity?: Emergency Food and the End of Entitlement. Penguin. ISBN .
  15. ^ abcAndrew Walter (2012). William A Dando (ed.). Food and Famine in the 21st Century. ABC-CLIO. pp. 171–181. ISBN .
  16. ^"Marian House Soup Kitchen". ccharitiescc.org. Retrieved 3 April 2018.
  17. ^Claire Bessette (14 February 2013). "Norwich soup kitchen hearing postponed". TheDay.com.
  18. ^"HOUSEHOLD FOOD SECURITY IN THE GLOBAL NORTH: CHALLENGES AND RESPONSIBILITIES REPORT OF WARWICK CONFERENCE"(PDF). Warwick University. 6 July 2012. Archived from the original(PDF) on 12 January 2013. Retrieved 28 August 2012.
  19. ^Nick Squires (5 February 2013). "Knights of Malta to open soup kitchens in Britain". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 3 March 2013.
  20. ^"SCOFF THAT - Free Food Daily For 300,000 at Worlds largest Soup Kitchen". croationtimes.com. 12 April 2013. Retrieved 17 September 2013.
  21. ^John Henley (14 March 2012). "Greece on the breadline: how leftovers became a meal". The Guardian. Retrieved 9 February 2013.
  22. ^Mat Clinch (8 February 2013). "Food bank visits surge, not just for the poor". GlobalPost. Retrieved 9 February 2013.
  23. ^Clare Lissaman (25 January 2013). "'Community spirit' fuels Wolverhampton soup kitchen". BBC. Retrieved 15 February 2013.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soup_kitchen

Food Bank vs. Food Pantry

A food bank and a food pantry are two very different things.

A FOOD BANK is an organization that collects product from the food industry and food drives, inventories and stores it, and distributes it to agencies – such as food pantries, soup kitchens, Kids Cafes and shelters – that provide food directly to individuals in need. A food bank has the capacity to distribute millions of pounds of grocery product every year. Food banks make it easy for agencies to obtain nutritious food at low cost in the quantities they need for their clients.

A FOOD PANTRY is an individual site that distributes bags or boxes of food directly to those in need who reside in a specified area. A food pantry is a member agency of, and obtains food from, a food bank. Both food pantries and food banks share the same commitment: to provide food to those in need.

A food bank makes it easy for agencies to obtain nutritious food at low cost in the quantities they need for their clients. Individual agencies in northwest Pennsylvania depend on Second Harvest for most of the food they provide to those in need.

Источник: https://nwpafoodbank.org/get-educated/food-bank-vs-food-pantry/

‘Heating or eating’

In an upmarket neighborhood in west London, a growing number of people are visiting a storefront tucked between a bicycle shop and a coffee house that charges no money and caters exclusively to the less fortunate.

Dad’s House is one of 2,200 food banks in the United Kingdom that serve Britons who are struggling to afford basic necessities. Billy McGranaghan, its founder, told CNN Business that "the future is bleak" for the people who frequent his shop.

London’s food banks were busy before the pandemic. But now, as the United Kingdom braces for a second winter with coronavirus, rising food prices, higher energy costs and cuts to government benefits are putting huge pressure on household budgets and forcing legions of people to turn to charity.

Food banks in the capital city have reported a surge of visits in recent weeks, with more and more working professionals seeking help with groceries following the end of a government program that subsidized millions of jobs during the pandemic and a reduction in welfare payments to those with lower incomes.

McGranaghan, 58, estimates that he's added 70 recipients to his food bank since mid-September, on top of the 300 to 400 already being served each week. The demographics of the new customers are broader than ever before, he said. Roughly 70 people were expected on the day CNN Business visited Dad's House.

“It’s been an eye-opener, where you would never have thought that person would ever use a food bank,” he said. “They’ve never been in that position.”

Dad’s House volunteer Luke Tydeman, left, helps a customer.

Hundreds of people are served at Dad’s House each week.

McGranaghan said that Dad's House has served teachers, graphic designers and journalists during the pandemic. People tend to come to the food bank via referrals from the local government, or after searching online for support.

But now, new clients tend to be younger and single. And despite relatively low unemployment and a record number of job vacancies across the country, McGranaghan anticipates a “huge surge” in attendees over the next few months.

“We’re seeing a rise again … because of the electricity prices, because of the gas, because of the end of furlough,” he said.

Marie, 63, who declined to provide her surname, first came to Dad’s House four months ago and is already worried about her next quarterly heating bill. Her husband has problems with his blood circulation, she said, so maintaining a warm house is essential.

“Food-wise we don’t eat a lot because we don't indulge in luxurious food, it’s just basic,” she said. “It’s the energy prices that's never come down, never come down, so that is the worry.”

Seven miles to the east, at another London food bank, up to 100 customers were expected at an evening meal service attended by CNN Business. Staffers prepared pumpkin soup.

Robert Hunningher, 42, turned part of his catering business, Humdingers, into a food bank in May last year, serving up to 1,000 people a week during the lockdown.

He said the number of visitors has “skyrocketed” by up to 250 per week since late September. A wide range of people are now turning up, he said, including young professionals, schoolteachers and a semi-pro tennis player.

“Even if you have a job, there’s no hope because you can't afford to live here,” Hunningher said. “Everything is out of arm's reach and then the prices are going up so much.”

Gary Lemon, director of policy and research at The Trussell Trust, which distributes groceries to about two thirds of UK food banks — although not Dad's House or Humdingers — told CNN Business that many of its members are “very busy with more people needing to come to them for emergency food.”

“They expect this to continue in the weeks leading up to Christmas," Lemon added.

Bills through the roof

Rising fuel and food costs have pushed up household bills for millions of Britons. Since January, wholesale gas prices have soared 423%, according to data from industry group Oil & Gas UK. A mix of factors explain the rise, including higher demand from Asia and lower-than-expected Russian gas exports.

In response, the UK energy regulator increased its consumer price cap — the maximum suppliers can charge customers per unit of energy — by up to 13% starting October 1, affecting 15 million people.

Jameson Keane, 49, an artist who cares for his mother, started coming to Dad’s House during the pandemic.

“I’m on a limited budget, about £100 ($138) a week,” he told CNN Business. “My money gets eaten up very quickly.”

Keane said his energy costs are higher than ever before, despite using similar amounts of fuel. He estimates that the money in his energy meter is being spent about “a third faster in the last two weeks — especially the gas.”

Higher energy prices are a problem across Europe, but Britain's relatively low levels of stored gas make it particularly exposed to volatile energy markets.

Many Brits are bracing for higher bills in April when the energy regulator next adjusts its consumer price cap.

‘Heating or eating’

More than a decade of government austerity in the United Kingdom has eaten away at budgets for health care, housing and welfare. A blistering 2019 report by the United Nations’ Human Rights Council blamed spending cuts for the “systematic immiseration of millions.”

Before the pandemic, about 14.5 million Britons, or 22%, were living in poverty, according to the government's own measure. The Joseph Rowntree Foundation, a think tank, expects even more people to fall into poverty as pandemic benefits taper off.

Kadriye Ali stands outside Humdinger's Soup Kitchen. She has noticed food becoming more expensive and started going to the food bank 10 months ago.

Fruits and vegetables are on display at Dad’s House. Food banks in London have reported a surge of visits in recent weeks.

In early October, the government cut Universal Credit — a benefit claimed by those out-of-work or earning low incomes — back to its pre-pandemic level. More than 5.8 million people lost £20 ($28) a week, adding up to £1,040 ($1,431) a year.

McGranaghan said the cuts have forced some of his clients to make difficult choices.

“(They will) have a salad on a cold October night instead of actually having something that they could have put in the oven,” he said. “That's the reality of losing £20 a week — it’s heating or eating.”

Amina, a food bank client who declined to give her full name, said the temporary benefit hike had been a lifeline for her family of five.

“For me it’s very helpful, £20, maybe for another, someone else it's nothing, but for me it’s money, especially for family, if you’ve got kids,” she said.

“When you’re used to having something and they take it away, you can feel the difference,” she added. “We don’t know how to manage, honestly.”

