are organic eggs good for you

As you face the challenge of losing weight, it's important to eat foods that are naturally nutrient-rich and stave off hunger between meals. The egg is an ". The old adage "you are what you eat" certainly holds true when Free range chicken eggs, pasture raised hens, organic, cage-free – all. Bottom line: While there may be no significant nutritional difference between organic and conventional produce, organic does have lower levels.

: Are organic eggs good for you

TARRANT COUNTY SOUTHWEST COURTHOUSE
Are organic eggs good for you
MICHIGAN UIA ONLINE CERTIFICATION
NPR logo

NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites (together, are organic eggs good for you to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic. This information is shared with social media, sponsorship, analytics, and other vendors or service providers. See details.

You may click on “Your Choices” below to learn about and use cookie management tools to limit use of cookies when you visit NPR’s sites. You can adjust your cookie choices in those tools at any time. If you click “Agree and Continue” below, you acknowledge that your cookie choices in those tools will be respected and that you otherwise agree to the use of cookies on NPR’s sites.

YOUR CHOICES

Источник: https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2014/12/23/370377902/farm-fresh-natural-eggs-not-always-what-they-re-cracked-up-to-be

The Nutrition of Organic Eggs

Organic eggs have been produced under the strict rules required for them to be classified as organic food. These protocols require that the hens are given organic feed, allowed outdoor space to roam and limited in the use of antibiotics. The positive outcome of these strict rules is that you are left with an egg that is in theory hormone- and antibiotic-free. Some people report that organic eggs have a better flavor than regular eggs, but the primary benefit of organic eggs is the health of the animal and of the planet. Organic eggs have a similar nutritional value to regular eggs. Eggs have been a popular food source due to being low in calories and fats with some essential nutrients.

Other Label Claims to Be Aware of Include:

Natural: This term simply means that nothing is added to the egg but all eggs are natural.

Cage-Free/Free-roaming hens: these terms indicate that hens are allowed to roam in a room or open space, typically a barn or poultry house.

Free-range/pasture-fed: indicate that the eggs are produced by hens who had outdoor access. Some people think these eggs taste better because in addition to the chicken feed, these hens can also eat plants and insects.

Nutritional Value of Organic Eggs

1 whole poached organic egg

Calories: 71

Fats: 5g / 8% DV

Carbohydrates: 0g

Protein: 6g

Fiber: 0g

Selenium: 15.8mcg / 23% DV

Riboflavin: 0.2mg / 12% DV

Vitamin B12: 0.6mcg / 11% DV

Phosphorus: 95.0mg / 10% DV

Omega-3 Fatty Acid: 37 mg

Health Benefits of Organic Eggs

  • Organic is better for the planet! Hens who live up to the organic label are fed an organic diet without conventional fertilizers or pesticides and limited antibiotics. This means that there are less pesticides, fertilizers or antibiotics being leached into the environment and into your body.
  • Riboflavin is a B vitamin that also helps your cells to produce energy. Additionally, it uses the amino acid tryptophan to make niacin in the body. Tryptophan and its metabolites regulate things like appetite, sleeping-waking-rhythm and pain perception. Niacin is important for helping your body utilize food to produce energy.
  • One egg is a good source of phosphorus. Phosphorus is part of your bones, teeth and DNA/RNA. It is also one of the main regulators of energy metabolism in organs, and helps generate energy in every cell.
  • Eggs are a high source of selenium. Selenium is a trace mineral frb dallas works with vitamin E for antioxidant protection. Eating enough selenium can help reduce your risk of cancer, heart disease and other diseases.
11milksmall.jpg

The Nutrition of Lowfat Milk


Emily DeLacey MS, RD is a Registered Dietitian and currently working in Jamaica as a HIV/ AIDS Prevention Specialist. She attended Central Washington University for her Bachelor's Degree in Science and Dietetics and continued on after her internship to Kent State University for her Master's Degree in Science and Nutrition, with a focus on public health and advocacy. She served as a U.S. Peace Corps Volunteer in Malawi 2012-2014 working as a Community Health Advisor in a rural village, immersing in the joys of life without electricity or running water. She has been to 20+ countries and 47 of the 50 states in the US. Traveling, adventuring and experiencing new cultures has made her a passionate advocate for the equality of nutrition and wellness for all people.

Источник: https://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/nutrition/healthy-eating/the-nutrition-of-organic-eggs.html

Are organic eggs better for you?

A box of eggs as four supermarkets have taken products off their shelves in the wake of the egg contamination scare - as the Food Standards Agency says the scale of the problem is higher than previously thought.

When it comes to cooking eggs, we know that not all yolks are equal.

The healthiest way to get your morning dose is to poach or boil your eggs, avoiding any added oils, salts or saturated sauces that may come with frying.

But what about the actual eggs?

There’s a plethora of different eggy options out there, from organic to cage-free and it’s not entirely obvious exactly what the different types mean for the birds’ welfare and for the nutritional content of the egg.

So, does the way a chicken has been reared affect the health-value of the egg?

Well, not necessarily.

Eggs are essentially eggs, but eggs produced by free-range chickens tend to have a slightly better nutritional profile – especially if we’re north rockland high school map about chickens who are organic eggs good for you spend most of their time outdoors with plenty of space to roam.

Birds who get to eat insects and plants can transfer a wider array of nutrients into the eggs, while caged birds are fed a restrictive diet of chicken feed. We know that chickens who live beak-to-beak with other birds in cramped cages experience high cortisol levels and it doesn’t seem beyond the realms of possibility that animals kept in those kinds of hellish conditions may well find their eggs affected by the stress.

It’s worth saying are organic eggs good for you cage-free doesn’t necessarily mean free-range; cage-free hens are simply chickens that aren’t housed in enclosures; they still might be raised in over-crowded hen houses with little-to-no time outdoors.

The colour of the yolk can be a bit of an indicator when it comes to nutritional profile.

Yolks are sources of lutein and zeaxanthin – two important antioxidants that look after the health of your eyes. The deeper the yellow of the yolk, the higher the levels of these antioxidants. Hens reared on the waste products of the grain industry (i.e. those unable to get out and eat lots of tasty grasses and bugs) tend to produce lighter yolks.

As for the question of splashing out on organic eggs, it depends how keen you are on ingesting tiny amounts of chemicals.

Toxic pollutants have shown to be present in eggs thanks to the fact that hens’ feed has been produced in fields covered in pesticides, fungicides, herbicides and fertilisers.

Organic eggs also come from hens which not only are reared on chemical-free grasses, but they’ve also not been treated with hormones (which fatten them up).

If you’re looking for a vitamin D injection, you may be better off opting for ‘pasture-raised’ eggs, which come from hens who are kept properly out in the open. Research has shown that eggs from hens who spend more time in the sun can contain up to six times more vitamin D than regular eggs.

More: Lifestyle

Oh, and you can get Omega-3 enriched eggs which come from hens who have been fed omega-3-rich feed (great for promoting healthy eyes and heart).

Bearing in mind that Omega-3 tends to come from oily fish, that’s a great option for vegetarians looking to up their load. But you can get the mineral from soybeans, nuts and seeds like walnuts, chia seeds and flaxseeds, as well as canola oil.

