how is garlic good for you

A great deal of research has been done on garlic, especially on garlic's or if you need surgery, tell your health care provider if you're taking or. It should be no surprise to you that we're big fans of garlic and ginger and the extra High in antioxidants — Garlic is full of healthy antioxidants! Would You or Wouldn't You: Gnaw on Raw Garlic For Cold & Flu Season Most of us love a little roasted garlic in a good recipe.

How is garlic good for you -

Fresh or capsuled? Researcher studies garlic’s potency as a supplement

By SARA SELIC

What good is garlic? And to reap any benefits, should you eat it in its odiferous fresh form or will a stink-free capsule suffice? Christopher Gardner, PhD, a researcher at the Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, is on a mission to find out.

Thanks to a grant from the National Institutes of Health, Gardner is conducting the most rigorous study ever to address a lingering controversy in the nutritional-supplement field: whether fresh garlic and garlic supplements — a widely consumed herbal supplement — lower cholesterol as claimed.

Food service workers carefully peel garlic in preparation for an unusual study conducted by Christopher Gardner. Gardner and his team are comparing the effectiveness of garlic taken in supplement form to garlic eaten fresh. Study volunteers must agree to eat a number of garlic-infused specialty sandwiches. PHOTO: COURTESY OF CHRISTOPHER GARDNER

In preparation for the study — which is seeking volunteers and entails eating gourmet sandwiches six days a week — Gardner’s staff spent two weeks peeling, mashing and measuring 150 pounds of fresh garlic. That’s on top of the weeks they spent taste-testing a dozen custom-made sandwiches ranging from Portobello mushroom to chicken quesadilla.

The Stanford study differs greatly from the dozens of garlic studies conducted over the past four decades, Gardner explained.

While previous studies tested different garlic preparations with inconsistent and often inadequate potency, the Stanford researchers know the exact chemical composition of the garlic preparations they’re using and will monitor this throughout the study with periodic chemical analyses. And unlike previous studies, which tested just one garlic type, the Stanford study will evaluate the effects of two top-selling garlic supplements along with fresh garlic.

"This study goes far beyond the other trials, because we know exactly what we’re giving participants," said Gardner, assistant professor of medicine. "These results should help set the record straight."

For centuries, garlic has been touted for its disease-fighting properties. The most commonly claimed benefit is reduced cholesterol, although garlic is also said to reduce blood pressure, boost antioxidants and reduce the risk of certain cancers. Seeking such benefits without eating (or smelling like) garlic, millions of Americans take garlic supplements — pills containing powdered garlic or aged-garlic extract.

Meanwhile, researchers sought to determine whether garlic deserves its reputation. More than two dozen studies in the 1970s and ‘80s claimed to prove that garlic lowers cholesterol, but the studies were later criticized for poor design. They involved too few participants or didn’t include a control group, for example. When more-rigorous studies were conducted in the 1990s, most concluded that garlic offered little to no significant benefit.

Gardner said the question remains unsettled because chemical analyses conducted by Larry Lawson, PhD, a biochemist and co-investigator for Stanford’s study, revealed serious flaws in the formulations of the garlic supplements used in past studies. The key issue is allicin, an enzyme that is garlic’s active ingredient.

When a person eats fresh garlic, allicin is released by chewing or mincing the herb. It’s more challenging to get allicin from a garlic pill, however. In some cases, if the pills dissolve in the stomach, the garlic enzyme needed to produce allicin becomes inactivated.

Some pills, meanwhile, have an enteric coating, and these pills often pass through the body undissolved. "The problem is, all these studies didn’t really test garlic — they tested garlic supplements," Gardner said. "That’s not the same as eating garlic."

To select the fresh garlic for the study, Gardner traveled to Gilroy, Calif., the nation’s "garlic capital." An eight-person team spent two weeks peeling and mashing the garlic, then scooping it into 5-gram containers.

The premeasured garlic portions will be spread onto the gourmet "study sandwiches" that participants in the "fresh garlic group" must eat six days a week.

All other participants must eat the sandwiches as well, but minus the garlic. The six types of sandwiches used in the study were chosen in taste tests from a larger sample all custom-prepared by a chef. "This isn’t your typical clinical trial. It’s a lot of fun," Gardner said.

Participants in the Stanford study — 200 healthy adults with moderately elevated cholesterol — will consume the sandwiches along with study tablets for six months. Random assignment will be used to determine which combination of sandwich and pill will be given to each participant in the trial.

Participants’ cholesterol, blood pressure, blood-clotting ability and antioxidant levels will be monitored periodically.

Volunteers must be between ages 30 and 65 and in good health but have moderately elevated cholesterol (LDL of 130-190). And, they must agree to eat their allotted "study sandwiches" six days a week.

"We only want people who like our sandwiches," Gardner said, adding, "We’ve gone to enormous lengths to make sure they’re excellent."

Interested volunteers should call 725-5018 for more information.


Источник: https://news.stanford.edu/news/2003/january15/garlic.html

5 great things that drinking garlic tea in the morning can do for you

We are sure by now you know of the many benefits of garlic. This bulb is a powerhouse of nutrients that help to boost immunity, keep infections at bay, and get your digestive system on track. But what if we were to tell you that you can enjoy these benefits not just by adding this herb to your meals, but also by drinking garlic tea? 

Yup, garlic tea is a great way to regulate your health—especially if you start your day with it. Even though it may not sound like the most delicious beverage out there, but the fact that it’s loaded with vitamins A, B, and C, antioxidants, fibre, manganese, and sulfur make it worth it. 

In fact, according to The University of Oregon Linus Pauling Institute, garlic is an excellent source of organosulfur. When you crush garlic, it releases an alliinase compound which can protect you against cardiovascular diseases. 

But that’s not all garlic tea can do for you. Here are all the health benefits that garlic tea has to offer you: 

 

1. It’s excellent for your heart health

 

Garlic is known for its heart-healthy properties. It is rich in allicin, an organosulfur compound that inhibits the development of atherosclerosis in people with heart disease. Garlic tea also promotes better blood circulation, lowers the level of bad cholesterol (LDL), and restricts plaque from blocking arteries thereby reducing the risk of heart diseases.

 

2. It can boost your immune system

 

Garlic’s allicin along with its antifungal, antibacterial, and antioxidant properties can help fight radicals. They not only protect your body against bacteria and other deadly pathogens, but also keep your immune system going strong. 

 

3. Garlic also has anti-cancer properties

 

Garlic tea has anti-carcinogenic properties that can contribute to preventing various types of cancerous diseases. Research finds that those who consume garlic tea can reduce their risk of stomach and breast cancer.

 

4. It improves the functioning of the respiratory system

 

If you have a cold, cough, sinus infection, fever, congestion, or sore throat—garlic anti-inflammatory properties can come to your aid. Because of this reason, garlic is also considered to be beneficial for people with asthma, though more research is needed on that front. 

 

5. Garlic tea can help with weight loss

 

If weight loss is on your mind, then garlic tea can help you out. Garlic tea can help boost fat loss, get your metabolism up to speed, and suppress your appetite.

Here’s how you can make garlic tea at home

Step 1: To a cup of water, add 2 to 3 garlic cloves cut in half. 

Step 2: Bring to a boil and turn off the heat. Squeeze some lemon juice and some  honey, if required.

Step 3: Strain the tea and drink. If you can stand the taste of it, go ahead and munch on the boiled garlic cloves. 

Your garlic tea is ready! Add this to your diet and see your body change. 

Aayushi Gupta Aayushi Gupta

Candid, outspoken, but prudent--Aayushi is exploring her place in media world.

Источник: https://www.healthshots.com/healthy-eating/superfoods/garlic-health-benefits-5-reasons-to-drink-garlic-tea-in-the-morning/

Discover our full range of health benefit guides, then check out some of our delicious garlic recipesand a video on how to crush garlic.

Nutritional Benefits

One clove (4g) of garlic provides:

  • 4Kcal / 16KJ
  • 0.3g protein
  • 0.0g fat
  • 0.7g carbohydrates
  • 0.2g fibre
  • 25mg Potassium

5 health benefits of garlic

1. Contains compounds with medicinal properties

Much of garlic’s therapeutic acclaim is down to an active compound called allicin. This sulphur-containing compound gives garlic its pungent smell and distinctive taste. Luckily for us cooks, the action of chopping or crushing stimulates the production of allicin. But, it is thought that the application of heat may inhibit some of the perceived medicinal properties, making it best to add garlic late in the cooking process.

2. May reduce the risk of heart attacks

Much research has focused on garlic’s potential in reducing the risk of heart disease and helping to manage cholesterol levels. Several studies suggest that garlic makes platelets (the cells involved in blood clotting) less likely to clump together and accumulate on artery walls; this means garlic acts like an anticoagulant and by so doing reduces the risk of heart attacks.

Garlic may also lower blood pressure through its ability to widen blood vessels, allowing blood to flow more freely.

3. May have anti-cancer properties

The sulphurous compounds in garlic have been studied for their ability to inhibit cancerous cells and block tumours. That said, much of the evidence for garlic in relation to colon, prostate, oesophageal and renal cancer is observational, with only small numbers of subjects included in the studies. As a result, the effect garlic has in relation to cancer remains uncertain and more studies are needed.

4. Has antimicrobial and antifungal properties

Garlic has a long history of use as an infection fighter against viruses, bacteria and fungi. It has been referred to as ‘Russian penicillin’ to denote its antibacterial properties, which is once again attributed to the compound allicin. Some skin conditions, such as warts and insect bites, may also respond to garlic oil or a crushed raw garlic clove.

5. May support bone health

Animal studies suggest garlic may minimise bone loss by increasing oestrogen levels in female rodents. A study in post-menopausal women found a similar effect when a daily dose of dry garlic extract (equivalent to 2g of raw garlic) was consumed.

Studies also suggest the consumption of garlic may give some relief from the inflammatory symptoms of osteoarthritis.

Is garlic safe for everyone?

Garlic poses few safety issues and allergies are rare. If you take garlic supplements for cholesterol management, have your cholesterol levels checked after three months. The recommended daily amount of garlic ranges from ½-1 whole clove per day (around 3000-6000mcg of allicin).

Please note that some people may experience indigestion, intestinal gas or diarrhoea when taking high doses of garlic.

Recipe suggestions for garlic

A simple aïoli is a great accompaniment for roasts, fish or as a dip:
Homemade aïoli
Salmon & prawns with dill & lime aïoli

Make your own delicious garlic bread:
Garlic & basil ciabatta
Quick tomato soup with cheesy garlic dippers

Cook with mushrooms:
Garlic mushroom burgers
Mushrooms on toast
Garlicky mushroom penne

Pair with prawns:
Stir-fry prawns with peppers & spinach
Lemony prawn bruschettas

Add flavour to mashed potato and stews:
Roast sweet potato squash & garlic mash
Garlic mash potato bake
Spicy root & lentil casserole

Garlic is great with chicken:
Garlic chicken with herbed potatoes

Want more? Take inspiration from our garlic recipes.


This article was last reviewed on 6 October 2021 by Kerry Torrens.

Kerry Torrens is a qualified nutritionist (MBANT) with a postgraduate diploma in Personalised Nutrition & Nutritional Therapy. She is a member of the British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT) and a member of the Guild of Food Writers. Over the past 15 years she has been a contributing author to a number of nutritional and cookery publications including BBC Good Food.

All health content on bbcgoodfood.com is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other health care professional. If you have any concerns about your general health, you should contact your local health care provider. See our website terms and conditions for more information.

Источник: https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/ingredient-focus-garlic

You Should Never Use Minced Garlic From A Jar. Here's Why

There's nothing like fresh garlic. No, seriously. Maybe some people and all vampires dislike the smell, but there's something about that aroma of freshly chopped garlic that just makes you confident: This meal is going to be good and flavorful.

And we'll admit it: Chopping garlic can be time-consuming. If you don't have a foolproof chopping method, you could end up hopelessly hacking away at irregularly sized little garlic chunks. But even poorly chopped garlic is better than the alternative: minced garlic from a jar, or, as we like to call it, garlic in purgatory. This garlic is expensive, oily, and seriously doesn't know what it wants to be. As human beings, we all have identity issues, but garlic should not: Raw garlic should be sharp, bitter, and aromatic, and frankly, the jarred stuff doesn't deliver. It may seem easier – no mincing – and it lasts longer, but it lacks flavor (via MyRecipes).

When The Kitchn editor Sheela Prakash compared minced jarred garlic to several other forms, like frozen cubes and pre-peeled cloves, the puree in a jar ranked pretty low. Why? Prakash observed a stale, subdued flavor. And if not for flavor, why else would you eat garlic? We're not exactly doing it to smell good. Opt for fresh garlic: If mincing is too tricky, you can use some shortcuts along the way. We've got you.

Источник: https://www.mashed.com/232390/you-should-never-use-minced-garlic-from-a-jar-heres-why/

1

Crush them. Then bake them slightly. That's according to Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and collaborators in Argentina.

Researchers have known for some time that garlic--like its close relative, the onion--is a rich source of heart-protective compounds called thiosulfinates. These sulfur compounds, best known for causing eyes to water, may lower blood pressure and break up potentially harmful clusters of platelets in the bloodstream.

But, up to now, most researchers and nutritionists assumed that the best way to seize on garlic's cardiovascular benefits was to eat the small bulbs in their most unfettered form: in the raw.

Not so, discovered ARS plant geneticist Philipp Simon and his colleagues Pablo Cavagnaro, Alejandra Camargo and Claudio Galmarini, whose findings appear in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Simon works in the ARS Vegetable Crops Research Unit in Madison, Wis. Cavagnaro, Camargo and Galmarini work at the INTA La Consulta in Argentina.

Since most people worldwide sauté or bake their garlic before eating it, the researchers wanted to know if cooking reduced garlic's blood-thinning effects. They also wanted to see what impact crushing the garlic before cooking had on its ability to bust up artery-clogging platelets.

After boiling, baking and microwaving both crushed and uncrushed cloves of garlic and evaluating them for their antiplatelet activity, the scientists learned that lightly cooked, crushed garlic provides most of the health benefits found in raw garlic. The only exception was microwaving, which stripped garlic almost entirely of its blood-thinning effects.

The researchers contend that while heating might be generally blamed for reducing garlic's antiplatelet activity, it's the crushing that enables the beneficial compounds to be freed in the first place.


Story Source:

Materials provided by US Department of Agriculture. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Cite This Page:

US Department of Agriculture. "Garlic's Goodness Best Released With A Crush." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 October 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071006084912.htm>.

US Department of Agriculture. (2007, October 10). Garlic's Goodness Best Released With A Crush. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 5, 2021 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071006084912.htm

US Department of Agriculture. "Garlic's Goodness Best Released With A Crush." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071006084912.htm (accessed December 5, 2021).


Источник: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071006084912.htm

How is garlic good for you -

1

Crush them. Then bake them slightly. That's according to Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and collaborators in Argentina.

Researchers have known for some time that garlic--like its close relative, the onion--is a rich source of heart-protective compounds called thiosulfinates. These sulfur compounds, best known for causing eyes to water, may lower blood pressure and break up potentially harmful clusters of platelets in the bloodstream.

But, up to now, most researchers and nutritionists assumed that the best way to seize on garlic's cardiovascular benefits was to eat the small bulbs in their most unfettered form: in the raw.

Not so, discovered ARS plant geneticist Philipp Simon and his colleagues Pablo Cavagnaro, Alejandra Camargo and Claudio Galmarini, whose findings appear in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Simon works in the ARS Vegetable Crops Research Unit in Madison, Wis. Cavagnaro, Camargo and Galmarini work at the INTA La Consulta in Argentina.

Since most people worldwide sauté or bake their garlic before eating it, the researchers wanted to know if cooking reduced garlic's blood-thinning effects. They also wanted to see what impact crushing the garlic before cooking had on its ability to bust up artery-clogging platelets.

After boiling, baking and microwaving both crushed and uncrushed cloves of garlic and evaluating them for their antiplatelet activity, the scientists learned that lightly cooked, crushed garlic provides most of the health benefits found in raw garlic. The only exception was microwaving, which stripped garlic almost entirely of its blood-thinning effects.

The researchers contend that while heating might be generally blamed for reducing garlic's antiplatelet activity, it's the crushing that enables the beneficial compounds to be freed in the first place.


Story Source:

Materials provided by US Department of Agriculture. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Cite This Page:

US Department of Agriculture. "Garlic's Goodness Best Released With A Crush." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 October 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071006084912.htm>.

US Department of Agriculture. (2007, October 10). Garlic's Goodness Best Released With A Crush. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 5, 2021 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071006084912.htm

US Department of Agriculture. "Garlic's Goodness Best Released With A Crush." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071006084912.htm (accessed December 5, 2021).


Источник: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071006084912.htm

5 great things that drinking garlic tea in the morning can do for you

We are sure by now you know of the many benefits of garlic. This bulb is a powerhouse of nutrients that help to boost immunity, keep infections at bay, and get your digestive system on track. But what if we were to tell you that you can enjoy these benefits not just by adding this herb to your meals, but also by drinking garlic tea? 

Yup, garlic tea is a great way to regulate your health—especially if you start your day with it. Even though it may not sound like the most delicious beverage out there, but the fact that it’s loaded with vitamins A, B, and C, antioxidants, fibre, manganese, and sulfur make it worth it. 

In fact, according to The University of Oregon Linus Pauling Institute, garlic is an excellent source of organosulfur. When you crush garlic, it releases an alliinase compound which can protect you against cardiovascular diseases. 

But that’s not all garlic tea can do for you. Here are all the health benefits that garlic tea has to offer you: 

 

1. It’s excellent for your heart health

 

Garlic is known for its heart-healthy properties. It is rich in allicin, an organosulfur compound that inhibits the development of atherosclerosis in people with heart disease. Garlic tea also promotes better blood circulation, lowers the level of bad cholesterol (LDL), and restricts plaque from blocking arteries thereby reducing the risk of heart diseases.

 

2. It can boost your immune system

 

Garlic’s allicin along with its antifungal, antibacterial, and antioxidant properties can help fight radicals. They not only protect your body against bacteria and other deadly pathogens, but also keep your immune system going strong. 

 

3. Garlic also has anti-cancer properties

 

Garlic tea has anti-carcinogenic properties that can contribute to preventing various types of cancerous diseases. Research finds that those who consume garlic tea can reduce their risk of stomach and breast cancer.

 

4. It improves the functioning of the respiratory system

 

If you have a cold, cough, sinus infection, fever, congestion, or sore throat—garlic anti-inflammatory properties can come to your aid. Because of this reason, garlic is also considered to be beneficial for people with asthma, though more research is needed on that front. 

 

5. Garlic tea can help with weight loss

 

If weight loss is on your mind, then garlic tea can help you out. Garlic tea can help boost fat loss, get your metabolism up to speed, and suppress your appetite.

Here’s how you can make garlic tea at home

Step 1: To a cup of water, add 2 to 3 garlic cloves cut in half. 

Step 2: Bring to a boil and turn off the heat. Squeeze some lemon juice and some  honey, if required.

Step 3: Strain the tea and drink. If you can stand the taste of it, go ahead and munch on the boiled garlic cloves. 

Your garlic tea is ready! Add this to your diet and see your body change. 

Aayushi Gupta Aayushi Gupta

Candid, outspoken, but prudent--Aayushi is exploring her place in media world.

Источник: https://www.healthshots.com/healthy-eating/superfoods/garlic-health-benefits-5-reasons-to-drink-garlic-tea-in-the-morning/

Garlic can make the vampires run away. But I think it’s a metaphor; a tale started to make us eat this pungent but very healthy herb because garlic can actually ward off various health problems, including cancer. And unlike the vampire stories, health benefits of garlic have scientific evidence.

The best part is roasted, toasted, crushed, chopped, minced, halved, or whole garlic in food can make the taste literally go from flat to fab! So, read on to know some cool facts and benefits of garlic for health, hair, and skin.

What is Garlic?

Image: iStock

Garlic is a bulbous herb vegetable. Its scientific name is Allium sativum and is most commonly known as (lasun/lahsun) in Hindi, ‘Vellulli’ in Telugu, ‘Poondu’ in Tamil, ‘Veluthulli’ in Malayalam, ‘Bellulli’ in Kannada, ‘Rasoon’ in Bengali, ‘Lasan’ in Gujarati, ‘Lasun’ in Marathi and ‘Lassan’ in Punjabi. It is basically the edible bulb part of the lily plant and belongs to the Allium family (1).

KingdomPlantae
CladeAngiosperms
CladeMonocots
OrderAsparagales
FamilyAmaryllidaceae
SubfamilyAllioideae
Genus:Allium
Species:A. sativum

Some of the other veggies that belong to Allium family are onion, leek, chives, shallots, and scallions. The average height and diameter of a garlic bulb is about 2 inches and contains numerous cloves, and both the cloves and bulb are enclosed in a paper-like sheath, which has white, off-white, purple or pink hue. The cloves of garlic are firm and are covered in a thicker paper-like sheath of the same color as the outer sheath. To use garlic, you need to detach the cloves from the bulb and peel them. Garlic tastes pungent and has a strong spicy smell. The pungent taste of garlic mellows down when cooked and adds a nutty flavor to the food.

Subscribe

There are different types of garlic such as softneck garlic, silverskin garlic, artichoke garlic, and hardneck garlic. Softneck garlic is the most common type of garlic that you see in the market and has a soft stalk, papery skin and creamy white in color. The outermost cloves of this garlic are larger in size as compared to those closer to the center. Silver garlic has a pink hue on its outer sheath and has a strong aroma. Artichoke garlic has a milder flavor and has larger but fewer cloves. Sometimes the artichoke garlic has a purple tint on its papery skin. However, it is the hardneck garlic that is known for its purple outer sheath. It has a hard, woody stalk and there are three types of hardneck garlic –  rocambole garlic, porcelain garlic, and purple stripe garlic (2).

Garlic mostly requires lower temperatures to grow, but there are reports where garlic was found to have grown in warmer tropical regions. In fact, garlic grows best in temperate regions and doesn’t thrive in too hot or too cold regions. In India, Gujarat is the leading producer of garlic followed by Orissa, Andhra Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, and Tamil Nadu. Garlic requires well drained loamy soil and is planted from August to November and is harvested within 4 to 5 months. The garlic bulbs are then dried to increase their shelf life.

History Of Garlic

Garlic is one of the oldest crops. Garlic is mentioned in Indian and Egyptian cultures about 5000 years ago, in Babylonian culture about 4500 years ago, and in Chinese culture about 4000 years ago. The crop originated in Central Asia and is referred to as “center of origin” and a wide range of garlic varieties can be found here. In the early days, there were no specific types of garlic. In fact, after garlic was cultivated in southern Europe in the last 1000 years the softneck and hardneck garlic varieties started to get noticed. Garlic is believed to have become popular as humans migrated to various parts of the world. Today, each year about 10 million metric tons of garlic is produced worldwide, China being the leading producer of garlic with 66% garlic production (3),(4).

Is Garlic Good For You?

So, how good is garlic for you? Garlic is rich in compounds like Allicin, Sulphur, Zinc, and Calcium that have health benefits, beauty benefits as well as antibiotic and antifungal properties. It is also a rich source of a mineral known as selenium. Selenium is known to fight cancer and it works with vitamin E in the body to boost antioxidant power. Garlic also acts as a blood thinner due to its salicylate content. This enables proper blood flow and enhances circulatory health.

Nowadays, garlic’s reputation as a medicinal herb is significantly growing. This is because it has been confirmed by many researchers to be highly effective in preventing and treating a wide range of health conditions (5). In fact, for decades, garlic has been recommended by natural medicine practitioners all over the world to be included in the daily diet because of its many powerful effects on health. Now, before I tell you the various benefits of garlic, let’s take a look at the nutrition facts of the herb below.

Garlic Nutrition Facts

Garlic contains numerous vital nutrients – flavonoids, oligosaccharides, alliin and allicin and also high levels of sulfur. Let’s look at its nutritional value in detail (6).

Energy149 Kcal7.5%
Carbohydrates33.06 g25%
Protein6.36 g11%
Total Fat0.5 g2%
Cholesterol0 mg0%
Dietary Fiber2.1 g5.5%
VITAMINS
Folates3 µg1%
Niacin0.700 mg4%
Pantothenic acid0.596 mg12%
Pyridoxine1.235 mg95%
Riboflavin0.110 mg8%
Thiamin0.200 mg17%
Vitamin A9 IU1%
Vitamin C31.2 mg52%
Vitamin E0.08 mg0.5%
Vitamin K1.7 µg1.5%
ELECTROLYTES
Sodium>153 mg>10%>
Potassium>401 mg>8.5%
MINERALS
Calcium181 mg18 %
Copper0.299 mg33%
Iron>1.70 mg21%
Magnesium25 mg6%
Manganese1.672 mg73%
Phosphorus153 mg22%
Selenium14.2 µg26%
Zinc>1.160 mg10.5%
PHYTO-NUTRIENTS
Carotene-ß5 µg
Crypto-xanthin-ß0 µg
Lutein-zeaxanthin16 µg

This was about garlic nutritional benefits. Now, let’s  find out how many ways garlic can be beneficial for your health, skin, and hair.

Health Benefits Of Garlic

Garlic health benefits are plentiful which include reversing heart disease, improving the health of diabetics and also preventing and fighting various forms of cancer. As garlic is consumed in small amounts, its bioactive components – sulfur and phytonutrients – have many health benefits. Here are some of the most profound garlic benefits that are supported by studies.

1. May Help In Stabilizing Blood Pressure

Image: iStock

Mature garlic extract contains a bioactive sulfur compound, S-allylcysteine, which has been found to effectively lower blood pressure by 10 mmHg (systolic pressure) and 8 mmHg (diastolic pressure). Sulfur deficiency is one of the reasons for high blood pressure and therefore supplementing the body with organosulfur compounds can help stabilize blood pressure (7).  Heat treatment tends to destroy allicin.

Garlic Dose To Lower Blood Pressure

Consume raw or dried garlic to be able to consume allicin in garlic.

2. May Help Lower LDL Cholesterol

American scientists found that aged garlic extract supplement can help lower LDL cholesterol by 10% in hypercholesterolemic male human participants. In rats, garlic inhibited the synthesis of cholesterol in liver cells. The researchers further experimented with water soluble and lipid soluble compounds of garlic and found that water soluble compounds in garlic inhibited cholesterol synthesis by 20-60% (8).

Garlic Dose To Lower Blood Pressure

You can eat 1-2 raw cloves of garlic per day to reduce LDL cholesterol.

3. May Reduce The Risk Of Cardiovascular Diseases

Image: iStock

Scientists have evidence that garlic can help prevent almost all cardiovascular diseases. It helps to prevent cardiovascular diseases by lowering bad cholesterol, lipid, and serum triglyceride increase antioxidant activities, and decrease platelet aggregation. Garlic was also found to be effective against atherosclerosis (9),(10).

Garlic Dose To Prevent Cardiovascular Diseases

Have a clove of raw garlic in the morning before your morning walk or morning run to keep cardiovascular diseases miles away.

4. May Improve Bone Health

Age and unhealthy lifestyle can make your bones weak, which means that fractures and osteoporosis will set in much earlier. Garlic has been found to be effective against osteoporosis and arthritis. In a study, scientists supplemented lab rats with garlic oil and found that garlic oil was able to suppress ovariectomy-induced bone resorption (11). Another group of researchers concluded that the diallyl disulfide helps to suppress the matrix degrading enzymes and therefore prevents damage to the bones (12).

Garlic Dose To Improve Bone Health

Consume 2-3 raw garlic cloves per day to improve bone health.

[ Read: Foods To Eat For Healthy Bones ]

5. Can Relieve Intestinal Ailments

Image: iStock

An upset stomach or a broken digestive system can hamper your daily life. So, if you are suffering from intestinal problems, you might want to consume garlic. Garlic tends to differentiate between the good and bad gut bacteria in the intestine and has an antibacterial effect on harmful enterobacteria (13). Scientists have also found that garlic is effective against H. pylori infections (14).

Garlic Dose For Relieving Intestinal Infection

Consume 1 raw garlic before breakfast with a glass of room temperature or cold water.

6. May Regulate Blood Sugar

High blood sugar can make you prone to developing diabetes, blood pressure, obesity etc. If you are suffering from high blood sugar, you must include garlic in your diet. Scientists from Kuwait conducted an experiment with raw and boiled garlic and found that raw garlic significantly reduced blood glucose levels in lab animal models (15). Therefore, consume raw garlic instead of the cooked bulb to help lower the blood sugar levels.

Garlic Dose For Lowering Blood Sugar

Consume 3-4 cloves of raw garlic to lower your blood sugar levels.

7. Can Prevent Thromboembolism

Image: iStock

Clotting of blood to prevent excess blood loss is good but not when the blood clots detach and are carried by the bloodstream to other vital organs such as brain, lungs, kidney etc. Indian scientists experimented with garlic. The participants were asked to consume 10 mg raw garlic every day before breakfast for two months. The study concluded that garlic could be used to prevent thromboembolism (16).

Garlic Dose For Preventing Thromboembolism

Consume 3 garlic cloves before breakfast every alternate day.

8. May Reduce The Risk Of Cancer

Garlic contains diallylsulfide that helps inhibit oxidative stress, selenium present in garlic is known to have cancer-fighting properties, prevents DNA mutation and uncontrolled cell proliferation, and metastasis (17). So, if you want to lower the risk of cancer, consume garlic along with leading a healthy lifestyle.

Garlic Dose For Fighting/Preventing Cancer

Consume at least 1 raw clove of garlic every day in the morning.

9. May Strengthen The Immune System

Image: iStock

Garlic contains phytonutrients that are antioxidant in nature. Antioxidants flush out toxins and reduce oxidative stress in the body, which prevents you from falling sick or being prone to DNA mutations and disrupted cell functions. Researchers have also found that supplementing with garlic helped increase different types of immune cells in the body (18).

Garlic Dose For Boosting Immunity

Consume 1-2 raw garlic cloves per day to boost your immunity.

[ Read: Home Remedies To Boost Your Immune System ]

10. Can Relieve Oxidative Stress

As I mentioned earlier, garlic can help relieve oxidative stress. The water soluble organosulfur compounds found in garlic can help prevent DNA damage, reduce inflammation and atherosclerosis risk due to oxidative stress. In fact, garlic can also help prevent heart diseases by nullifying harmful free oxygen radicals (19),(20), (21).

Garlic Dose For Relieving Oxidative Stress

Consume 1 clove of raw garlic every day to flush out the harmful free oxygen radicals.

11. Helps Prevent Heavy Metal Poisoning

Image: iStock

Heavy metals can kill you. And therefore it is best that you get rid of any traces of heavy metal from your body. A study conducted on lab rats showed that orally administering garlic helped reduce the levels of heavy metal (22). Another study confirmed that pickled garlic was more effective in lowering cadmium levels (23).

Garlic Dose For Lowering Heavy Metal

Consume pickled garlic to reduce or prevent heavy metal poisoning.

12. May Help Manage Diabetes

Diabetes is a metabolic disorder, mainly caused by unhealthy lifestyle. Scientists at IICT, India fed garlic to lab rats and found a reduction in blood glucose and triglyceride levels and also the rats showed increased insulin sensitivity (24). So, if you are prediabetic or a diabetic, consume garlic to lower glucose levels in the blood and make your body insulin sensitive.

Garlic Dose For Diabetes

Consume 2-3 cloves of raw garlic to prevent the risk or fight diabetes.

13. Helps In Reducing Yeast Infections

Image: iStock

Yeast infections can be both embarrassing and distressing. Garlic is a natural remedy for yeast infections. Scientists have found that fresh garlic extract is highly effective against Candida infections (25). In another study, the researchers found that garlic was effective against candida vaginitis (26).

Garlic Dose For Diabetes

Consume 2-3 cloves of raw garlic every day. Do not apply raw garlic on the infected area.

14. Helps In Treating UTI And Kidney Infections

Cranberry is the go-to fruit for treating or preventing UTI, but garlic is no less. Scientists have found that garlic can help treat or prevent the growth of P. aeruginosa, a pathogen that colonizes the urinary tract walls and is responsible for recurring UTIs and kidney infections (27). Garlic is also effective against E.coli growth in the urinary tract (28).

Garlic Dose For Preventing UTI And Kidney Infection

Consume 3-4 cloves of garlic to prevent and fight UTI and kidney infections.

15. Can Help In Treating Asthma And Common Cold

Image: iStock

Garlic has been used for ages to treat common cold and asthma. A special mustard garlic oil is massaged near the nose and on throat and lungs area to help treat chest congestion. Now, scientists also have found evidence that garlic can delay the hypersensitivity associated with asthma and also help treat common cold (29),(30).

Garlic Dose For Treating Asthma And Common Cold

Heat mustard oil with garlic and massage your body with this oil for treating cold. You can also consume 2-3 cloves of raw garlic to treat cold and asthma. Make sure you talk to your doctor first.

16. May Relieve Cold Sores

Cold sores or blisters are caused by herpes simplex virus. These are generally painful blisters that erupt in and around lips, chin, and nose. The worst news – this is contagious. Garlic contains antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial properties and therefore may help treat these blisters. However, there is no solid scientific evidence to back this belief.

Garlic Dose For Treating Cold Sores

Consume 1-2 cloves of raw garlic to treat cold sores.

[ Read: How To Get Rid Of A Cold Sore Overnight ]

17. May Reduce The Risk Of Alzheimer’s Disease And Dementia

Image: iStock

Garlic is said to protect from neurodegenerative disease, dementia. Alzheimer’s is a type of dementia and garlic is also effective against Alzheimer’s disease. A bioactive compound S-allyl-cysteine, found in garlic is neuroprotective in nature. Moreover, the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of garlic also help prevent neurological deterioration (31),(32).

Garlic Dose For Preventing Alzheimer’s and Dementia

Consume 3-4 garlic cloves per day to help prevent the risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

18. May Aid Weight Loss

If you want to lose weight, you must consume garlic. Because garlic actually gets to the root of the weight gain problem. It helps to inhibit the expression of adipogenic tissues, increases thermogenesis, and reduces bad cholesterol (33) (34).

Garlic Dose For Weight Loss

Consume 3-4 raw garlic cloves for weight loss.

19. May Improve Eye Health

Image: iStock

It is impossible to believe, but garlic has also been found to help improve eye health. Scientists have found that garlic reduces intraocular pressure (35). The antimicrobial property of garlic is also effective against the microbes causing eyesight threatening keratitis (36). Scientists have also found that garlic juice can help prevent lead-induced apoptosis of the retinal cells in rats (37).

Garlic Dose For Eye Health

Consume 3-4 cloves of raw garlic after breakfast to protect your eyes.

20. Helps Reduce Ear Infections

Garlic has anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties and therefore may be effective against ear infections. However, there is no scientific evidence to establish this yet.

Garlic Dose For Reducing Ear Infection

Consume 2-3 cloves of raw garlic to reduce inflammation and microbial infection. However, consult your doctor before you start taking garlic to reduce ear infection.

[ Read: Home Remedies For Ear Infections ]

21. Kills Oral Pathogens

Image: iStock

Allicin present in garlic has antimicrobial properties and helps kill oral pathogens that are associated with dental caries and periodontitis (38). Scientists have also experimented with garlic extract as mouthwash and have found it to be an effective one (39). In fact, using toothpaste or mouthwashes containing garlic extract can help prevent dental caries (40).

Garlic Dose For Oral Health

Chew one raw garlic clove every day if you are suffering from a toothache or dental caries.

22. Improves Iron And Zinc Absorption

Both iron and zinc are important for proper functioning of various biological processes. Garlic contains sulfur that positively influences the bioavailability of both iron and zinc (41). Therefore, if you are iron or zinc deficient, you must include garlic in your diet.

Garlic Dose For Improved Iron And Zinc Absorption

Consume 1-2 raw garlic cloves to increase iron and zinc absorption and bioavailability.

23. May Ameliorate Fatty Liver

Image: iStock

An excessive amount of fat deposition in the liver can be fatal. Garlic had been found to be effective against non-alcoholic fatty liver. Sulphur containing amino acid cysteine in garlic helps to have a better detoxification effect and generates potent antioxidant glutathione. Scientists found that S-allylmercaptocysteine (SAMC) helped ameliorate hepatic injury and garlic oil’s antioxidative properties also helped protect against non-alcoholic fatty liver (42),(43).

Garlic Dose For Ameliorating Fatty Liver

Add raw chopped 1-2 garlic cloves to spinach smoothie to help prevent fatty liver.

24. May Help You Live Longer

It is clear from all the above garlic benefits that consuming garlic can help improve your health by protecting your vital organs and cell functions. This way, garlic can help increase longevity (44).

Garlic Dose For Long Life

Consume 2 garlic cloves per day for long and healthy life.

Back To TOC

Benefits Of Garlic For Skin

The garlic benefits for skin are explained in greater detail below. Know how to apply garlic on face and skin for good results.

25. May Reduce Acne

Image: iStock

Garlic is a powerful antioxidant and has anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties. Since acne is caused due to over accumulation of toxins, clogged pores, and bacterial infections – garlic can be used to reduce acne (45).

How To Use Garlic For Reducing Acne

You can eat 1 clove of raw garlic followed by a glass of cold water. Also, make sure you keep yourself hydrated and clean your skin every 3 hours.

26. Soothes Psoriasis

Psoriasis is an autoimmune skin disease, and the symptoms are red, scaly, and itchy skin that affect the scalp, elbows, and knees. It is not curable but consuming garlic can help reduce the disease symptoms. Psoriasis is caused due to inflammation, and since garlic is a strong anti-inflammatory agent, many recommend  the use of garlic to reduce psoriasis. However, there is no direct scientific evidence to prove this.

How To Use Garlic For Reducing Psoriasis

Consume 3 cloves of raw garlic with leek, broccoli, and beetroot juice.

27. May Delay Aging

Image: iStock

Skin aging occurs due to stress, unhealthy habits, stress, inflammation, genes etc. S-allyl cysteine, found in garlic helps protect the skin from UV damage and wrinkling. The antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds present in garlic help scavenge the oxygen radicals thereby reducing stress. Moreover, scientists have also found that garlic induces synthesis of normal human skin cells in the lab (46),(47).

How To Use Garlic For Delaying Wrinkles

Consume one clove of raw garlic with honey and lemon the first thing in the morning. You can also add raw chopped garlic to Triphala water and drink it in the morning.

[ Read: Homemade Tips For Anti-Aging ]

28. May Fade Stretch Marks

The moment you hear about stretch marks, all you wish is for them to vanish! Well, they are stubborn, and our skin is elastic. To reduce stretch marks can take a long time if you don’t put in extra effort to get rid of them. Hot oil massage with garlic may help reduce stretch marks, and you must try it with olive oil or mustard oil.

How To Use Garlic To Remove Stretch Marks

Heat mustard oil and add 2-3 cloves of garlic. When you start to smell the garlic, remove from flame and let it cool down a bit. You can use it when it’s still warm. Massage in circular motion.

29. May Soothe Eczema

Image: iStock

Dry, itchy, flaky, rough, and inflamed skin is known as eczema. It is caused due to inflammation triggered by an allergic reaction. Garlic has anti-inflammatory properties and thus believed to be effective against eczema. But there is no solid scientific backing this theory. So, talk to your doctor before consuming garlic to reduce symptoms of eczema.

How To Use Garlic To Remove Stretch Marks

Consume 1-2 raw garlic cloves with room temperature water.

30. Can Treat Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is caused due to a fungal or yeast infection, also known as tinea pedis (ringworm of the foot).  Garlic is an antifungal agent and can be used to treat ringworm of the foot.

How To Use Garlic To Treat Athlete’s Foot

Consume 2 garlic cloves with leek juice in the morning.

Benefits Of Garlic For Hair

Ever thought of what are the uses of garlic for hair. But hey, even consuming raw garlic can have benefits for your hair – they can improve hair health and appearance.

31. May Prevent Hair Loss

Image: iStock

Hair loss is a serious problem these days. Pollution, impure water, bad eating habits, stress etc. all add up to rapid hair loss. Scientists have found that garlic gel, along with betamethasone valerate can help prevent hair loss (48).

How To Use Garlic To Prevent Hair Loss

Consume 1 raw garlic clove with a spinach smoothie. Also, add lots of garlic in cooked fish to prevent hair loss.

So, those were the 31 garlic benefits for health, hair, and skin. Now, let me tell you how you can incorporate garlic into your daily diet.

How To Incorporate Garlic Into Your Diet?

  • You can consume a clove of raw garlic to treat all your health problems.
  • Add garlic to your food – pasta, bread, curries, casserole, salads, soups, dal, stews etc.

Best Ways to Use Garlic

The best way to use garlic to get rid of all health, skin, and hair problems is to eat it raw. Cooking it – boiling, frying, roasting etc. destroys it healing properties. So, start by taking a small piece of raw garlic and gulping it down with a glass of water in the morning. Then start consuming half a garlic and finally, chew a whole clove of raw garlic and wash it down with water. But you can also use it in other cooked food recipes. Here are a few garlic recipes for you.

Garlic Recipes

If you want to reap the healing power of this wonder herb, try adding it to some of your favorite recipes. Here are a few delicious recipes using garlic to try so you can enjoy all of their health-promoting benefits of garlic everyday.

Note: Heating garlic cloves whole or immediately after crushing can destroy the sensitive enzyme (alliinase) in garlic that is responsible for producing allicin.

However, the health benefits can be partially conserved by crushing garlic and allowing it to stand for 10 minutes prior to cooking. That gives the enzyme time to be released and for allicin to form. Once formed, allicin is relatively heat stable.

1. Garlic Baked Chicken

Image: iStock

Ingredients
  • 2 skinless chicken breasts
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • ½ cup grated parmesan cheese
  • 2 minced clove of garlic
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • ½ cup breadcrumbs
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • Salt to taste
How To Prepare
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F and lightly grease the baking tray.
  2. In a bowl mix olive oil and minced garlic.
  3. In another bowl mix breadcrumbs, cheese, dried basil, and black pepper.
  4. Dip the chicken in oil and garlic mixture and then coat it with the breadcrumb.
  5. Place the chicken breasts on the baking tray and bake for 30 minutes.

2. Roasted Garlic Sweet Potato Soup

Image: iStock

Ingredients
  • 1 whole garlic bulb
  • 4 large sweet potatoes, peeled and cut
  • 3 teaspoons olive oil
  • 2 large onions, cut into wedges
  • 2 tablespoons chopped parsley
  • 1 tablespoon dried thyme
  • 5 cups low-sodium chicken broth
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • Salt to taste
  • Cooking spray
How To Prepare
  1. Spray the baking tray with cooking oil and toss in the sweet potato and onion.
  2. Remove the thin papery skin of the garlic bulb and chop off the top and wrap it in a foil.
  3. Toss it into the baking tray and bake the veggies for 30 minutes at 350 degrees F.
  4. Let it cool for 15 minutes and take out the garlic bulb.
  5. Now, gently squeeze out the soft garlic cloves into a blender.
  6. Add dried thyme, chicken broth, black pepper, olive oil, and parsley to the blender and blend until it becomes smooth.
  7. Transfer this into a saucepan and add the baked onions and sweet potatoes.
  8. Use a hand blender to blend the onions and sweet potato.
  9. Stir and cook for 5 minutes more.

3. Garlic Basil Pesto

Image: iStock

Ingredients
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 2 cups fresh basil leaves
  • ¼ cup pine nuts
  • ½ cup grated pecorino cheese
  • ⅔ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • Salt to taste
How To Prepare
  1. Process basil, pine nuts, and garlic until they are finely chopped.
  2. Add a pinch of salt and pepper to season it.
  3. Now, add the olive oil and pulse again until it becomes smooth.
  4. Transfer it into a bowl and mix with grated cheese.

Yummy, aren’t they? So, go ahead and prepare the best food with garlic and enjoy good health as well. But the next big question is how to select and store garlic? Read on to find out.

How To Select And Store Garlic?

To choose the best garlic, always hold the garlic in your hand to feel if it is damp and soft. Reject it immediately. Select the ones that are plump, firm, and light. If you like garlic and use it on a regular basis, choose garlic that has larger clove as peeling so many cloves can be very tiring. A trick to peel garlic quickly is to dry it in the sun for a day and then transferring it into a steel bowl, cover it with a plate and shake it vigorously. This will magically peel off all the garlic in just a minute.

To store garlic, keep it at room temperature or sun dry it before storing it at room temperature. Store garlic in places where there is good air circulation, dry and dark. You can also store garlic in a zip lock bag. Finally, you can store peeled garlic in oil or vinegar. So, where can you buy garlic?

Where To Buy Garlic?

The best place to find fresh and unadulterated garlic is the local farmer’s market. You can also buy garlic in supermarkets and online stores too.

It is clear that garlic has many benefits but can it cause any harm if taken in excess quantities or when people with certain conditions take it? Let’s find out in the next section.

Garlic benefits and uses are well known. But, the side effects of eating raw garlic can’t be overlooked. Check out what are they.

Bad Odor

Consuming raw garlic can make you stink as it has a strong and pungent odor.

Nausea, Heartburn, Vomiting

Consuming too many raw garlic cloves can make you feel dizzy, cause heartburn, and in some cases make you vomit.

Gastritis Issues

Too much garlic can irritate the stomach lining and cause gastritis issues.

Body Heating

Consuming too many garlic cloves can lead to heating up of your body, which can cause too much sweating.

Triggers Migraine

Garlic can trigger a migraine. So, if you suffer from a migraine, avoid consuming excessive raw garlic.

Effects Eyesight

If you consume garlic in excess, it can affect your eyesight. Hyphema or bleeding inside the eye is found in those who consume too much garlic.

Low Blood Pressure

Yes, garlic helps prevent hypertension but when you consume it in excess, it can cause low blood pressure.

Skin Irritation

Too much garlic can cause allergic reactions leading to skin rashes, reddening of the skin, and flaky and itchy skin.

Aggravates Vaginal Infection

Garlic in mild doses can help prevent vaginal infections but in larger doses can aggravate the vaginal infection.

Liver Damage

Excess garlic can be toxic and to remove the toxins the liver has to work extra. This may finally damage your liver.

Who Should Avoid Garlic

  • Pregnant women.
  • If you are allergic to garlic.
  • If you are suffering from a stomach ulcer, IBS, IBD or just underwent intestinal surgery.
  • If your doctor doesn’t allow you to take garlic.

So, those were the benefits and facts about garlic. Always consult a doctor before adding garlic to your diet for a certain condition. Avoid overdosing yourself with garlic. Raw garlic can be 1-2 and the total garlic cannot exceed 10 gm/daily. Garlic in limited quantities can help you treat most of the health problems and must be consumed daily for best results. Take care!

Frequently Asked Questions

Is there any benefit to removing the core of a garlic clove?

No, you must eat the whole clove of garlic.

How to reduce garlic odor?

Chew parsley or mint right after consuming raw garlic to get rid of garlic’s pungent odor.

What is the best time to eat raw garlic?

Eat it in the morning after drinking your detox drink.

Does eating garlic prevent flea bites?

Garlic can help repel the mosquitoes and so, you may consume it to prevent getting bitten by fleas.

How many cloves of garlic should a person eat per day?

You can consume 1-4 raw garlic cloves per day.

Can you eat garlic skin?

No. Unless you want to feel how it feels like to be a grass-eating animal! You get enough antioxidants from the clove, why would you want to eat the tasteless and papery skin?

What are the benefits of eating raw garlic in morning?

Eating raw garlic in the morning can help reduce the risk of diabetes, cancer, obesity, premature aging, hypertension, high blood glucose levels hair fall, and can help you avoid skin problems.

Is it good to eat garlic and honey in the morning?

Garlic and honey are both rich in antioxidants and have antimicrobial properties. So, consuming them in moderation will help you ward off various bacterial, fungal, and viral infections, help prevent throat infections, aid weight loss etc.

Is garlic a herb or a spice?

Garlic is a herb vegetable.

Is it okay to have milk with garlic?

Yes, you can have milk with garlic.

Is it safe to use garlic mask for acne?

No. Do not use garlic directly on your acne as it may irritate your skin and aggravate the acne.

Does garlic help in skin whitening?

Garlic helps to flush out the toxins and helps to make your skin acne-free and also helps to reduce marks.

Garlic for facial hair – rubbing garlic on face hair growth.

Garlic will not help remove facial hair.

What are the uses of garlic paste on skin?

Consuming garlic paste will help to scavenge the harmful oxygen radicals and treat all your skin problems. However, we do not recommend you to apply garlic paste on skin without consulting a skin specialist.

Any benefits of black garlic supplements?

You can take black garlic supplements to boost your immunity, improve skin, hair, and memory.

What are the benefits of garlic soap?

Garlic sopa will help prevent any skin infections and also protects against acne.

How many Calories in Roasted Garlic Bulb?

One clove is 4 g, total calories is 4 calories. Garlic bulb of 40 g gives 40 cal.

Sources

Articles on StyleCraze are backed by verified information from peer-reviewed and academic research papers, reputed organizations, research institutions, and medical associations to ensure accuracy and relevance. Check out our editorial policy for further details.

  • Garlic. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. US Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health.
    https://nccih.nih.gov/health/garlic/ataglance.htm
  • Varieties of Garlic.
    http://hvgf.org/types%20of%20garlic.html
  • The origins and distribution of garlic: How many garlics are there? Agricultural Research Service, USDA.
    https://www.ars.usda.gov/midwest-area/madison-wi/vegetable-crops-research/docs/simon-garlic-origins/
  • Garlic Post-Harvest Operations, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.
    http://www.fao.org/3/a-av002e.pdf
  • Garlic: a review of potential therapeutic effects, Avicenna journal of phytomedicine, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4103721/
  • Garlic, raw Nutrition Facts & Calories, SELFNutrition Data.
    https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2446/2
  • Potential of garlic (Allium sativum) in lowering high blood pressure: mechanisms of action and clinical relevance, Integrated blood pressure control, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4266250/
  • Cholesterol-lowering effect of garlic extracts and organosulfur compounds: human and animal studies, The Journal of nutrition, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11238803
  • Effect of garlic on cardiovascular disorders: a review, Nutrition journal, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC139960/
  • Garlic and Heart Disease, The Journal of nutrition, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26764327
  • Prevention of bone loss by oil extract of garlic (Allium sativum Linn.) in an ovariectomized rat model of osteoporosis, Phytotherapy research : PTR, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15173999
  • Dietary garlic and hip osteoarthritis: evidence of a protective effect and putative mechanism of action, BMC musculoskeletal disorders, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21143861
  • Garlic: a review of potential therapeutic effects, Avicenna journal of phytomedicine, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4103721/
  • Assessment of antibacterial effect of garlic in patients infected with Helicobacter pylori using urease breath test, Avicenna journal of phytomedicine, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5052411/
  • Including garlic in the diet may help lower blood glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides, The Journal of nutrition, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16484567
  • Effect of ingestion of raw garlic on serum cholesterol level, clotting time and fibrinolytic activity in normal subjects, Journal of postgraduate medicine, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1784022
  • Can garlic reduce risk of cancer? The American journal of clinical nutrition, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2647709/
  • Effect of Allium Cepa and Allium Sativum on Some Immunological Cells in Rats, African journal of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicines : AJTCAM / African Networks on Ethnomedicines, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3746674/
  • Garlic attenuates cardiac oxidative stress via activation of PI3K/AKT/Nrf2-Keap1 pathway in fructose-fed diabetic rat, PLos One, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24796753
  • Garlic supplementation prevents oxidative DNA damage in essential hypertension, Molecular Cell Biochemistry, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16335787
  • Garlic compounds minimize intracellular oxidative stress and inhibit nuclear factor-kappa b activation, The Journal of nutrition, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11238809
  • A study on the effect of garlic to the heavy metal poisoning of rat, Journal of Korean medical science, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3268178
  • The antioxidant and anti-cadmium toxicity properties of garlic extracts, Food science & nutrition, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4256585/
  • Garlic improves insulin sensitivity and associated metabolic syndromes in fructose fed rats, Nutrition & metabolism, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21794123
  • Effects of Fresh Garlic Extract on Candida albicans Biofilms, Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC538912/
  • Investigating the therapeutic effect of vaginal cream containing garlic and thyme compared to clotrimazole cream for the treatment of mycotic vaginitis, Iranian journal of nursing and midwifery research, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3208935/
  • Garlic blocks quorum sensing and attenuates the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, FEMS immunology and medical microbiology, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19878318
  • Alternative Approaches to Conventional Treatment of Acute Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infection in Women, Current infectious disease reports, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3622145/
  • Complementary and alternative interventions in asthma, allergy, and immunology, Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology : official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15330011
  • Garlic for the common cold, The Cochrane database of systematic reviews, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22419312
  • Neuroprotective Effects of Garlic A Review, The Libyan journal of medicine, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3074326/
  • Ameliorating effects of aged garlic extracts against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity and cognitive impairment, BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Springer Nature.
    https://bmccomplementalternmed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1472-6882-13-268
  • Reduction of body weight by dietary garlic is associated with an increase in uncoupling protein mRNA expression and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in diet-induced obese mice, The Journal of nutrition, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21918057
  • Effect of garlic on high fat induced obesity, Acta biologica Hungarica, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21840827
  • Therapeutic Uses and Pharmacological Properties of Garlic, Shallot, and Their Biologically Active Compounds, Iranian journal of basic medical sciences, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3874089/
  • In vitro evaluation of the amoebicidal activity of garlic (Allium sativum) extract on Acanthamoeba castellanii and its cytotoxic potential on corneal cells, Journal of ocular pharmacology and therapeutics : the official journal of the Association for Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18370873
  • The Effect of Ascorbic Acid and Garlic Administration on Lead-Induced Apoptosis in Rat Offspring’s Eye Retina, Iranian biomedical journal, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3882924/
  • Garlic allicin as a potential agent for controlling oral pathogens, Journal of medicinal food, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21548800
  • Efficacy of garlic extract and chlorhexidine mouthwash in reduction of oral salivary microorganisms, an in vitro study, Ancient science of life, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4389398/
  • Inhibitory activity of garlic (Allium sativum) extract on multidrug-resistant Streptococcus mutans, Journal of the Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18007101
  • Higher bioaccessibility of iron and zinc from food grains in the presence of garlic and onion, Journal of agricultural and food chemistry, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20597543
  • Garlic-Derived S-Allylmercaptocysteine Ameliorates Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in a Rat Model through Inhibition of Apoptosis and Enhancing Autophagy, Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23861709
  • The anti-fatty liver effects of garlic oil on acute ethanol-exposed mice,, Chemico-biological interactions, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18718457
  • Herbs that Ensure Good Health and Longevity, The West Indian medical journal, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4655638/
  • Garlic in dermatology, Dermatology reports, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4211483/
  • Anti-wrinkle and anti-inflammatory effects of active garlic components and the inhibition of MMPs via NF-κB signaling, PLos One, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24066081
  • Testing garlic for possible anti-ageing effects on long-term growth characteristics, morphology and macromolecular synthesis of human fibroblasts in culture, Journal of ethnopharmacology, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7526077
  • 48. Combination of topical garlic gel and betamethasone valerate cream in the treatment of localized alopecia areata: a double-blind randomized controlled study, Indian journal of dermatology, venereology and leprology, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17314444

Recommended Articles:

Was this article helpful?

YesNo

Related

The following two tabs change content below.

Ravi Teja Tadimalla is an editor and a published author. He has been in the digital media field for over... more

Dr. Geeta Dharmatti is the Director and Founder of Geeta Nutriheal Consultancy (Nutrition Services Consultancy) and an Executive Member of... more

Источник: https://www.stylecraze.com/articles/beauty-benefits-of-garlic/

Fresh or capsuled? Researcher studies garlic’s potency as a supplement

By SARA SELIC

What good is garlic? And to reap any benefits, should you eat it in its odiferous fresh form or will a stink-free capsule suffice? Christopher Gardner, PhD, a researcher at the Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, is on a mission to find out.

Thanks to a grant from the National Institutes of Health, Gardner is conducting the most rigorous study ever to address a lingering controversy in the nutritional-supplement field: whether fresh garlic and garlic supplements — a widely consumed herbal supplement — lower cholesterol as claimed.

Food service workers carefully peel garlic in preparation for an unusual study conducted by Christopher Gardner. Gardner and his team are comparing the effectiveness of garlic taken in supplement form to garlic eaten fresh. Study volunteers must agree to eat a number of garlic-infused specialty sandwiches. PHOTO: COURTESY OF CHRISTOPHER GARDNER

In preparation for the study — which is seeking volunteers and entails eating gourmet sandwiches six days a week — Gardner’s staff spent two weeks peeling, mashing and measuring 150 pounds of fresh garlic. That’s on top of the weeks they spent taste-testing a dozen custom-made sandwiches ranging from Portobello mushroom to chicken quesadilla.

The Stanford study differs greatly from the dozens of garlic studies conducted over the past four decades, Gardner explained.

While previous studies tested different garlic preparations with inconsistent and often inadequate potency, the Stanford researchers know the exact chemical composition of the garlic preparations they’re using and will monitor this throughout the study with periodic chemical analyses. And unlike previous studies, which tested just one garlic type, the Stanford study will evaluate the effects of two top-selling garlic supplements along with fresh garlic.

"This study goes far beyond the other trials, because we know exactly what we’re giving participants," said Gardner, assistant professor of medicine. "These results should help set the record straight."

For centuries, garlic has been touted for its disease-fighting properties. The most commonly claimed benefit is reduced cholesterol, although garlic is also said to reduce blood pressure, boost antioxidants and reduce the risk of certain cancers. Seeking such benefits without eating (or smelling like) garlic, millions of Americans take garlic supplements — pills containing powdered garlic or aged-garlic extract.

Meanwhile, researchers sought to determine whether garlic deserves its reputation. More than two dozen studies in the 1970s and ‘80s claimed to prove that garlic lowers cholesterol, but the studies were later criticized for poor design. They involved too few participants or didn’t include a control group, for example. When more-rigorous studies were conducted in the 1990s, most concluded that garlic offered little to no significant benefit.

Gardner said the question remains unsettled because chemical analyses conducted by Larry Lawson, PhD, a biochemist and co-investigator for Stanford’s study, revealed serious flaws in the formulations of the garlic supplements used in past studies. The key issue is allicin, an enzyme that is garlic’s active ingredient.

When a person eats fresh garlic, allicin is released by chewing or mincing the herb. It’s more challenging to get allicin from a garlic pill, however. In some cases, if the pills dissolve in the stomach, the garlic enzyme needed to produce allicin becomes inactivated.

Some pills, meanwhile, have an enteric coating, and these pills often pass through the body undissolved. "The problem is, all these studies didn’t really test garlic — they tested garlic supplements," Gardner said. "That’s not the same as eating garlic."

To select the fresh garlic for the study, Gardner traveled to Gilroy, Calif., the nation’s "garlic capital." An eight-person team spent two weeks peeling and mashing the garlic, then scooping it into 5-gram containers.

The premeasured garlic portions will be spread onto the gourmet "study sandwiches" that participants in the "fresh garlic group" must eat six days a week.

All other participants must eat the sandwiches as well, but minus the garlic. The six types of sandwiches used in the study were chosen in taste tests from a larger sample all custom-prepared by a chef. "This isn’t your typical clinical trial. It’s a lot of fun," Gardner said.

Participants in the Stanford study — 200 healthy adults with moderately elevated cholesterol — will consume the sandwiches along with study tablets for six months. Random assignment will be used to determine which combination of sandwich and pill will be given to each participant in the trial.

Participants’ cholesterol, blood pressure, blood-clotting ability and antioxidant levels will be monitored periodically.

Volunteers must be between ages 30 and 65 and in good health but have moderately elevated cholesterol (LDL of 130-190). And, they must agree to eat their allotted "study sandwiches" six days a week.

"We only want people who like our sandwiches," Gardner said, adding, "We’ve gone to enormous lengths to make sure they’re excellent."

Interested volunteers should call 725-5018 for more information.


Источник: https://news.stanford.edu/news/2003/january15/garlic.html

Is Eating a Clove of Garlic Healthy?

Garlic has been used as food and medicine for centuries. It's a popular addition to stews, soups, salads, meat dishes and more. It can also be consumed raw or applied topically as a natural remedy for fungal infections and skin disorders. Hippocrates used to prescribe this spice due to its therapeutic effects. Eating a clove of garlic a day might keep the doctor away.

The Nutritional Value of Garlic

Touted as a superfood, garlic boasts anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antiviral and antioxidant properties. Plus, it's a nutrition powerhouse. This popular spice boasts large doses of vitamin C, vitamin B-6, dietary fiber, calcium and manganese. One clove has only 5 calories.

This superfood is an excellent source of B-complex vitamins and minerals. Its health benefits are largely due to its high levels of sulfur compounds and other nutrients, such as cysteine, glutathione and methionine. Allicin, a key nutrient in garlic, scavenges oxidative stress and offsets the damage caused by free radicals. It also supports cardiovascular health by slowing the development of atherosclerosis.

S-allyl cysteine, a sulfur compound found in this spice, may protect against cognitive decline and neuroinflammation. When consumed regularly, it can reduce cholesterol and blood sugar levels, prevent neurotoxicity and lower the risk of neurological disorders. Others studies have found that garlic may slow the aging process and improve kidney function.

Raw vs. Cooked Garlic

Some experts say that garlic should be consumed raw in order to preserve its anti-cancer and antioxidant effects. For example, you can add it to salads and sauces or eat it on an empty stomach in the morning. Cooking destroys allinase, an enzyme that converts alliin to allicin, the sulfur compound responsible for garlic's healing properties.

However, it appears that crushing the garlic before cooking it may prevent enzyme loss. Wait for about 10 to 15 minutes before throwing it into the pan. This way, allicin will have enough time to form. Even though research is limited, it's worth considering that raw garlic may be more nutritious.

Potential Health Benefits

Thousands of studies confirm the health benefits of garlic. This spice has the ability to improve blood lipids, reduce blood glucose levels and improve diabetes symptoms. Allyl sulfide, allicin and other natural compounds in garlic can inhibit tumor growth and reduce the side effects of chemotherapy. Furthermore, this superfood is packed with antioxidants that fight free radicals and protect against brain damage.

According to a 2016 study conducted in patients with metabolic syndrome, those who consumed aged garlic extract experienced a significant reduction in plaque buildup in the arteries. The accumulation of plaque is a major risk factor for heart disease. Other studies indicate that garlic may reduce blood pressure, which can further lower your risk of cardiovascular problems.

If you have a weak immune system, consider eating garlic more often. With its antiviral and antimicrobial properties, this spice protects against infections, flu and colds. It improves your body's natural defenses, leading to a stronger immune system and better overall health.

The World Health Organization recommends eating about one clove of fresh garlic daily. If you have digestive problems, consume this spice along with other foods to prevent stomach upset. Beware that consuming large amounts of garlic may increase the risk of bleeding post-surgery.

References

Writer Bio

Andra Picincu is a certified nutritionist and personal trainer with more than 10 years of experience. She holds a BA in Psychology and a BA in Marketing and International Business. Her mission is to help people live healthier lives by making smarter food choices and staying active. Andra provides digital marketing consulting and copywriting services as well as nutrition counseling. She owns ShapeYourEnergy, a popular health and fitness website. In 2014, she launched a local nutrition office and partnered up with local gyms to help their clients take the steps needed to better health. Current and former clients include The HOTH, Nutracelle, CLICK - The Coffee Lover's Protein Drink, InstaCuppa, GritWell, GoHarvey, and more. Andra is a regular contributor to these platforms where she either provides health-related content or coaching to those who are interested in achieving a balanced lifestyle.

Источник: https://healthyeating.sfgate.com/eating-clove-garlic-healthy-3950.html

Is Eating a Clove of Garlic Healthy?

Garlic has been used as food and medicine for centuries. It's a popular addition to stews, soups, salads, meat dishes and more. It can also be consumed raw or applied topically as a natural remedy for fungal infections and skin disorders. Hippocrates used to prescribe this spice due to its therapeutic effects. Eating a clove of garlic a day might keep the doctor away.

The Nutritional Value of Garlic

Touted as a superfood, garlic boasts anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antiviral and antioxidant properties. Plus, it's a nutrition powerhouse. This popular spice boasts large doses of vitamin C, vitamin B-6, dietary fiber, calcium and manganese. One clove has only 5 calories.

This superfood is an excellent source of B-complex vitamins and minerals. Its health benefits are largely due to its high levels of sulfur compounds and other nutrients, such as cysteine, glutathione and methionine. Allicin, a key nutrient in garlic, scavenges oxidative stress and offsets the damage caused by free radicals. It also supports cardiovascular health by slowing the development of atherosclerosis.

S-allyl cysteine, a sulfur compound found in this spice, may protect against cognitive decline and neuroinflammation. When consumed regularly, it can reduce cholesterol and blood sugar levels, prevent neurotoxicity and lower the risk of neurological disorders. Others studies have found that garlic may slow the aging process and improve kidney function.

Raw vs. Cooked Garlic

Some experts say that garlic should be consumed raw in order to preserve its anti-cancer and antioxidant effects. For example, you can add it to salads and sauces or eat it on an empty stomach in the morning. Cooking destroys allinase, an enzyme that converts alliin to allicin, the sulfur compound responsible for garlic's healing properties.

However, it appears that crushing the garlic before cooking it may prevent enzyme loss. Wait for about 10 to 15 minutes before throwing it into the pan. This way, allicin will have enough time to form. Even though research is limited, it's worth considering that raw garlic may be more nutritious.

Potential Health Benefits

Thousands of studies confirm the health benefits of garlic. This spice has the ability to improve blood lipids, reduce blood glucose levels and improve diabetes symptoms. Allyl sulfide, allicin and other natural compounds in garlic can inhibit tumor growth and reduce the side effects how is garlic good for you chemotherapy. Furthermore, this superfood is packed with antioxidants that fight free radicals and protect against brain damage.

According to a 2016 study conducted in patients with metabolic syndrome, those who consumed aged garlic extract experienced a significant reduction in plaque buildup in the arteries. The accumulation of plaque is a major risk factor for heart disease. Other studies indicate that garlic may reduce blood pressure, which can further lower your risk of cardiovascular problems.

If you have a weak immune system, consider eating garlic more often. With its antiviral and antimicrobial properties, this spice protects against infections, flu and colds. It improves your body's natural defenses, leading to a stronger immune system and better overall health.

The World Health Organization recommends eating about one clove of fresh garlic daily. If you have digestive problems, consume this spice along with other foods to prevent stomach upset. Beware that consuming large amounts of garlic may increase the risk of bleeding post-surgery.

References

Writer Bio

Andra Picincu is a certified nutritionist and personal trainer with more than 10 years of experience. She holds a BA in Psychology and a BA in Marketing and International Business. Her mission is to help people live healthier lives by making smarter food choices and staying active. Andra provides digital marketing consulting and copywriting services as well as nutrition counseling. She owns ShapeYourEnergy, a popular health and fitness website. In 2014, she launched a local nutrition office and partnered up with local gyms to help their clients take the steps needed to better health. Current and former clients include The HOTH, Nutracelle, CLICK - The Coffee Lover's Protein Drink, InstaCuppa, GritWell, GoHarvey, and more. Andra is a regular contributor to these platforms where she either provides health-related content or coaching to those who are interested in achieving a balanced lifestyle.

Источник: https://healthyeating.sfgate.com/eating-clove-garlic-healthy-3950.html

4 major health benefits of garlic, from boosting your immune system to lowering cholesterol

  • Garlic benefits include improving heart health and reducing the risk of certain cancers. 
  • One garlic clove also contains important vitamins and minerals like vitamin C, iron, and manganese.
  • To get health benefits from garlic, opt for whole cloves rather than pre-minced versions in jars. 
  • Visit Insider's Health Reference library for more advice.

Garlic is an easy way to amp up the flavor to many meals. And beyond its widespread use for taste and seasoning, garlic is also packed with key nutrients that may benefit your health. 

Here are four benefits of garlic and how much you should add to your diet. 

Garlic nutrition

One raw clove of garlic has roughly 14 calories, 0.57 grams of protein, and about three grams of carbohydrates (one slice of white bread has 34 grams of carbohydrates, for comparison.)

Though one raw clove of garlic is pretty small, there is actually a significant amount of the following vitamins and nutrients: 

  • Vitamin C (2.81 mg)
  • Selenium (1.28 mcg)
  • Manganese (0.15 mg)
  • Iron (0.15 mg)

One garlic clove packs a dense nutrient profile, but garlic's small size means we're not getting a large amount of nutrients from a single garlic clove. "The concentration is not as robust as we would think about, say eating a full salad," says Tom Holland, MD, a physician scientist at Rush University Medical Center.

You shouldn't add too much garlic to your diet, too quickly. "One to two cloves a day should be the maximum consumed by anyone," says Tracey Brigman, a food and nutrition expert at the University of Georgia. Eating more than that may cause upset stomach, diarrhea, bloating, or bad breath. 

"If you opt for adding two cloves of garlic a day to your diet, you may also want to add fresh parsley, mint, or raw apples to your diet to help prevent the bad breath associated with garlic consumption," Brigman says. 

1. Boost immunity

The flavorful bulbs at the end of the garlic plant are also rich with nutritious compounds called allicin and alliinase. In fact, the presence of allicin helps garlic boost the immune system. 

A 2015 review found that garlic fortifies the immune system by stimulating immune cells like macrophages, lymphocytes, and natural killer cells. Garlic may also help stave off colds and flu because of the plant's antimicrobial and antibiotic properties, Brigman says, which would stop the growth of viruses, bacteria, and other unwanted organisms. 

However, Brigman notes that although some studies show a benefit, there is a lack how is garlic good for you strong evidence that garlic supplements help prevent or reduce severity of the common cold and flu.

Related
How to boost your immune system through diet and lifestyle changes

You should still wash your hands, avoid touching your face, stay hydrated, and practice other methods to prevent getting sick. Garlic probably won't prevent sickness, but it may provide a little extra boost if you want to strengthen your immune system. 

2. Reduce cancer risk

"[Garlic is] also a good source of phytochemicals, which help to provide protection from cell damage, lowering your risk for certain cancers," says Brigman. 

Phytochemicals are compounds in vegetables and fruits associated with a reduced risk of chronic illness. There is some evidence that consuming phytochemicals through garlic can have anticarcinogenic effects and potentially lower risk for stomach and colorectal cancers. 

However, research in human subjects is lacking, and it's not proven that garlic consumption can actually prevent or treat cancer. 

3. Improve heart health

A 2019 study found that consuming two capsules of garlic extract a day for two months can lower blood pressure and decrease arterial stiffness for people with hypertension. 

"Garlic seems to lead to overall protection for your heart," Brigman says. 

In addition, a 2013 report suggested that garlic can reduce lipids in the blood, which means lower cholesterol and thus a lower risk for plaque build up in the cardiovascular system. 

Related
The best and worst foods to eat to lower cholesterol — and how the Mediterranean diet can help you

The amount of garlic how is garlic good for you to achieve these heart healthy effects differ among individuals. However, looking at the research available on the subject, it's best to consume about four fresh cloves of garlic per week, says Puja Agarwal, PhD, a nutrition epidemiologist at Rush University Medical Center. 

4. Enhance workouts

Historically, Ancient Greek athletes ate garlic before an event to improve their performance. That's because garlic releases nitric oxide, a compound that relaxes blood vessels and lowers blood pressure. This compound is often released while running to supply more oxygen to working muscles. 

Some animal studies in rats and mice have also found that garlic can improve athletic endurance, finds a 2007 review. However, Brigman notes the inconclusive data in human subjects means we can't draw definitive conclusions. 

Insider's takeaway 

Brigman says to opt for whole garlic rather than the pre-minced version in jars, as you will get the most health and medicine benefits from raw garlic.

This is because the alicin in garlic, which contributes to many of its health benefits, is most potent briefly after how is garlic good for you has been chopped, crushed, or chewed. In fact, the amount of allicin in garlic cloves peaks 10 minutes after chopping and is destroyed by temperatures over 140 degrees Fahrenheit. 

"If you want to add garlic to hot meals, then add it when your food is almost finished cooking to limit the destruction of allicin," Brigman says. 

Allicin can also be consumed in supplemental forms, such as in pills, but the most benefit comes from raw garlic, Brigman says. This may be due to the fact that garlic supplements do not have regulated manufacturing standards and may actually contain little to no allicin. 

Источник: https://www.insider.com/garlic-benefits

On the list of pungent-yet-healthy foods (apple cider vinegar shots, onions, tuna), raw garlic tops the list. Besides the obvious concerns (can you say garlic breath and B.O.?), it's not exactly one you often hear about being good for you. One the best ways to reap the benefits of garlic is eating it raw.

Ariana Lutzi, ND, naturopath and nutrition consultant for Bubs Naturals, says garlic is one of the most accessible healthy foods to eat. "Garlic is packed full of nutrients and adds intense flavor to any dish. It's the most potent when used in its raw form," she says.

Besides delivering a nutritional boost, Lutzi says the benefits of raw garlic include kicking nasty infections, too. "Garlic fights all types of infections—fungal, bacterial, parasitic, and viral—regulates blood sugar, lowers blood pressure, and lowers cholesterol, to name a few." Who knew all of these benefits could be packed inside such a small (and smelly) herb?

Health benefits of raw garlic

Health benefits of raw garlic

Alejandro Junger, MD, founder of the Clean Program, a 30-day cleanse program endorsed by celebrities like Meghan Markle and Gwyneth Paltrow, encourages people to eat a clove of how is garlic good for you garlic each day while on the cleanse. "[Raw garlic] will help not only to eliminate bad bacteria, yeast, and parasites, but also to regulate blood sugar levels, enhance fat burning, reduce hunger sensations, lower cholesterol, relieve arthritic pain, and reduce bowel gas," writes Dr. Junger in his book Clean.

Here are some other health benefits of the veggie, amplified when raw as cooking dulls some of its nutrient density:

1. Garlic is good for your brain

One benefit of raw garlic is that its fill of vitamins and minerals, including vitamin B6, manganese, selenium, vitamin c, iron, potassium, and copper. This powerhouse combination is especially good for cognitive function: Vitamin B6 and magnesium are both linked to boosting mood and improving brain health.

2. It supports a healthy immune system

You have the vitamin How is garlic good for you in raw garlic to thank for this one. For a more savory immunity booster than oranges, incorporate some raw garlic into your meals.

3. It's anti-inflammatory

Garlic contains allyl sulfides, an anti-inflammatory, cancer-fighting compound that studies have shown to slow the growth rate of cancer cells. Because it's anti-inflammatory, this means it also helps protect the body from free radicals.

4. It's good for your liver

Studies have shown that it can protect the liver from some toxins, and help lower blood sugar levels. This helps your body flush out toxins more efficiently, which benefits the entire body overall.

5. Garlic is good for your heart

According to clinical nutritionist and chiropractor Vikki Petersen, CCN, DC, CFMP, consuming garlic on a regular basis is directly linked to benefitting cardiovascular health. "Garlic has long been known to reduce cholesterol and normalize blood pressure," she says. "Additionally, its anti-inflammatory effects are a big benefit to diminishing risk of our number one killer, heart disease."

6. It may help protect against osteoporosis

With aging, the risk for osteoporosis increases, particularly for women. Dr. Petersen says there is some evidence to suggest that consuming garlic can help protect against it. "Garlic can increase estrogen levels in women entering menopause, a time when bones are most at risk for developing osteoporosis. Some studies also showed it to slow the effects of osteoarthritis," she says. While the preliminary studies are promising, more research needs to be done to confirm this connection.

7. Garlic is good for your skin

While you probably don't want to rub garlic all over your body, eating garlic can benefit your skin from the inside out. "Garlic’s antibacterial and antifungal properties can help acne, and its general anti-inflammatory benefits help improve overall circulation, including bringing nutrients to your skin in a more efficient manner," says Dr. Petersen. "Garlic is Mother Nature’s antibiotic and contains immune-boosting properties due to its antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, and antiseptic aspects, all courtesy of the compound allicin that garlic is so rich in." She adds that allicin is also anti-inflammatory and rich in antioxidants, which is good for the skin.

Watch the video below to learn more benefits of raw garlic:

Side effects of raw garlic

When it comes to incorporating garlic into your diet, Dr. Petersen says there are some side effects to consider. Some people may experience heartburn, burning in the mouth, gas, nausea, diarrhea, or vomiting. Body odor is another side-effect of loading up on garlic. But this is typically only an issue when people are eating three to four cloves of raw garlic a day.

Eating raw garlic is not as easy as it sounds. For starters, it can be super intense and even cause a burning sensation once you start chewing it. And Lutzi says other potential side effects include gastrointestinal burning or irritation. "It can produce changes in intestinal flora," she says.

Dr. Petersen says some people may be sensitive to garlic topically, meaning it could negatively affect their skin, causing a rash. If you're sensitive, she recommends wearing gloves when chopping it.

People taking certain medications should proceed with caution since raw garlic can potentially react with some drugs including anticoagulants, antiplatelet, hypoglycemic, and insulin. If you're on other meds it's always a good idea to talk with your doctor before incorporating any kind of supplement or herb (like raw garlic) into your diet.

All of this is to say, experiment with your raw garlic intake. Dr. Petersen says a healthy dose of garlic is two to three cloves a day cooked or a supplement of aged garlic at a dose of 600 to 1,200 milligrams. Go small and if it seems to agree with your body, that's great. If not, raw garlic just isn't for you—and that's okay. Since the potential side effects of eating raw garlic sound less than ideal, there are (thankfully) lots of different ways you can get all of the benefits of eating raw garlic, without well, having to chew an actual clove of garlic.

How to use raw garlic and reap the benefits

One way to make raw garlic go down a bit easier is to slice the clove into thin slices and sandwich them between apple slices, as Dr. Junger suggests in Clean. The apple will help cover up the pungent flavor, and mixing the garlic with another food will make the whole experience a lot more tolerable. According to Lutzi, you can try cutting the clove into how is garlic good for you small pieces and swallowing whole like a pill to avoid the pungent effect from chewing it.

Other ideas for eating raw garlic:

  • Mince a garlic clove and toss into your salad or salad dressing
  • Make garlic toast, like this blogger, by mincing the raw garlic, and then mix with some ghee or butter, and spread on toast
  • Make a ACV garlic tonic (see recipe below)
  • Add to soups or juice with other veggies

If you really hate the taste but want to reap the benefits of raw garlic, there are garlic extract supplements available, including some that are odorless.

Dr. Lutzi's Healthy Healing Herbal Tonic With Raw Garlic

Ingredients
Raw garlic
Honey
Apple cider vinegar

1. Roughly chop multiple cloves of garlic and add to small mason jar.
2. Fill at least one-fourth of the jar full of chopped garlic. Next, pour in equal parts honey and apple cider vinegar, enough to cover the garlic.
3. Let this mixture sit in a dark pantry or cupboard for at least a week, shaking daily.
4. After a week, strain out the garlic or leave it for a more robust concoction. Take 1 tablespoon daily for immune defense throughout cold and flu season.

 

Oh hi! You look like someone who loves free workouts, discounts for cult-fave wellness brands, and exclusive Well+Good content. Sign up for Well+, our online community of wellness insiders, and unlock your rewards instantly.

Our editors independently select these products. Making a purchase through our links may earn Well+Good a commission.

Источник: https://www.wellandgood.com/benefits-of-raw-garlic/

Discover our full range of health benefit guides, then check out some of our delicious garlic recipesand a video on how to crush garlic.

Nutritional Benefits

One clove (4g) of garlic provides:

  • 4Kcal / 16KJ
  • 0.3g protein
  • 0.0g fat
  • 0.7g carbohydrates
  • 0.2g fibre
  • 25mg Potassium

5 health benefits of garlic

1. Contains compounds with medicinal properties

Much of garlic’s therapeutic acclaim is down to an active compound called allicin. This sulphur-containing compound gives garlic its pungent smell and distinctive taste. Luckily for us cooks, the action of chopping or crushing stimulates the production of allicin. But, it is thought that the application of heat may inhibit some of the perceived medicinal properties, making it best to add garlic late in the cooking process.

2. May reduce the risk of heart attacks

Much research has focused on garlic’s potential in reducing the risk of heart disease and helping to manage cholesterol levels. Several studies suggest that garlic makes platelets (the cells involved in blood clotting) less likely to clump together and accumulate on artery walls; this means garlic acts like an anticoagulant and by so doing reduces the risk of heart attacks.

Garlic may also lower blood pressure through its ability to widen blood vessels, allowing blood to flow more freely.

3. May have anti-cancer properties

The sulphurous compounds in garlic have been studied for their ability to inhibit cancerous cells and block tumours. That said, much of the evidence for garlic in relation to colon, prostate, oesophageal and renal cancer is observational, with only small numbers of subjects included in the studies. As a result, the effect garlic has in relation to cancer remains uncertain and more studies are needed.

4. Has antimicrobial and antifungal properties

Garlic has a long history of use as an infection fighter against viruses, bacteria and fungi. It has been referred to as ‘Russian penicillin’ to denote its antibacterial properties, which is once again attributed to the compound chase freedom customer service phone number. Some skin conditions, such as warts and insect bites, may also respond to garlic oil or a crushed raw garlic clove.

5. May support bone health

Animal studies suggest garlic may minimise bone loss by increasing oestrogen levels in female rodents. A study in post-menopausal women found a similar effect when a daily dose of dry garlic extract (equivalent to 2g of raw garlic) was consumed.

Studies also suggest the consumption of garlic may give some relief from the inflammatory symptoms of osteoarthritis.

Is garlic safe for everyone?

Garlic poses few safety issues and allergies are rare. If you take garlic supplements for cholesterol management, have your cholesterol levels checked after three months. The recommended daily amount of garlic ranges from ½-1 whole clove per day (around 3000-6000mcg of allicin).

Please note that some people may experience indigestion, intestinal gas or diarrhoea when taking high doses of garlic.

Recipe suggestions for garlic

A simple aïoli is a great accompaniment for roasts, fish or as a dip:
Homemade aïoli
Salmon & prawns with dill & lime aïoli

Make your own delicious garlic bread:
Garlic & basil ciabatta
Quick tomato soup with cheesy garlic dippers

Cook with mushrooms:
Garlic mushroom burgers
Mushrooms on toast
Garlicky mushroom penne

Pair with prawns:
Stir-fry prawns with peppers & spinach
Lemony prawn bruschettas

Add flavour to mashed potato and stews:
Roast sweet potato squash & garlic mash
Garlic mash potato bake
Spicy root & lentil casserole

Garlic is great with chicken:
Garlic chicken with herbed potatoes

Want more? Take inspiration from our garlic recipes.


This article was last reviewed on 6 October 2021 by Kerry Torrens.

Kerry Torrens is a qualified nutritionist (MBANT) with a postgraduate diploma in Personalised Nutrition & Nutritional Therapy. She is how is garlic good for you member of the British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT) and a member of the Guild of Food Writers. Over the past 15 years she has been a contributing author to a number of nutritional and cookery publications including BBC Good Food.

All health content on bbcgoodfood.com is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other health care professional. If you have any concerns about your general health, you should contact your local health care provider. See our website terms and conditions for more information.

Источник: https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/ingredient-focus-garlic

1

Crush them. Then bake them slightly. That's according to Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and collaborators in Argentina.

Researchers have known for some time that garlic--like its close relative, the onion--is a rich source of heart-protective compounds called thiosulfinates. These sulfur compounds, best known for causing eyes to water, may lower blood pressure and break up potentially harmful clusters of platelets in the bloodstream.

But, up to now, most researchers and nutritionists assumed that the best way to seize on garlic's cardiovascular benefits was to eat the small bulbs in their most unfettered form: in the raw.

Not so, discovered ARS plant geneticist Philipp Simon and his colleagues Pablo Cavagnaro, Alejandra Camargo and Claudio Galmarini, whose findings appear in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Simon works in the ARS Vegetable Crops Research Unit in Madison, Wis. Cavagnaro, Camargo and Galmarini work at the INTA La Consulta in Argentina.

Since most people worldwide sauté or bake their garlic before eating it, the researchers wanted to know if cooking reduced garlic's blood-thinning effects. They also wanted to see what impact crushing the garlic before cooking had on its ability to bust up artery-clogging platelets.

After boiling, baking and microwaving both crushed and uncrushed cloves of garlic and evaluating them for their antiplatelet activity, the scientists learned that lightly cooked, crushed garlic provides most of the health benefits found in raw garlic. The only exception was microwaving, which stripped garlic almost entirely of its blood-thinning effects.

The researchers contend that while heating might be generally blamed for reducing garlic's antiplatelet activity, it's the crushing that enables the beneficial compounds to be freed in the first place.


Story Source:

Materials provided by US Department of Agriculture. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Cite This Page:

US Department of Agriculture. "Garlic's Goodness Best Released With A Crush." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 October 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071006084912.htm>.

US Department of Agriculture. (2007, October 10). Garlic's Goodness Best Released With A Crush. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 5, 2021 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071006084912.htm

US Department of Agriculture. "Garlic's Goodness Best Released With A Crush." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071006084912.htm (accessed December 5, 2021).


Источник: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071006084912.htm

Fresh or capsuled? Researcher studies garlic’s potency as a supplement

By SARA SELIC

What good is garlic? And to reap any benefits, should you eat it in its odiferous fresh form or will a stink-free capsule suffice? Christopher Gardner, PhD, a researcher at the Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, is on a mission to find out.

Thanks to a grant from the National Institutes of Health, Gardner is conducting the most rigorous study ever to address a lingering controversy in the nutritional-supplement field: whether fresh garlic and garlic supplements — a widely consumed herbal supplement — lower cholesterol as claimed.

Food service workers carefully peel garlic in preparation for an unusual study conducted by Christopher Gardner. Gardner and his team are comparing the effectiveness of garlic taken in supplement form to garlic eaten fresh. Study volunteers must agree to eat a number of garlic-infused specialty sandwiches. PHOTO: COURTESY OF CHRISTOPHER GARDNER

In preparation for the study — which is seeking volunteers and entails eating gourmet sandwiches six days a week — Gardner’s staff spent two weeks peeling, mashing and measuring 150 pounds of fresh garlic. That’s on top of the weeks they spent taste-testing a dozen custom-made sandwiches ranging from Portobello mushroom to chicken quesadilla.

The Stanford study differs greatly from the dozens of garlic studies conducted over the past four decades, Gardner explained.

While previous studies tested different garlic preparations with inconsistent and often inadequate potency, the Stanford researchers know the exact chemical composition of the garlic preparations they’re using and will monitor this throughout the study with periodic chemical analyses. And unlike previous studies, which tested just one garlic type, the Stanford study will evaluate the effects of two top-selling garlic supplements along with fresh garlic.

"This study goes far beyond the other trials, because we know exactly what we’re giving participants," said Gardner, assistant professor of medicine. "These results should help set the record straight."

For centuries, garlic has been touted for its disease-fighting properties. The most commonly claimed benefit is reduced cholesterol, although garlic is also said to reduce blood pressure, boost antioxidants and reduce the risk of certain cancers. Seeking such benefits without eating (or smelling like) garlic, millions of Americans take garlic supplements — pills containing powdered garlic or aged-garlic extract.

Meanwhile, researchers sought to determine whether garlic deserves its reputation. More than two dozen studies in the 1970s and ‘80s claimed to prove that garlic lowers cholesterol, but the studies were later criticized for poor design. They involved too few participants or didn’t include a control group, for example. When more-rigorous studies were conducted in the 1990s, most concluded that garlic offered little to no significant benefit.

Gardner said the question remains unsettled because chemical analyses conducted by Larry Lawson, PhD, a biochemist and co-investigator for Stanford’s study, revealed serious flaws in the formulations of the garlic supplements used in past studies. The key issue is allicin, an enzyme that is garlic’s active ingredient.

When a person eats fresh garlic, allicin is released by chewing or mincing the herb. It’s more challenging to get allicin from a garlic pill, however. In some cases, if the pills dissolve in the stomach, the garlic enzyme needed to produce allicin becomes inactivated.

Some pills, meanwhile, have an enteric coating, and these pills often pass through the body undissolved. "The problem is, all these studies didn’t really test garlic — they tested garlic supplements," Gardner said. "That’s not the same as eating garlic."

To select the fresh garlic for the study, Gardner traveled to Gilroy, Calif., the nation’s "garlic capital." An eight-person team spent two weeks peeling and mashing the garlic, then scooping it into 5-gram containers.

The premeasured garlic portions will be spread onto the gourmet "study sandwiches" that participants in the "fresh garlic group" must eat six days a week.

All other participants must eat the sandwiches as well, but minus the garlic. The six types of sandwiches used in the study were chosen in taste tests from a larger sample all custom-prepared by a chef. "This isn’t your typical clinical trial. It’s a lot of fun," Gardner said.

Participants in the Stanford study — 200 healthy adults with moderately elevated cholesterol — will consume the sandwiches along with study tablets for six months. Random assignment will be used to determine which combination of sandwich and pill will be given to each participant in the trial.

Participants’ cholesterol, blood pressure, blood-clotting ability and antioxidant levels will be monitored periodically.

Volunteers must be between ages 30 and 65 and in good health but have moderately elevated cholesterol (LDL of 130-190). And, they must agree to eat their allotted "study sandwiches" six days a week.

"We only want people who like our sandwiches," Gardner said, adding, "We’ve gone to enormous lengths to make sure they’re excellent."

Interested volunteers should call 725-5018 for more information.


Источник: https://news.stanford.edu/news/2003/january15/garlic.html
how is garlic good for you
how is garlic good for you

Thematic video

Eat Garlic Every Day And This Will Happen To Your Body
how is garlic good for you

4 Replies to “How is garlic good for you”

  1. hi someone wanna send me 500$ but told me to get gift card what should i do is he a cheater

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *