baseball card stores in my area

Whether you are a long-term hobbyist or simply rediscovering an old pastime, Neuhart Cards & Sports Collectibles is your first stop for sports cards. Contact the store for more details. JWW Sports Cards & Gaming is a locally owned business located for more than 25 years at Location. Fountain Court. The Great Zimbabwe now Sports Card Shop Locator - Find directions, store Litecoin has a huge community, has low commissions and fast transaction speed.
baseball card stores in my area

Baseball card stores in my area -

Oak City Sports Cards

We're a family team with over 13 years experience buying, selling, and trading sports cards and over 30 years in the hobby. Our home base is Raleigh, NC, but we travel all over the country and have even been abroad to check out cards!

Weston has been collecting cards since he was 4, and his love for the hobby has never ceased. After college, he realized this could be his full-time gig, so he opened a store in his hometown, Martinsville, VA.

In 2018, Weston sold his brick and mortar store to his friend/colleague, relocated to Raleigh, and then met his wife, Katie, who soon became his partner in life and in cards. Now, with their son Luka, they are taking the card market by storm!

In July 2021, we opened our storefront in downtown Raleigh. We are excited to be a spot for card lovers of all ages. We hope to see you in the store! Follow us on Facebook or Instagram for events and updates.

Источник: https://oakcitycards.com/

Bottom Line

Be careful of assuming your collectibles are covered under your homeowner’s policy. There could be several instances or types of damages that don’t cover the loss of your collection just because it resides in your home. Typically, the least expensive way to insure your collection is to cover it through a rider on your existing homeowner’s policy. But very often these riders do not cover the full market value of your collection, so read the fine print when you explore this avenue.

Collectibles insurance policies exist as standalone coverage to protect against these shortcomings of loss coverage and value. Collectibles insurance companies understand the nuances surrounding your valuables. American Collectors Insurance checks all the boxes and more. As our best overall collectibles insurance company, they offer specialized policy features that account for full collector’s value, inflation, automatic coverage additions to your collection as it grows, and more.

Compare Providers

CompanyWhy We Picked ItBest Features
American Collectors InsuranceBest OverallAgreed Value Coverage; Inflation Guard Protection; Automatic coverage of new additions; Collector’s Choice Program
BHI Insurance AssociatesBest for AntiquesBacked by 44 insurers to find the best policy for you; potential to combine policies for savings
Arroyo Insurance ServicesBest for Persian RugsInsure someone else’s collectibles; insure your collection while on loan
ProgressiveBest for ArtworkOpportunity for bundled savings
Collectibles Insurance ServicesBest for Sports MemorabiliaComprehensive loss coverage; no appraisal required for items under $25,000; inflation coverage; $0 deductibles
MiniCo Insurance AgencyBest ValueQuick online quote tool; insurance up to $1 million; Competitive premiums and $0 deductible; insures full value
ChubbBest CustomizationCustomizable policies that can blend blanket coverage with some itemized pieces; liberal appraisal requirements

Frequently Asked Questions

What Is Collectibles Insurance?

Collectibles insurance protects prized possessions from loss events such as theft, accidental damage, and mysterious disappearances that homeowner’s coverage does not. They take into account that collections typically don’t depreciate, but rather appreciate over time. Homeowner's insurance limits property coverage to a percentage of your home total value. Sometimes, that is not enough to replace your collection if it were ever destroyed, damaged, or stolen. And even if there is enough coverage in dollar values, the policy may limit coverage to certain collectibles such as fine art or Persian rugs, thus won’t fully cover the loss. 

Collectible insurance policies may also cover your collection outside of your home. For example, you can tailor a policy to cover your items while in transit in the mail, while traveling with you, while housed in a storage facility, or while on display at an exhibit.

How Do I Insure a Collection?

To insure a collection, insurance companies will have you start by providing some proof that you possess the collection, identify specifically what is in it with a detailed inventory, and show some type of third-party valuation such as a bill of sale or appraisal.

You can do some quick research with some online quoting tools to get an estimate, then you’ll contact insurance companies or consultants to work toward a more accurate quote. Insurers will want to know a bit more about your lifestyle as it pertains to the collection so their agents can suggest certain policies that will protect you best. For example, are you a dealer who frequently travels with your baseball card collection to exhibits? You’ll need a policy that covers theft, accidental damage during transit, or missing inventory.

How Much Does Collectible Insurance Cost?

There are two primary ways to insure a collection. The less expensive way is to add an inventory schedule rider to your homeowner’s policy. Even though they may have a lower annual premium, these riders may not give you enough coverage. That’s when a separate and specialized collectible policy makes sense that schedules each asset. 

Look for policies that give your collection full market value, not cash value or replacement value. Expect these policies to cost in the neighborhood of 1% to 2% of that insured value. For example, a $100,000 baseball card collection could cost roughly $2,000 per year in premium payments to insure.

How We Chose the Best Collectibles Insurance

After looking at 16 insurance companies we found these seven to be the best in their league. Some of these seven companies actually serve as brokers who are backed by 30 to 50 AM Best-rated financial institutions, giving them a deep reservoir of expertise and value from which to draw. 

We chose companies that offered a broad scope of insurance products, whether it be hundreds of types of collections, or complementary insurance products that can be bundled for savings. All of the winners used the similar pricing philosophy of offering full market collector’s value, with premiums in the 1% to 2% range of the collection’s appraisal or bill of sale. As always, we favor companies that are easy to work with, and have simple online tools as well as email and phone options. From application to claims to customer support, companies that had streamlined online processes rose to the top.

Источник: https://www.investopedia.com/best-collectibles-insurance-5101072

Attack of the Baseball Cards: A small New Jersey card shop with a big-time heart

UNION, N.J. — Steve Mandy waltzes up and down behind the counter in his store, equal parts game show host, auctioneer and cool uncle.

His single stud earring and graying hair illustrate the latter of those qualities. He has an interesting demeanor; he's got some Arthur Fonzarelli-like coolness to him, but with none of the bravado, and exudes a genuine warmth as the day's activities begin.

It's Super Bowl Sunday, but inside Attack of the Baseball Cards, you might not know it. Crowding the small store are about 25 customers lined up to take part in this year's Super Bowl Sunday "Pack Wars" event. Most people know one another on a first-name basis, and it seems like there's a single link. 

MORE: Watch 'ChangeUp,' a new MLB live whiparound show on DAZN

Unprovoked, several customers walk over to me with glowing reviews of the store and its owner. They tell me how great Mandy is, with no fluff or filler. They're not blowing smoke, either. There's authenticity to it here, with Frank, a regular customer, putting a bow on all the reviews.

"Steve's the best," he says with genuine enthusiasm.

Mandy is the host of the biggest annual "Pack Wars" event; round-by-round, Mandy sells off packs of cards to each customer at a discounted price. The customers rip the packs open, and whoever pulls the card that wins the corresponding question — biggest player, closest hometowns and so forth — wins the round, and a prize.

It’s a fun tradition, and everyone leaves the store happy, with brand-new cards of all types — including tobacco cards, more than $800 worth of product — and sports memorabilia as a "thank you for playing."

After the dust settles and the customers leave, you get to take in some of the history of the store. Autographed memorabilia, rare cards and more — the stuff you'd typically see in a card shop — adorn the cases and walls. But there are more novel rarities; a few Reggie Bars in a glass case, a signed Ernie Banks bat and a baseball statistics book that features the signatures of many Hall of Fame players. That's not for sale, however.

Of course, the question must be asked: What's the most valuable thing in the store?

Mandy shows me around, glass cases and walls decked out in memories that jump off the items.

Mandy sets his eyes on a photo next to the glass case next to his front door. His voice gets low as he looks at the photo. His eyes light up with pride more than excitement. He wrestles with just a bit of emotion before getting his words out.

“This is the most valuable thing I have.”

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Mandy’s odyssey led him to a somewhat hidden warehouse park in Union, nestled among delivery trucks, potholed blacktop and faded parking lines.

If you drive by the building, you'd miss it — which someone did twice when trying to find the store. The old building, which also houses batting cages, comes alive once the doors open — the sounds of aluminum bats meeting training balls provide a fitting, poetic soundtrack to the shop, which sits alongside the cages.

The space is cramped but makes use of every inch: There's memorabilia in every nook and cranny, with boxes and packs of cards intertwining with other collectibles and keepsakes. It's been a long time since Mandy has been in this spot, almost 11 years, having moved here after his last location raised rent by 30 percent. It's been an odyssey for Mandy, but he seems settled in his current location.

Union isn't far from Mandy's hometown of Hillside, N.J., where he grew up a collector of baseball cards. The first cards he collected were 1960 Topps cards, gripped by the alternating colored lettering on the front. 

But long before Mandy wound up off the busy highway of Route 22 and had the idea of starting a business of his own, he forged a friendship with a Yankees stalwart with whom he shared the same hometown.

"My dad took me and my brother over to Phil Rizzuto's house," Mandy says, overcome with nostalgia. "He just rang the doorbell and wanted us to meet Phil Rizzuto. Rizzuto brought us into his den, showed us all his trophies, sat us down, talked to us, signed some autographs for us. From then on I became totally in love with Phil Rizzuto."

Mandy, roughly 7 years old at the time, got Rizzuto's autograph, one of the first of his extensive collection he keeps to this day. The friendship with Rizzuto grew to the point that he would visit four or five times a year, along with his brother Jack, and Joe, one of his best childhood friends, who died in 2018.

"We'd hang out, watch TV and talk to him. He just got used to us coming over all the time," Mandy says. "He always let us in, he was always awesome."

One early Saturday morning, Mandy and his brother visited Rizzuto's house, the morning after a Yankees night game Rizzuto called as a broadcaster. Cora, Rizzuto's wife, brought both Mandy and his brother inside, fed them breakfast and had them watch cartoons until Rizzuto sauntered down the stairs in his pajamas and his robe.

"That was the relationship," Mandy says. "There were times where I would go over and Mickey Mantle would be there. I went over one time and Joe DiMaggio was there. Yogi Berra was there."

MORE: An inside look at the Topps creative process

As Mandy and Co. grew older, he started taking the bus from Hillside to New York to see the Yankees play. He and friends would bring items to get signed before and after games, his collecting and autograph habit in full fervor.

Mandy recounts the time when he and some friends who frequented the Rizzuto household went to a Yankee game and shouted for Rizzuto to give them a ride home from the ballpark.

"He would say, 'Yeah, just make sure you're back here in the eighth inning so you're here for the end of the game!'"

Rizzuto would drive each of the friends home individually — given the lateness of the hour — dropping them off directly at their front doors.

Holy cow.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Because of his enamorment with Rizzuto, Mandy started collecting cards and autographs more. But as with some collectors, as he entered his teenage years, he fell out of love with card collecting. Mandy eventually found himself in a career in advertising, working as an art director for several prominent publications, including The Record, Cosmopolitan and Popular Photography.

Eventually, a co-worker at one of Mandy's ad jobs wondered whether Mandy would accompany her to see and get autographs from Ted Williams, who was signing at a New Jersey hotel. It was the first card show Mandy had been to. Mandy got Williams' autograph, but the experience changed him.

"I went into the card show and I walked around and I was blown away," Mandy said. "I want to do this. ... I want to do this."

A few months after that January show, Mandy dug up cards from his youth and set up a table at another show. After that March 1982 day, Mandy never stopped. There was just one thing missing: He needed a name.

"On a Friday night, back in 1982, we had company over one night, and I said to everybody, 'Look, I have to come up with a trade name.' I wanted something with an 'A,' because I wanted to be listed first in the phone book.

"We sat around for over a half an hour, with everybody throwing out names, and they were all terrible, there was nothing that was good," Mandy says. "Finally, one of the guys says, 'This is ridiculous. Turn on the damn TV.' The movie 'Attack of the Killer Tomatoes' was on. He said, 'Hey, look at this! 'Attack of the Killer Tomatoes.' Why don't you make it 'Attack of the Baseball Cards,' and you can have giant baseball cards chasing you around.'"

Mandy, instantly loving the idea, headed up to his bedroom, grabbed a couple of 5,000-card boxes, lay on the floor, and his friends covered with him baseball cards and took a photograph. Since then, Mandy has used the image of him being "attacked" by baseball cards on flyers he sends out to customers. The rest, as they say, is history.

The original Attack of the Baseball Cards image at the top of an event flyer.

Originally, Mandy started doing solely baseball card shows on weekends, and eventually at night. The birth of his daughter in 1981 meant that going into the card business made for a few extra bucks in his pocket. With momentum came opportunity, and Mandy made enough money to go into business with a partner, having a store in Woodbridge, N.J. Along with his partner, Mandy promoted baseball cards shows and signings, moving several times — and going solo — before ending up in Union.

Mandy retired as an artist in 1994 and has been in the card game full time since then. 

"It's been a love affair with this," he says. "Things were progressing too computerized. The art field was getting to a point where I wasn't sure how much I wanted to do the computerized stuff."

Eventually, Mandy asked for his release from his ad job, finding that his heart wasn't in it. His boss at the time, with whom he shared what he describes as a "father-son relationship," offered a bit of odd encouragement on the way out the door.

"I remember my boss saying to me, 'You're throwing your career away for nickel and dime baseball cards.'"

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

There's more to Attack of the Baseball Cards than might appear from a first impression.

On the outside, the store doesn't seem to be anything special. It's what's on the inside that counts.

During that Super Bowl Sunday "Pack Wars" event, Mandy makes a point to remind customers of success stories that frequented his store. He mentions he was inspired by his former boss at his last art job — the one who claimed he was throwing his career away — to integrate more humanitarian causes and a sense of community into his store.

"I started doing a lot of things for the community, and a lot of things for kids through the store," Mandy says. "I wanted to make it more than a regular store."

Among the efforts to get the community more involved: a now-defunct essay contest that Mandy used to schedule during the summer. The idea came from a friend of Mandy's who owned a card shop in Florida — the same friend who gave him inspiration for his "Pack Wars" contests — who also did essay contests.

Couple that with Mandy's desire to be more for the community than just a card store, and it yielded some excellent results.

Each summer, Mandy would give students a player to research — usually with some kind of human-interest angle — with the winner being selected by different judges, including sports media stalwart Bill Daughtry (an Attack of the Baseball Cards customer) and Michael Jordan's brother, Larry.

Judges would read the essays and select a winner, who would win cards and other goodies at a September "Pack Wars" event. One winner, Bill Murphy, would go on to become a pitching coordinator with the Houston Astros.

All throughout that Sunday during "Pack Wars" event in early February, Mandy makes the point to remind everyone that the customers are more than that — they are family, and that's what matters most. He keeps tabs on his customers, making sure all is well, demonstrating a genuine sincerity.

Steve Mandy, far right, with the late Gary Carter in 2002. Also pictured, Bill Murphy (white shirt) with his mother.

"I want people to look back and smile and say, 'Yeah, I love that place,'" Mandy says. "That's the key. I want people to remember this place, that they had fun here. I don't want it to be a monetary thing."

Customers feel Mandy's effect.

"He's reassuring because someone like him still exists," says Jason Zimmerman, a regular customer. "He's a really nice person. He moves with the times. He's involved, he's involved with people's lives. … You go to other card stores in New Jersey, and it's just some a—hole sitting behind a counter, not doing anything. When you get (to Attack of the Baseball Cards), you're like, 'I'm glad I made the trip.'"

"He's inspired me," Zimmerman added. "My goal now is to open a store, because a store like Steve's isn't a dime a dozen anymore."

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

It's a quiet Wednesday afternoon in February, and Mandy shows me around his store a bit more. Asim, a regular customer strolls in, pleased to speak with Mandy. He had been frequenting Mandy’s shop for almost 20 years, long before Mandy's retreat into the warehouse park. Asim was even named one of Upper Deck's top 100 collectors in the country in 2018.

He's just one of the many die-hard collectors known to swing by the store — including some with famous names. Bill Daughtry, Al Leiter, Don Mattingly, Rex Ryan and Prince Amukamara are some of the famous sports figures to come by Mandy's store. One day, TV director Michael Smith — whose credits include "Suits," "Law & Order: SVU" and "Manifest" — was lounging in the store, cataloging and searching for values for his cards.

Mandy and Asim speak like old friends more than a store owner and a client, talking about the latest products and cards, and catching up with each other, before trying to put an exact timeline on how long Asim's been stopping by.

All throughout the interview, Mandy’s words are writhe with nostalgia, a genuine boyish elation, more than pride, appreciative of the history and memories each item in his store has.

MORE: Ranking the top baseball card sets of the '80s and '90s

Mandy is willing and thrilled to share his story, but never once does he make himself the star, pointing out family, friends and inspirations for his success along the way. While Attack of the Baseball Cards is in business to make a dollar — as most businesses are — Mandy seems more resigned to the role of friendly neighborhood card-seller.

He shows me the labor of his some of his work: a baseball stats book that has the signatures of many players, signed across their stat lines in the book. There are hundreds of autographs therein, and he tells me stories of meeting baseball greats through the years, valuing some baseball friendships and people he's met along the way.

Mandy shows me around — selfishly, I'm looking for any and all New York Jets cards — pointing out the valuable tobacco cards and other products in the store. A victim of a burglary once in the past, Mandy doesn't seem to let it bother him. His idea of value is different from a thief's.

Which brings us back to the photo on the wall.

Encased in a plastic holder, it's an aged drawing of the old Attack of the Baseball Cards storefront, drawn in crayon, youthful innocence and exaggeration. Underneath, there's a chicken-scratch blurb written in uneven pencil. It was illustrated by a 7-year-old nearly two decades ago.

Mandy looks at the picture with pride.

"In school, they asked what their favorite place was, and they had to draw a picture of it and write a story about it. He handed that in in school, and his mother gave it to me. He picked Attack of the Baseball Cards as his favorite place to go to.

"That's the most valuable thing I have in here."

Источник: https://www.sportingnews.com/us/mlb/news/wipdnp-attack-of-the-baseball-cards-a-small-card-shop-with-big-time-heart/1esg5e3pdbrln168tvoe0y4jpk

About Dean's Cards


Since 2002, Dean's Cards has been the number one resource for information on buying, selling, and investing in vintage baseball cards. With nearly 1.5 million sports cards online, Dean's Cards is a top seller in the booming sports cards industry and offers the largest selection on the market. The company is run by a staff of around 20 employees and is located in an 8500 square foot office in Cincinnati, Ohio. Deanscards.com features high-resolution scans of every vintage card online, plus detailed statistics on the grades of individual cards as well as complete sets. With our state-of-the-art website, top grading standards, five-star customer service, and the most complete online catalog in the hobby, Dean's Cards provides one of the best shopping experiences on the web!

Meet the Owner

In December 2001, Dean Hanley left corporate America and started Dean's Cards out of his basement in Cincinnati, OH. A life-long baseball fanatic and collector of sports cards, Dean first considered selling baseball cards for a living when writing a paper on a hypothetical business idea for his MBA program in the early 90s. While the professor deemed the idea "unrealistic" (the paper earned Dean a solid B+), Dean saw room for his dream to become reality almost a decade later after the internet boom. Realizing the potential for the baseball card hobby, reliant on catalog sales and card shows at the time, to move to e-commerce, Dean started one of the first online-only baseball card stores. Armed with his own collection, his dad's doubles, and the support of his loving wife, he launched the Dean's Cards website in 2002. Dean's Cards recorded its first sale in May of 2002 and has experienced significant growth every year since.

Our Mission

The mission of Dean's Cards is to make collecting vintage sports cards Fast, Easy and Fun!  We fulfill this mission by constantly striving to maintain the best eCommerce Shopping Experience, Product Selection, and Customer Service in the hobby.  Specifically, we do this by: 1) designing the DeansCards.com eStore to be fast, secure and easy-to-use, 2) by having online inventory of over a million vintage sports cards, 3) a selection of 20,000 different complete sets, starter sets, and team sets for almost every vintage (1948 to 1980) sports card set, in several different conditions, 4) a knowledgeable, friendly team, 5) a 100% satisfaction guarantee on all purchases.

If you will give us the opportunity to earn your business, you will be glad that you did.  We guarantee it. We love this hobby and work very hard to ensure that orders are shipped 100% correct, mailed within one business day and that the items sent are conservatively graded. If you are not happy for any reason, you may return your order for a full refund. 


Our goal at Dean's Cards is to provide our customers with a simple, cost-effective and enjoyable way to build their collections. We have the largest online selection of baseball, football, basketball, hockey, and non-sports cards ranging in years from 1887 to the present. We also offer thousands of issues of Sports Illustrated, Sport Magazine, Baseball and Football Digest as well as vintage team yearbooks and media guides. 

Our customers have given Dean's Cards 4.9 (out of a possible 5.0) stars on Google Customer Reviews.  We are NOT a physical retail store that people can visit, so we were able to focus our efforts on designing and stocking a website that provides the best collecting experience possible.


Deans Knows Vintage Sports Cards

One of the foremost experts on the subject of vintage baseball and football cards, Dean created Dean's Cards with collectors in mind: "I am a collector, just like our customers. My goal is to provide the ideal place to buy sports cards. We strive to make the experience fast, easy and fun. The whole Dean's Cards team has worked hard to provide the best selection of vintage cards available anywhere, toughly graded and at great prices." 

Aside from running his website, Dean strives to educate the card collecting hobby by writing a blog, filming videos, writing articles for Sports Collectors Digest, and has published two best-selling books on vintage baseball cards.


To Contact Us, please click here.

To View our Buyer and Seller Testimonials, please click here.

Links:

Dean's Cards on Facebook

Dean's Cards on Twitter

Dean's Cards on YouTube

Dean's Cards Blog

Dean Hanley in Sports Collectors Digest

Dean Hanley's best-selling books on Amazon

Dean Hanley featured in Cincinnati Magazine

Источник: https://www.deanscards.com/about-us

**OFFER DETAILS

COUPON: Valid one time only. Duplicate offers will not be accepted. Offer will not be re-issued if lost, stolen or destroyed or with return/refund of merchandise. The entire transaction amount after discount must be placed on the Academy Sports + Outdoors Credit Card.

OFFER: Valid one time only. Offer will be received via mail by 1/1/2022.

†CARD BENEFIT DETAILS

$15 OFF FIRST PURCHASE: Application and approval must occur same day to receive the offer. Cannot be combined with 5% cardmember discount. Cannot be used to purchase gift cards, licenses, or in-store services. See team member or visit academy.com/instore-services for list of in-store services. Valid one time only. The entire transaction amount after discount must be placed on the Academy Sports + Outdoors Credit Card. Minimum pre-tax purchase of $15.01 required to receive discount. The 5% cardmember discount will be applied for purchases less than $15.01. If approved online, first purchase must be made in the same session as approval to receive discount.

5% OFF EVERY DAY: Cannot be combined with purchase on special financing or other offers except Free Shipping benefit. Excludes gift cards, licenses, and in-store services. See team member or visit academy.com/instore-services for list of in-store services. If more than one form of payment is used for a purchase online, cardmember will not receive 5% off. Account must not be in default.

FREE SHIPPING: Limited to standard shipping. Bulk and select items may be excluded, see product page for shipping information. Cannot be combined with the Academy Sports + Outdoors employee discount. Academy Sports + Outdoors does not ship to Alaska, California or Hawaii. The entire transaction amount after discount must be placed on the Academy Sports + Outdoors Credit Card. Minimum pre-tax purchase of $15.00 required to receive discount.

Credit Card Offers are subject to credit approval.

Academy Sports + Outdoors Credit Card Accounts are issued by Comenity Capital Bank. This credit card program is unavailable to California residents.

Источник: https://www.academy.com/shop/browse/academy-credit-card

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T206 Honus Wagner

Baseball card issued 1909–1911

The T206 Honus Wagnerbaseball card depicts the Pittsburgh Pirates' Honus Wagner, known as "The Flying Dutchman,” a dead-ball erabaseball player who is widely considered to be one of the best players of all time.[1] The card was designed and issued by the American Tobacco Company (ATC) from 1909 to 1911 as part of its T206 series. Wagner refused to allow production of his baseball card to continue, either because he did not want children to buy cigarette packs to get his card, or because he wanted more compensation from the ATC. The ATC ended production of the Wagner card and a total of only 50 to 200 cards were ever distributed to the public (exact number unknown), as compared to the "tens or hundreds of thousands" of T206 cards, over three years in sixteen brands of cigarettes, for any other player.[2] In 1933, the card was first listed at a price value of US$50 in Jefferson Burdick's The American Card Catalog (equivalent to $1,000 in 2020), making it the most expensive baseball card in the world at the time.

The most famous T206 Honus Wagner is the "Gretzky T206 Honus Wagner" card. The card's odd texture and shape led to speculation that it was altered. The Gretzky T206 Wagner was first sold by Alan Ray to a baseball memorabilia collector named Bill Mastro, who sold the card two years later to Jim Copeland for nearly four times the price he had originally paid. Copeland's sizable transaction revitalized interest in the sports memorabilia collection market. In 1991, Copeland sold the card to ice hockey figures Wayne Gretzky and Bruce McNall for $451,000. Gretzky resold the card four years later to Walmart and Treat Entertainment for $500,000 for use as the top prize in a promotional contest.

The next year, a Florida postal worker won the card and auctioned it at Christie's for $640,000 to collector Michael Gidwitz. In 2000, the card was sold via Robert Edward Auctions to card collector Brian Seigel for $1.27 million. In February 2007, Seigel sold the card privately to an anonymous collector for $2.35 million. Less than six months later, the card was sold to another anonymous collector for $2.8 million. In April 2011, that anonymous purchaser was revealed to be Ken Kendrick, owner of the Arizona Diamondbacks.[3] A different card, named the "Jumbo Wagner", was sold at auction again in 2016 for a record $3.12 million.[4] These transactions have made the Wagner card the most valuable baseball card in history. However, this record was recently broken when a Mike Trout 2009 Bowman Chrome Draft Prospectors Superfractor series rookie card with a card count of 1 sold in August 2020 for a record setting $3.93 million, and pushed further back by a 1952 ToppsMickey Mantle card that sold for $5.2 million in November 2020,[5] making Wagner the third most valuable baseball card in the world. Another example sold for $6.6 million in August 2021 making it the most expensive sports card.[6]

In October 2013, Bill Mastro, CEO of Mastro Auctions (the owner of Robert Edward Auctions) pleaded guilty to mail fraud in U.S. District Court and later admitted to the court that he had trimmed the "Gretzky" Wagner card to sharply increase its value.[7]

Other T206 Wagners, both legitimate and fake, have surfaced in recent years. Some of the real cards have fetched hundreds of thousands of dollars in auctions. One particular T206 Honus Wagner owned by John Cobb and Ray Edwards has attracted media controversy over its authenticity.

Background[edit]

Cabinet photo by Carl Horner (c. 1902) used for the Wagner T206 card

The American Tobacco Company was formed as a result of an 1889 merger of five major cigarette manufacturers: W. Duke & Sons & Company, Allen & Ginter, Goodwin & Company, F. S. Kinney Company and William S. Kimball & Company. Because the company came to monopolize the tobacco industry, ATC did not have to conduct advertising or promotions for its products. Since baseball cards were primarily used as a sales promotion, ATC removed them from its tobacco packs, almost driving the cards into obsolescence.[8] During the presidency of "trust-buster" Theodore Roosevelt, the ATC was subjected to legal action from the government, in hopes of shutting down the monopoly in the industry.[8]

Thereafter, the ATC was back in competition with other tobacco companies, so it reinserted baseball cards into cigarette packs. In 1909, the company introduced the T206 series – also known as the "white border set" – of baseball cards of 524 players into its cigarette packs. The cards were printed at seven factories in New York, North Carolina, Ohio and Virginia.[9] Two years later, the ATC was broken up into several major companies as part of the United States Supreme Court ruling in United States v. American Tobacco Company, 221 U.S. 106 (1911).[10][11]

Physical attributes and production[edit]

The typical card in the T206 series had a width of 1+7⁄16 inches (3.65 cm) and a height of 2+5⁄8 inches (6.67 cm).[9] Some cards were awkwardly shaped or irregularly sized, which prompted a baseball card stores in my area that many of the cards in the series had been altered at one point or another. In his work Inside T206: A Collector Guide to the Classic Baseball Card Set, Scot A. Reader wrote that "[i]t is not at all uncommon to find T206 examples that have been altered at some point during their near-century of existence."[12] These discrepancies were taken advantage of by "card doctors" who trimmed corners and dirty edges to improve the appearance of the card. The front of all T206 series cards, including the Wagner card, displayed a lithograph of the player[13] created by a multi-stage printing process in which a number of colors were printed on top of each other to create a lithograph with the appropriate design. The backs of the cards featured the monochromatic colors of the 16 tobacco brands for which the cards were printed.[14] The Wagner cards in particular advertised the Piedmont and Sweet Caporal brands of cigarettes and were produced at Factory 25 in Virginia, as indicated by the factory stamp imprinted on the back of the cards.[15]

Wagner's involvement[edit]

Starting from January 1909, the ATC sought authorization from baseball players for inclusion in the T206 series, which would feature 524 major league players, 76 of whom would later be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.[16][17] Wagner had been at the top of his game throughout the decade, and was even considered to be the game's greatest player at the time.[18] He had appeared on advertisements for a number of other products such as chewing gum, gunpowder, and soft drinks. Unsurprisingly, the ATC asked for Wagner's permission to have his picture on a baseball card. According to an October 12, 1912, issue of The Sporting News, Wagner did not give his consent to appear on the baseball card. In response to the authorization request letter sent by John Gruber, a Pittsburgh sportswriter hired by the ATC to seek Wagner's permission, Wagner wrote that he "did not care to have his picture in a package of cigarettes." He threatened to seek legal action against ATC if they went ahead and distributed his baseball card.[19]

The reasons for Wagner's strong negative reaction to the ATC's request have been the subject of much speculation. The most commonly told account is that Wagner rejected the deal because he did not want young baseball fans to purchase the tobacco packs for his baseball card. Wagner held his fans in high regard, particularly the younger ones. His granddaughter, Blair, remarked that "[h]e loved children. He wanted to teach kids good sportsmanship. When it came time for that card to come out, it wasn't that he wasn't paid. He didn't want kids to have to buy tobacco to get his card."[20] However, Wagner chewed tobacco, and he had previously appeared in advertisements idbi mortgage loan interest rate many tobacco products, including a cigar baseball trading card in 1899 and a newspaper ad for Murad cigarettes during the 1909 World Series.[21]

Another explanation surmised is that Wagner did not consent because he felt he was not receiving just compensation from the ATC for his baseball card.[22] Wagner had a history of being a tough negotiator; he had announced his retirement from baseball in December 1907, but returned shortly before the start of the 1908 baseball season after receiving a $10,000 contract, double his salary from the 1907 season.[23] This theory has its flaws, however, since Wagner sent Gruber a check for $10 to compensate him for the fee ATC would have paid him if Wagner had given permission to create his baseball card. Michael O'Keeffe and Teri Thompson, authors of The Card: Collectors, Con Men, and the True Story of History's Most Desired Baseball Card, asked why Wagner would compensate Gruber for $10, a substantial amount of money at the time (approximately equal to $275 in 2016), if he refused authorization for monetary reasons.[24] The ATC had already produced a number of T206 Honus Wagner baseball cards; the exact number is unknown, but is speculated to be between 50 and 200.[25] They stopped production of the card, however, after Baseball card stores in my area denied authorization.[26]

Gretzky T206 Honus Wagner[edit]

In 1991, National Hockey League player Wayne Gretzky purchased a mint condition 1909 T206 Honus Wager baseball card, with a Piedmont cigarette brand back, at a Sotheby's auction.[27] The card became known as the "Gretzky T206 Wagner" to the public.[28] The Professional Sports Authenticator (PSA) company graded this card a PSA 8 Near Mint-Mint (NM-MT) on their 10-point scale,[29][30] the highest grade given to a T206 Honus Wagner card. Bill Hughes[31] was the official grader of the card, working for PSA at the baseball card stores in my area. Hughes admitted to knowing that the card had been altered when he graded it.[32]

The Gretzky T206 Wagner first came to attention in 1985, when small-time Hicksville, New York card collector Alan Ray contacted Bob Sevchuk, the owner of a Long Island sports memorabilia store, to arrange a potential $25,000 deal for his T206 Honus Wagner card.[33] Bill Mastro, a sports memorabilia dealer who later founded Mastro Auctions and became one of the most powerful figures in the industry, heard the news, and immediately jumped on the offer.[34] Mastro, with the financial backing of friend Rob Lifson, sought to improve the offer and had Ray add 50 to 75 of his other T206 series cards, including the rare T206 Eddie Plank, into the deal. Ray, who later stated he "had a money situation," agreed to Mastro's terms of the deal.[35]

The circumstances regarding how Ray came into possession of the Gretzky T206 Wagner have been shrouded in mystery. He tried to avoid answering any questions regarding the matter but, in a 2001 interview, claimed to have received it from a relative, whose name he did not disclose.[36] Inside the memorabilia community, there was speculation that the card had been cut from a printing sheet during the deal made with Mastro. Mastro has told colleagues in the memorabilia circuit that he purchased the card from a printer, which was not Ray's profession. Ray personally stated that Mastro might have been doing this to prevent others from trying to trace the card. Some also claim that Mastro bought the card from Sevchuk, not Ray.[36]

After the transaction was completed, Mastro went back to his car and showed the Gretzky T206 Wagner to Lifson. Mastro offered one of the other T206 Wagner cards in his personal collection to Lifson as payment for the $25,000 that Lifson fronted him for the Gretzky T206 Wagner—claiming that Lifson could sell the lower quality one for $30,000 and make a quick $5,000 profit. Lifson was skeptical, but he took Mastro's word and accepted the deal, successfully selling this other Wagner card to New Jersey businessman Barry Halper for $30,000.[37] (Halper sold that card and 200 other baseball memorabilia items in 1998 to Major League Baseball for over $5,000,000.)[38]

In 1987, Mastro sold the Gretzky T206 Wagner to Jim Copeland, a San Luis Obispo, California, sporting-goods chain owner, for $110,000. With that transaction, there was a sudden renewed interest in baseball card collecting. As Lifson commented, the Copeland deal revitalized the industry and "created an incentive to sell these great cards."[39]

1991 Copeland memorabilia auction[edit]

Within five years, Copeland decided it was time to sell his card collection; he chose to sell his entire 873-piece collection in a single sale, through Mastro.[40] Mastro contacted Sotheby's, the renowned New York auction house, and asked them to accept the Copeland memorabilia collection on consignment.[41] Sotheby's advertised Copeland's items as uib claim "Copeland Collection of Important Baseball Cards and Sports Memorabilia" to attract hobbyists and other potential clients. The March 1991 auction attracted nearly 800 collectors who were interested in purchasing some of Copeland's rare memorabilia. The bidding prices far exceeded the pre-auction estimates, as a 1952 ToppsMickey Mantle card sold for $49,500, more than three times the initial pre-auction price estimate.[42] Pre-auction estimates placed Copeland's T206 Honus Wagner at a price of $114,000. Within minutes of the opening bid for the T206 Wagner card, the highest bidder had put down $228,000, twice the pre-auction estimate. A bidding competition between Mike Gidwitz, Mark Friedland and an unknown phone bidder ensued. Gidwitz dropped out of the competition when the bidding reached the $300,000 mark. As Friedland made each bid, the phone bidder would counter with a bid $5,000 or $10,000 higher. Friedland dropped out of the competition after the phone bidder countered with a $410,000 bid for the card.[27] With Sotheby's 10% buyer's premium, the final price of the card came out to $451,000 (equivalent to $856,933 in 2020), nearly four times the pre-auction estimate. The phone bidder was Wayne Gretzky, who purchased the card with advice and financial backing from his 'boss' Bruce McNall, the owner of the NHL's Los Angeles Kings.[27] Copeland received around $5 million for the entire collection. The publicity coverage of the Sotheby's auction renewed interest in the hobby of sports memorabilia collecting. Mastro worked with Sotheby's for the next four years to facilitate sports memorabilia auctions and established himself as a leading card dealer in the industry.[43] Illusionist David Copperfield used the popularity of the card as part of a magic trick on a TV Specials. In a 1993 special, Copperfield had Gretzky sign the card (using a reprint of course), then Copperfield proceeded to tear the card into four pieces, then restoring the card, and magically removing the signature.

Gretzky, who was not a big card collector, said he purchased the card because he thought "the market would remain strong," thus making for a valuable investment.[34] McNall orchestrated the plan to buy the card. In a 2005 interview, McNall stated his "philosophy was, if you buy something that is absolutely the best in the world, you'd be okay because there is always another buyer for something at the top end."[44]

Card back on the market[edit]

In 1995, Gretzky sold the card to Walmart and Treat Entertainment for $500,000 (equivalent to $849,203 in 2020).[45] The two companies intended to use the card as the grand prize in a promotional contest. The card was sent all across the United States, as part of Walmart's plan to rejuvenate the baseball card market.[45] On February 24, 1996 (the 122nd anniversary of Wagner's birthday), the grand prize drawing for the card was held on CNN's Larry King Weekend.[46] At around 9:00 p.m., Hall of Fame third baseman Brooks Robinson, one of King's guests on the show, pulled out the name of one Patricia Gibbs, a postal worker living in Hollywood, Florida. After spending hours unsuccessfully trying to contact Gibbs, King's staff finally got through to her phone, and informed Gibbs of her prize.[47] Treat Entertainment and Walmart gave the card to Gibbs a few weeks later at a Walmart store in Miramar, Florida. Gibbs could not afford the taxes on the card, so she decided to consign the card to an auction later on. She consigned the card to Christie's, a New York-based auction house better known for selling famous artworks.[48]

Michael Gidwitz, the same individual who battled with Gretzky and Mark Friedland for the card at the Copeland auction in 1991, won the Christie's auction with a bid of $641,500 in 1996 (equivalent to $1,058,550 in 2020).[49] Four years later, on July 5, 2000, Gidwitz partnered with eBay and Robert Edwards Auctions to start a 10-day online auction for the card. Robert Edwards Auctions, a division of MastroNet, set up a registration system in which they approved prospective individuals before they actually made bids. These individuals had to wire a $100,000 deposit to iEscrow.com in order to be pre-approved to make bids for the card.[50] On July 15, the card was sold to Brian Seigel, a collector from California, for $1.265 million (equivalent to $1.901 million in 2020).[51][52] In February 2007, the Associated Press announced that Seigel had sold the card privately and directly to an anonymous collector from Southern California for $2.35 million (equivalent to $2.933 million in 2020).[53] Less than six months later, on September 6, 2007, SCP Auctions announced that baseball card stores in my area card had been sold once again to another anonymous collector for $2.8 million (equivalent to $3.5 million in 2020).[54] The anonymous collector was later revealed to be Arizona Diamondbacks owner Ken Kendrick.[55]

Alteration[edit]

Shortly after Gretzky's 1991 purchase, previously ignored allegations that the card had once been subject to alteration flared up again. This is when Gretzky approached the Bank website Sports Authenticator (PSA) company to grade the card, resulting in the aforementioned PSA 8 NM-MT grading. Despite PSA company president David Hall's personal statement that the card was "superb" and a "fantastic card in every way," a number of people in the memorabilia industry were not convinced that the card had not been altered at some point.[56]

Soon afterward, Alan Ray came back into the picture, claiming that he had proof the card had been doctored by Mastro at one point after the initial $25,000 trade in 1985. He had a photograph of the card taken before the transaction with Mastro and claimed that the card in the photo looked significantly different from the photo of Gretzky's card.[57] He sent the comparison of the two photos to both McNall and Baseball card stores in my area, but never received a response from them. Some memorabilia collectors have dismissed Ray's claims, saying that the photo hardly proves any doctoring was ever done on the card.[58]

On December 4, 2012, Mastro was indicted on federal fraud charges, and entered a plea of not guilty.[59] In 2013, Mastro pleaded guilty, having entered into a plea agreement with federal prosecutors, and admitted to trimming the Honus Wagner card in the mid-1980s to increase its value.[60] Mastro's plea agreement was rejected by a judge.[61] In August 2015, Mastro was sentenced to 20 months in federal prison under a new plea agreement.[62] Mastro was released in May 2017.[63]

A similar but unaltered card, the 'Jumbo Wagner', also has a NM-MT grade quality for the majority of the card, but the lower quality edges have not been trimmed, lowering it from NM-MT to an overall grade of PSA 5 – one of only three (along with Mastro's trimmed card) rated PSA 5 or better – sold at a 2013 auction for $2,105,770.50.[64]

Topps reissues[edit]

Reissues of the Wagner card by Topps in 2002: #179 similar to 1909 original (but shorter), #307 featuring blue background and #456 with red background

The Honus Wagner card was first reissued by Topps in 2002, with variations on its background color. The card was printed with the original 1909 orange color (#179), and also in blue (#307) and red (#456).[65] In 2020, a new Honus Wagner card was issued by the company (#45) as part of the second wave (of 5) released that year.[66]

Known controversies[edit]

Cobb–Edwards controversy[edit]

Another T206 Wagner card owned by two Cincinnati men was dismissed as a fake by Bill Mastro and PSA president Joe Orlando. The two men, John Cobb and Ray Edwards, have tried to prove that their Piedmont-backed card is not a fake and, due to its excellent condition, should fetch over $1 million in an auction.[67] Cobb and Edwards also have alleged that they have been dismissed because they are inner city black men in a hobby that has been dominated by successful white men.[68] Cobb, like Mastro back in the late 1980s, does not divulge the exact details of how he came to own the card. He has variously stated he purchased the card at an estate sale from "an old couple" for $1,800 in 1983 or 1984; he claimed not to know who Honus Wagner was at the time of purchase.[69] When Cobb and Edwards tried to sell the card on eBay in 2002, an attorney from Newport, Kentucky (part of the Cincinnati metro) filed a police report against the two men because he believed the card was a reprint that was stolen from his office months earlier. The police launched an investigation, but found no evidence of wrongdoing. An outraged Edwards dismissed the accusations as "bullshit," adding that they would not have been made "if we were white."[70]

Card Collector Services graded the card and officially ruled that it was indeed a reprint. Cobb and Edwards dismissed the findings and went to Integrated Paper Services (IPS), an independent paper testing and analysis lab, in February 2003 to have their card's paper tested. An IPS expert determined that the card dated back to 1910, which would be consistent to the time period when the card was distributed. The expert ruled that the "paper stock was consistent with the time that card would have been made."[71] Cobbs and Edwards later went to an Ohio paper industry consultant who confirmed that the card was from 1909. The consultant stated that a decent counterfeit of the card could only be produced from a "master pressman with 5–10 years experience, and would require a machine which would cost between $500,000 and $2 million."[72] Afterwards, an appraiser named Bob Connelly valued the card at $850,000, based on the two previous paper analysis reports. In November 2005, Cobb and Edwards put the card up for sale on eBay. They had to shut down the sale, however, because Connelly only agreed to appraise the card if his report was printed in its entirety at the eBay card listing.[72]

A few months after the sale, Edwards asked Connelly if he would accept the card for his auction. Connelly consented and took the card across the country to prospective buyers. Meanwhile, HBO's Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel decided to cover the progress of Cobb and Edwards' struggles with the card.[73] Connelly met a card dealer in New York City, Mike Mangasarian, who was sent on behalf of a prominent collector to check the card out. Mr. Mangasarian said the card seemed authentic and stated he would attend the auction for the card later on if the card could be taken out of the thick lucite holder for a closer examination. A promise was made that this could be done the day of the auction in Binghamton, NY. After the auction and by not bidding on the card Mr. Mangasarian revealed to HBO that he felt the back of the card was indeed real but in his opinion the front was not. He explained that all T-206s have dark brown letters printed for the team's name and are there home remedies for pink eye name and this one was in black. Additionally, he stated that he was not comfortable with the print process exhibited on the card's front. Meanwhile, a number of card collectors who doubted the card contacted eBay and demanded that the card's listing on the website be removed. eBay officials finally pulled the plug the day before the actual auction was to begin. As a result, a number of previously interested collectors decided not to bid for the card at the auction the next day. As Connelly pointed out, the collectors chose not to make bids because "[w]hen eBay pulled the card . it raised too many questions about its authenticity."[74]

Other notable authentic T206 Wagner cards[edit]

As a result of the publicity generated from the financially successful Gretzky T206 Honus Wagner, a number of previously undiscovered legitimate T206 Wagner cards have surfaced. There are fewer than 60 authenticated Wagner cards in existence.

The New York Public Library[edit]

An authentic card is part of the Leopold Morse Goulston Baseball Collection in The New York Public Library's George Arents Collection.[75]

The Metropolitan Museum of Art[edit]

An authentic card is held by The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.[76]

Nuns auctioning T206 Honus Wagner[edit]

In 2010, a rare Honus Wagner was found in a box left by the brother of Sister Virginia Muller who left all her possessions to the Baltimore-based School Sisters of Notre Dame.[77] The card came with her brother's handwritten note: "Although damaged, the value of this baseball card should increase exponentially throughout the 21st century!"[78] The Roman Catholic nuns auctioned the card, which despite its poor condition was expected to fetch between $150,000 and $200,000. On November 4, 2010, the final sale price exceeded the expectations of auctioneers at Dallas-based Heritage Auctions and sold for $262,000 to Doug Walton, a collector and card-shop owner. Walton, however, never paid, and Heritage Auctions subsequently contacted one of its longtime clients, Nicholas DePace, a New Jersey cardiologist, who immediately agreed to buy the card for the same price.[79] On December 20, 2010, after taking its 19.5 percent buyer's premium, the auction house sent $220,000 by bank wire to the School Sisters of Notre Dame.[80] The religious order had already announced that the proceeds from the sale would go to its ministries in more than 30 countries.[81] In May 2020, Gregorio Amor and a team of investors, purchased the card. It is currently on display in the Rally Rd Showroom in the Soho section of New York City.

The 'Jumbo Wagner'[edit]

1909 T206 Honus Wagner Baseball Card with PSA grade EX 5-MC

Many of the remaining T206 Honus Wagner cards in existence have rated low on the PSA grading scale. Only three existing Wagner cards received a PSA rating of EX [5] or better. One such example is known in the industry as the 'Jumbo Wagner' [shown on the right]. Graded EX 5 (MC) on the PSA grading scale, the card has unusually ample borders due to a miscut. These dimensions far exceed the standard size for a T206 baseball card virtually preserving a Near Mint example within its boundaries.[82][83]

President of PSA, Joe Orlando said "The PSA EX 5 (MC) 1909-11 T206 Honus Wagner (serial number 15385994) is, without question, one of the top examples of this historic card known. The technical grade includes the MC qualifier. The card was given this designation by PSA due to its oversized nature. This particular T206 Honus Wagner stands out from other known examples and therefore gives it placement as a top-notch specimen."[64]

Initially sold at auction for $1.62M in 2008, the 'Jumbo Wagner' was featured by Goldin Auctions in their 2013 Winter Auction, which closed on April 5, 2013.[84] Historical price increases and the state of the sports collectible market contributed to projections that the auction could set a new overall price record for the sale of a T206 Honus Wagner.[64] The card ultimately sold for $2,105,770.50, including the buyer's premium, a record price for a baseball card in a public auction.[85]

The All Star Cafe Wagner[edit]

In April 2013, Robert Edward Auctions was scheduled to begin an auction of a T206 Honus Wagner that was once owned by actor Charlie Sheen. Sheen had loaned the card to the All Star Cafe where it was stolen and later recovered by the FBI. It is graded PSA 1.[86]

T206 Honus Wagner recent sales[edit]

  • A T206 Wagner given a two on the PSA's 1–10 grading scale sold for $75,000 in September 2000.
  • Five years later, in 2005, another PSA 2 card sold for $237,000.
  • Included in the above auction, a PSA 1 card sold for $110,000.[87]
  • In 2004, a PSA PR-FR-1 Wagner sold for $109,638.[88]
  • Another PSA PR-FR-1 brought $132,000 one year later in 2005.[88]
  • A T206 Wagner owned by renowned collector Frank Nagy sold for $456,000 in December 2005, through Mastro's auction company.[89]
  • Two PSA Grade 2 Wagners sold for $236,705 in 2005 and $294,338 in 2006.[88]
  • In May 2008, a graded 1 set a new record for a low-grade card, selling at auction for $317,250.[90]
  • Several months later, in November 2008, an SGC 3 graded Wagner card was sold by Philip Weiss Auctions of New York. The final bid was $700,000, but with a 13% buyer's premium added, the realized price was $791,000.[91]
  • A PSA PR-FR 1 Wagner sold for $400,000 in 2009[88]
  • In 2010, a PSA Authentic/Altered Wagner sold for $219,225.[88]
  • On April 20, 2012, an anonymous New Jersey resident purchased a VG-3 graded T206 Wagner card for more than $1.2 million.[92]
  • On April 6, 2013, a T206 card sold for a record for a baseball card on an online auction. It brought in $2,105,770.50 in an online sale by Goldin Auctions.[93]
  • On October 1, 2016, the same T206 Honus Wagner card sold in 2013 was again sold at the close of a Goldin Auctions online auction for a new record of $3.12M.[94]
  • On May 28, 2019, it was announced that a PSA-graded 2 (Good) card was sold by private transaction to an unnamed buyer for $1.2M.[95] The same card was reported to have been previously sold in 2014 for $657,250 and 2016 for $776,750.
  • On August 16, 2021, it was announced that a T206 Honus Wagner baseball card sold for $6.606 million, which includes a 20% buyer's premium, breaking the record for highest-selling sports card of all time.[96]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^James, Bill (2001). The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract. New York, New York: Simon & Schuster. p. 358. ISBN .
  2. ^quote by Keith Olbermann (2013-03-25). "Holy Grail: The T206 Honus Wagner (ESPN Films' 30 For 30 Shorts)". Prospect Productions & ESPN Films. Retrieved 2014-05-28.
  3. ^Harris, Craig (2011-04-16). "Arizona Diamondbacks owner Ken Kendrick reveals $2.8 million secret Honus Wagner card". Arizona Republic. Retrieved 2011-05-17.
  4. ^Roberts, Daniel (October 2, 2016). "Honus Wagner baseball card sells for new record $3.12 million". Yahoo! Finance. Yahoo!. Retrieved 24 April 2017.
  5. ^Boeck, Scott (January 14, 2021). "1952 Mickey Mantle baseball card sells for record $5.2 million". USA Today. Retrieved 2021-01-14.
  6. ^Knight, Brett (2021-08-16). "Honus Wagner Card Sells For $6.6 Million, The Third Record Baseball Card Sale In A Year". Forbes. Retrieved 2021-10-24.
  7. ^O'Keeffe, Michael (October 11, 2013). "Bill Mastro admits cutting T206 Honus Wagner card, pleads guilty to mail fraud". New York Daily News. Retrieved 2015-03-01.
  8. ^ abO'Keeffe, Michael; Teri Thompson (2007). The Card: Collectors, Con Men, and the True Story of History's Most Desired Baseball Card. New York: HarperCollins. p. 32. ISBN .
  9. ^ abO'Keeffe and Thompson, p33.
  10. ^"1907–1925 Terms (207–271 U. S.)". United States Supreme Court. 2007-08-16. Archived from the original on 2007-10-14. Retrieved 2007-10-19.
  11. ^Knauth, Oswald Whitman (1914). The Policy of the United States Towards Industrial Monopoly. New York, New York: Columbia University Press. p. 153. ISBN .
  12. ^Reader, Scot A. (2006). Inside T206: A Collector's Guide to the Classic Baseball Card Set(PDF) (3rd ed.). p. 13. Archived from the original(PDF) on 2008-10-29.
  13. ^Reader, p11.
  14. ^Reader, p12.
  15. ^Reader, p45.
  16. ^Reader, p9.
  17. ^Wong, Stephen (2005). Smithsonian Baseball: Inside the World's Finest Private Collections. New York, New York: HarperCollins. p. 66. ISBN .
  18. ^James, p132.
  19. ^Davis, Ralph S. (1912-10-12). "Wagner A Wonder: One Player In Game Who Is Not Money Mad"(PDF). The Sporting News. Archived from the original(PDF) on 2007-10-09. Retrieved 2007-10-19.
  20. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p39.
  21. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p37.
  22. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p36.
  23. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, pp37–38.
  24. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p38.
  25. ^Wolverton, Troy (2000-07-05). "eBay invokes new rules for baseball card auction". CNET. Retrieved 2007-10-19.
  26. ^"World Record of $2.8 Million Paid for Famed T206 Honus Wagner Baseball Card". Professional Sports Authenticator. 2007-09-06. Retrieved 2013-03-17.
  27. ^ abcO'Keeffe and Thompson, p47.
  28. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p76.
  29. ^ The PSA grades card based on a 1–10 scale. As from the description from the PSA Sports Card Grading StandardsArchived 2007-10-31 at the Wayback Machine, NM-MT 8: "A ticket of this quality will appear to be a Mint 9 at first glance but one of the following additional defects may be present. Very light "touches" at two corners, apparent to the naked eye, would be acceptable under this standard. A very slight surface abrasion or evidence of modest surface damage, on the front or back, may be acceptable if limited. For instance, a faint impression from baseball card stores in my area paper clip would be an example of this type of acceptable defect. "Medium to Medium/Dark" printing of crucial game information is required. Centering must fall within approximately 60/40 to 65/35 or better on the front and back."
  30. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p89.
  31. ^"Homepage - VintageCollectables.net". vintagecollectables.net.
  32. ^O'Keefe, Michael (2013-02-28). "Grantland's 30 for 30 series examines The Card - the T206 Honus Wagner". New York Daily News. Archived from the baseball card stores in my area on 2016-03-04.
  33. ^Only two T206 Honus Wagner cards featuring the Piedmont cigarette brand on the back of the card exist today. The other Piedmont-backed card belongs to a collector from Virginia.
  34. ^ abO'Keeffe, Michael; Bill Madden (2001-03-25). "Wagner's Wild Card: Mystery has surrounded Honus T206 since 1909". Daily News. Archived from the original on 2008-02-13. Retrieved 2007-11-02.
  35. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p12.
  36. ^ abO'Keeffe and Thompson, p13.
  37. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p14.
  38. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p15.
  39. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p26.
  40. ^Nightingale, Van (1991-07-07). "The Wagner Is in a League by Itself". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2007-11-02.
  41. ^Peers, Alexandra (1996-09-20). "Baseball's Card of Cards Is Up for Grabs". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 2007-11-02.
  42. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p46.
  43. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p48.
  44. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p72.
  45. ^ abO'Keeffe and Thompson, p204.
  46. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p121.
  47. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p122.
  48. ^Gelatt, Dorothy S. (December 1996). "Secret Life of the Record Honus Wagner Card". Maine Antique Digest.
  49. ^Lenihan, Rob (2000-07-07). "eBay goes for grand slam". CNN. Retrieved 2007-11-09.
  50. ^"Legendary T206 Honus Wagner Baseball Trading Card for Sale on eBay". eBay. 2000-06-06. Archived from the original on 2007-01-13. Retrieved 2007-11-09.
  51. ^The winning online bid was $1.1 million, but with the 15% buyer's premium, the total came to $1.265 million.
  52. ^"T206 Honus Wagner Sold on eBay for $1.265 Million;". eBay. 2000-07-17. Archived from the original on 2007-01-17. Retrieved 2007-11-09.
  53. ^"Honus Wagner card sold for $2.35 million". Associated Press. 2007-02-27. Archived from the original on 2007-03-01. Retrieved 2007-11-09.
  54. ^"Honus Wagner card sells for record $2.8 million". Associated Press. 2007-09-06. Retrieved 2007-11-09.
  55. ^"Memorabilia dealer admits to altering famed $2.8 million Honus Wagner card". Yahoo!. 2013-04-10. Retrieved 2013-04-11.
  56. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p112.
  57. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p80.
  58. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p81.
  59. ^"Sports memorabilia king Bill Mastro indicted on fraud charges". NY Daily News. Retrieved 2017-11-04.
  60. ^"Bill Mastro Honus Wagner Altered: Dealer Cops To Doctoring Most Valuable Baseball Card Ever Sold". Huffington Post. 2013-04-10. Retrieved 2017-11-04.
  61. ^"Judge tosses out Mastro's plea deal . again". NY Daily News. Retrieved 2017-11-04.
  62. ^Crosby, Rachel. "'King of Memorabilia' sentenced to 20 months in prison for fraud". chicagotribune.com. Retrieved 2017-11-04.
  63. ^"Mastro Released from Federal Prison Camp". Sports Collectors Daily. 2017-06-12. Retrieved 2017-11-04.
  64. ^ abc"Goldin Auctions Winter 2013 Auction Offers The Rare Chance To Own One Of Only Three 1909 Honus Wagner T206 Graded Excellent 5 Or Higher By PSA". Goldin Auctions Website. 2013-01-04. Retrieved 2013-02-25. Goldin Auctions Winter 2013 Auction Offers.
  65. ^2002 Topps 206 checklist
  66. ^2020 TOPPS 206 BASEBALL VARIATIONS GUIDE by RYAN CRACKNELL on Beckett
  67. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p151.
  68. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p152.
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  70. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p155.
  71. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p157.
  72. ^ abO'Keeffe and Thompson, p158.
  73. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p159.
  74. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p161.
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  76. ^DeLessio, Joe (2012-01-18). "A Q&A About the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Baseball Card Collection". New York Magazine. Retrieved 2012-01-26.
  77. ^"Nuns auctioning rare baseball card". FoxSports.com. The Associated Press. October 27, 2010. Retrieved 2010-12-22.
  78. ^Kaduk, Kevin (November 5, 2010). "Nuns cash in big on sale of Honus Wagner T-206 card". Yahoo! Sports. Big League Stew sports blog. Retrieved 2010-12-22.
  79. ^Newall, Mike (December 22, 2010). "Christmas comes early, thanks to a Haddonfield physician". Philly.com. The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved 2012-04-19.
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  82. ^"Don't put this in your spokes: 'Jumbo Wagner' card could fetch $3M". Investment News. 2013-01-04. Walmart money card number 2013-01-04.Don't put this in your spokes: 'Jumbo Wagner' card could fetch $3M
  83. ^"Bidding to be Open February 25 for the T206 Honus Wagner PSA EX 5 (MC) and 850 Additional Lots in Goldin Auctions 2013 Winter Auction". PSA Authentication Website. 2013-02-15. Archived from the original on 2013-02-19. Retrieved 2013-02-25. Bidding to be Open February 25 for the T206 Honus Wagner PSA EX 5 (MC)
  84. ^"Jumbo Wagner Bidding to Start at $500,000". Sports Collectors Daily Website. 2013-02-13. Retrieved 2013-02-25. Jumbo Wagner Bidding to Start at $500,000
  85. ^"ESPN: T206 Honus Wagner sells for $2.1 Million". ESPN. 2013-04-05. Retrieved 2013-04-05.
  86. ^"REA Pulls Back Curtain on Annual Blockbuster Auction: Will Include T206 Wagner". Sports Collectors Daily. 2013-03-24. Retrieved 2014-10-01.
  87. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p149.
  88. ^ abcde"PSA Population Report". Professional Sports Authenticator. Retrieved 2013-04-01.
  89. ^O'Keeffe and Thompson, p92.
  90. ^Beckett Graded Card Investor and Price Guide, Vol. 2 No. 3, July/August 2008, p. 4.
  91. ^Mueller, Rich (2008-06-29). "T206 Wagner, Gehrig Jersey, Ruth Bat Part of Live Auction". Sports Collectors Daily. Archived from the original on 2016-04-25.
  92. ^Holleman, Joe (April 20, 2012). "Rare baseball card tops $1 million in auction". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Retrieved April 21, 2012.
  93. ^Fox, Emily Jane (April 6, 2013). "1909 Honus Wagner baseball card sells for $2.1 million". CNN Money. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  94. ^"Honus Wagner Card - What Makes the T206 Jumbo So Special? - Goldin Auctions". Goldin Auctions.
  95. ^"Honus Wagner baseball card sells privately for $1.2 million". Associated Press . May 28, 2019. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  96. ^"ESPN: Rare Honus Wagner card sells for record $6.6M". ESPN. 2021-08-16. Retrieved 2013-08-16.

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T206_Honus_Wagner

**OFFER DETAILS

COUPON: Valid one time only. Duplicate offers t&d motors not be accepted. Offer will not be re-issued if lost, stolen or destroyed or with return/refund of merchandise. The entire transaction amount after discount must be placed on the Academy Sports + Outdoors Credit Card.

OFFER: Valid one time only. Offer will be received via mail by 1/1/2022.

†CARD BENEFIT DETAILS

$15 OFF FIRST PURCHASE: Application and approval must occur same day to receive the offer. Cannot be combined with 5% cardmember discount. Cannot be used to purchase gift cards, licenses, or in-store services. See team member or visit academy.com/instore-services for list of in-store services. Valid one time only. The entire transaction amount after discount must be placed on the Academy Sports + Outdoors Credit Card. Minimum pre-tax purchase of $15.01 required to receive discount. The 5% cardmember discount will be applied for purchases less than $15.01. If approved online, first purchase must be made in the same session as approval to receive discount.

5% OFF EVERY DAY: Cannot be combined with purchase on special financing or other offers except Free Shipping benefit. Excludes gift cards, licenses, and in-store services. See team member or visit academy.com/instore-services for list of in-store services. If more than one form of payment is used for a purchase online, cardmember will not receive 5% off. Account must not be in default.

FREE SHIPPING: Limited to standard shipping. Bulk and select items may be excluded, see product page for shipping information. Cannot be combined with the Academy Sports + Outdoors employee discount. Academy Sports + Outdoors does not ship to Alaska, California or Hawaii. The entire transaction amount after discount must be placed on the Academy Sports + Outdoors Credit Card. Minimum pre-tax purchase of $15.00 required to receive discount.

Credit Card Offers are subject to credit approval.

Academy Sports + Outdoors Credit Card Accounts are issued by Comenity Capital Bank. This credit card program is unavailable to California residents.

Источник: https://www.academy.com/shop/browse/academy-credit-card

Bottom Line

Be careful of assuming your collectibles are covered under your homeowner’s policy. There could be several instances or types of damages that don’t cover the loss of your collection just because it resides in your home. Typically, the least expensive way to insure your collection is to cover it through a rider on your existing homeowner’s policy. But very often these riders do not cover the full market value of your collection, so read the fine print when you explore this avenue.

Collectibles insurance policies exist as standalone coverage to protect against these shortcomings of loss coverage and value. Collectibles insurance companies understand the nuances surrounding your valuables. American Collectors Insurance checks all the boxes and more. As our best overall collectibles insurance company, they offer specialized policy features that account for full collector’s value, inflation, automatic coverage additions to your collection as it grows, and more.

Compare Providers

CompanyWhy We Picked ItBest Features
American Collectors InsuranceBest OverallAgreed Value Coverage; Inflation Guard Protection; Automatic coverage of new additions; Collector’s Choice Program
BHI Insurance AssociatesBest for AntiquesBacked by 44 insurers to find the best policy for you; potential to combine policies for savings
Arroyo Insurance ServicesBest for Persian RugsInsure someone else’s collectibles; insure your collection while on loan
ProgressiveBest for ArtworkOpportunity for bundled savings
Collectibles Insurance ServicesBest for Sports MemorabiliaComprehensive loss coverage; no appraisal required for items under $25,000; inflation coverage; $0 deductibles
MiniCo Insurance AgencyBest ValueQuick online quote tool; insurance up to $1 million; Competitive premiums and $0 deductible; insures full value
ChubbBest CustomizationCustomizable policies that can blend blanket coverage with some itemized pieces; liberal appraisal requirements

Frequently Asked Questions

What Is Collectibles Insurance?

Collectibles insurance protects prized possessions from loss events such as theft, accidental damage, and mysterious disappearances that homeowner’s coverage does not. They take into account that collections typically don’t depreciate, but rather appreciate over time. Homeowner's insurance limits property coverage to a percentage of your home total value. Sometimes, that is not enough to replace your collection if it were ever destroyed, damaged, or stolen. And even if there is enough coverage in dollar values, the policy may limit coverage to certain collectibles such as fine art or Persian rugs, thus won’t fully cover the loss. 

Collectible insurance policies may also cover your collection outside of your home. For example, you can tailor a policy to cover your items while in transit in the mail, while traveling with you, while housed in a storage facility, or while on display at an exhibit.

How Do I Insure a Collection?

To insure a collection, insurance companies will have you start by providing some proof that you possess the collection, identify specifically what is in it with a detailed inventory, and show some type of third-party valuation such as a bill of sale or appraisal.

You can do some quick research with some online quoting tools to get an estimate, then you’ll contact insurance companies or consultants to work toward a more accurate quote. Insurers will want to know a bit more about your lifestyle as it pertains to the collection so their agents can suggest certain policies that will protect you best. For example, are you a dealer who frequently travels with your baseball card collection to exhibits? You’ll need a policy that covers theft, accidental damage during transit, or missing inventory.

How Much Does Collectible Insurance Cost?

There are two primary ways to insure a collection. The less expensive way is to add an inventory schedule rider to your homeowner’s policy. Even though they may have a lower annual premium, these riders may not give you enough coverage. That’s when a separate and specialized collectible policy makes sense that schedules each asset. 

Look for policies that give your collection full market value, not cash value or replacement value. Expect these policies to cost in the neighborhood of 1% to 2% of that insured value. For example, a $100,000 baseball card collection could cost roughly $2,000 per year in premium payments to insure.

How We Chose the Best Collectibles Insurance

After looking at 16 insurance companies we found these seven to be the best in their league. Some of these seven companies actually serve as brokers who are backed by 30 to 50 AM Best-rated financial institutions, giving them a deep baseball card stores in my area of expertise and value from which to draw. 

We chose companies that offered a broad scope of insurance products, whether it be hundreds of types of collections, or complementary insurance products that can be bundled for savings. All of the winners used the similar pricing philosophy of offering full market collector’s value, with premiums in the 1% to 2% range of the collection’s appraisal or bill of sale. As always, we favor companies that are easy to work with, and have simple online tools as well as email and phone options. From application to claims to customer support, companies that had streamlined online processes rose to the top.

Источник: https://www.investopedia.com/best-collectibles-insurance-5101072

Best Baseball Card Appraisal Services

Final Verdict

Whether you are looking to sell your collection or simply see how much your cards are worth, getting your baseball cards appraised by the right service can help you understand their true value. There are many appraisal services available online and at local card shops, so understanding the differences between these services and their offerings can help you find the right one for your collection.

If you are looking to insure your collection or need to report its value for tax purposes, getting a certified appraisal by an accredited company is a must.

Always compare services to make sure you are getting the best price possible. If you're first financial bank texas customer service number a free service, acquire multiple quotes to get an accurate value of your collection.

Should I Get My Cards Graded Before Selling Them?

If you believe your card is valuable, most serious collectors will only consider purchasing a baseball card that has been professionally graded. These services will evaluate the cut, finish, and overall condition of your cards and give them a score. The most widely accepted grading service is offered by PSA, but Sportscard Guaranty and Beckett offer grading services as well.

What Is the Best Way to Sell a Baseball Card Collection?

There are several ways to sell your baseball cards, both online and in-person. Many of the companies that do appraisals may offer to purchase your baseball cards as well.

There are also local places to sell your collectibles, including sports card shops and consignment stores. You might not get the best price from a local shop because they are typically trying to flip cards for profit. You can also try eBay or Craigslist, but beware of online scams.

No matter where you sell your baseball cards, make sure to first get their fair market value with an online price guide such as Beckett.

We compared the top appraisal companies by looking at customer reviews, service offerings, and industry notoriety. All paid appraisal services on our list are accredited by the Appraisers Association of America (AAA), the American Society of Appraisers (ASA), or the ISA. We’ve included both free and paid offerings with a variety of services to help you choose a company that will fit your specific appraisal goals.

Источник: https://www.thesprucecrafts.com/best-baseball-card-appraisal-services-5116251

Top Sports Memorabilia Stores In Denver

Mike's Stadium Sportscards

Mike's Stadium Sportscards(credit: Mike’s Stadium Sportscards)
Even if you aren’t a huge fan, chances are there’s at least one moment in Denver sports history that you will remember forever. Whether it be the Broncos winning their second Super Bowl in John Elway’s last game, or the Rockies’ amazing run in “Rocktober” of 2007, or Tim Tebow’s perfect pass to Demaryius Thomas to win in overtime, we can all think of one moment in which a sporting event captivated our full attention. Luckily, there are more than a few stores across the Denver metro area where you can find collectibles and memorabilia that will help instill that wonderful sense of nostalgia, and bring back those amazing memories. These are some of the best places in Denver to buy and sell sports memorabilia.
Bill’s Sports Collectibles
2335 S Broadway
Denver, CO 80210
(303) 733-4878
www.billssportscollectibles.com

Bill’s Sports Collectibles is one of the most popular sports memorabilia stores in the city. They have more than 5,000 square feet of space, 1 million plus cards, as well as thousands of other authentic collector’s items. They’ve been around since 1981, and Bill and his staff are extremely knowledgeable and helpful when it comes to buying and selling items. Bill’s specializes in everything related to the four major sports (baseball, football, basketball and hockey), and if you have any questions, they’ll definitely have the answer.

Mike’s Stadium Sportscards
4022 S Parker Road
Aurora, CO 80014
(303) 699-9808
www.facebook.com/mikesstadiumsportscards

The premier sports card store in the state, Mike has more than 3.6 million items in his collection spanning the entire sporting world. From wax boxes to single collector’s items, Mike’s has it all. The store also hosts trade nights each month, as well as autograph signings with players from Denver’s home teams (Broncos defensive end Derek Wolfe was the latest). Not only that, but they just moved to a larger location, so they have much more room to properly display their items. Follow them on Facebook for monthly events, news and updates from the store.

Related:  Top Spots To Buy Men’s Dress Socks In Denver

Denver Autographs
14500 W Colfax Ave., Suite 383
Lakewood, CO 80401
(303) 462-1145
www.denverautographs.com

Denver Autographs carries one of the most diverse inventories in the city. They specialize in Denver memorabilia, and have a massive selection of autographs from a variety of Denver’s favorites sports figures. However, their staff consistently travels to most large national shows, so they are able to bring back items from all across the nation. They’ll even bring your items out with them and get them signed and returned for a small fee. Denver Autographs also hosts public signings with Denver athletes, such as Aqib Talib and Demaryius Thomas. They have two locations, one at Colorado Mills and one at the Flatirons, so be sure to stop by and see what they have.

John’s Sports Collectibles
3615 Galley Road
Colorado Springs, CO 80909
(719) 574-7040

South of Denver, the best place to find Sports Memorabilia is John’s Sports Collectibles. Dealing in cards, autographs and collectibles, John’s is the premier memorabilia store in Colorado Springs. They buy and sell merchandise, and their staff is very knowledgeable and will help you find whatever it is you’re looking for, or answer any questions you have regarding value and rarity. So next time you’re in the Springs, be sure to pop in and see what gems you might be missing.

Related: Top All You Can Eat Buffets In Denver

To read more from Examiner, visit Examiner.com.

Источник: https://denver.cbslocal.com/top-lists/top-sports-memorabilia-stores-in-denver/

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