The UK government has also wrapped up its £69 billion ($95 billion) pandemic furlough program. In August, it reduced payments to employers from 70% of a worker's monthly salary to 60%, before stopping them altogether at the end of September.

Sabine Goodwin, coordinator of the Independent Food Aid Network, an organization representing more than 500 food banks, including Dad's House, told CNN Business that “there’s a real danger that demand will outstrip food banks' capacity to support people” this winter.

She added that the government's reliance on charities to feed its people was “neither morally acceptable nor sustainable.”

A spokesperson for the UK Department for Work and Pensions, which administers benefit payments, told CNN Business that “Universal Credit continues to provide a vital safety net for millions.”

The spokesperson said that the government was committed to eradicating poverty and had created a new £500 million ($688 million) fund to help “the most vulnerable with essential costs through this winter.”

A ‘Catch-22’ for strained food banks

Food banks are not a new phenomenon in modern Britain — between 2010 and 2019, the number of emergency food parcels distributed by The Trussell Trust rose 2,543%, driven in part by cuts to the country’s social security system.

But supply chain bottlenecks, inflating food prices and shortages in supermarkets have limited their ability to feed struggling households as the economy emerges from its pandemic slump.

McGranaghan told CNN Business that this puts Dad's House in a “Catch-22.”

“We’re relying on the public to donate food, but they haven’t got enough food on the shelves for their families,” he said. “That’s when the donations decrease and that's a huge, huge worry for all independent food banks.”

In east London, Hunningher said that supermarkets no longer let him buy in bulk as they are short of stock.

“I’m having to go to more expensive places,” he said. “The 20 (pence) pasta at Tesco’s (supermarket) is fantastic and I need seven boxes a week — I’m not allowed it.”

Mai Pedersen receives a hot meal from Humdinger's Soup Kitchen. Like many others, she was working up until the pandemic, and then fell upon hard times and started accessing free meals.

A father arrives at Humdinger's Soup Kitchen with his children. A wide range of people are now turning up, says Robert Hunningher.

Supermarkets are having trouble keeping their shelves stocked because the United Kingdom is short 100,000 truck drivers, due in part to an exodus of EU workers following Brexit. The pandemic also limited the number of certification tests for new commercial truck drivers.

Shortages were made even worse in September when service stations across the country ran out of fuel following a spate of panic buying.

FareShare, a charity which redistributes surplus supermarket food to charities and community groups, including food banks, told CNN Business that all of its 30 regional centers had been affected by shortages.

Lindsay Boswell, FareShare's CEO, said that it normally receives up to 160 metric tons of groceries a day, but the fuel shortage cut deliveries to under 100 metric tons.

“Up to 30% of the food we would normally expect to receive into our warehouses on an average day is at risk of not reaching us,” Boswell said. “And (is) therefore at risk of not reaching the vulnerable people we support.”

‘We’re going back in time’

Some economists have warned that rising inflation in the United Kingdom, combined with weak economic growth, could lead to a period of “stagflation” reminiscent of the 1970s, when wages failed to keep pace with the rocketing cost of living.

As higher grocery prices erode Britons’ purchasing power, food banks are preparing for more visitors, and to spend more themselves.

Rajesh Makwana, the director of Sufra, a food bank in north-west London, told CNN Business that he is “bracing for increased demand as the cost of living continues to rise.”

“Our food costs are already unsustainably high, so even a small increase would be painful,” he added.

Inflation was up 3.1% in September, according to official data. That's above the central bank’s target rate of 2% but far short of the 5% pace that could be reached early next year, according to Bank of England chief economist Huw Pill.

The government plans to increase the minimum wage from £8.91 ($12.27) to £9.50 ($13.09) an hour in April, but the mounting cost of living will temper the boost to Britons' spending power.

Geraldine Hurley, 62, a retiree from east London, passed by Humdingers as it opened its evening meal service, and stopped to talk to CNN Business.

“My coffee, it’s always been £5 ($6.88) a jar, it’s now in Tesco’s for £5.75 ($7.91),” she said. “What sort of increase is that?”

Although Hurley applauds food banks like Humdingers for stepping up to support her community, she is frustrated by their necessity.

“We really shouldn't be doing it nowadays,” she said. “We’re going back in time.”

Источник: https://www.cnn.com/interactive/2021/11/business/london-food-banks-cnnphotos/

El Pasoans Fighting Hunger Food Bank

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El Pasoans Fighting Hunger Food Bank is El Paso's only Food Bank.

In 2020 from March 17 to December 31 the EPFH food bank dramatically surpassed food distribution for 2019 by reaching a record of 139,700,000 pounds of food distributed across the Borderland.

In 2019 the food bank distributed over 32.5 million pounds of food compared to the 139,700 million distributed in 2020 during the worldwide pandemic. An average of 15 million pounds were distributed from May to December of 2020. On average, all the primary sites distribute food to between 9,000 and 10,000 families a day.

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In the first 8 months of 2021 the food bank has distributed 101 million pounds of food. The food bank is now ranked 3rd in the nation in food distribution.

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Check out the “Need Help” section of our website or call for information on one of the locations nearest you.

We are the food distribution center for over 132 partner agencies and programs including pantries, churches, schools, soup kitchens and shelters. Food is distributed where it is needed most throughout El Paso, Culberson and Hudspeth Counties.

Learn more about how we can make an instant impact on hunger together. If you would like to volunteer for the El Pasoans Fighting Hunger Food Bank, please submit your volunteer application.

The Need Continues

El banco de alimentos, El Pasoans Fighting Hunger, es el único banco de alimentos en El Paso.

En 2020 desde el 17 de marzo hasta el 31 de diciembre, el banco de alimentos de EPFH superó dramáticamente la distribución de alimentos en 2019 distribuyendo la cifra de 139,700,000 libras de alimentos distribuidos a través del área de El Paso.

En 2019 el banco de alimentos distribuyó más de 32.5 millones de libras de alimentos en la frontera, comparado a 2020 cuando se distribuyó 139,700,000 durante una pandemia global. Un promedio de 15 millones de libras de alimentos distribuidos entre Mayo y Diciembre de 2020. El promedio de distribución de alimentos entre todos los sitios primarios fue de entre 9,000 a 10,000 familias por día.

EPFH ha distribuido más de 1,536,247 cajas de alimentos de emergencia en la comunidad.

La necesidad es grande y continúa aumentando durante la pandemia que ha afectado a tantas familias. Ha afectado a todos de manera tan grave.

Mientras los clientes sigan viniendo, El Pasoans Fighting Hunger estará aquí para ayudar ... porque nadie debería pasar hambre. Si tiene dificultades para poner comida en su mesa y necesita ayuda, vaya al banco de alimentos.

Consulte la sección "Necesita ayuda" de nuestro sitio web o llame para obtener información sobre uno de los lugares más cercanos a usted.

Somos el centro de distribución de alimentos para más de 132 agencias y programas asociados, que incluyen despensas, iglesias, escuelas, comedores populares y refugios. La comida se distribuye donde más se necesita en los condados de El Paso, Culberson y Hudspeth.

Obtenga más información sobre cómo podemos tener un impacto instantáneo en el hambre juntos. Si desea ser voluntario para el Banco de Alimentos de El Pasoans Fighting Hunger,envíe su solicitud de voluntario.

Pounds of Food And Number of Meals Distributed (in Millions)

Pounds of FoodNo. of Meals


73

TEAM MEMBERS

operate the food bank

28000

VOLUNTEER HOURS ANNUALLY - Pre-Pandemic

are a backbone to our accomplishments! Need more Volunteers NOW!!

132

PARTNER AGENCIES

distribute food locally

3

PERCENT OVERHEAD

means 97 percent goes back into feeding our community

139700136

POUNDS DONATED

139.7 million pounds of food distributed in 2020

543

MOBILE PANTRIES

for those who do not have access to a local food pantry nearby

67000

SQ. FT WAREHOUSE

to store, process and package food for El Paso

101000000

POUNDS DONATED (Jan - Sept 2021)

101 million pounds of food distributed first half of 2021

Calendar of Upcoming Events

Please find upcoming events, fundraisers and important dates below.

Save The Date!

El Pasoans Fighting Hunger & the city of El Paso Dept. of Public Health host Resource Fair

Monday, June 14, 2021 from 10 am – 1 pm, - El Pasoans Fighting Hunger & the city of El Paso Dept. of Public Health host Resource Fair El Pasoans Fighting Hunger and the city of El Paso Department of Public Health will host a Community & Health Resource Fair on Mon., June 14, 2021 from 10 am – 1 pm at the food bank.

Subscribe to our email communications

Get notified on updates, upcoming events and volunteer opportunities

Источник: https://elpasoansfightinghunger.org/
emergency food pantry open today near me

Basic Needs

Welcome to the Food Pantry!

The Food Pantry is an emergency food relief supply for all UC Berkeley students (undergraduate and graduate), staff, visiting scholars, student researchers, postdocs, and faculty. We are currently located on the 1st floor of the MLK Student Union, moving back to our previous location in  BNorth next year. We are currently open for walk ups only during open hours. If you currently have to quarantine due to COVID-19 and cannot come in person, please see our external delivery request form below open hours.

We offer items such as rice, pasta, milk, cereal, freezer items, and fresh produce!

Students and staff are welcome to come up to once per week, take as much as needed whenever needed while being mindful that it is a shared community resource for emergencies. 

The Pantry operates on a self-assessed need basis. There are no eligibility requirements and all you need is your Cal ID or Cal ID # (if you don't have your physical card yet).

Источник: https://basicneeds.berkeley.edu/pantry

El Pasoans Fighting Hunger Food Bank

El Pasoans Fighting Hunger Food Bank

Our mission is to combat the hunger crisis in our region by strategically procuring and distributing nutritious food through community partners…because no one should go hungry.

spirit airlines phone number usa Make a Contribution to/ Haga una contribución Fight Hunger

Your gift will be put to immediate use to provide food for hungry people in our community. Thank you for your support of El Pasoans Fighting Hunger Food Bank.
Su donación ayuda a nuestra comunidad. emergency food pantry open today near me A DONATION
DONE POR FAVOR

EPFHFB Sponsor Food

Sponsor a home delivery for an individual or family for one week who are struggling to put food on their table due to a COVID-19 diagnosis.


Sponsor a home delivery for an individual or family for one week who are struggling to put food on their table due to a COVID-19 diagnosis.

You will be redirected to our Online Donation Platform to make your donation.


Donate to EPFHFB
EPFHFB Sponsor Food

Sponsor a weekly home delivery for one month for those who are homebound: seniors or disabled.


Sponsor a weekly home delivery for one month for those who are homebound: seniors or disabled.

You will be redirected to our Online Donation Platform to make your donation.


Donate to EPFHFB
EPFHFB Sponsor Food

Sponsor food for a child for a whole year.




Sponsor food for a child for a whole year.



You will be redirected to our Online Donation Platform to make your donation.


Donate to EPFHFB
EPFHFB Sponsor Food

Sponsor food for a family for the whole year.




Sponsor food for a family for the whole year.



You will be redirected to our Online Donation Platform to make your donation.


Donate to EPFHFB

Treasure a special family member, friend, colleague, group, or give a gift in tribute of a loved one.

You will be redirected to our Online Donation Platform to make your donation.

Donate to EPFHFB
Call us to assist you in exploring best options.
EPFHFB Sponsor Food

Become empowered and be the voice for hunger relief

EPFHFB Sponsor Food

Learn about policy that affects individuals and families in our community

EPFHFB Sponsor Food

1 in 5 children experience food insecurity

EPFHFB Sponsor Food

1 in 7 adults experiences food insecurity

How can you help?

When you sign up to be an El Pasoans Fighting Hunger Food Bank Advocate, you will periodically be "Called Into Action."


EPFH WILL

Inform you of critical time-sensitive hunger relief issues & provide you with guidance to contact legislators.

Combatiendo el hambre una comida a la vez

The Need Continues
The Need Continues










The Need Continues

Combatiendo el hambre una comida a la vez

The Need Continues

El Pasoans Fighting Hunger Food Bank is El Paso's only Food Bank.

In 2020 from March 17 to December 31 the EPFH food bank dramatically surpassed food distribution for 2019 by reaching a record of 139,700,000 pounds of food distributed across the Borderland.

In 2019 the food bank distributed over 32.5 million pounds of food compared to the 139,700 million distributed in 2020 during the worldwide pandemic. An average of 15 million pounds were distributed from May to December of 2020. On average, emergency food pantry open today near me the primary sites distribute food to between 9,000 and 10,000 families a day.

EPFH has now distributed over 1,536,247 emergency food boxes in the community.

In the first 8 months of 2021 the food bank has distributed 101 million pounds of food. The food bank is now ranked 3rd in the nation in food distribution.

2021

The need continues to be great as the pandemic forges on and affects so many families. As long as the clients keep coming, El Pasoans Fighting Hunger will be here to help … because no one should go hungry. If you are struggling to put food on your table and need assistance come to the emergency food pantry open today near me bank.

Check out the “Need Help” section of our website or call for information on one of the locations nearest you.

We are the food distribution center for over 132 partner agencies and programs including pantries, churches, schools, soup kitchens and shelters. Food is distributed where emergency food pantry open today near me is needed most throughout El Paso, Culberson and Hudspeth Counties.

Learn more about how we can make an instant impact on hunger together. If you would like to volunteer for the El Pasoans Fighting Hunger Food Bank, please submit your volunteer application.

The Need Continues

El banco de alimentos, El Pasoans Fighting Hunger, es el único banco de alimentos en El Paso.

En 2020 desde el 17 de marzo hasta el 31 de diciembre, el banco de alimentos de EPFH superó dramáticamente la distribución de alimentos en 2019 distribuyendo la cifra de 139,700,000 libras de alimentos distribuidos a través del área de El Paso.

En 2019 el banco de alimentos distribuyó más de 32.5 millones de libras de alimentos en la frontera, comparado a 2020 cuando se distribuyó 139,700,000 durante una pandemia global. Un promedio de 15 millones de libras de alimentos distribuidos entre Emergency food pantry open today near me y Diciembre de 2020. El promedio de distribución de alimentos entre todos los sitios primarios fue de entre 9,000 a 10,000 familias por día.

EPFH ha distribuido más de 1,536,247 cajas de alimentos de emergencia en la comunidad.

La necesidad es grande y continúa aumentando durante la pandemia que ha afectado a tantas familias. Ha afectado a todos de manera emergency food pantry open today near me grave.

Mientras los clientes sigan viniendo, El Pasoans Fighting Hunger estará aquí para ayudar . porque nadie debería pasar hambre. Si tiene dificultades para poner comida en su mesa y necesita ayuda, vaya al banco de alimentos.

Consulte la sección "Necesita ayuda" de nuestro sitio web o llame para obtener información sobre uno de los lugares más cercanos a usted.

Somos el centro de distribución de alimentos para más de 132 agencias y programas asociados, que incluyen despensas, iglesias, escuelas, comedores populares y refugios. La comida se distribuye donde más se necesita en los condados de El Paso, Culberson y Hudspeth.

Obtenga más información sobre cómo podemos tener un impacto instantáneo en el hambre juntos. Si desea ser voluntario para el Banco de Alimentos de El Pasoans Fighting Hunger,envíe su solicitud de voluntario.

Pounds of Food And Number of Meals Distributed (in Millions)

Pounds of FoodNo. of Meals


73

TEAM MEMBERS

operate the food bank

28000

VOLUNTEER HOURS ANNUALLY - Pre-Pandemic

are a backbone to our accomplishments! Need more Volunteers NOW!!

132

PARTNER AGENCIES

distribute food locally

3

PERCENT OVERHEAD

means 97 percent goes back into feeding our community

139700136

POUNDS DONATED

139.7 million pounds of food distributed in 2020

543

MOBILE PANTRIES

for those who do not have access to a local food pantry nearby

67000

SQ. FT WAREHOUSE

to store, process and package food for El Paso

101000000

POUNDS DONATED (Jan - Sept 2021)

101 million pounds of food distributed first half of 2021

Calendar of Upcoming Events

Please find upcoming events, fundraisers and important dates below.

Save The Date!

El Pasoans Fighting Hunger & the city of El Paso Dept. of Public Health host Resource Fair

emergency food pantry open today near me Monday, June 14, 2021 from 10 am – 1 pm, - El Pasoans Fighting Hunger & the city of El Paso Dept. of Public Health host Resource Fair El Pasoans Fighting Hunger and the city of El Paso Department of Public Health will host a Community & Health Resource Fair on Mon., June 14, 2021 from 10 am – 1 pm at the food bank.

Subscribe to our email communications

Get notified on updates, upcoming events and volunteer opportunities

Источник: https://elpasoansfightinghunger.org/

‘Heating or eating’

In an upmarket neighborhood in west London, a growing number of people are visiting a storefront tucked between a bicycle shop and a coffee house that charges no money and caters exclusively to the less fortunate.

Dad’s House is one of 2,200 food banks in the United Kingdom that serve Britons who are struggling to afford basic necessities. Billy McGranaghan, its founder, told CNN Business that "the future is bleak" for the people who frequent his shop.

London’s food banks were busy before the pandemic. But now, as the United Kingdom braces for a second winter with coronavirus, rising food prices, higher energy costs and cuts to government benefits are putting huge pressure on household budgets and forcing legions first farmers bank and trust phone number people to turn to charity.

Food banks in the capital city have reported a surge of visits in emergency food pantry open today near me weeks, with more and more working professionals seeking help with groceries following the end of a government program that subsidized millions of jobs during the pandemic and a reduction in welfare payments to those with lower incomes.

McGranaghan, 58, estimates that he's added 70 recipients to his food bank since mid-September, on top of the 300 to 400 already being served each week. The demographics of the new customers are broader than ever before, he said. Roughly 70 people emergency food pantry open today near me expected on the day CNN Business visited Dad's House.

“It’s been an eye-opener, where you would never have thought that person would ever use a food bank,” he said. “They’ve never been in that position.”

Dad’s House volunteer Luke Tydeman, left, helps a customer.

Hundreds of people are served at Dad’s House each week.

McGranaghan said that Dad's House has served teachers, graphic designers and journalists during the pandemic. People tend to come to the food bank via referrals from the local government, or after searching online for support.

But now, new clients tend to be younger and single. And despite relatively low unemployment and a record number of job vacancies across the country, McGranaghan anticipates a “huge surge” in attendees over the next few months.

“We’re seeing a rise again … because of the electricity prices, because of the gas, because of the end of furlough,” he said.

Marie, 63, who declined to provide her surname, first came to Dad’s House four months ago and is already worried about her next quarterly heating bill. Her husband has problems with his blood circulation, she said, so maintaining a warm house is essential.

“Food-wise we don’t eat a lot because we don't indulge in luxurious food, it’s just basic,” she said. “It’s the energy prices that's never come down, never come down, so that is the worry.”

Seven miles to the east, at another London food bank, up to 100 customers were expected at an evening meal service attended by CNN Business. Staffers prepared pumpkin soup.

Robert Hunningher, 42, turned part of his catering business, Humdingers, into a food bank in May last year, serving up to 1,000 people a week during the lockdown.

He said the number of visitors has “skyrocketed” by up to 250 per week since late September. A wide range of people are now turning up, he said, including young professionals, schoolteachers and a semi-pro tennis player.

“Even if you have a job, there’s no hope because you can't afford to live here,” Hunningher said. “Everything is out of arm's reach and then the prices are going up so much.”

Gary Lemon, director of policy and research at The Trussell Trust, why are red cherries good for you distributes groceries to about two thirds of UK food banks — although not Dad's House or Humdingers — told CNN Business that many of its members are “very busy with more people needing to come to them for emergency food.”

“They expect this to continue in the weeks leading up to Christmas," Lemon added.

Bills through the roof

Rising fuel and food costs have pushed up household bills for millions of Britons. Since January, wholesale gas prices have soared 423%, according to data from industry group Oil & Gas UK. A mix of factors explain the rise, including higher demand from Asia and lower-than-expected Russian gas exports.

In response, the UK energy regulator increased its consumer price cap — the maximum suppliers can charge customers per unit of energy — by up to 13% starting October 1, affecting 15 million people.

Jameson Keane, 49, an artist who cares for his mother, started coming to Dad’s House during the pandemic.

“I’m on a limited budget, about £100 ($138) a week,” he told CNN Business. “My money gets eaten us bank app for samsung tablet very quickly.”

Keane said his energy costs are higher than ever before, despite using similar amounts of fuel. He estimates that the money in his energy meter is being spent about “a third faster in the last two weeks — especially the gas.”

Higher energy prices are a problem across Europe, but Britain's relatively low levels of stored gas make it particularly exposed to volatile energy markets.

Many Brits are bracing for higher bills in April when the energy regulator next adjusts its consumer price cap.

‘Heating or eating’

More than a decade of government austerity in the United Kingdom has eaten away at budgets for health care, housing and welfare. A blistering 2019 report by the United Nations’ Human Rights Council blamed spending cuts for the “systematic immiseration of millions.”

Before the pandemic, about 14.5 million Britons, or 22%, were living in poverty, according to the government's own measure. The Joseph Rowntree Foundation, a think tank, expects even more people to fall into poverty as pandemic benefits taper off.

Kadriye Ali stands outside Humdinger's Soup Kitchen. She has noticed food becoming more expensive and started going to the food bank 10 months ago.

Fruits and vegetables are on display at Dad’s House. Food banks in London have reported a surge of visits in recent weeks.

In early October, the government cut Universal Credit — a benefit claimed by those out-of-work or earning low incomes — back to its pre-pandemic level. More than 5.8 million people lost £20 ($28) a week, adding up to £1,040 ($1,431) a year.

McGranaghan said the cuts have forced some of his clients to make difficult choices.

“(They will) have a salad on a cold October night instead of actually having something that they could have put in the oven,” he said. “That's the reality of losing £20 a week — it’s heating or eating.”

Amina, a food bank client who declined to give her full name, said the temporary benefit hike had been a lifeline for her family of five.

“For me it’s very helpful, £20, maybe for another, someone else it's nothing, but for emergency food pantry open today near me it’s money, especially for family, if you’ve got kids,” she said.

“When you’re used to having something and emergency food pantry open today near me take it away, you can feel the difference,” she added. “We don’t know how to manage, honestly.”

The UK government has also wrapped up its £69 billion ($95 billion) pandemic furlough program. In August, it reduced payments to employers from 70% of a worker's monthly salary to 60%, before stopping them altogether at the end of September.

Sabine Goodwin, coordinator of the Independent Food Aid Network, an organization representing more than 500 food banks, including Dad's House, told CNN Business that “there’s a real danger that demand will outstrip food banks' capacity to support people” this winter.

She added that the government's reliance on charities to feed its people was “neither morally acceptable nor sustainable.”

A spokesperson for the UK Department for Work and Pensions, which administers benefit payments, told CNN Business that “Universal Credit continues to provide a vital safety net for millions.”

The spokesperson said that the government was committed to eradicating poverty and had created a new £500 million ($688 million) fund to help “the most vulnerable with essential costs through this winter.”

A ‘Catch-22’ for strained food banks

Food banks are not a new phenomenon in modern Britain — between 2010 and 2019, the number of emergency food parcels distributed by The Trussell Trust rose 2,543%, driven in part by cuts to the country’s social security system.

But supply chain bottlenecks, inflating food prices and shortages in supermarkets have limited their ability to feed struggling households as the economy emerges from its pandemic slump.

McGranaghan told CNN Business that this puts Dad's House in a “Catch-22.”

“We’re relying on the public to donate food, but they haven’t got enough food on the shelves for their families,” he said. “That’s when the donations decrease and that's a huge, huge worry for all independent food banks.”

In east London, Hunningher said that supermarkets no longer let him buy in bulk as they are short of stock.

“I’m having to go to more expensive places,” he said. “The 20 (pence) pasta at Tesco’s (supermarket) is fantastic and I need seven boxes a week — I’m not allowed it.”

Mai Pedersen receives a hot meal from Humdinger's Soup Kitchen. Like many others, she was working up until the pandemic, and then fell upon hard times and started accessing free meals.

A father arrives at Humdinger's Soup Kitchen with his children. A wide range of people are now turning up, says Robert Hunningher.

Supermarkets are having trouble keeping their shelves stocked because the United Kingdom is short 100,000 truck drivers, due in part to an exodus of EU workers following Brexit. The pandemic also limited the number of certification tests for new commercial truck drivers.

Shortages were made even worse in September when service stations across the country ran out of fuel following a spate of panic buying.

FareShare, a charity which redistributes surplus supermarket food to charities and community groups, including food banks, told CNN Business that all of its 30 regional centers had been affected by shortages.

Lindsay Boswell, FareShare's CEO, said that it normally receives up to 160 metric tons of groceries a day, but the fuel shortage cut deliveries to under 100 metric tons.

“Up to 30% of the food we would normally expect to receive into our warehouses on an average day is at risk of not reaching us,” Boswell said. “And (is) therefore at risk of not reaching the vulnerable people we support.”

‘We’re going back in time’

Some economists have warned that rising inflation in the United Kingdom, combined with weak economic growth, could lead to a period of “stagflation” reminiscent of the 1970s, when wages failed to keep pace with the rocketing cost of living.

As higher grocery prices erode Britons’ purchasing power, food banks are preparing for more visitors, and to spend more themselves.

Rajesh Makwana, the director of Sufra, a food bank in north-west London, told CNN Business that he is “bracing for increased demand as the cost of living continues to rise.”

“Our food costs are already unsustainably high, so even a small increase would be painful,” he added.

Inflation was up 3.1% in September, according to official data. That's above the central bank’s target rate of 2% but far short of the 5% pace that could be reached early next year, according to Bank of England chief economist Huw Pill.

The government plans to increase the minimum wage from £8.91 ($12.27) to £9.50 ($13.09) an hour in April, but the mounting cost of living will temper the boost to Britons' spending power.

Geraldine Hurley, 62, a retiree from east London, passed by Humdingers as it opened its evening meal service, and stopped to talk to CNN Business.

“My coffee, it’s always been £5 ($6.88) a jar, it’s now in Tesco’s for £5.75 ($7.91),” she said. “What sort of increase is that?”

Although Hurley applauds food banks like Humdingers for stepping up to support her community, she is frustrated by their necessity.

“We really shouldn't be doing it nowadays,” she said. “We’re going back in time.”

Источник: https://www.cnn.com/interactive/2021/11/business/london-food-banks-cnnphotos/

Find Food

PLEASE NOTE: This list is updated at least monthly to reflect changes in food assistance program operations. Please call ahead to confirm a program is open during their regularly listed hours and to find out what information you need to bring with you.

View our Food Assistance List (by city, town and village) or search the map below to find a location near you. You can also reach out to United Way of Rhode Island by calling2-1-1 from any phone.

All Are Welcome

Everyone is welcome at the member agencies of the Food Bank. Click here to learn more.

Using Our Virtual Map
Enter your zip code in the Search box below to find an agency near you. Click on any location for more details. Or use the scroll bar on the right side of the map to see a list of all of our member agencies.

View the Current Mapin full screen.

Источник: https://rifoodbank.org/find-food/

Savings Account

The eligibility and documentation required for a Savings Account may vary on the type of Savings Account variant chosen as well as the type of user (Individual or Joint) or the nature of account opening (Physical or Digital Savings Account).

Certain common documents requested include:

• KYC Documents (Proof of Identification, Address and Nationality)
• A Duly Filled Account opening form
• Photographs of the customer
• Transfer of the initial funding amount as and when applicable.

Please remember however that this is not an exhaustive list; do check the Eligibility and Documentation sections of your chosen Savings Account variant as some features are liable to change.

For Example: In order to open an Easy Access Savings Account for HUFs (Hindu Undivided Families) will require additional documents such as a declaration from the “Karta” and the prescribed Joint Hindu emergency food pantry open today near me Family Letter while, during application for a Digital Savings Account need not be submitted as hard copies and can just be recorded via Video KYC.

Источник: https://www.axisbank.com/retail/accounts/savings-account

Emergency food pantry open today near me -

Send money 24/7 around the world

1 Fee reductions apply only to the Western Union® transfer fee for a single Western Union Money Transfer® or Quick Collect® transaction. Excludes all other services, including without limitation, online bill payments, and money transfers via social/chat applications. Points used will not be reversible and if amount of transfer fee is less than redeemed discount, no cash, credit or refund will be provided. Western Union reserves the right to offer promotions l discounts that cannot be combined with My WU® fee reductions.

2 Western Union also makes money from currency exchange. When choosing a money transmitter, carefully compare both transfer fees and exchange rates. Fees, foreign exchange rates and taxes may vary by brand, channel, and location based on a number of factors. Fees and rates subject to change without notice.

3 Network data as of June 30, 2020.

4 If you’re using a credit card, a card-issuer cash advance fee and associated interest charges may apply. To avoid these fees or for reduced fees, use a debit card or check other payment methods.

5 Funds may be delayed or services unavailable based on certain transaction conditions, including amount sent, destination country, currency availability, regulatory issues, identification requirements, Agent location hours, differences in time zones, or selection of delayed options. For mobile transactions funds will be paid to receiver’s mWallet account provider for credit to account tied to receiver’s mobile number. Additional third-party charges may apply, including SMS and account over-limit and cash-out fees. See the transfer form for restrictions.

* Terms and Conditions apply. Restrictions apply, see amazon.com/gc-legal

Источник: https://www.westernunion.com/us/en/home.html

Soup kitchen

Place where food is available at no cost as charity

For the former restaurant, see Soup Kitchen International.

A soup kitchen, food kitchen, or meal center, is a place where food is offered to the hungry usually for free or sometimes at a below-market price (such as via coin donations upon visiting). Frequently located in lower-income neighborhoods, soup kitchens are often staffed by volunteer organizations, such as church or community groups. Soup kitchens sometimes obtain food from a food bank for free or at a low price, because they are considered a charity, which makes it easier for them to feed the many people who require their services.

Many historical and modern soup kitchens serve only soup, or just soup with bread. But other establishments which refer to themselves as a "soup kitchen" also serve a wider range of food, so social scientists sometimes discuss them together with similar hunger relief agencies that provide more varied hot meals, like food kitchens and meal centers.

While societies have been using various methods to share food with the hungry for millennia, the first soup kitchens in the modern sense may have emerged in the late 18th century. By the late 19th century, they were located in several American and European cities. In the United States and elsewhere, they became more prominent in the 20th century, especially during the Great Depression. With the much improved economic conditions that immediately followed World War II, soup kitchens became less widely used, at least in the advanced economies. In the United States, there was a resurgence in the use of soup kitchens following the cutbacks in welfare that were implemented in the early 1980s.

In the 21st century, the use of soup kitchens expanded in both the United States and Europe, following lasting global increases in the price of food which began in late 2006. Demand for their services grew as the Great Recession began to worsen economic conditions for those with lower incomes. In much of Europe, demand further increased after the introduction of austerity-based economic policies from 2010.[citation needed]

History[edit]

The earliest occurrences of soup kitchens are difficult to identify. Throughout history, societies have invariably recognized a moral obligation to feed the hungry. The philosopher Simone Weil wrote that feeding the hungry when one has resources to do so is the most obvious obligation of all. She also said that as far back as Ancient Egypt, it was believed that people needed to show they had helped the hungry in order to justify themselves in the afterlife.[1] Soup has long been one of the most economical and simple ways to supply nutritious food to large numbers of people.[2][3]

The Christian church had been providing food to the hungry since St Paul's day, and since at least the early middle ages such nourishment was sometimes provided in the form of soup.[4] From the 14th to the 19th centuries, Islamic soup kitchens, called Imarets, were built throughout the Ottoman Empire. Soup and bread were often the main food served, though sometimes also rice, meat, fruit and sweet puddings.[5]

Social historian Karl Polanyi wrote that before markets became the world's dominant form of economic organisation in the 19th century, most human societies would generally either starve all together or not at all; because, communities would naturally share their food. As markets began to replace the older forms of resource allocation such as redistribution, reciprocity, and autarky, society's overall level of food security would typically rise. But food insecurity could become worse for the poorest section of society, and the need arose for more formal methods for providing them with food.[6]

Emergence of the modern soup kitchen[edit]

The earliest modern soup kitchens were established by the inventor Sir Benjamin Thompson, who was employed as an aide-de-camp to the Elector of Bavaria in the 1790s. Thompson was an American loyalist refugee from New England and an inventor who was ennobled by Bavaria as Count Rumford. The Count was a prominent advocate of hunger relief, writing pamphlets that were widely read across Europe.[4][7][8]

Count Rumford's message was especially well received in Great Britain, where he had previously held a senior government position for several years and was known as "the Colonel". An urgent need had recently arisen in Britain for hunger relief, due to her leading role in driving the Industrial Revolution. While technological development and economic reforms were rapidly increasingly overall prosperity, conditions for the poorest were often made worse, as traditional ways of life were disrupted. In the closing years of the 18th century, soup kitchens run on the principles pioneered by Rumford were to be found throughout England, Wales, and Scotland, with about 60,000 people being fed by them daily in London alone.[4][7]

While soup kitchens were initially well regarded, they attracted criticism from some, for encouraging dependency, and sometimes on a local level for attracting vagrants to an area. In Britain, they were made illegal, along with other forms of aid apart from workhouses, by the Poor Law Amendment Act 1834.[a]

During the Irish famine of the 19th century, in which as many as one million people may have died, the British government passed the Temporary Relief Act (also known as the Soup Kitchen Act) in February 1847. The Act amended the restrictions on the provision of aid outside the workhouses for the duration of the famine and expressly allowed the establishment of soup kitchens in Ireland to relieve pressure from the overstretched Poor Law system, which was proving to be totally inadequate in coping with the disaster.[9]

Prohibition against soup kitchens was soon relaxed on mainland Britain too, though they never again became as prevalent as they had been in the early 19th century, partly as from the 1850s onwards, economic conditions generally began to improve even for the poorest. For the first few decades after the return of soup kitchens to mainland Britain, they were at first heavily regulated, run by groups like the Charity Organization Society. Even in the early 20th century, campaigning journalists like Bart Kennedy would criticize them for their long queues, and for the degrading questions staff would ask the hungry before giving out any soup.[4]

Spread to the United States[edit]

The concept of soup kitchens spread to the United States from Ireland after the Great famine and the concomitant wave of Irish emigration to the New World.[9] The earliest ones were established in the 1870s. A sharp rise in the number of hungry people resulting from an industrial recession coincided with the success of the AICP, and the American branch of the Charity Organization Society, in getting various forms of "outdoor relief"[b] banned. This resulted in civil society establishing soup kitchens, to help feed those of the poor who did not wish to subject themselves to the regimented organisation of the Almshouses favored by the charitable societies.[10]

It is believed the term “breadline” entered the popular lexicon in the 1880s. It was during those years that a noteworthy bakery in New York City’s Greenwich Village, “Fleischmann Model Viennese Bakery,” instituted a policy of distributing unsold baked goods to the poor at the end of their business day.[11] By the late 19th century soup kitchens were to be found in several US cities.[7][12] The concept of soup kitchens hit the mainstream of United States consciousness during the Great Depression. One soup kitchen in Chicago was even sponsored by American mobster Al Capone in an effort to clean up his image.[13]

With the improved economic conditions that followed the Second World War, there was less need for soup kitchens in advanced economies.[14] However, with the scaling back of welfare provision in the 1980s under president Reagan's administration, there was a rapid rise in activity from grass roots hunger relief agencies such as soup kitchens. According to a comprehensive government survey completed in 2002, over 90% of food banks, about 80% of emergency kitchens, and all known food rescue organisations, were established in the US after 1981.[14][15] Presently, Catholic Charities USA of Colorado Springs, Colorado, founded by The Sisters of Loretto, provides food to upwards of 600-700 persons or more per day, and has been doing so since 1985.[16]

In the 21st century[edit]

Use of soup kitchens has grown rapidly across the world, following the lasting global inflation in the cost of food that began in late 2006. The financial crisis of 2007–2008 further increased the demand for soup kitchens, as did the introduction of austerity policies that have become common in Europe since 2010. Modern soup kitchens are generally well regarded, though like their historical counterparts they are sometimes disliked by local residents for lowering the tone of a neighborhood.[15][17][18][19]

Sikh temple soup kitchens[edit]

Every Sikh shrine has a religiously sanctioned moral and humanitarian obligation to serve and provide hospitality, provisions, nourishments and meals to any man, regardless of race, creed, religious profession, identification, or affiliation. At the Langar (the temple's community run free kitchen), food is served to all visitors regardless of faith, religion, or background. Only vegetarian food is served and people eat together as equals. The institution of the Sikh langar was started by the first Sikh Guru, Guru Nanak. It was designed to uphold the principle of equality between all people regardless of religion, caste, colour, creed, age, gender, or social status. In addition to the ideals of equality, the tradition of langar expresses the ethics of sharing, community, inclusiveness, and oneness of humankind.

World's largest soup kitchen[edit]

Main article: Harmandir Sahib

The world's largest (and longest running) soup kitchen is run at the Sikhs' holiest shrine, Golden Temple in Punjab, India, which according to Croatian Times can serve free food for up to 100,000 - 300,000 people every day.[20] (This number has since increased.) It was started in circa 1481 A.D by Guru Nanak and has continued ever since, except for two brief breaks.

Comparison with front line food banks and pantries[edit]

In some countries such as Great Britain, increased demand from hungry people has largely been met by food banks, operating on the "front line" model, where they give food out directly to the hungry. In the USA, such establishments are called "food pantries"; Americans generally reserve the term "food bank" for entities which perform a warehouse-like function, distributing food to front line agencies, but not directly to the hungry themselves. Instead of providing hot meals, front line food banks and pantries hand out packages of groceries so that recipients can cook themselves several meals at home. This is often more convenient for the end user. They can receive food for up to a dozen or so meals at once, whereas with a soup kitchen, they typically only receive a single meal with each visit.[c]

Food banks typically have procedures needed to prevent unscrupulous people taking advantage of them, unlike soup kitchens which will usually give a meal to whoever turns up with no questions asked. The soup kitchen's greater accessibility can make it more suitable for assisting people with long-term dependence on food aid. Soup kitchens can also provide warmth, companionship, and the shared communal experience of dining with others, which can be especially valued by people such as disabled, pensioners, widowers, homeless and ex-homeless. In some countries such as Greece, soup kitchens have become the most widely used form of food aid, with The Guardian reporting in 2012, that an estimated 400,000 Greeks visit a soup kitchen each day.[9][15][21][22][23]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^Note that criticism of soup kitchens was only a minor driver of the 1834 law - the move was driven more by free market ideology and discontent with other forms of "outdoor" aid like the much more widely disliked Speemhanland system, see Hunger in the United Kingdom.
  2. ^In the main, this meant ending the practice where municipal officials would give out small sums of cash to the poor. Unlike in Britain a few decades earlier, the US did not pass nationwide laws restricting private individuals from giving food to the hungry.
  3. ^Although some soup kitchens also like to give visitors a second "carry out" meal.

References[edit]

  1. ^Simone Weil (2002) [1942]. The Need for Roots. Routledge. p. 6. ISBN .
  2. ^Victoria R. Rumble (2009). "Chpt 29, Soup Kitchens". Soup Through the Ages. McFarland. ISBN .
  3. ^Pat Thane (30 April 2011). "There Has Always Been a 'Big Society'". historyworkshop.org.u. Retrieved 9 February 2013.
  4. ^ abcdVictoria R. Rumble (2009). "Chpt 29, Soup Kitchens". Soup Through the Ages. McFarland. ISBN .
  5. ^Amy Singer (historian) (2005). "Serving Up Charity: The Ottoman Public Kitchen". Journal of Interdisciplinary History. 35: 481–500. doi:10.1162/0022195052564252.
  6. ^Karl Polanyi (2002) [1942]. "chpt. 1-5". The Great Transformation. Beacon Press. ISBN .
  7. ^ abcLisa Bramen (29 December 2010). "Count Rumford and the History of the Soup Kitchen". Smithsonian. Retrieved 9 February 2013.
  8. ^"The Shadow Behind Our Founding Fathers: A traitor, a scientist, a womanizer and an enigma" review of Nicholas Delbanco's The Count of ConcordBook World p. 9, June 22, 2008, The Washington Post.
  9. ^ abcGwendolyn Mink and Alice O'Connor (2004). Poverty in the United States. ABC-CLIO. pp. 321–323. ISBN .
  10. ^Todd DePastino (2005). Citizen Hobo: How a Century of Homelessness Shaped America. University of Chicago Press. p. 22. ISBN .
  11. ^Wetsteon, Ross (2003). Republic of Dreams: Greenwich Village, the American Bohemia, 1910–1960. Simon & Schuster. preface. ISBN .
  12. ^James Vernon (2007). "Chpts. 1-3". Hunger: A Modern History. Harvard University Press. ISBN .
  13. ^"Soup Kitchens"Social Security Online History Page.
  14. ^ abJanet Poppendieck (1999). "Introduction, Chpt 1". Sweet Charity?: Emergency Food and the End of Entitlement. Penguin. ISBN .
  15. ^ abcAndrew Walter (2012). William A Dando (ed.). Food and Famine in the 21st Century. ABC-CLIO. pp. 171–181. ISBN .
  16. ^"Marian House Soup Kitchen". ccharitiescc.org. Retrieved 3 April 2018.
  17. ^Claire Bessette (14 February 2013). "Norwich soup kitchen hearing postponed". TheDay.com.
  18. ^"HOUSEHOLD FOOD SECURITY IN THE GLOBAL NORTH: CHALLENGES AND RESPONSIBILITIES REPORT OF WARWICK CONFERENCE"(PDF). Warwick University. 6 July 2012. Archived from the original(PDF) on 12 January 2013. Retrieved 28 August 2012.
  19. ^Nick Squires (5 February 2013). "Knights of Malta to open soup kitchens in Britain". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 3 March 2013.
  20. ^"SCOFF THAT - Free Food Daily For 300,000 at Worlds largest Soup Kitchen". croationtimes.com. 12 April 2013. Retrieved 17 September 2013.
  21. ^John Henley (14 March 2012). "Greece on the breadline: how leftovers became a meal". The Guardian. Retrieved 9 February 2013.
  22. ^Mat Clinch (8 February 2013). "Food bank visits surge, not just for the poor". GlobalPost. Retrieved 9 February 2013.
  23. ^Clare Lissaman (25 January 2013). "'Community spirit' fuels Wolverhampton soup kitchen". BBC. Retrieved 15 February 2013.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soup_kitchen

Food Bank vs. Food Pantry

A food bank and a food pantry are two very different things.

A FOOD BANK is an organization that collects product from the food industry and food drives, inventories and stores it, and distributes it to agencies – such as food pantries, soup kitchens, Kids Cafes and shelters – that provide food directly to individuals in need. A food bank has the capacity to distribute millions of pounds of grocery product every year. Food banks make it easy for agencies to obtain nutritious food at low cost in the quantities they need for their clients.

A FOOD PANTRY is an individual site that distributes bags or boxes of food directly to those in need who reside in a specified area. A food pantry is a member agency of, and obtains food from, a food bank. Both food pantries and food banks share the same commitment: to provide food to those in need.

A food bank makes it easy for agencies to obtain nutritious food at low cost in the quantities they need for their clients. Individual agencies in northwest Pennsylvania depend on Second Harvest for most of the food they provide to those in need.

Источник: https://nwpafoodbank.org/get-educated/food-bank-vs-food-pantry/

Basic Needs

Welcome to the Food Pantry!

The Food Pantry is an emergency food relief supply for all UC Berkeley students (undergraduate and graduate), staff, visiting scholars, student researchers, postdocs, and faculty. We are currently located on the 1st floor of the MLK Student Union, moving back to our previous location in  BNorth next year. We are currently open for walk ups only during open hours. If you currently have to quarantine due to COVID-19 and cannot come in person, please see our external delivery request form below open hours.

We offer items such as rice, pasta, milk, cereal, freezer items, and fresh produce!

Students and staff are welcome to come up to once per week, take as much as needed whenever needed while being mindful that it is a shared community resource for emergencies. 

The Pantry operates on a self-assessed need basis. There are no eligibility requirements and all you need is your Cal ID or Cal ID # (if you don't have your physical card yet).

Источник: https://basicneeds.berkeley.edu/pantry

Savings Account

The eligibility and documentation required for a Savings Account may vary on the type of Savings Account variant chosen as well as the type of user (Individual or Joint) or the nature of account opening (Physical or Digital Savings Account).

Certain common documents requested include:

• KYC Documents (Proof of Identification, Address and Nationality)
• A Duly Filled Account opening form
• Photographs of the customer
• Transfer of the initial funding amount as and when applicable.

Please remember however that this is not an exhaustive list; do check the Eligibility and Documentation sections of your chosen Savings Account variant as some features are liable to change.

For Example: In order to open an Easy Access Savings Account for HUFs (Hindu Undivided Families) will require additional documents such as a declaration from the “Karta” and the prescribed Joint Hindu Family Letter while, during application for a Digital Savings Account need not be submitted as hard copies and can just be recorded via Video KYC.

Источник: https://www.axisbank.com/retail/accounts/savings-account

‘Heating or eating’

In an upmarket neighborhood in west London, a growing number of people are visiting a storefront tucked between a bicycle shop and a coffee house that charges no money and caters exclusively to the less fortunate.

Dad’s House is one of 2,200 food banks in the United Kingdom that serve Britons who are struggling to afford basic necessities. Billy McGranaghan, its founder, told CNN Business that "the future is bleak" for the people who frequent his shop.

London’s food banks were busy before the pandemic. But now, as the United Kingdom braces for a second winter with coronavirus, rising food prices, higher energy costs and cuts to government benefits are putting huge pressure on household budgets and forcing legions of people to turn to charity.

Food banks in the capital city have reported a surge of visits in recent weeks, with more and more working professionals seeking help with groceries following the end of a government program that subsidized millions of jobs during the pandemic and a reduction in welfare payments to those with lower incomes.

McGranaghan, 58, estimates that he's added 70 recipients to his food bank since mid-September, on top of the 300 to 400 already being served each week. The demographics of the new customers are broader than ever before, he said. Roughly 70 people were expected on the day CNN Business visited Dad's House.

“It’s been an eye-opener, where you would never have thought that person would ever use a food bank,” he said. “They’ve never been in that position.”

Dad’s House volunteer Luke Tydeman, left, helps a customer.

Hundreds of people are served at Dad’s House each week.

McGranaghan said that Dad's House has served teachers, graphic designers and journalists during the pandemic. People tend to come to the food bank via referrals from the local government, or after searching online for support.

But now, new clients tend to be younger and single. And despite relatively low unemployment and a record number of job vacancies across the country, McGranaghan anticipates a “huge surge” in attendees over the next few months.

“We’re seeing a rise again … because of the electricity prices, because of the gas, because of the end of furlough,” he said.

Marie, 63, who declined to provide her surname, first came to Dad’s House four months ago and is already worried about her next quarterly heating bill. Her husband has problems with his blood circulation, she said, so maintaining a warm house is essential.

“Food-wise we don’t eat a lot because we don't indulge in luxurious food, it’s just basic,” she said. “It’s the energy prices that's never come down, never come down, so that is the worry.”

Seven miles to the east, at another London food bank, up to 100 customers were expected at an evening meal service attended by CNN Business. Staffers prepared pumpkin soup.

Robert Hunningher, 42, turned part of his catering business, Humdingers, into a food bank in May last year, serving up to 1,000 people a week during the lockdown.

He said the number of visitors has “skyrocketed” by up to 250 per week since late September. A wide range of people are now turning up, he said, including young professionals, schoolteachers and a semi-pro tennis player.

“Even if you have a job, there’s no hope because you can't afford to live here,” Hunningher said. “Everything is out of arm's reach and then the prices are going up so much.”

Gary Lemon, director of policy and research at The Trussell Trust, which distributes groceries to about two thirds of UK food banks — although not Dad's House or Humdingers — told CNN Business that many of its members are “very busy with more people needing to come to them for emergency food.”

“They expect this to continue in the weeks leading up to Christmas," Lemon added.

Bills through the roof

Rising fuel and food costs have pushed up household bills for millions of Britons. Since January, wholesale gas prices have soared 423%, according to data from industry group Oil & Gas UK. A mix of factors explain the rise, including higher demand from Asia and lower-than-expected Russian gas exports.

In response, the UK energy regulator increased its consumer price cap — the maximum suppliers can charge customers per unit of energy — by up to 13% starting October 1, affecting 15 million people.

Jameson Keane, 49, an artist who cares for his mother, started coming to Dad’s House during the pandemic.

“I’m on a limited budget, about £100 ($138) a week,” he told CNN Business. “My money gets eaten up very quickly.”

Keane said his energy costs are higher than ever before, despite using similar amounts of fuel. He estimates that the money in his energy meter is being spent about “a third faster in the last two weeks — especially the gas.”

Higher energy prices are a problem across Europe, but Britain's relatively low levels of stored gas make it particularly exposed to volatile energy markets.

Many Brits are bracing for higher bills in April when the energy regulator next adjusts its consumer price cap.

‘Heating or eating’

More than a decade of government austerity in the United Kingdom has eaten away at budgets for health care, housing and welfare. A blistering 2019 report by the United Nations’ Human Rights Council blamed spending cuts for the “systematic immiseration of millions.”

Before the pandemic, about 14.5 million Britons, or 22%, were living in poverty, according to the government's own measure. The Joseph Rowntree Foundation, a think tank, expects even more people to fall into poverty as pandemic benefits taper off.

Kadriye Ali stands outside Humdinger's Soup Kitchen. She has noticed food becoming more expensive and started going to the food bank 10 months ago.

Fruits and vegetables are on display at Dad’s House. Food banks in London have reported a surge of visits in recent weeks.

In early October, the government cut Universal Credit — a benefit claimed by those out-of-work or earning low incomes — back to its pre-pandemic level. More than 5.8 million people lost £20 ($28) a week, adding up to £1,040 ($1,431) a year.

McGranaghan said the cuts have forced some of his clients to make difficult choices.

“(They will) have a salad on a cold October night instead of actually having something that they could have put in the oven,” he said. “That's the reality of losing £20 a week — it’s heating or eating.”

Amina, a food bank client who declined to give her full name, said the temporary benefit hike had been a lifeline for her family of five.

“For me it’s very helpful, £20, maybe for another, someone else it's nothing, but for me it’s money, especially for family, if you’ve got kids,” she said.

“When you’re used to having something and they take it away, you can feel the difference,” she added. “We don’t know how to manage, honestly.”

The UK government has also wrapped up its £69 billion ($95 billion) pandemic furlough program. In August, it reduced payments to employers from 70% of a worker's monthly salary to 60%, before stopping them altogether at the end of September.

Sabine Goodwin, coordinator of the Independent Food Aid Network, an organization representing more than 500 food banks, including Dad's House, told CNN Business that “there’s a real danger that demand will outstrip food banks' capacity to support people” this winter.

She added that the government's reliance on charities to feed its people was “neither morally acceptable nor sustainable.”

A spokesperson for the UK Department for Work and Pensions, which administers benefit payments, told CNN Business that “Universal Credit continues to provide a vital safety net for millions.”

The spokesperson said that the government was committed to eradicating poverty and had created a new £500 million ($688 million) fund to help “the most vulnerable with essential costs through this winter.”

A ‘Catch-22’ for strained food banks

Food banks are not a new phenomenon in modern Britain — between 2010 and 2019, the number of emergency food parcels distributed by The Trussell Trust rose 2,543%, driven in part by cuts to the country’s social security system.

But supply chain bottlenecks, inflating food prices and shortages in supermarkets have limited their ability to feed struggling households as the economy emerges from its pandemic slump.

McGranaghan told CNN Business that this puts Dad's House in a “Catch-22.”

“We’re relying on the public to donate food, but they haven’t got enough food on the shelves for their families,” he said. “That’s when the donations decrease and that's a huge, huge worry for all independent food banks.”

In east London, Hunningher said that supermarkets no longer let him buy in bulk as they are short of stock.

“I’m having to go to more expensive places,” he said. “The 20 (pence) pasta at Tesco’s (supermarket) is fantastic and I need seven boxes a week — I’m not allowed it.”

Mai Pedersen receives a hot meal from Humdinger's Soup Kitchen. Like many others, she was working up until the pandemic, and then fell upon hard times and started accessing free meals.

A father arrives at Humdinger's Soup Kitchen with his children. A wide range of people are now turning up, says Robert Hunningher.

Supermarkets are having trouble keeping their shelves stocked because the United Kingdom is short 100,000 truck drivers, due in part to an exodus of EU workers following Brexit. The pandemic also limited the number of certification tests for new commercial truck drivers.

Shortages were made even worse in September when service stations across the country ran out of fuel following a spate of panic buying.

FareShare, a charity which redistributes surplus supermarket food to charities and community groups, including food banks, told CNN Business that all of its 30 regional centers had been affected by shortages.

Lindsay Boswell, FareShare's CEO, said that it normally receives up to 160 metric tons of groceries a day, but the fuel shortage cut deliveries to under 100 metric tons.

“Up to 30% of the food we would normally expect to receive into our warehouses on an average day is at risk of not reaching us,” Boswell said. “And (is) therefore at risk of not reaching the vulnerable people we support.”

‘We’re going back in time’

Some economists have warned that rising inflation in the United Kingdom, combined with weak economic growth, could lead to a period of “stagflation” reminiscent of the 1970s, when wages failed to keep pace with the rocketing cost of living.

As higher grocery prices erode Britons’ purchasing power, food banks are preparing for more visitors, and to spend more themselves.

Rajesh Makwana, the director of Sufra, a food bank in north-west London, told CNN Business that he is “bracing for increased demand as the cost of living continues to rise.”

“Our food costs are already unsustainably high, so even a small increase would be painful,” he added.

Inflation was up 3.1% in September, according to official data. That's above the central bank’s target rate of 2% but far short of the 5% pace that could be reached early next year, according to Bank of England chief economist Huw Pill.

The government plans to increase the minimum wage from £8.91 ($12.27) to £9.50 ($13.09) an hour in April, but the mounting cost of living will temper the boost to Britons' spending power.

Geraldine Hurley, 62, a retiree from east London, passed by Humdingers as it opened its evening meal service, and stopped to talk to CNN Business.

“My coffee, it’s always been £5 ($6.88) a jar, it’s now in Tesco’s for £5.75 ($7.91),” she said. “What sort of increase is that?”

Although Hurley applauds food banks like Humdingers for stepping up to support her community, she is frustrated by their necessity.

“We really shouldn't be doing it nowadays,” she said. “We’re going back in time.”

Источник: https://www.cnn.com/interactive/2021/11/business/london-food-banks-cnnphotos/

Find Food

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Click the “More” filter, select “Diaper distribution” and then “Done” to find a site near you giving away free diapers!

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How to find a free food pantry near me

The Greater Chicago Food Depository’s find food map can help you find a food pantry or food program near you. Search the map to find free food or a hot meal at a food pantry, soup kitchen, shelter, mobile program or food program in Chicago and Cook County. Use the map filters to find a food pantry that is open today or on the day that works best for you to visit.

The Food Depository is Chicago’s food bank. We provide food for people facing hunger and food insecurity. Visit a food distribution today to receive healthy food and groceries for yourself and your family.

Источник: https://www.chicagosfoodbank.org/find-food/
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