So it’s probably better to think about your eggs from a humane angle; happier hens = healthier eggs.

The nutritional difference is actually pretty minimal and you could get the tiny differences in vitamin and mineral content from other sources. But if you can afford to spend a little extra on eggs that come from happier hens, you could also see the nutritional content of your eggs improve a little.

MORE : Millennials really aren’t frivolous with their money – and here’s proof

MORE : I went snorkelling with are organic eggs good for you at SEA LIFE London because, well, sharks are incredible

Источник: https://metro.co.uk/2018/07/29/organic-eggs-better-7772522/

The Egg-straordinarily High Quality Nutrition of Backyard Chicken Eggs

Backyard chickens all around the world are clucking about their egg-straordinarily nutrient rich eggs! Backyard chicken keepers know that when they allow their chickens to free range, their chooks’ eggs are indeed healthier. Why? Free ranged chickens are “free” to egg-splore and forage, consuming plants, insects, and seeds and grains which provide them with a much higher quality diet than that of just feed. They are consuming nutrition as nature intended-they’re pecking simple, organic, additive- free, and nutritionally rich food which promotes healthy growth and development. So, what’s all that clucking about, anyway? Well, let’s take a look at the factors that greatly influence the quality of chicken eggs.

the-environment-which-chickens-are-raised-affects-nutrition

Environment is Everything!

The environment in which chickens are raised is essential to their general health and wellbeing. Environment is really everything. An ideal environment is one that offers ample space to move freely about inside their house, as well as, to leisurely roam the good earth for the dual-purpose of egg-sercising and foraging. The benefits of daily egg-ercise and access to the “all-chickens-can-peck” buffet of nature, are egg-ceptional! Chickens that get the majority of their nutrition from nature are healthier all around-they are able to consume more omega-3 richness from legumes, vitamin E from whole grains and fresh greens, vitamin A from corn, vitamin B2 or Riboflavin from legumes, leafy greens, and tomatoes, and vitamin D, a vital ingredient in the absorption of calcium and phosphorous needed for quality egg production, from basking in the warmth of the glorious sunshine, and protein, fat, vitamins and minerals from slurping up tasty worms and bugs!

Proper Nutrition is Vital!

Most backyard chicken keepers put a lot of time and effort into feeding their flock. We offer our chooks the “Oh So Good for Them” opportunity to free range the day away, for shorter periods daily or as often as possible.  When we allow our chooks to free range, we are blessing them with the gift of great grub, and the chance to eat plenty of green plants, luscious legumes, great  grains,  spectacular seeds, and incredibly delicious insects.  We choose commercially produced  feed appropriate to our flocks’ stages of development or we mix up our own unique batch whether it be fermented or unfermented feed. And, we supplement, supplement, supplement by offering our fine feathered friends kitchen scraps chock full of vitamins and minerals, probiotics, fresh from our garden herbs and vegetables, and boost their immune system with ACV (Apple Cider Vinegar) added to their water.

eggs-are-incredibly-nutritious-and-healthy

The Egg-straordinarly Incredible Edible Egg!

So, how do backyard farm fresh eggs compare to factory raised chicken eggs? Let’s take a peek inside the incredible edible backyard chicken egg and see what we discover.

Chicken eggs are a staple food found in virtually every refrigerator or sitting pretty atop a kitchen countertop throughout the world. However, not all chicken eggs are created equal.  Eggs from chickens raised in small backyard flocks or on family farms are by far stronger, healthier and so much better for us than those produced by their overcrowded factory cage-raised counterparts. Backyard chicken eggs have more of the good stuff such as Omega-3s and bright colorful yolks and much less of the bad stuff such as the infamous cholesterol and saturated fat!

Age aside, a hen’s egg is a direct reflection of her environment and nutritional intake.  Research shows that backyard chicken eggs contain a higher quality of nutrition in comparison to eggs laid by commercial factory hens.  In this quest are organic eggs good for you compare nutritional quality, several studies have been conducted around the world. In 1988, research for the book, The Omega Diet, unveiled supportive evidence in eggs laid by backyard hens in Greece.  A British study in 1974 concurred.  More recently, in 2007, a study conducted by Mother Earth News revealed that free- ranged hens from fourteen different small family farms across the United States laid eggs that were far superior in nutritional quality than hens raised in cramped, stuffy, confined conditions with no access to the great outdoor buffet!  Check out these startling statistics:

  • Twice as much Omega-3 Fatty Acids

  • Three times more Vitamin E

  • Seven times more Beta-carotene from Vitamin A

  • Fifty percent more Folic Acid

  • One quarter LESS Saturated Fat

  • One third LESS Cholesterol

  • Up to six times more Vitamin D

  • Significantly more of the B Vitamins

  • Significantly more of the Antioxidants, Lutein and Zeaxanthin

Backyard chickens do truly get to live their lives to the fullest! This awesome lifestyle manifests itself in healthy looking, clucky, flap-happy chooks who lay LOTS of large strong- shelled nutritiously healthier EGGS! The wonderful world of backyard chickens = an essential environment for happy healthy chooks and delicious egg-straordinarily nutrient rich eggs which in turn = happy healthy backyard chicken keepers! Now that’s definitely a win-win situation!

healthier-chickens-means-healthier-eggs

The benefits of having chickens are limitless! From friendly companionship to fresh produce, being a chicken keeper is both rewarding and eggciting! Nothing beats having home-laid eggs in the house for delicious, healthy meals and baking treats. However, in order to get a frequent, fresh supply of eggs, keepers need to look after the chickens are organic eggs good for you lay them. There can be multiple issues that are stopping your ladies from laying which is stressful for them and for you!

Don’t worry though – the eggsperts at Chickenpedia have cracked it! They have created the Eggs in Your Basket course to help you, help your ladies lay successfully. Discover crucial information to keep your chickens happy, healthy, and frequent layers. All your egg questions will be answered in this extensive course.

From double yolkers, to soft shells, no eggs, to odd eggs, Chickenpedia cover it all! Check out their great beginner-friendly courses today.

Sources and further reading

Related Articles

backyard chooks near taj mahal coop
Essential Tools for Keeping Chickens

by Kassandra SmithJanuary 13, 2021

Keeping chickens is a flap-happy experience. Why? Well, thankfully, chickens need little care and maintenance. So, you have a LOT of free happy-go-clucky time to.

View full article →

chickens eating leafy greens feature
5 Chicken Treats for Better Quality Backyard Eggs

by Backyard Chicken CoopsJanuary 09, 2019

Making sure our laying ladies are happy and healthy in their backyard chicken coop is an important part of keeping chooks. If you’re fortunate enough.

View full article →

basket-of-eggs
Cool and Quirky Ideas For Using Our Fresh Eggs!

by Kassandra SmithDecember 01, 2018

Think eggs are just great for eating? Think again! Eggs are incredibly versatile little miracles, and there are lots of tricks are organic eggs good for you tips you can.

View full article →

Fertilised chicken egg diagram

EggsRaising Baby Chicks

Everything You Need To Know About Fertile Eggs

by Kassandra SmithJanuary 13, 2021

What are they? Technically speaking, fertile eggs are where the ‘blastodisc’ turns into a ‘blastoderm’ - the first stage of a developing embryo.  In layman's.

View full article →

Different coloured chicken eggs and speckled eggs

BreedsEggsKids Corner

Different Coloured Eggs and the Breeds That Lay Them

by Kassandra SmithJanuary 09, 2021

It’s a very common practice among backyard chicken keepers to keep LOTS of egg-exquisitely different breeds! Why? Chicken keeping is quite addictive and once bitten.

View full article →

 roosters can be great guardians for your backyard chickens

Chicken BehaviorChickens 101Protecting the Flock

The 4 Essential Tips for Keeping a Rooster in your Urban Backyard

by Kassandra SmithJanuary 09, 2021

Roosters are a contentious issue among backyard chicken keepers. On the one hand, these charming chaps can be a huge benefit in keeping your flock.

View full article →

wyandotte chickens eating mealworm treats in chicken run

Chickens 101HealthNutrition

Top 5 Treats for Chickens

by Kassandra SmithFebruary 26, 2021

To keep chickens happy, healthy and laying bounties of delicious eggs, they need to be fed a varied diet rich in protein and calcium- most.

View full article →

Black Australorp bantam chicken laying in taj mahal nesting box

Chicken CoopsChickens 101Eggs

Poultry Nesting Boxes - The Facts

by Kassandra SmithJanuary 13, 2021

It’s morning! Time to peek inside those poultry nesting boxes and gather all the egg-ceptionally fresh eggs! This is truly the most egg-citing part of.

View full article →

Rooster in backyard

Chickens 101

Do I Need a Rooster in My Backyard Flock?

by Kassandra SmithJanuary 12, 2021

Plain and simple, the answer is no! Hens are one of the most captivating creatures on the face of the earth. They are beautiful, intelligent.

View full article →

Illustration of a fertile chicken egg with a developing embryo

HealthIncubatingRaising Baby Chicks

Incubation: How To Tell If An Egg Is Fertile Or Infertile

by Kassandra SmithFebruary 05, 2021

Not sure whether your eggs are fertile? There are a couple of different methods you can use to see if there’s potential life inside an.

View full article →

silver-laced-wyandotte

Breeds

Wyandottes: A Comprehensive Guide

by Kassandra SmithJanuary 10, 2021

Wyandottes are splendid birds that come in an endless variety of colours. This American bred bird is incredibly popular all over the world - not.

View full article →

Rooster and chicken flock

Chicken BehaviorChickens 101Health

Gender Bender: When Your Hen Thinks She's A He!

by Kassandra SmithJanuary 10, 2021

You have yourself a lovely flock of girls- they get along harmoniously, you collect their delicious fresh produce each and every morning- everything is going.

View full article →


Источник: https://www.backyardchickencoops.com.au/blogs/learning-centre/the-egg-straordinarily-high-quality-nutrition-of-backyard-chicken-eggs

The Most Important Foods to Buy Organic

Organic foods aren’t just for granola-crunching hippies anymore. These days, they’re growing in popularity and availability worldwide. But this raises the question: With so many options available, which foods are worth buying organic?

Food for Thought — The Need to Know

Organic foods are often associated with fewer synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, but the USDA has created plenty of other requirements to make the grade as a certified organic food. In the case of livestock, animal health and welfare play a role. The livestock must also be raised without hormones or antibiotics and fed an organic diet. Organic crops can’t be grown with synthetic fertilizers, certain prohibited pesticides, sewage sludge, or genetically modified organisms (GMO). And multi-ingredient foods (think packaged foods in the center of the grocery store) must include 95 percent organic ingredients to earn the organic label. But all that organic TLC costs extra. For farmers, organic foods are more expensive to grow, meaning higher prices may be unavoidable. To avoid the premium price tag (and getting ripped off!), there are a few other key words to look for:

Natural: This product label is not synonymous with organic. “Natural” means that the product doesn’t contain any artificial ingredients or colors. These products are also minimally processed, but the label must include a more detailed explanation of what exactly makes it natural.

Free-Range: “Free-range” or “free-roaming” means that the animals have access to the outdoors, though there is no standard for how much access they have. Consider springing for organic rather than free-range if animal welfare is a primary concern.

Cage-Free: Some egg producers house hens in cage-free environments. These systems are generally considered to offer better conditions for the animals, though they’re still far from cruelty-free. There’s no evidence the nutritional quality of the eggs differs based on caged and cage-free systems.

Antibiotic-free:Antibiotic-resistant bacteria can result from the overuse of antibiotics, and those bacteria can be passed from animals to humans through the food chain. Farms that use fewer antibiotics have been shown to have fewer resistant bugs, which may make their products safer when they reach the table (though studies are still preliminary).

Hormone-free: The presence of hormones is one of the most significant differences between conventional and organic milk products, even if there still isn’t absolute evidence that hormones are dangerous. For buyers that choose to avoid hormones, hormone-free (rather than all-out organic) dairy products offer the same benefits at a potentially lower price.

Transitional: Going organic ain’t cheap or quick (for the farmer!), and the easiest way to help a farm make the switch is buying transitional food. “Transitional” means that the product has been cultivated according to organic standards, but the soil and farm conditions haven’t yet completely met organic standards or the farm’s organic status is pending.

Getting Your Green On — Your Action Plan

Farmers that cultivate organic foods must use methods that promote biodiversity, cycle resources, and generally look after Mother Nature But what the heck does that mean? Greatist digs in to find out what these extra requirements do for nutritional value:

Meats: If meat is what’s for dinner, the environment, health, and animal welfare may all influence the decision to go organic. Three things make organic livestock unique: They’re raised without antibiotics and hormones, they’re given proper veterinary treatment whenever necessary, and they have access to the outdoors, sunlight, and clean water— all of which affect each type of meat differently.

Beef: For the most part, scientists agree that the drugs given to animals carry over to the meat on that dinner table, but they can’t seem to agree on whether beef growth hormones— used to make animals grow larger faster— pose a health risk to humans. And while the European Food Safety Authority has concluded that hormones may be linked to certain cancers and early puberty, U.S. agencies maintain that they’re perfectly safe. Cows’ diets may also affect the quality of meat. While organic cows must graze in pastures for at least 120 days per year, conventional cattle are typically cooped up indoors without grazing time. Some studies show that pasture feeding can result in leaner meat with higher concentrations of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids.

Chicken: The jury (read: scientists) is out as to whether organic poultry beats conventional in terms of nutrition. But the limitation on antibiotics could result in fewer antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria. Reducing antibiotics may be better for the environment, too, as antibiotic-laden run-off could be poisonous to wildlife and could even make its way into the water supply. On the other hand, allowing chickens more access to the outdoors— as is the case with organic poultry— could actually increase the risk of infection and contamination. Given the conflicting results, the choice between conventional and organic chicken comes down to a matter of preference— if animal welfare and the environment are a priority, organic poultry may be worth the splurge.

Pork: One significant difference between organic and conventional pork is that organic, cured pork products don’t include chemical preservatives like nitrate and nitrite. These preservatives have occasionally been linked to gastric cancer and birth defects, though there is not enough data to support a causal relationship. Instead, organic cured meats are preserved with vegetable derivatives that contain natural nitrate. However, the veggies don’t preserve quite as well as the chemical versions, so food safety is especially important when cooking up organic bacon, sausage, and deli meats.

Fruits and Vegetables:Compared to conventional produce, organic fruits and veggies are grown with far fewer pesticides, which have been associated with developmental neurological issues among children. Research has also suggested organic food may be more nutritious— with fewer nitrates and more vitamin C, for example— though these studies are far from conclusive. Peeling fruits and vegetables or removing outer layers of leafy greens is also a great way to cut back on pesticide intake. That said, certain fruits and veggies might be more important to buy organic than others. Enter, the Environmental Working Group’s (EWG) Clean 15 and Dirty Dozen. The Dirty Dozen generally have the most pesticide residues when are organic eggs good for you conventionally because they’re more prone to pesky bugs.Purchase these fruits and veggies organic whenever possible to avoid the potentially harmful effects of pesticides:

ApplesCeleryBlueberries

StrawberriesNectarinesLettuce

PeachesSpinach

Bell PeppersPotatoes

KaleCollard Greens

Dairy and Eggs: Organic dairy and meat animals are afforded the same creature comforts, and the same regulations apply to their diet and medical treatment.

Milk: As with beef cattle, hormones —used to increase milk production— are a hotly-debated issue with dairy cows, too. One study found that organic milk has significantly higher concentrations of the hormones estradiol and progesterone which may help prevent the potentially breast cancer-causing effects of milk’s Vitamin D, but had a lower concentration of IGF-1, the hormone that triggers the onset of puberty. Organic milk may also be healthier thanks to a higher concentration of beneficial fatty acids. However, one study suggests organic milk could be lower in iodine, a necessary nutrient. Further confusing matters, a separate study found that organic and conventional milk were almost identical in protein and bacteria count, making the still-controversial hormone debate the deciding factor between the two.

Eggs: While some say organic eggs are no higher in quality than conventional eggs, opponents argue that organic eggs are still worth the splurge because they can be more nutritious and free of dangerous chemicals and antibiotics. One study found that, when given access to a grazing pasture, chickens produced eggs with more omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin A, and vitamin E. On the other hand, a study based in Taiwan found that chickens permitted access to the outdoors actually produced eggs with significantly higher concentrations of pollutants. The pollutants found in those eggs were prevalent in Taiwan, though, so this study’s findings may not apply b2b high interest savings rate. As with other dairy and meat items, antibiotics fed to chickens could crop up in the end product (under USDA-established tolerable levels, of course), so skip conventional eggs if this is a personal concern.

Photo by Marissa Angell

Источник: https://greatist.com/health/most-important-foods-buy-organic

Egg Varieties

The egg section in your grocery store is stocked with many varieties of eggs. Some specialty eggs appear to be healthier than the regular white eggs. Are they worth the extra money?

egg varieties

Did You Know?

Egg yolk color is determined by the type of feed a hen eats. A wheat-based diet will produce a pale yellow yolk, while a corn or alfalfa-based diet yields a darker yellow yolk. The most important thing to remember is that the color of a yolk does not indicate egg quality, freshness, or nutritional value.

egg nutrition

  • Brown Eggs: Eggshell color can vary but it has nothing to do with the quality, flavor, nutritive value, cooking characteristics or shell thickness of an egg. The eggshell color is mostly dependent upon the breed of the hen.
  • Omega 3 enhanced eggs are from hens fed a diet of flax seed or fish oils. Omega-3 enhanced eggs contain more omega-3 fatty acids and Vitamin E than regular eggs. An independent test conducted by the CBC TV show Marketplace found that omega-3 enhanced eggs contain approximately 7 times more omega-3 fatty acids than regular white eggs.
  • Organic eggs are produced by hens fed certified organic grains without most conventional pesticides and fertilizers. Growth hormones and antiobiotics are also prohibited for this designation class. Organic eggs have the same nutritional content, fat or cholesterol as regular eggs.
  • Free-Run or Cage-free eggs are produced by hens that are able to move about the floor of the barn and have access to nesting boxes and perches. The nutrient content of these eggs is the same as that of regular eggs.
  • Free-Range eggs are produced in a similar environment as cage-free eggs but hens have access to outdoor runs as well. The nutrient content of these eggs is the same as that of regular eggs.
  • Processed eggs such as liquid egg whites or dried egg whites are regular eggs broken by special machines then pasteurized spirit airlines phone number usa being further processed and packaged into a liquid, frozen or dried form. Processed egg products may also contain preservatives, flavor or color additives.

Studies have shown that healthy adults can enjoy an egg every day without increasing their risk for heart disease. A study by the Harvard School of Public Health found no significant link between eating eggs and developing heart disease among healthy individuals. And health authorities have since removed the daily upper limits for cholesterol intake. However, if you have high cholesterol or known risks for heart diseases, the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) recommends not eating more than 2 egg yolks per week (you can have as many egg whites as you like).

The Bottom Line

Eggs are a nutrition powerhouse. Rich in folate, Vitamin B12, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, eggs also provides a good source of lutein, a type of an antioxidant.

According to the Egg Nutrition Center, the nutritional value of an egg is affected ONLY by the feed. In other words, specialty eggs such as organic eggs, or cage-free eggs provide the same nutritional value as the regular varieties if their feeds are the same.

If you are concerned about animal welfare, you may look for United Egg Producers Certified Are organic eggs good for you. These eggs come from hens living in humane conditions with attention to living environment, healthcareand treatment. More information about the UEP program here.

Categories Nutrition 101Tags cage-free, eggs, free-range, free-run, omega-3, organicИсточник: https://www.healthcastle.com/eggs-101-are-some-eggs-healthier-than-others/

Similar video

Are organic eggs good for you -

Brown Eggs Vs White Eggs: What's the Difference?

When it comes to food, the golden rule is that brown is better. Brown bread, wheat pasta, whole wheat crackers, brown sugar - they're all considerably healthier than their white counterparts. But, what about brown eggs? Does the colour of it's skin, in this case shell, make it healthier than white eggs? Or just like in the case of people, what's on the inside is what really matter. The only real difference between brown and white eggs that you might know as a matter of fact is that brown eggs are more expensive than the white ones. Their nutritional profile, quality and type is all hearsay. 

So, what you should know is that do brown eggs pack more nutrients than the white ones? And if so, does that justify the price difference? And what real difference does it really make in terms of calories? Do they really taste different and does that reflect on how healthy or unhealthy they are?

Brown Eggs Vs. White Eggs: What's The Difference?

According to Tro V. Bui, a visiting fellow in animal science at Cornell University, "There is no real difference in nutritional value between brown and white eggs."(as quoted by a popular daily)

He added, "However brown eggs have more Omega-3 fatty acids but the difference is almost negligible."

White eggs are laid by white-feathered chickens with white or light coloured earlobes while the brown ones are laid by brown-feathered chickens with red earlobes. You would be correct to assume that there are more white eggs in the market than brown ones but that's because breeding and raising white-feathered chickens is much cheaper. Since they aren't fed as much as their brown counterparts.

The reason brown eggs cost more is because they come from chickens that have a big appetite! And also because they're a bit bigger in size. These brown feathered chickens eat more and hence are expensive to keep.

o6v9m7mg

Eggs are replete with antioxidants

A lot of research has been done to identify the difference between brown and white eggs in terms of nutritional value but so far the majority seems to believe that there isn't any. Dr.Gargi Sharma, weight-management expert believes that brown eggs are healthier than white egg and for those looking to get their fair share of protein and and at the same time wanting to keep in check things like cholesterol and calories, brown eggs are a better option.

However, nutritionist Niharika Ahluwalia says, "There is no real difference between brown and white eggs in terms of nutritional value. But these days brown eggs are associated with being organic, which might make them seem a healthier choice. But, if the chicken was fed regular food, then the eggs wouldn't be organic."

Brown and white eggs taste different! Yes, they do. But that has nothing to do with quality or nutritional profile of the egg but more with the diet of the chicken that laid it. The chickens are fed a different kind of diet which impacts the quality and taste of the egg. So if you were to feed a brown chicken and a white chicken the same kind of food, the difference in taste would go unnoticed. The colour of the yolk in brown eggs is much darker, yes. But that's because brown hens are fed a lot of corn at times.

Some people believe that there is a slight difference between the shell of brown and white eggs but there really isn't. The only thing you might factor in, is that younger hens lay eggs with harder shells. But this applies to both white and brown chickens.

Nutritional Value Of Eggs:

As per United Stated Department of Agriculture (USDA), a 100-gram serving of egg has 12.56 grams of proteins, which is why nutritionists consider it as a good, inexpensive source of protein that diabetics can have in their diet.

One large egg (50 grams) has about 72 calories and 4.75 grams of fat, only 1.5 grams of which is saturated fat, as per the USDA. Eggs are versatile and can be prepared in different ways to suit your palate. You can make an already-healthy food even more healthy by mixing in tomatoes, onions, and other veggies.

So, the next time you're picking up a batch of eggs for breakfast make sure you're more concerned about the quality of chickens it comes from rather than it's colour.

For the latest food news, health tips and recipes, like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter and YouTube.

Источник: https://food.ndtv.com/food-drinks/brown-eggs-vs-white-eggs-whats-the-difference-743350

Egg Varieties

The egg section in your grocery store is stocked with many varieties of eggs. Some specialty eggs appear to be healthier than the regular white eggs. Are they worth the extra money?

egg varieties

Did You Know?

Egg yolk color is determined by the type of feed a hen eats. A wheat-based diet will produce a pale yellow yolk, while a corn or alfalfa-based diet yields a darker yellow yolk. The most important thing to remember is that the color of a yolk does not indicate egg quality, freshness, or nutritional value.

egg nutrition

  • Brown Eggs: Eggshell color can vary but it has nothing to do with the quality, flavor, nutritive value, cooking characteristics or shell thickness of an egg. The eggshell color is mostly dependent upon the breed of the hen.
  • Omega 3 enhanced eggs are from hens fed a diet of flax seed or fish oils. Omega-3 enhanced eggs contain more omega-3 fatty acids and Vitamin E than regular eggs. An independent test conducted by the CBC TV show Marketplace found that omega-3 enhanced eggs contain approximately 7 times more omega-3 fatty acids than regular white eggs.
  • Organic eggs are produced by hens fed certified organic grains without most conventional pesticides and fertilizers. Growth hormones and antiobiotics are also prohibited for this designation class. Organic eggs have the same nutritional content, fat or cholesterol as regular eggs.
  • Free-Run or Cage-free eggs are produced by hens that are able to move about the floor of the barn and have access to nesting boxes and perches. The nutrient content of these eggs is the same as that of regular eggs.
  • Free-Range eggs are produced in a similar environment as cage-free eggs but hens have access to outdoor runs as well. The nutrient content of these eggs is the same as that of regular eggs.
  • Processed eggs such as liquid egg whites or dried egg whites are regular eggs broken by special machines then pasteurized before being further processed and packaged into a liquid, frozen or dried form. Processed egg products may also contain preservatives, flavor or color additives.

Studies have shown that healthy adults can enjoy an egg every day without increasing their risk for heart disease. A study by the Harvard School of Public Health found no significant link between eating eggs and developing heart disease among healthy individuals. And health authorities have since removed the daily upper limits for cholesterol intake. However, if you have high cholesterol or known risks for heart diseases, the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) recommends not eating more than 2 egg yolks per week (you can have as many egg whites as you like).

The Bottom Line

Eggs are a nutrition powerhouse. Rich in folate, Vitamin B12, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, eggs also provides a good source of lutein, a type of an antioxidant.

According to the Egg Nutrition Center, the nutritional value of an egg is affected ONLY by the feed. In other words, specialty eggs such as organic eggs, or cage-free eggs provide the same nutritional value as the regular varieties if their feeds are the same.

If you are concerned about animal welfare, you may look for United Egg Producers Certified Eggs. These eggs come from hens living in humane conditions with attention to living environment, healthcare , and treatment. More information about the UEP program here.

Categories Nutrition 101Tags cage-free, eggs, free-range, free-run, omega-3, organicИсточник: https://www.healthcastle.com/eggs-101-are-some-eggs-healthier-than-others/

The Egg-straordinarily High Quality Nutrition of Backyard Chicken Eggs

Backyard chickens all around the world are clucking about their egg-straordinarily nutrient rich eggs! Backyard chicken keepers know that when they allow their chickens to free range, their chooks’ eggs are indeed healthier. Why? Free ranged chickens are “free” to egg-splore and forage, consuming plants, insects, and seeds and grains which provide them with a much higher quality diet than that of just feed. They are consuming nutrition as nature intended-they’re pecking simple, organic, additive- free, and nutritionally rich food which promotes healthy growth and development. So, what’s all that clucking about, anyway? Well, let’s take a look at the factors that greatly influence the quality of chicken eggs.

the-environment-which-chickens-are-raised-affects-nutrition

Environment is Everything!

The environment in which chickens are raised is essential to their general health and wellbeing. Environment is really everything. An ideal environment is one that offers ample space to move freely about inside their house, as well as, to leisurely roam the good earth for the dual-purpose of egg-sercising and foraging. The benefits of daily egg-ercise and access to the “all-chickens-can-peck” buffet of nature, are egg-ceptional! Chickens that get the majority of their nutrition from nature are healthier all around-they are able to consume more omega-3 richness from legumes, vitamin E from whole grains and fresh greens, vitamin A from corn, vitamin B2 or Riboflavin from legumes, leafy greens, and tomatoes, and vitamin D, a vital ingredient in the absorption of calcium and phosphorous needed for quality egg production, from basking in the warmth of the glorious sunshine, and protein, fat, vitamins and minerals from slurping up tasty worms and bugs!

Proper Nutrition is Vital!

Most backyard chicken keepers put a lot of time and effort into feeding their flock. We offer our chooks the “Oh So Good for Them” opportunity to free range the day away, for shorter periods daily or as often as possible.  When we allow our chooks to free range, we are blessing them with the gift of great grub, and the chance to eat plenty of green plants, luscious legumes, great  grains,  spectacular seeds, and incredibly delicious insects.  We choose commercially produced  feed appropriate to our flocks’ stages of development or we mix up our own unique batch whether it be fermented or unfermented feed. And, we supplement, supplement, supplement by offering our fine feathered friends kitchen scraps chock full of vitamins and minerals, probiotics, fresh from our garden herbs and vegetables, and boost their immune system with ACV (Apple Cider Vinegar) added to their water.

eggs-are-incredibly-nutritious-and-healthy

The Egg-straordinarly Incredible Edible Egg!

So, how do backyard farm fresh eggs compare to factory raised chicken eggs? Let’s take a peek inside the incredible edible backyard chicken egg and see what we discover.

Chicken eggs are a staple food found in virtually every refrigerator or sitting pretty atop a kitchen countertop throughout the world. However, not all chicken eggs are created equal.  Eggs from chickens raised in small backyard flocks or on family farms are by far stronger, healthier and so much better for us than those produced by their overcrowded factory cage-raised counterparts. Backyard chicken eggs have more of the good stuff such as Omega-3s and bright colorful yolks and much less of the bad stuff such as the infamous cholesterol and saturated fat!

Age aside, a hen’s egg is a direct reflection of her environment and nutritional intake.  Research shows that backyard chicken eggs contain a higher quality of nutrition in comparison to eggs laid by commercial factory hens.  In this quest to compare nutritional quality, several studies have been conducted around the world. In 1988, research for the book, The Omega Diet, unveiled supportive evidence in eggs laid by backyard hens in Greece.  A British study in 1974 concurred.  More recently, in 2007, a study conducted by Mother Earth News revealed that free- ranged hens from fourteen different small family farms across the United States laid eggs that were far superior in nutritional quality than hens raised in cramped, stuffy, confined conditions with no access to the great outdoor buffet!  Check out these startling statistics:

  • Twice as much Omega-3 Fatty Acids

  • Three times more Vitamin E

  • Seven times more Beta-carotene from Vitamin A

  • Fifty percent more Folic Acid

  • One quarter LESS Saturated Fat

  • One third LESS Cholesterol

  • Up to six times more Vitamin D

  • Significantly more of the B Vitamins

  • Significantly more of the Antioxidants, Lutein and Zeaxanthin

Backyard chickens do truly get to live their lives to the fullest! This awesome lifestyle manifests itself in healthy looking, clucky, flap-happy chooks who lay LOTS of large strong- shelled nutritiously healthier EGGS! The wonderful world of backyard chickens = an essential environment for happy healthy chooks and delicious egg-straordinarily nutrient rich eggs which in turn = happy healthy backyard chicken keepers! Now that’s definitely a win-win situation!

healthier-chickens-means-healthier-eggs

The benefits of having chickens are limitless! From friendly companionship to fresh produce, being a chicken keeper is both rewarding and eggciting! Nothing beats having home-laid eggs in the house for delicious, healthy meals and baking treats. However, in order to get a frequent, fresh supply of eggs, keepers need to look after the chickens that lay them. There can be multiple issues that are stopping your ladies from laying which is stressful for them and for you!

Don’t worry though – the eggsperts at Chickenpedia have cracked it! They have created the Eggs in Your Basket course to help you, help your ladies lay successfully. Discover crucial information to keep your chickens happy, healthy, and frequent layers. All your egg questions will be answered in this extensive course.

From double yolkers, to soft shells, no eggs, to odd eggs, Chickenpedia cover it all! Check out their great beginner-friendly courses today.

Sources and further reading

Related Articles

backyard chooks near taj mahal coop
Essential Tools for Keeping Chickens

by Kassandra SmithJanuary 13, 2021

Keeping chickens is a flap-happy experience. Why? Well, thankfully, chickens need little care and maintenance. So, you have a LOT of free happy-go-clucky time to...

View full article →

chickens eating leafy greens feature
5 Chicken Treats for Better Quality Backyard Eggs

by Backyard Chicken CoopsJanuary 09, 2019

Making sure our laying ladies are happy and healthy in their backyard chicken coop is an important part of keeping chooks. If you’re fortunate enough...

View full article →

basket-of-eggs
Cool and Quirky Ideas For Using Our Fresh Eggs!

by Kassandra SmithDecember 01, 2018

Think eggs are just great for eating? Think again! Eggs are incredibly versatile little miracles, and there are lots of tricks and tips you can...

View full article →

Fertilised chicken egg diagram

EggsRaising Baby Chicks

Everything You Need To Know About Fertile Eggs

by Kassandra SmithJanuary 13, 2021

What are they? Technically speaking, fertile eggs are where the ‘blastodisc’ turns into a ‘blastoderm’ - the first stage of a developing embryo.  In layman's...

View full article →

Different coloured chicken eggs and speckled eggs

BreedsEggsKids Corner

Different Coloured Eggs and the Breeds That Lay Them

by Kassandra SmithJanuary 09, 2021

It’s a very common practice among backyard chicken keepers to keep LOTS of egg-exquisitely different breeds! Why? Chicken keeping is quite addictive and once bitten...

View full article →

 <div><h2>The Most Important Foods to Buy Organic</h2><div><p>Organic foods aren’t just for granola-crunching hippies anymore. These days, they’re growing in popularity and availability worldwide. But this raises the question: <strong>With so many options available, which foods are worth buying organic?</strong></p><h3>Food for Thought — The Need to Know</h3><p>Organic foods are often associated with fewer synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, but the USDA has created plenty of other requirements to make the grade as a certified organic food. In the case of livestock, animal health and welfare play a role. <strong>The livestock must also be raised without hormones or antibiotics and fed an organic diet. Organic crops can’t be grown with synthetic fertilizers, certain prohibited pesticides, sewage sludge, or genetically modified organisms (GMO)</strong>. And multi-ingredient foods (think packaged foods in the center of the grocery store) must include 95 percent organic ingredients to earn the organic label. But all that organic TLC costs extra. For farmers, organic foods are more expensive to grow, meaning higher prices may be unavoidable. To avoid the premium price tag (and getting ripped off!), there are a few other key words to look for:</p><p><strong>Natural:</strong> This product label is not synonymous with organic. “Natural” means that the product doesn’t contain any artificial ingredients or colors. These products are also minimally processed, but the label must include a more detailed explanation of what exactly makes it natural.</p><p><strong>Free-Range: </strong>“Free-range” or “free-roaming” means that the animals have access to the outdoors, though there is no standard for <em>how much</em> access they have. Consider springing for organic rather than free-range if animal welfare is a primary concern.</p><p><strong>Cage-Free: </strong>Some egg producers house hens in cage-free environments. These systems are generally considered to offer better conditions for the animals, though they’re still far from cruelty-free. There’s no evidence the nutritional quality of the eggs differs based on caged and cage-free systems.</p><p><strong>Antibiotic-free:</strong>Antibiotic-resistant bacteria can result from the overuse of antibiotics, and those bacteria can be passed from animals to humans through the food chain. Farms that use fewer antibiotics have been shown to have fewer resistant bugs, which may make their products safer when they reach the table (though studies are still preliminary).</p><p><strong>Hormone-free:</strong> The presence of hormones is one of the most significant differences between conventional and organic milk products, even if there still isn’t absolute evidence that hormones are dangerous. For buyers that choose to avoid hormones, hormone-free (rather than all-out organic) dairy products offer the same benefits at a potentially lower price.</p><p><strong>Transitional: </strong>Going organic ain’t cheap or quick (for the farmer!), and the easiest way to help a farm make the switch is buying transitional food. “Transitional” means that the product has been cultivated according to organic standards, but the soil and farm conditions haven’t yet completely met organic standards or the farm’s organic status is pending.</p><h3>Getting Your Green On — Your Action Plan</h3><p>Farmers that cultivate organic foods must use methods that promote biodiversity, cycle resources, and generally look after Mother Nature But what the heck does that mean? Greatist digs in to find out what these extra requirements do for nutritional value:</p><p><strong><u>Meats:</u></strong> If meat is what’s for dinner, the environment, health, and animal welfare may all influence the decision to go organic. <strong>Three things make organic livestock unique: They’re raised without antibiotics and hormones, they’re given proper veterinary treatment whenever necessary, and they have access to the outdoors</strong>, sunlight, and clean water— all of which affect each type of meat differently.</p><p><strong>Beef:</strong> For the most part, scientists agree that the drugs given to animals carry over to the meat on that dinner table, but they can’t seem to agree on whether beef growth hormones— used to make animals grow larger faster— pose a health risk to humans. And while the European Food Safety Authority has concluded that hormones may be linked to certain cancers and early puberty, U.S. agencies maintain that they’re perfectly safe. Cows’ diets may also affect the quality of meat. While organic cows must graze in pastures for at least 120 days per year, conventional cattle are typically cooped up indoors without grazing time. Some studies show that <strong>pasture feeding can result in leaner meat with higher concentrations of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids</strong>.</p><p><strong>Chicken: </strong>The jury (read: scientists) is out as to whether organic poultry beats conventional in terms of nutrition. But the limitation on antibiotics could result in fewer antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria. Reducing antibiotics may be better for the environment, too, as antibiotic-laden run-off could be poisonous to wildlife and could even make its way into the water supply. On the other hand, allowing chickens more access to the outdoors— as is the case with organic poultry— could actually increase the risk of infection and contamination. Given the conflicting results, the<strong> choice between conventional and organic chicken comes down to a matter of preference— if animal welfare and the environment are a priority, organic poultry may be worth the splurge</strong>.</p><p><strong>Pork: </strong>One significant difference between organic and conventional pork is that organic, <strong>cured pork products don’t include chemical preservatives like nitrate and nitrite</strong>. These preservatives have occasionally been linked to gastric cancer and birth defects, though there is not enough data to support a causal relationship. Instead, organic cured meats are preserved with vegetable derivatives that contain natural nitrate. However, the veggies don’t preserve quite as well as the chemical versions, so food safety is especially important when cooking up organic bacon, sausage, and deli meats.</p><p><strong>Fruits and Vegetables:</strong>Compared to conventional produce, organic fruits and veggies are grown with far fewer pesticides, which have been associated with developmental neurological issues among children. <strong>Research has also suggested organic food may be more nutritious— with fewer nitrates and more vitamin C</strong>, for example— though these studies are far from conclusive. Peeling fruits and vegetables or removing outer layers of leafy greens is also a great way to cut back on pesticide intake. That said, certain fruits and veggies might be more important to buy organic than others. Enter, the Environmental Working Group’s (EWG) Clean 15 and Dirty Dozen. <strong>The Dirty Dozen generally have the most pesticide residues when grown conventionally because they’re more prone to pesky bugs.</strong>Purchase these fruits and veggies organic whenever possible to avoid the potentially harmful effects of pesticides:</p><p>ApplesCeleryBlueberries</p><p>StrawberriesNectarinesLettuce</p><p>PeachesSpinach</p><p>Bell PeppersPotatoes</p><p>KaleCollard Greens</p><p><strong>Dairy and Eggs:</strong> Organic dairy and meat animals are afforded the same creature comforts, and the same regulations apply to their diet and medical treatment.</p><p><strong>Milk: </strong>As with beef cattle,<strong> hormones —used to increase milk production— are a hotly-debated issue with dairy cows</strong>, too. One study found that organic milk has significantly higher concentrations of the hormones estradiol and progesterone which may help prevent the potentially breast cancer-causing effects of milk’s Vitamin D, but had a lower concentration of IGF-1, the hormone that triggers the onset of puberty. Organic milk may also be healthier thanks to a higher concentration of beneficial fatty acids. However, one study suggests organic milk could be lower in iodine, a necessary nutrient. Further confusing matters, a separate study found that organic and conventional milk were almost identical in protein and bacteria count, making the still-controversial hormone debate the deciding factor between the two.</p><p><strong>Eggs: </strong>While some say<strong> organic eggs are no higher in quality than conventional eggs, opponents argue that organic eggs are still worth the splurge because they can be more nutritious and free of dangerous chemicals and antibiotics</strong>. One study found that, when given access to a grazing pasture, chickens produced eggs with more omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin A, and vitamin E. On the other hand, a study based in Taiwan found that chickens permitted access to the outdoors actually produced eggs with significantly higher concentrations of pollutants. The pollutants found in those eggs were prevalent in Taiwan, though, so this study’s findings may not apply overseas. <strong>As with other dairy and meat items, antibiotics fed to chickens could crop up in the end product (under USDA-established tolerable levels, of course), so skip conventional eggs if this is a personal concern.</strong></p><p><em>Photo by Marissa Angell</em></p></div>Источник: https://greatist.com/health/most-important-foods-buy-organic</div> roosters can be great guardians for your backyard chickens

Chicken BehaviorChickens 101Protecting the Flock

The 4 Essential Tips for Keeping a Rooster in your Urban Backyard

by Kassandra SmithJanuary 09, 2021

Roosters are a contentious issue among backyard chicken keepers. On the one hand, these charming chaps can be a huge benefit in keeping your flock...

View full article →

wyandotte chickens eating mealworm treats in chicken run

Chickens 101HealthNutrition

Top 5 Treats for Chickens

by Kassandra SmithFebruary 26, 2021

To keep chickens happy, healthy and laying bounties of delicious eggs, they need to be fed a varied diet rich in protein and calcium- most...

View full article →

Black Australorp bantam chicken laying in taj mahal nesting box

Chicken CoopsChickens 101Eggs

Poultry Nesting Boxes - The Facts

by Kassandra SmithJanuary 13, 2021

It’s morning! Time to peek inside those poultry nesting boxes and gather all the egg-ceptionally fresh eggs! This is truly the most egg-citing part of...

View full article →

Rooster in backyard

Chickens 101

Do I Need a Rooster in My Backyard Flock?

by Kassandra SmithJanuary 12, 2021

Plain and simple, the answer is no! Hens are one of the most captivating creatures on the face of the earth. They are beautiful, intelligent,...

View full article →

Illustration of a fertile chicken egg with a developing embryo

HealthIncubatingRaising Baby Chicks

Incubation: How To Tell If An Egg Is Fertile Or Infertile

by Kassandra SmithFebruary 05, 2021

Not sure whether your eggs are fertile? There are a couple of different methods you can use to see if there’s potential life inside an...

View full article →

silver-laced-wyandotte

Breeds

Wyandottes: A Comprehensive Guide

by Kassandra SmithJanuary 10, 2021

Wyandottes are splendid birds that come in an endless variety of colours. This American bred bird is incredibly popular all over the world - not...

View full article →

Rooster and chicken flock

Chicken BehaviorChickens 101Health

Gender Bender: When Your Hen Thinks She's A He!

by Kassandra SmithJanuary 10, 2021

You have yourself a lovely flock of girls- they get along harmoniously, you collect their delicious fresh produce each and every morning- everything is going...

View full article →


Источник: https://www.backyardchickencoops.com.au/blogs/learning-centre/the-egg-straordinarily-high-quality-nutrition-of-backyard-chicken-eggs

The healthfulness—or unhealthiness—of eggs is a continual point of controversy in the nutrition community. Are they really a smart, protein-packed breakfast option? Or are you sitting down to heart problems on a plate? Should you eat the yolks or switch to egg whites instead?

The answer, as always, is that moderation is key. While eating four eggs every day might not be best, evidence suggests that eating up to one egg per day won't increase your risk of health issues like heart disease or stroke.

Recently, however, vegan eggs have hit the market. With a rising desire for sustainable and plant-based foods, you can now find meats and eggs made not from animals, but from plants. A few brands stand out for this animal-free alternative, including Just Egg, Follow Your Heart, and Simply Eggless. Even well-known health brands, like Bob's Red Mill, offer an egg replacement.

So are vegan eggs really the way to go, or should you stick with the real eggs you know and love to eat at breakfast? We tapped New York City-based dietitian Natalie Rizzo, M.S., R.D., to find out.

What are vegan eggs, exactly?

Just Egg has been made to resemble real eggs, using turmeric and mung bean protein to create an egg-like texture and flavor. Reviews of the product on Amazon stated that people were pleasantly surprised by its similarity to chicken eggs in its texture, smell, and taste.

Are vegan eggs healthy?

That's the real question: Are these egg alternatives as healthy as the real deal? According to Rizzo, the answer is yes.

“Regular eggs and Just Egg are pretty similar,” Rizzo tells Runner’s World. “For example, a regular egg and Just Egg both have 70 calories and 5 grams of fat per serving (one large egg versus 3 tablespoons). Regular eggs have 6 grams of protein, while Just Egg has 5 grams of protein, so that’s also similar.”

The only real nutritional downside is that real eggs have added nutrients such as vitamin D, vitamin B12, choline, and antioxidants like lutein and zeaxanthin, Rizzo says. Though you may focus on the protein, these nutrients play an important role in bone health, cognition, energy, pregnancy, and eye health, she explains.

“Another concern is that vegan eggs are made with a whole list of ingredients like mung bean protein isolate, canola oil, natural flavors, potassium citrate, and soy lecithin,” Rizzo says. While these aren’t necessarily bad for you, it’s a complicated list, especially if you are attempting to eat more whole foods that are less processed.

What else should you know about vegan eggs?

It’s worth noting that free-range, organic eggs can be cheaper than some of the vegan egg options, especially if you're buying a dozen eggs. (The Follow Your Heart Brand currently sells for $15 on Amazon, while Just Egg costs about $4 for 12 fluid ounces.)

If you already follow a plant-based diet—or are simply curious and want to give them a try—there is no harm in adding these vegan eggs to your plate. But if you eat regular eggs and are looking for an added nutritional boost, vegan eggs probably won't fulfill that goal. Go for what tastes best for you and what fits your lifestyle—that’s always the best way to decide what diet choice is right for you.

This content is imported from {embed-name}. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

Gabrielle HondorpBefore joining Runner's World as an Editor in 2019, Gabrielle Hondorp spent 6 years in running retail (she has tested top gear from shoes, to watches, to rain jackets which has expanded her expertise—and her closets); she specializes in health and wellness, and is an expert on running gear from head-to-toe.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Источник: https://www.runnersworld.com/nutrition-weight-loss/a28541659/are-vegan-eggs-healthy/

The Nutrition of Organic Eggs

Organic eggs have been produced under the strict rules required for them to be classified as organic food. These protocols require that the hens are given organic feed, allowed outdoor space to roam and limited in the use of antibiotics. The positive outcome of these strict rules is that you are left with an egg that is in theory hormone- and antibiotic-free. Some people report that organic eggs have a better flavor than regular eggs, but the primary benefit of organic eggs is the health of the animal and of the planet. Organic eggs have a similar nutritional value to regular eggs. Eggs have been a popular food source due to being low in calories and fats with some essential nutrients.

Other Label Claims to Be Aware of Include:

Natural: This term simply means that nothing is added to the egg but all eggs are natural.

Cage-Free/Free-roaming hens: these terms indicate that hens are allowed to roam in a room or open space, typically a barn or poultry house.

Free-range/pasture-fed: indicate that the eggs are produced by hens who had outdoor access. Some people think these eggs taste better because in addition to the chicken feed, these hens can also eat plants and insects.

Nutritional Value of Organic Eggs

1 whole poached organic egg

Calories: 71

Fats: 5g / 8% DV

Carbohydrates: 0g

Protein: 6g

Fiber: 0g

Selenium: 15.8mcg / 23% DV

Riboflavin: 0.2mg / 12% DV

Vitamin B12: 0.6mcg / 11% DV

Phosphorus: 95.0mg / 10% DV

Omega-3 Fatty Acid: 37 mg

Health Benefits of Organic Eggs

  • Organic is better for the planet! Hens who live up to the organic label are fed an organic diet without conventional fertilizers or pesticides and limited antibiotics. This means that there are less pesticides, fertilizers or antibiotics being leached into the environment and into your body.
  • Riboflavin is a B vitamin that also helps your cells to produce energy. Additionally, it uses the amino acid tryptophan to make niacin in the body. Tryptophan and its metabolites regulate things like appetite, sleeping-waking-rhythm and pain perception. Niacin is important for helping your body utilize food to produce energy.
  • One egg is a good source of phosphorus. Phosphorus is part of your bones, teeth and DNA/RNA. It is also one of the main regulators of energy metabolism in organs, and helps generate energy in every cell.
  • Eggs are a high source of selenium. Selenium is a trace mineral that works with vitamin E for antioxidant protection. Eating enough selenium can help reduce your risk of cancer, heart disease and other diseases.
11milksmall.jpg

The Nutrition of Lowfat Milk


Emily DeLacey MS, RD is a Registered Dietitian and currently working in Jamaica as a HIV/ AIDS Prevention Specialist. She attended Central Washington University for her Bachelor's Degree in Science and Dietetics and continued on after her internship to Kent State University for her Master's Degree in Science and Nutrition, with a focus on public health and advocacy. She served as a U.S. Peace Corps Volunteer in Malawi 2012-2014 working as a Community Health Advisor in a rural village, immersing in the joys of life without electricity or running water. She has been to 20+ countries and 47 of the 50 states in the US. Traveling, adventuring and experiencing new cultures has made her a passionate advocate for the equality of nutrition and wellness for all people.

Источник: https://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/nutrition/healthy-eating/the-nutrition-of-organic-eggs.html

4 Replies to “Are organic eggs good for you”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *