is flavored greek yogurt good for you

1 #8 Oikos Triple Zero Vanilla Greek Yogurt This yogurt is packed with protein but you would never be able to tell from the taste. Greek yogurt is a good source of calcium which is needed for healthy bones and teeth as well as muscle contractions, and it contains a good. Enjoy this blend of our nutrient-rich Greek Yogurt and the natural sweetness of Even better, you get rich flavor, but less fat since it's made from our.

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THE TRUTH ABOUT GREEK YOGURT - Should You Be Eating It?

You’ve probably noticed that your options is flavored greek yogurt good for you the yogurt aisle have ballooned in recent years. Greek, skyr, goat, coconut—the varieties of cultured dairy seem endless. Now, you can add quark to the fold. Not quite cheese and not quite yogurt, quark is slowly gaining popularity as a viable yogurt (or cottage cheese or cream cheese) substitute.

While it may be a relatively new addition to American supermarkets, it has long been a staple in German households. So, should you ditch your beloved extra-thick Greek yogurt for this dairy import? Here’s everything you need to know.

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What Exactly Is Quark?

Quark is a tricky food to pin down: Is it cheese? Is it yogurt? Is it something physicists study? Technically, quark is a soft, spreadable cheese. However, because of its creamy texture, it’s more often compared to a thick yogurt, similar to Greek or skyr. It’s also often likened to cottage cheese, however, it lacks the lumpy texture.

To make quark, milk that has been soured via the addition of acid is warmed until it curdles and then is strained before bacterial strains are added to ferment the lactose further. Next, it’s continuously stirred to prevent hardening and to give quark its signature thick and smooth texture (and, hence, the creamy goodness).

As for its flavor, it can be best described as mild and neither sweet nor sour, is flavored greek yogurt good for you it lacks the tangy aftertaste of yogurt. So if you’re not a fan of yogurt unless it’s smothered in honey to tame its sour power, quark just might be the stuff for you.

The Nutritional Benefits of Quark for Cyclists

Nutritionally, quark has several highlights.

One serving—1 cup—of 4 percent fat plain quark contains about the how hard is it to get a pnc credit card

  • 120 calories
  • 14 g of protein
  • 5 g fat
  • 5 g saturated fat
  • 5 g of carbs
  • 0 g of dietary fiber
  • 60 mg sodium
  • 182 mg calcium

One serving—1 cup—of 0 percent spirit airlines phone number usa plain quark contains about the following:

  • 90 calories
  • 17 g of protein
  • 0 g fat
  • 0 g saturated fat
  • 6 g of carbs
  • 0 g of dietary fiber
  • 60 mg sodium
  • 201 mg calcium

It’s worth noting from the start that quark is in the same ballpark when it comes to protein content as Greek yogurt or skyr (levels vary by brand). And it’s not just any lightweight protein.

“It contains all the essential amino acids, including leucine—a branched-chain amino acid—that helps muscle protein synthesis,” says sports dietitian Lori Russell, M.S. R.D. C.S.S.D., owner of Hungry for Results.

Russell notes that it can be a great protein-packed snack option or a way for vegetarian meals to get a boost of this macronutrient. Since research shows that the body can utilize up to 30 grams of protein after a bout of endurance exercise to maximize the rate of muscle protein synthesis is flavored greek yogurt good for you. muscle building), the high protein content of quark also makes it a good food choice after a hard ride to help repair your muscles.

Being a fermented product, quark can help boost your gut health with a resupply of beneficial bacteria.

“Having a healthy and diverse gut microbiome definitely brings with it some performance-enhancing benefits,” Russell says.

For instance, frequent consumption of probiotics may lessen the chances of suffering GI distress during prolonged exercise, and according to a study in the journal Nutrients, it could help athletes ramp their immunity up so you’re less likely to be sidelined by the sniffles.

One study found that higher intakes of fermented milk products can assist in lowering blood pressure numbers, which, in turn, helps fend off hypertension. With this said, we still don’t know if the strains of bacteria in quark have the same health impacts as those present in yogurt, kefir, kimchi, and other fermented foods and drinks.

As a nutrient-dense product, quark contains various amounts of bone-benefiting calcium, vitamin A, vitamin D, and B vitamins, all of which can help contribute to the heightened nutrient needs of anyone who puts in some serious saddle time.

There’s no need to choose fat-free quark over that made from whole milk. An ever-expanding pile of research papers are serving to roll back the idea that we need to steer clear of full-fat dairy, like 4 percent quark. For instance, an investigation in the journal Circulation discovered those who had higher circulating blood levels of fats associated with dairy intake, on average, had a 46 percent lower risk of developing diabetes over a 15-year period than those with lower levels.

A recent University of Texas study reported that the substitution of 2 percent of daily calorie intake from meat-based saturated fat with calories from dairy-based saturated fat was associated with a 25 percent lower heart disease risk in 5,209 people over a decade.

And, despite the few extra calories it introduces to your diet, there is emerging evidence that the fat in dairy may help—not hurt—your waistline. It might be that the unique makeup of the type of fats in dairy has less harmful (and even beneficial) effects on the body.

“Fat in dairy like quark is not to be feared, but which option an athlete chooses depends on their overall diet and caloric needs,” Russell says. “If an athlete is consuming quark for a snack, having more fat will provide added satiety and fullness, but if it is part of a meal that contains other healthy fats such as avocado and almonds, a lower fat option might be best.”

If your stomach is not a fan of lactose—a naturally occurring sugar in dairy—Russell says that quark might be tolerated since the fermentation process makes it lower in lactose than milk so that it’s easier to digest. However, individual tolerances can vary, so some testing is needed to determine if any unpleasant side effects surface after smearing some quark on your toast.

It probably should come as no surprise that versions of quark on American store shelves are now being pumped full of added sugars. A serving of berry-flavored quark can contain upwards of 10 grams of added sweet stuff. So to keep your sugar intake in check, opt for plain flavored versions most often and save any sugary flavored types for spooning up after a spirited ride when your body can make better use of these fast-digesting carb calories for recovery purposes.

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How Should You Incorporate Quark into Your Diet?

“Think of quark as a mix between Greek yogurt and cottage cheese, so any way you enjoy those items, you can enjoy quark,” advises Russell. And, since the flavor is mild, you can go savory or sweet.

One of the most straightforward ways is to spoon it up for a snack like you would yogurt; perhaps topped with chopped nuts, granola, or fruit. But the possibilities are nearly endless: Blend it into smoothies and dips, whisk into dressings for a creamy salad topper, spoon dollops on baked potatoes, tacos, pancakes, or even pizza, use in muffin batters, stir into tuna salad in place of mayo, use as a base for parfaits, or smear on toast or a bagel followed by your favorite sweet or savory toppings like sliced pear or smoked salmon.

The Bottom Line

It’s always fun to try new foods, and if your taste buds don’t love the tang of yogurt then quark could be a good (and nutritious) addition to your shopping cart. But if you are already satisfied with the dairy options in your daily menu and eat a predominantly whole- food diet, then missing out on quark won’t hinder your health and nutrition.

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Источник: https://www.bicycling.com/health-nutrition/a33824856/what-is-quark/

Yogurts

yoggroup465x280.jpg

What's in your pot?

According to consumer research, the UK population spends a staggering 1.7 billion a year on yogurt and fromage frais.

With an ever-increasing range of yogurt varieties on offer, it can be difficult to work out why one variety may be more or less healthy than another.

Here at Enjoy Food, we thought it was about time we took a closer look at this popular product and find out what exactly is in those pots…

The good news

Yogurt provides many health benefits. Made with milk, it contains protein and calcium needed for healthy bones and teeth. Some yogurts also have added vitamin D, which helps our body to absorb calcium. It’s also good to know that low-fat yogurts have just as much calcium as the full-fat versions.

Some research even suggests that eating yogurt can help you to feel fuller, which may make it easier to manage your weight.

As well as a useful portable snack, or instant pudding when you fancy a sweet fix, plain, natural, or greek yogurt can be used as a topping on fruit and desserts instead of cream, in smoothies, or in cooking. 

blueberryyog465x280.jpg

Spotlight on sugar

As with most manufactured food products, you need to take a step back from is flavored greek yogurt good for you marketing hype and take a closer look at the food label, to check whether that innocent looking pot is as healthy as it seems.

Many yogurts, particularly the ones aimed at children, are crammed full of the ‘free sugars’ we all need to cut back on.

Looking at the label, the carbohydrate ‘of which sugars’ provides useful information. An amount in grams (g) will be given.

Spotting 'free sugars'

This figure includes sugars which come naturally from the milk used to make the yogurt, known as ‘lactose’, as well as any sugar added to the yogurt, ie ‘free sugars’, and sugar that comes naturally from any fruit or fruit puree that has been used to make the product.

As a general rule, in any 100g of yogurt, the first 5g of sugar listed is the milk sugar (lactose) found naturally in the milk used to make the yogurt. Lactose is not a 'free sugar'.

If sugar is second or third on the ingredients list, you know that a lot has been added as the order of ingredients is dictated by the quantity present. Other forms of sugar that you may see added include fructose, dextrose, glucose, fructose syrup, and honey.

garlicyog465x280.jpg

If you carb count, it’s the total amount of carbs that you need to count.

By looking at the ‘of which sugars,’ together with the ingredients list, you can gain a fairly accurate picture of the amount of sugar added, especially if you remember that the first 5g of any 100g of yogurt is generally a result of the lactose in milk.

Added fruit is sometimes listed as a percentage. If it is a long way down the ingredient list, it means that very little has been added. Generally, more expensive yogurts have the most fruit added.


Popular yogurts

Below is the nutritional information for 10 everyday yogurts so you can see how they perform.

*These nutritional values were accurate at the time of publication, but some of these values may have changed. Please check the food labels for the latest nutritional information.

Muller Light – Strawberry

Per 100gPer 175g serving
Calories5189
Carbs7.813.7
Sugar7.112.4
Fat0.10.18
Saturated fat0.10.18
Salt0.20.35

Danone Light & Free – Blueberry Burst

Per 100gPer 115g serving
Calories5058
Carbs7.18.2
Sugar6.47.3
Fat0.10.1
Saturated fat<0.1<0.1
Salt0.20.23

Liberté 0% – Natural

Per 100gPer 125g serving
Calories5872.5
Carbs3.64.5
Sugar3.64.5
Fat0.10.13
Saturated fat<0.1<0.1
Salt0.140.18

Danone Activia 0% Fat – Peach

Per 100gPer 125g serving
Calories5872.5
Carbs3.64.5
Sugar3.64.5
Fat0.10.13
Saturated fat<0.1<0.1
Salt0.140.18

Skyr Is flavored greek yogurt good for you Free – Simply Natural

Per 100gPer 150g serving
Calories6598
Carbs46
Sugar46
Fat0.20.3
Saturated fat0.10.1
Salt0.140.21

Nestle Ski Smooth – Strawberry

Per 100gPer 120g serving
Calories94114
Carbs13.616.3
Sugar13.215.8
Fat2.73.3
Saturated fat1.82.1
Salt0.10.3

Yeo Valley – Natural

Per 100gPer 120g serving
Calories8298.4
Carbs6.57.8
Sugar6.57.8
Fat4.25
Saturated fat2.73.4
Salt0.180.22

Alpro Soya – Simply Plain

Per 100gPer 120g serving
Calories5060
Carbs2.12.5
Sugar2.12.5
Fat2.32.8
Saturated fat0.40.48
Salt0.250.26

Rachel's Organic Greek Style – Natural

Per 100gPer 120g serving
Calories109131
Carbs56
Sugar56
Fat8.310
Saturated fat5.26.2
Salt0.10.12

Sainsbury's Low-Fat Greek Style – Natural

Per 100gPer 120g serving
Calories7590
Carbs7.18.5
Sugar7.18.5
Fat2.73.2
Saturated fat1.72
Salt0.20.24

The findings

We’ve used the governments’ colour coding front-of-pack scheme so that you can see whether the amount in each yogurt is high (red), medium (amber) or low (green). As you can see, they are all coded green or amber for sugar, fat, and salt. One was coded red for saturated fat, probably because whole (blue top) milk  is used in the recipe. However, this brand’s range also offers lower fat and saturated alternatives.

childyog465x280.jpgThough many of the yogurts had no added sugar, a few did, with sugar and fructose listed in the ingredients list.

Artificial sweeteners such as sucralose, acesulfame K, and aspartame were added to a few of the yogurts to sweeten them. These are not counted as ‘free sugars’ and provide neglible amounts of cals and carbs.

Childrens' yogurts

Yogurts can be a useful snack to pop into your kids' lunch boxes, or to enjoy at work or home as part of a healthy, balanced diet.

It pays to check the label rather than be blinded by the marketing hype, especially if you carb count. 


Kids' yogurt nutritional information

Muller Kids Corner Butterflies

Carbohydrate per 100 g = 19.8g and per 135 g pot = 26.7g

Carbohydrate ‘of which sugars’ per 100g = 17.3g and per 135g pot = 23.3g

Munch Bunch – Strawberry and Vanilla

Carbohydrate per 100 g = 13.9g and per 85g pot = 13.4g

Carbohydrate ‘of which sugars’ per 100g = 11.8g and per 85g pot = 11.4g

Petits Filous Magic Squares – Raspberry/Vanilla

Carbohydrate per 100g = 13g and per 80g pot = 10.4g

Carbohydrate ‘of which sugars’ per 100g = 12.4g and per 80g pot = 9.9g

Muller Kids Corner Blast Off

Carbohydrate per 100g = 19.8g and per 135g pot = 26.7g

Carbohydrate ‘of which sugars’ per 100g = 16.4g and per 135g pot = 22.1g

Yoplait – Strawberry and Raspberry

Carbohydrate per 100g = 13.3g and per 70g pot = 9.4g

Carbohydrate ‘of which sugars’ per 100g = 13.2 g and per 70g pot = 9.4g

Remember to check the ingredients listed above before purchasing a yogurt for your child. Different yogurts can vary considerably and some offer far healthier options than others.

And finally.

With entire supermarket aisles, and pages and pages of online shopping sites dedicated to yogurts, you’re bound to find one you enjoy. Or, why not experiment and add your own delicious toppings and is flavored greek yogurt good for you to natural or greek yogurt for your very own unique flavour?

Much more than yogurts…

Want to find out more about healthy eating and diabetes management? Sign up to our free, monthlyEnjoy Food e-newsletter.

Источник: https://www.diabetes.org.uk/guide-to-diabetes/enjoy-food/eating-with-diabetes/diabetes-food-myths/yogurts

By comparison, 100g of low-fat plain Greek yogurt contains less calories, protein and fat but is higher in carbohydrates. Pre-mixed, flavoured fruit varieties will typically also be higher in carbohydrates because of the added fruit or sugar.

Greek yogurt is a good source of calcium which is needed for healthy bones and teeth as well as muscle contractions, and it contains a good array of B vitamins which we need for energy. Greek yogurt also contains iodine which helps support thyroid health and metabolic rate (the speed at which chemical reactions take place in the body) and also helps keep our cells healthy.

Is Greek yogurt high in protein?

Standard Greek yogurt is a good source of protein with around 5g per 100g.

There are some yogurt products now available which have a similar consistency to Greek yogurt, called Skyr. They are naturally higher in protein and have around 10g of protein per 100g, but technically they are classed as a sour milk cheese.

Does Greek yogurt contain probiotics?

Yes, most Greek yogurts do contain probiotics, as long as they are labelled as containing ‘live cultures’ – check the label to be sure.

Read more about probiotics.

What is a healthy serving of Greek yogurt?

A healthy serving is around 110g or 5-6 tablespoons of Greek yogurt as part of a balanced diet. It can added to breakfast, used as a snack or in cooking.

Can you be allergic to Greek yogurt?

Yes – people who are allergic to cow's milk will be allergic to Greek yogurt. Speak to your GP if you experience any concerning symptoms, such as a tickly throat or cough, sneezing or an itchy tongue after consuming milk or yogurt.

Less commonly, a severe allergic reaction can occur, known as anaphylaxis. This is a medical emergency and requires immediate attention.

Visit the NHS website to read more about allergies.

It's also possible to have an intolerance to cow's milk or lactose, which is different to an allergy. Read more about food intolerances.

How to buy the best Greek yogurt

There are many different varieties of Greek yogurt available and some of this will come down to personal preference or taste.

Plain Greek yogurt is a good choice, as they contain good quantities of all the macronutrients: protein, fat and carbohydrates and no added sugar or sweeteners. You could add prepared fresh fruit such as bananas, apples or berries, if you like.

You can also buy varieties that are pre-flavoured with fruit purées or honey – these are likely to be higher in sugar and calories, so may be best enjoyed as an occasional treat.

Low-fat or fat-free varieties will be lower in calories (and of course, fat) but bear in mind that they may also contain more sugar – manufacturers often add this to ‘make up’ the lost flavour when the fat is reduced. If you're looking to control your calorie intake, a smaller portion size of normal Greek yogurt may be best, and the fat content will provide longer satiety.

Check the labels to ensure that the variety you are buying contains probiotics coldwell banker burnet realty rochester mn extra health benefits.

Healthy Greek yogurt recipes

Chicken korma
Tangy trout with simple garden salad
Mushroom & chickpea burgers
Fruit & nut breakfast bowl
Porridge with blueberry compote
Frozen strawberry yogurt

Enjoyed these? Now read.

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Is pasta healthy?
Is porridge healthy?
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Is popcorn healthy?
Is hummus healthy?


This page was published on 2nd March 2020.

Nicola Shubrook is a nutritional therapist and works with both private clients and the corporate sector. She is an accredited member of the British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT) and the Complementary & Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC). Find out more at urbanwellness.co.uk.

All health content on bbcgoodfood.com is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other healthcare professional. If you have any concerns about your general health, you should contact your local healthcare provider. See our website terms and conditions for more information.

Источник: https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/greek-yogurt-healthy

Which Yogurt is the Healthiest?

But if you find plain Greek yogurt a bit too tart and need just a hint of sugar, then Chobani Less Sugar, Siggi’s Vanilla, and Oikos Triple Zero may be just right for you. They all add a touch of sweetness but are still low in added sugar and Oikos has the added bonus of 15% DV of calcium and vitamin D. Note that Oikos does contain stevia, which is a naturally occurring sweetener, but can have an aftertaste that is not appealing to some people.

 Whether to choose the 0% fat or the 4% fat Greek yogurt depends on many factors, including weight goals, health history and other saturated fat sources in your is flavored greek yogurt good for you diet. This is one of those questions that a registered dietitian can help provide individualized recommendations based on family health history, current medical conditions, and your health goals.

Traditional or Regular Yogurt:

This was the mainstay until Greek yogurt’s popularity started to take off about 10 years ago. Today it’s challenging to find regular yogurt that’s not loaded with added sugars, unless you choose plain yogurt, which is a good source of protein and is higher in calcium (30%DV) than Greek yogurt. Most regular, plain yogurt is only available in 32 oz. tubs (vs. individual 5 oz. containers), so having re-useable containers is a must if you’re taking your yogurt on the go. Here are a few examples that provide at least 7 grams of protein and at least 25% DV for calcium in a 6 ounce serving.

Источник: https://www.jillwestrd.com/nutritionblog/which-yogurt-is-the-healthiest/2020

Why Greek Yogurt Should Be Part of Your Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Smooth, creamy, thick — Greek yogurt is one of the hottest foods around, and its popularity shows no signs of abating. With a pudding-like texture and a slightly tart flavor, Greek yogurt also has more protein and fewer carbs and fewer sugars than traditional yogurt. This means that Greek yogurt can be even better for people with type 2 diabetes, says Tami Ross, RD, CDE, a diabetes educator in Lexington, Kentucky.

"My patients love the consistency of it," Ross explains. "Even the patients who are not big on yogurt or milk products overwhelmingly seem to like Greek yogurt."

Greek yogurt's thick consistency comes from straining it to remove liquid whey. This process increases the amount of protein per serving and removes some of the carbohydrates, which people with diabetes must watch carefully.

"For folks with diabetes, the lower carbs are a plus," Ross notes. "You can work in the yogurt for a snack without having to account for so many carbohydrates."

The increased protein can also help you feel that you've had a more substantial snack, so you'll feel more satisfied and won't be hungry for something else quite so quickly. "In terms of promoting satiety and helping people feel full, it's great," Ross says. And starting your day with Greek yogurt may even help you manage your blood sugar throughout the day. Eating low-GI foods for breakfast helps prevent blood-sugar spikes later on, one recent study found.

How to Find the Right Greek Yogurt 

Of course, not all Greek yogurts are created equal. With many brands and flavors on the market, it's important to read nutrition labels carefully to find one that will work with a diabetes-friendly diet. Carbohydrate content is the most important item to look for on the nutrition label of Greek yogurt, since it accounts for the sugar content that people with diabetes must watch. "The best choice is always a nonfat version," Ross says.

In terms of flavor, plain varieties also work best over the fruit-filled choices. "If there's fruit on the bottom, it means there's going to be more sugar and carbs in it," Ross warns. "If you really want a flavored yogurt, you can flavor it yourself with fruit at home."

Another alternative is to select vanilla Greek yogurt varieties, which are usually lower in carbohydrates than those with fruit. "My patients feel like they are getting a decadent treat," Ross says. "It's almost too good to be true." To avoid accidentally exceeding your carbohydrate limit, you should also check the label to find out how many servings are in a single package "In some products, one container may be two servings, so you have to be careful," Ross says.


Healthy and Delicious Ways to Use Greek Yogurt 

Most people with diabetes have anywhere from 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates to "spend" on each meal, and snacks should range from 15 to 30 grams. With many nonfat Greek yogurts weighing in at about 7 to 12 grams of carbohydrates per serving, it's easy to integrate them into a meal or as a between-meals snack, Ross says.

Greek yogurt can also be used in recipes. Ross suggests using plain Greek yogurt in place of sour cream on baked potatoes or in dips; blend in your favorite chopped fresh or dried herbs. You can also try this decadent-tasting dessert: Mix a teaspoon of honey and a handful of chopped walnuts into a single-serving size container of plain, nonfat Greek yogurt. If desired, add in a drop of your favorite extract, such as vanilla or almond, for extra flavor.

"This can give you a nice treat without all the carbs you'd get with ice cream or other foods," Ross says.

Источник: https://www.everydayhealth.com/type-2-diabetes/diet/greek-yogurt-in-the-diabetic-diet/

Health-conscious Americans have long touted the benefits of yogurt. But now many who once turned their noses up at yogurt are embracing the Greek way. Few foods pack as healthy a punch in such small serving sizes as Greek yogurt. A bowl of Greek yogurt can keep you fortified with essential nutrients and even help you lose weight. For many Greek yogurt lovers, the richer texture is also a big sell. Greek yogurt is made by separating out the liquid whey, explains Alissa Rumsey, a registered dietitian and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “This results in a thicker texture with fewer carbohydrates and sugar, and more protein the regular yogurt,” she says.

1. The Power is flavored greek yogurt good for you Protein

Protein is essential for good health. It is vital to cell growth, building muscle, and repairing tissue. As you age, you need more protein to keep your skin healthy and to fight off illness. Greek yogurt is a great way to boost your protein levels while avoiding heavy foods like meats.“Have it for breakfast and add in a handful of walnuts and blueberries,” Rumsey says. “Use it as a substitute for sour cream on top of chili or baked potatoes.”

2. Probiotics Keep You Regular

Greek yogurt is packed with probiotics. These are microorganisms such as bacteria and yeast. These normally live in your intestines, and having good microorganisms in your intestines helps keep you healthy, says Shane Griffin, a certified nutritional practitioner and founder of Whole Life Balance. “Without a healthy balance of good bacteria from probiotics, too much bad bacteria can build up and cause damage to our immune systems,” Griffin says. Probiotics are great for the digestive system, and especially helpful to people who first premier bank tarjeta de credito from conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, he adds.

3. Get Your B12 Here!

Vitamin B12 is necessary for energy and healthy brain function, and Greek yogurt is full of it. “Many is flavored greek yogurt good for you to supplement vitamin B12 into their diet, but Greek yogurt offers a powerful, natural alternative,” Griffin says. Vegetarians are often deficient in B12 because it generally is found in meats, so Greek yogurt is an excellent, meat-free way to add more to your diet.

4. Potassium Balances Out Sodium

Most Americans have way too much sodium in their diet. Not only is Greek yogurt low in sodium, it is also high in potassium.What does one have to do with the other? “Think of this scenario like it is a teeter-totter,” advises Griffin. “There must be a proper balance between sodium and potassium in the body, and Greek yogurt can help you maintain the correct proportions.”

5. A Workout Recovery Food

Greek yogurt can be a healthy and satisfying treat after a tough workout. Not only will it tide you over until your next meal, but it actually contains protein that can repair damage done by exercise. “Greek yogurt is rich in the amino acids which make up proteins, and proteins are the building blocks for regenerating muscle tissue and repairing fiber damage,” explains Griffin. Add a banana or some berries for a nutrition-packed post workout snack.

6. Iodine Keeps Your Waist in Check

Greek yogurt is chock full of iodine. Iodine is important for proper thyroid function, and the thyroid is essential for healthy metabolism.“People today tend to be iodine deficient, which can cause serious problems, including rapid fluctuations in weight,” Griffin says. “For people with weight problems, increasing iodine levels in their diet increases the thyroid’s activity and in turn increases their metabolism promoting weight loss.”

7. Calcium Is Key to Keeping Fit

Another benefit of Greek yogurt that is key both to weight loss and your overall health is its high calcium content. Calcium has been linked to regulation of the body’s cortisol output, Griffin says. “Elevated levels of the hormone cortisol can cause the body to store fat, inhibiting weight loss or other health goals.” “By incorporating more calcium into your diet, you can partially limit fat production in the body.”

8. The Sliminess Factor

Even though Greek yogurt is thicker than regular yogurt, and therefore not so “slimy,” some people still don’t care for the consistency. One way around that is to incorporate the yogurt into a smoothie drink. Alternately, you can use it as a topping on other foods. “Use it as a substitute for sour cream on top of chili or baked potatoes,” suggests Rumsey. You could also make your own popsicles at home by freezing Greek yogurt with fresh fruit.

Source:  8 Ways Greek Yogurt Benefits Your Health – Healthline
Copyright: Healthline.com
Author: David Heitz
Источник: https://www.yogurtinnutrition.com/8-ways-greek-yogurt-benefits-health/

Learn how to estimate added sugars in yogurt. Post also includes a chart of estimated added sugars for three popular brands sold in the United States.

How Much Added Sugar is in Yogurt?

Many yogurt lovers have bemoaned the loss of innocence when they take a look at the food label of their favorite yogurt and discover that the sugar content looks alarmingly high. But those sugar grams may or may not include added sugars.

Plain unflavored yogurt typically has no added sugar. This is true for regular or Greek style, nonfat or full fat yogurt. The sugar in plain unflavored yogurt is naturally occurring lactose sugar from milk, the primary starting ingredient.

Greek style yogurt typically has less lactose and calcium but more total protein compared to regular yogurt. This is due to how Greek style yogurt is made - there is more straining and a greater loss of whey. And for those of who are worried about lactose intolerance, the lactose is not exactly intact by the time it reaches your gut. Certain species of bacteria are added to milk to ferment the lactose sugar. Fermentation causes lactose content to decrease while lactic acid increases - and that in turn gives us the distinctive tangy tart flavor and pleasant thickened texture.

Why Care About Added Sugars?

The American Heart Association published a scientific statement entitled, "Dietary Sugars Intake and Cardiovascular Health" with the recommendation that people limit added sugars intake in an effort to help curb the obesity epidemic as well as lessen the risk of cardiovascular disease. The recommendation boils down to a daily intake of not more than:
Men: 9 teaspoons (38 grams) or less of added sugar
Women: 6 teaspoons (25 grams) or less of added sugar

Added Sugars in Yogurt?

Unfortunately, food labels still list total sugars - they do not identify the amount of added sugars. But here are some tips to help you estimate how much sugar is added to your favorite yogurt.

Quick Estimation of Added Sugars

# sugar grams in flavored type - # sugar grams in the plain of same type and serving size

Tip: To calculate number of teaspoons, simply divide sugars by 4. There are 4 grams sugar per teaspoon.

What's confusing is that plain yogurt and flavored yogurts are often sold with different serving sizes. So I decided to do the math for you. I collected data from the websites of three top selling yogurt brands in the United States: Yoplait, Chobani, and Dannon. I limited analysis to just nonfat versions of regular and Greek style yogurts since their sugar content is nearly identical to their higher fat versions. For fruit flavors, I chose blueberry. If that flavor was not offered, I used strawberry instead as these two flavors were typically identical in sugar content. Typically, flavors had the same nutrient profile within a product line. See two charts below - the first sorted is flavored greek yogurt good for you estimated added sugars per ounce of yogurt so you can compare added sugar content most easily, and the second sorted by estimated added sugars by single serving size.

Yogurt Sorted by Added Sugars per Ounce of Yogurt

Estimated added sugars / oz of yogurtYogurt TypeSugars / containerEstimated added sugars / container
0 gramsChobani Blended Non-Fat Plain Greek Yogurt 5.3 oz (150g) container4 grams0 gram
0 gramsDannon Oikos Plain Greek Yogurt (nonfat and lowfat) 5.3 oz (150g) container6 grams0 grams
0 gramsYoplait Greek 100 Calories Plain Yogurt, 1 cup (225g) container6 g / 225g
4 g / 150g
0 grams
0 gramsDannon All Natural Plain Nonfat Yogurt 6 oz (170g) container12 grams0 grams
0.2 gramsDannon Oikos Triple Zero Strawberry Greek Yogurt 5.3 oz (150g) container7 grams1 gram
0.2 gramsYoplait Light Blueberry Patch Yogurt* 6 oz (170g) container10 grams1 gram*
0.8 gramsChobani Simply 100 Blueberry Yogurt 5.3 oz (150g) container8 grams4 grams
0.9 gramsYoplait Greek 100 Strawberry Yogurt 5.3 oz (150g) container9 grams5 grams
1.5 gramsYoplait Original Strawberry Yogurt* 6oz (170g) container18 grams9 grams
2 gramsChobani Blueberry on the Bottom Greek Yogurt walmart money card number oz (150g) container15 grams11 grams
2 gramsDannon Fruit on the Bottom Blueberry Yogurt - 6 oz (170g) container24 grams12 grams
2.4 gramsDannon Oikos Blueberry Greek Nonfat Yogurt 5.3 oz (150g) container19 grams13 grams
2.6 gramsYoplait Blueberry Greek Yogurt 5.3 oz (150g) container18 grams14 grams

Yogurt Sorted by Added Sugars per Single Size Container

*Used 9g lactose per 6 oz yogurt for the regular Yoplait yogurt estimate - this would be equivalent to the starting milk lactose load.
Estimated added sugars / containerYogurt TypeSugars / container
0 gramChobani Blended Non-Fat Plain Greek Yogurt 5.3 oz (150g) container4 grams
0 gramsYoplait Greek 100 Calories Plain Yogurt, 1 cup (225g)6 grams/225g
4 grams/150g
0 gramsDannon Oikos Plain Greek Yogurt (nonfat and lowfat) 5.3 oz (150g) container6 grams
0 gramsDannon All Natural Plain Nonfat Yogurt 6 oz (170g) container12 grams
1 gramDannon Oikos Triple Zero Strawberry Greek Yogurt 5.3 oz (150g) container7 grams
1 gram*Yoplait Light Blueberry Patch Yogurt* 6 oz (170g) container10 grams
4 gramsChobani Simply 100 Blueberry Yogurt 5.3 oz (150g) container8 grams
5 gramsYoplait Greek 100 Strawberry Yogurt 5.3 oz (150g) container9 grams
9 gramsYoplait Original Strawberry Yogurt* 6oz (170g) container18 grams
11 gramsChobani Blueberry on the Bottom Greek Yogurt 5.3 oz (150g) container15 grams
12 gramsDannon Fruit on the Bottom Blueberry Yogurt - 6 oz (170g) container24 grams
13 gramsDannon Oikos Blueberry Greek Nonfat Yogurt 5.3 oz (150g) container19 grams
14 gramsYoplait Blueberry Greek Yogurt 5.3 oz (150g) container18 grams
*Used 9g lactose per 6 oz yogurt for the regular Yoplait yogurt estimate - this would be equivalent to the starting milk lactose load.

Yogurts Lowest in Added Sugars

. If you want a snack that has 0 grams of added sugar, use plain unflavored yogurt (Greek or regular style) and add your own fresh fruit. If you add honey or syrup, you need to count that as added sugar.

. If you want the convenience of a single-serve flavored container of yogurt with the lowest amount of added sugars, then choose a 100-calorie style Greek yogurt or a light regular yogurt. However, these choices all use some form of non-caloric sweetener. Yoplait uses sucralose and acesulfame potassium whereas Chobani and Dannon use Stevia to get the sweet taste. The lowest in added sugar while also being highest in protein goes to Dannon Oikos Triple Zero Greek Yogurt with 1 gram added sugar (my estimate but Dannon markets this as 0 grams of added sugar) and 15 grams protein.

If you are curious as to how sugary some yogurt styles can be, I urge you to browse the yogurt product lines in your local supermarket. For the three brands in this post, I found that Chobani Flip and Dannon's Caramel or Chocolate on Top product lines contained an estimated 25 grams (6 teaspoons) of added sugars per serving - the maximum recommended limit for women. Yikes!

Resources

Visit the American Heart Association's Added Sugars webpage for more information. If you enjoy listening to podcasts, then check out Walk Talk Nutrition's "The Colossal Nuisance of Added Sugars." If you want to learn how to make yogurt, then read Scientific American's Semisolid Science: Growing Yogurt. Enjoy!

Foods & Recipes->Dairy FoodsNutrients->"Carbs: Fiber, Starch, & Sugar"Weight Loss->Sugars & Sweeteners

May 7, 2015

Источник: https://www.mynetdiary.com/how-much-added-sugar-is-in-yogurt.html

Is flavored greek yogurt good for you -

Health-conscious Americans have long touted the benefits of yogurt. But now many who once turned their noses up at yogurt are embracing the Greek way. Few foods pack as healthy a punch in such small serving sizes as Greek yogurt. A bowl of Greek yogurt can keep you fortified with essential nutrients and even help you lose weight. For many Greek yogurt lovers, the richer texture is also a big sell. Greek yogurt is made by separating out the liquid whey, explains Alissa Rumsey, a registered dietitian and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “This results in a thicker texture with fewer carbohydrates and sugar, and more protein the regular yogurt,” she says.

1. The Power of Protein

Protein is essential for good health. It is vital to cell growth, building muscle, and repairing tissue. As you age, you need more protein to keep your skin healthy and to fight off illness. Greek yogurt is a great way to boost your protein levels while avoiding heavy foods like meats.“Have it for breakfast and add in a handful of walnuts and blueberries,” Rumsey says. “Use it as a substitute for sour cream on top of chili or baked potatoes.”

2. Probiotics Keep You Regular

Greek yogurt is packed with probiotics. These are microorganisms such as bacteria and yeast. These normally live in your intestines, and having good microorganisms in your intestines helps keep you healthy, says Shane Griffin, a certified nutritional practitioner and founder of Whole Life Balance. “Without a healthy balance of good bacteria from probiotics, too much bad bacteria can build up and cause damage to our immune systems,” Griffin says. Probiotics are great for the digestive system, and especially helpful to people who suffer from conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, he adds.

3. Get Your B12 Here!

Vitamin B12 is necessary for energy and healthy brain function, and Greek yogurt is full of it. “Many choose to supplement vitamin B12 into their diet, but Greek yogurt offers a powerful, natural alternative,” Griffin says. Vegetarians are often deficient in B12 because it generally is found in meats, so Greek yogurt is an excellent, meat-free way to add more to your diet.

4. Potassium Balances Out Sodium

Most Americans have way too much sodium in their diet. Not only is Greek yogurt low in sodium, it is also high in potassium.What does one have to do with the other? “Think of this scenario like it is a teeter-totter,” advises Griffin. “There must be a proper balance between sodium and potassium in the body, and Greek yogurt can help you maintain the correct proportions.”

5. A Workout Recovery Food

Greek yogurt can be a healthy and satisfying treat after a tough workout. Not only will it tide you over until your next meal, but it actually contains protein that can repair damage done by exercise. “Greek yogurt is rich in the amino acids which make up proteins, and proteins are the building blocks for regenerating muscle tissue and repairing fiber damage,” explains Griffin. Add a banana or some berries for a nutrition-packed post workout snack.

6. Iodine Keeps Your Waist in Check

Greek yogurt is chock full of iodine. Iodine is important for proper thyroid function, and the thyroid is essential for healthy metabolism.“People today tend to be iodine deficient, which can cause serious problems, including rapid fluctuations in weight,” Griffin says. “For people with weight problems, increasing iodine levels in their diet increases the thyroid’s activity and in turn increases their metabolism promoting weight loss.”

7. Calcium Is Key to Keeping Fit

Another benefit of Greek yogurt that is key both to weight loss and your overall health is its high calcium content. Calcium has been linked to regulation of the body’s cortisol output, Griffin says. “Elevated levels of the hormone cortisol can cause the body to store fat, inhibiting weight loss or other health goals.” “By incorporating more calcium into your diet, you can partially limit fat production in the body.”

8. The Sliminess Factor

Even though Greek yogurt is thicker than regular yogurt, and therefore not so “slimy,” some people still don’t care for the consistency. One way around that is to incorporate the yogurt into a smoothie drink. Alternately, you can use it as a topping on other foods. “Use it as a substitute for sour cream on top of chili or baked potatoes,” suggests Rumsey. You could also make your own popsicles at home by freezing Greek yogurt with fresh fruit.

Source:  8 Ways Greek Yogurt Benefits Your Health – Healthline
Copyright: Healthline.com
Author: David Heitz
Источник: https://www.yogurtinnutrition.com/8-ways-greek-yogurt-benefits-health/

Yogurts

yoggroup465x280.jpg

What's in your pot?

According to consumer research, the UK population spends a staggering 1.7 billion a year on yogurt and fromage frais.

With an ever-increasing range of yogurt varieties on offer, it can be difficult to work out why one variety may be more or less healthy than another.

Here at Enjoy Food, we thought it was about time we took a closer look at this popular product and find out what exactly is in those pots…

The good news

Yogurt provides many health benefits. Made with milk, it contains protein and calcium needed for healthy bones and teeth. Some yogurts also have added vitamin D, which helps our body to absorb calcium. It’s also good to know that low-fat yogurts have just as much calcium as the full-fat versions.

Some research even suggests that eating yogurt can help you to feel fuller, which may make it easier to manage your weight.

As well as a useful portable snack, or instant pudding when you fancy a sweet fix, plain, natural, or greek yogurt can be used as a topping on fruit and desserts instead of cream, in smoothies, or in cooking. 

blueberryyog465x280.jpg

Spotlight on sugar

As with most manufactured food products, you need to take a step back from the marketing hype and take a closer look at the food label, to check whether that innocent looking pot is as healthy as it seems.

Many yogurts, particularly the ones aimed at children, are crammed full of the ‘free sugars’ we all need to cut back on.

Looking at the label, the carbohydrate ‘of which sugars’ provides useful information. An amount in grams (g) will be given.

Spotting 'free sugars'

This figure includes sugars which come naturally from the milk used to make the yogurt, known as ‘lactose’, as well as any sugar added to the yogurt, ie ‘free sugars’, and sugar that comes naturally from any fruit or fruit puree that has been used to make the product.

As a general rule, in any 100g of yogurt, the first 5g of sugar listed is the milk sugar (lactose) found naturally in the milk used to make the yogurt. Lactose is not a 'free sugar'.

If sugar is second or third on the ingredients list, you know that a lot has been added as the order of ingredients is dictated by the quantity present. Other forms of sugar that you may see added include fructose, dextrose, glucose, fructose syrup, and honey.

garlicyog465x280.jpg

If you carb count, it’s the total amount of carbs that you need to count.

By looking at the ‘of which sugars,’ together with the ingredients list, you can gain a fairly accurate picture of the amount of sugar added, especially if you remember that the first 5g of any 100g of yogurt is generally a result of the lactose in milk.

Added fruit is sometimes listed as a percentage. If it is a long way down the ingredient list, it means that very little has been added. Generally, more expensive yogurts have the most fruit added.


Popular yogurts

Below is the nutritional information for 10 everyday yogurts so you can see how they perform...

*These nutritional values were accurate at the time of publication, but some of these values may have changed. Please check the food labels for the latest nutritional information.

Muller Light – Strawberry

Per 100gPer 175g serving
Calories5189
Carbs7.813.7
Sugar7.112.4
Fat0.10.18
Saturated fat0.10.18
Salt0.20.35

Danone Light & Free – Blueberry Burst

Per 100gPer 115g serving
Calories5058
Carbs7.18.2
Sugar6.47.3
Fat0.10.1
Saturated fat<0.1<0.1
Salt0.20.23

Liberté 0% – Natural

Per 100gPer 125g serving
Calories5872.5
Carbs3.64.5
Sugar3.64.5
Fat0.10.13
Saturated fat<0.1<0.1
Salt0.140.18

Danone Activia 0% Fat – Peach

Per 100gPer 125g serving
Calories5872.5
Carbs3.64.5
Sugar3.64.5
Fat0.10.13
Saturated fat<0.1<0.1
Salt0.140.18

Skyr Fat Free – Simply Natural

Per 100gPer 150g serving
Calories6598
Carbs46
Sugar46
Fat0.20.3
Saturated fat0.10.1
Salt0.140.21

Nestle Ski Smooth – Strawberry

Per 100gPer 120g serving
Calories94114
Carbs13.616.3
Sugar13.215.8
Fat2.73.3
Saturated fat1.82.1
Salt0.10.3

Yeo Valley – Natural

Per 100gPer 120g serving
Calories8298.4
Carbs6.57.8
Sugar6.57.8
Fat4.25
Saturated fat2.73.4
Salt0.180.22

Alpro Soya – Simply Plain

Per 100gPer 120g serving
Calories5060
Carbs2.12.5
Sugar2.12.5
Fat2.32.8
Saturated fat0.40.48
Salt0.250.26

Rachel's Organic Greek Style – Natural

Per 100gPer 120g serving
Calories109131
Carbs56
Sugar56
Fat8.310
Saturated fat5.26.2
Salt0.10.12

Sainsbury's Low-Fat Greek Style – Natural

Per 100gPer 120g serving
Calories7590
Carbs7.18.5
Sugar7.18.5
Fat2.73.2
Saturated fat1.72
Salt0.20.24

The findings

We’ve used the governments’ colour coding front-of-pack scheme so that you can see whether the amount in each yogurt is high (red), medium (amber) or low (green). As you can see, they are all coded green or amber for sugar, fat, and salt. One was coded red for saturated fat, probably because whole (blue top) milk  is used in the recipe. However, this brand’s range also offers lower fat and saturated alternatives.

childyog465x280.jpgThough many of the yogurts had no added sugar, a few did, with sugar and fructose listed in the ingredients list.

Artificial sweeteners such as sucralose, acesulfame K, and aspartame were added to a few of the yogurts to sweeten them. These are not counted as ‘free sugars’ and provide neglible amounts of cals and carbs.

Childrens' yogurts

Yogurts can be a useful snack to pop into your kids' lunch boxes, or to enjoy at work or home as part of a healthy, balanced diet.

It pays to check the label rather than be blinded by the marketing hype, especially if you carb count. 


Kids' yogurt nutritional information

Muller Kids Corner Butterflies

Carbohydrate per 100 g = 19.8g and per 135 g pot = 26.7g

Carbohydrate ‘of which sugars’ per 100g = 17.3g and per 135g pot = 23.3g

Munch Bunch – Strawberry and Vanilla

Carbohydrate per 100 g = 13.9g and per 85g pot = 13.4g

Carbohydrate ‘of which sugars’ per 100g = 11.8g and per 85g pot = 11.4g

Petits Filous Magic Squares – Raspberry/Vanilla

Carbohydrate per 100g = 13g and per 80g pot = 10.4g

Carbohydrate ‘of which sugars’ per 100g = 12.4g and per 80g pot = 9.9g

Muller Kids Corner Blast Off

Carbohydrate per 100g = 19.8g and per 135g pot = 26.7g

Carbohydrate ‘of which sugars’ per 100g = 16.4g and per 135g pot = 22.1g

Yoplait – Strawberry and Raspberry

Carbohydrate per 100g = 13.3g and per 70g pot = 9.4g

Carbohydrate ‘of which sugars’ per 100g = 13.2 g and per 70g pot = 9.4g

Remember to check the ingredients listed above before purchasing a yogurt for your child. Different yogurts can vary considerably and some offer far healthier options than others.

And finally...

With entire supermarket aisles, and pages and pages of online shopping sites dedicated to yogurts, you’re bound to find one you enjoy. Or, why not experiment and add your own delicious toppings and fruits to natural or greek yogurt for your very own unique flavour?

Much more than yogurts…

Want to find out more about healthy eating and diabetes management? Sign up to our free, monthlyEnjoy Food e-newsletter.

Источник: https://www.diabetes.org.uk/guide-to-diabetes/enjoy-food/eating-with-diabetes/diabetes-food-myths/yogurts

You’ve probably noticed that your options in the yogurt aisle have ballooned in recent years. Greek, skyr, goat, coconut—the varieties of cultured dairy seem endless. Now, you can add quark to the fold. Not quite cheese and not quite yogurt, quark is slowly gaining popularity as a viable yogurt (or cottage cheese or cream cheese) substitute.

While it may be a relatively new addition to American supermarkets, it has long been a staple in German households. So, should you ditch your beloved extra-thick Greek yogurt for this dairy import? Here’s everything you need to know.

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What Exactly Is Quark?

Quark is a tricky food to pin down: Is it cheese? Is it yogurt? Is it something physicists study? Technically, quark is a soft, spreadable cheese. However, because of its creamy texture, it’s more often compared to a thick yogurt, similar to Greek or skyr. It’s also often likened to cottage cheese, however, it lacks the lumpy texture.

To make quark, milk that has been soured via the addition of acid is warmed until it curdles and then is strained before bacterial strains are added to ferment the lactose further. Next, it’s continuously stirred to prevent hardening and to give quark its signature thick and smooth texture (and, hence, the creamy goodness).

As for its flavor, it can be best described as mild and neither sweet nor sour, meaning it lacks the tangy aftertaste of yogurt. So if you’re not a fan of yogurt unless it’s smothered in honey to tame its sour power, quark just might be the stuff for you.

The Nutritional Benefits of Quark for Cyclists

Nutritionally, quark has several highlights.

One serving—1 cup—of 4 percent fat plain quark contains about the following:

  • 120 calories
  • 14 g of protein
  • 5 g fat
  • 5 g saturated fat
  • 5 g of carbs
  • 0 g of dietary fiber
  • 60 mg sodium
  • 182 mg calcium

One serving—1 cup—of 0 percent fat plain quark contains about the following:

  • 90 calories
  • 17 g of protein
  • 0 g fat
  • 0 g saturated fat
  • 6 g of carbs
  • 0 g of dietary fiber
  • 60 mg sodium
  • 201 mg calcium

It’s worth noting from the start that quark is in the same ballpark when it comes to protein content as Greek yogurt or skyr (levels vary by brand). And it’s not just any lightweight protein.

“It contains all the essential amino acids, including leucine—a branched-chain amino acid—that helps muscle protein synthesis,” says sports dietitian Lori Russell, M.S. R.D. C.S.S.D., owner of Hungry for Results.

Russell notes that it can be a great protein-packed snack option or a way for vegetarian meals to get a boost of this macronutrient. Since research shows that the body can utilize up to 30 grams of protein after a bout of endurance exercise to maximize the rate of muscle protein synthesis (i.e. muscle building), the high protein content of quark also makes it a good food choice after a hard ride to help repair your muscles.

Being a fermented product, quark can help boost your gut health with a resupply of beneficial bacteria.

“Having a healthy and diverse gut microbiome definitely brings with it some performance-enhancing benefits,” Russell says.

For instance, frequent consumption of probiotics may lessen the chances of suffering GI distress during prolonged exercise, and according to a study in the journal Nutrients, it could help athletes ramp their immunity up so you’re less likely to be sidelined by the sniffles.

One study found that higher intakes of fermented milk products can assist in lowering blood pressure numbers, which, in turn, helps fend off hypertension. With this said, we still don’t know if the strains of bacteria in quark have the same health impacts as those present in yogurt, kefir, kimchi, and other fermented foods and drinks.

As a nutrient-dense product, quark contains various amounts of bone-benefiting calcium, vitamin A, vitamin D, and B vitamins, all of which can help contribute to the heightened nutrient needs of anyone who puts in some serious saddle time.

There’s no need to choose fat-free quark over that made from whole milk. An ever-expanding pile of research papers are serving to roll back the idea that we need to steer clear of full-fat dairy, like 4 percent quark. For instance, an investigation in the journal Circulation discovered those who had higher circulating blood levels of fats associated with dairy intake, on average, had a 46 percent lower risk of developing diabetes over a 15-year period than those with lower levels.

A recent University of Texas study reported that the substitution of 2 percent of daily calorie intake from meat-based saturated fat with calories from dairy-based saturated fat was associated with a 25 percent lower heart disease risk in 5,209 people over a decade.

And, despite the few extra calories it introduces to your diet, there is emerging evidence that the fat in dairy may help—not hurt—your waistline. It might be that the unique makeup of the type of fats in dairy has less harmful (and even beneficial) effects on the body.

“Fat in dairy like quark is not to be feared, but which option an athlete chooses depends on their overall diet and caloric needs,” Russell says. “If an athlete is consuming quark for a snack, having more fat will provide added satiety and fullness, but if it is part of a meal that contains other healthy fats such as avocado and almonds, a lower fat option might be best.”

If your stomach is not a fan of lactose—a naturally occurring sugar in dairy—Russell says that quark might be tolerated since the fermentation process makes it lower in lactose than milk so that it’s easier to digest. However, individual tolerances can vary, so some testing is needed to determine if any unpleasant side effects surface after smearing some quark on your toast.

It probably should come as no surprise that versions of quark on American store shelves are now being pumped full of added sugars. A serving of berry-flavored quark can contain upwards of 10 grams of added sweet stuff. So to keep your sugar intake in check, opt for plain flavored versions most often and save any sugary flavored types for spooning up after a spirited ride when your body can make better use of these fast-digesting carb calories for recovery purposes.

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How Should You Incorporate Quark into Your Diet?

“Think of quark as a mix between Greek yogurt and cottage cheese, so any way you enjoy those items, you can enjoy quark,” advises Russell. And, since the flavor is mild, you can go savory or sweet.

One of the most straightforward ways is to spoon it up for a snack like you would yogurt; perhaps topped with chopped nuts, granola, or fruit. But the possibilities are nearly endless: Blend it into smoothies and dips, whisk into dressings for a creamy salad topper, spoon dollops on baked potatoes, tacos, pancakes, or even pizza, use in muffin batters, stir into tuna salad in place of mayo, use as a base for parfaits, or smear on toast or a bagel followed by your favorite sweet or savory toppings like sliced pear or smoked salmon.

The Bottom Line

It’s always fun to try new foods, and if your taste buds don’t love the tang of yogurt then quark could be a good (and nutritious) addition to your shopping cart. But if you are already satisfied with the dairy options in your daily menu and eat a predominantly whole- food diet, then missing out on quark won’t hinder your health and nutrition.

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Источник: https://www.bicycling.com/health-nutrition/a33824856/what-is-quark/

Is Fruit on the Bottom of Yogurt High in Sugar?

By Carly Schuna

Yogurt can be made from lactose-free milk alternatives, including healthful coconut milk.

Fruity yogurt makes a tasty and convenient snack. Its creamy texture and sweetness almost liken it to a dessert. Whether it’s flavored naturally or artificially, yogurt with fruit on the bottom is typically very high in sugar, which also boosts its total calorie count. You might want to reconsider eating this kind of yogurt if you are monitoring your sugar and calorie intake.

Nutrition Facts

Due to its sugar content, low-fat or non fat yogurt with fruit on the bottom tends to contain more calories per serving than even full-fat yogurt. One cup of plain, full-fat yogurt contains approximately 149 calories, 8 grams of protein, 8 fat grams, 296 milligrams of calcium and 11 grams of sugar. While the sugar in plain yogurt is natural and not added, that’s not always the case with yogurt with fruit on the bottom. One cup of mixed berry fruit on the bottom yogurt has about 200 calories, 8 grams of protein, 2 fat grams, 265 milligrams of calcium and 36 grams of sugar.

Putting It in Perspective

Most people don’t think about sugar in terms of how many grams they’re eating. but guidelines regarding sugar intake could help with that. The American Heart Association recommends that adult women consume no more than 6 teaspoons of added sugar daily and that adult men have no more than 9 teaspoons. Because every type of fruit contains some natural sugar, it doesn’t count toward those suggested amounts concerning daily added sugar. For perspective, a medium banana has 14.5 grams of sugar, and a cup of strawberries has 8 grams.

So What?

Eating fruit on the bottom yogurt and other foods that are high in added sugar may not seem so bad, especially if they’re not raising your total calorie intake for the day. But all that added sugar comes with health risks. Dietitian Jennifer Nelson of the Mayo Clinic suggests that eating a diet that’s high in fructose might promote fat storage in the body over time. Additionally, exceeding recommended limits for added sugar intake may increase your triglyceride levels, which could raise the risk of heart disease.

Considerations

Making fruit on the bottom yogurt an occasional snack isn’t likely to wreck a healthy diet or cause any damage in the long term. If you eat it on a daily basis, however, you may want to take stock of how much added sugar you’re consuming and consider making some changes to your diet. To enjoy a similar taste with less refined sugar, layer fresh berries and plain nonfat yogurt into a parfait glass and top them with a drizzle of honey for extra sweetness.

References

Writer Bio

Carly Schuna is a Wisconsin-based professional writer, editor and copy editor/proofreader. She has worked with hundreds of pieces of fiction, nonfiction, children's literature, feature stories and corporate content. Her expertise on food, cooking, nutrition and fitness information comes from a Level 1 personal training certification and years of in-depth study.

Источник: https://healthyeating.sfgate.com/fruit-bottom-yogurt-high-sugar-6562.html

Healthiest yogurts: The healthiest yogurt brand and worst revealed

  • We earn a commission for products purchased through some links in this article.

  • Finding the healthiest yogurts is a difficult task, as many of the most famous brands come complete with hidden sugars and additives. 

    Yogurts are already a staple in most people’s kitchens, as much like healthy cereal, they’re a quick and easy go-to for low-calorie breakfasts, dessert and afternoon snacks. But the debate around yogurt, everything from whether Greek yogurt is actually good for you to whether frozen yogurt is a good replacement for ice cream, carries on as myths around the food seem to be created and debunked almost every day.

    To figure out the healthiest yogurts, we’ve ranked 17 different yogurts from best to worst. These rankings are based on the yogurts’ nutritional values per 100g, looking particularly at calories, sugar and salt content. Particularly high or low values are spotlighted throughout, so you can pick the yogurt that works best for you.

    Healthiest yogurts at a glance

    The healthiest yogurt overall is St Helen’s Farm Low Fat Goats Milk Yogurt. As well as having the lowest sugar content of all the yogurts we evaluated, it also has the second lowest calorie count (by only 2 calories). It also scores well in fat and saturated fat as it only has trace amounts.

    Best yogurt overall: St Helen’s Farm Low Fat Goats Milk Yogurt

    Best yogurt for sugar content: St Helen’s Farm Low Fat Goats Milk Yogurt

    Best yogurt for saturated fat content: Danone Light and Free Greek Style Peach Passion Fruit Yogurt

    Muller Crunch Corner Toffee Hoops comes in as our least healthiest yogurt overall. With 16.8g of sugar per portion, it also has the highest calorie content of all the yogurts we reviewed.

    Worst yogurt overall: Muller Crunch Corner Toffee Hoops

    Worst yogurt for sugar content: Total Greek 0% Fat Free Yogurt with Honey

    Worst yogurt for saturated fat content: Perle de Lait Coconut Yoghurt

    With the help of nutritionist Dr Sana Khan, we’ve compared different varieties of yogurt ranging from kids’ favourites like Munch Bunch and Petits Filous, well-known healthy yogurt brands like Onken and Danone, to other favourites like Greek yogurt, so you know which healthiest yogurts to bulk buy and those to leave on the shelf.

    Healthiest yogurt with oats and blueberries

    Credit: Getty

    Dr Sana Khan says, “Yoghurt is a great source of protein but I would recommend the ones that are not packed with sugar. The one rated the best here is the probiotic goats milk yoghurt, which is live and has less sugar. It contains just 3.1g sugar per serving and also contains live bacteria which may help improve your gut health.”

    For an all round healthy breakfast, opt for a low-calorie Weetabix and a dollop of St Helen’s Farm Low Fat Goats Milk Yogurt.

    Healthiest yoghurts ranked from best to worst

    Healthiest yogurt overall and lowest in sugar: St Helen’s Farm Low Fat Goats Milk Yogurt

    St Helen’s Farm Low Fat Goats Milk Yogurt, the healthiest yogurt

    Credit: Ocado

    Rating for calorie-counters: 8.5/10
    Calories: 47kcal per 100g
    Fat: 0.3g
    Saturated Fat: 0.2g
    Sugar: 3.9g
    Salt: 0.2g
    Price: £2.40 for 450g from Tesco

    Verdict: Cow’s milk doesn’t necessarily agree with everyone’s skin and digestion, but nut milks (cashew, almond, coconut) can be expensive. Goats’ milk, however is relatively easy to find and easier on the purse, plus it’s not as allergenic at cow’s milk. St Helen’s Farm specialises in it and the yogurts are delicious. Plus they’re pretty good for us too. Two scoops of this with some berries in the morning and you’ll be ready for anything.

    Dr Sana Khan says, “Goats milk generally can be better tolerated by our GI system. This yogurt also contains probiotic cultures.”

    Rachel’s Greek Style Natural Yoghurt

    Rachel's Organic Greek Style yogurt

    Credit: Sainsbury’s

    Rating for calorie-counters: 7/10
    Calories: 109kcal per 100g
    Fat: 8.3g
    Saturated Fat: 5.2g
    Sugar: 5.0g
    Salt: 0.1g
    Price: £1.30 for 450g at Sainsbury’s

    Verdict: While Rachel’s contains a rather sizeable amount of fat, it has a much lower quantity of sugar than many of the other yoghurts available.

    Dr Sana Khan says, “This yogurt is great for a snack as it helps support blood sugar levels. It’s not packed full of sugar and does contain some fat. You can add a portion of fresh fruit to this if you wish.”

    Yeo Valley Organic Natural Probiotic Yogurt

    Yeo Valley Organic Natural Probiotic Yogurt

    Credit: Yeo Valley

    Rating for calorie-counters: 8/10
    Calories: 82kcal per 100g
    Fat: 4.5g
    Saturated Fat: 2.9g
    Sugar: 5.6g
    Salt: 0.13g
    Price: £2.80 for 1kg at Tesco

    Verdict: Yeo Valley is almost as famous for its advert as it is for its yogurt. As nutritional ratings go, this is fairly middle of the road. It’s not particularly high in calories, fat or sugar as long as you’re strict on enjoying 100g only per serving. The range of flavours also makes this brand an all-round winner with the whole family.

    Dr Sana Khan says, “This yogurt contains gut health supporting live bacteria! With plain yoghurt options you have the option of adding fruit to it to make it more filling and nutrient dense. The fruit flavoured options already have a lot of sugar to start off with so don’t recommend adding fruit to it.”

    Danone Actimel Strawberry Drink

    Actimel yogurts

    Credit: Getty

    Rating for calorie-counters: 7/10
    Calories: 76 kcal per 100g
    Fat: 1.5 g
    Saturated Fat: 1.0 g
    Sugar: 12 g
    Salt: 0.10 g
    Price: £3.75 for 12 x 100g from Tesco

    Verdict: The famous Actimel yogurt, advertised mainly to increase gut health, is low in calories, fat and saturated fat but very high in sugar. So while it’s a good one for people exclusively counting calories, it’s important to consider the impact of the 12g of sugar on your daily intake.

    Best yogurt for low saturated fat: Danone Light and Free Greek Style Peach Passion Fruit Yogurt

    Danone Light and Free Greek Style Peach Passion Fruit Yogurt, one of the healthiest yogurts

    Credit: Sainsbury’s

    Rating for calorie-counters: 8/10
    Calories: 54 kcal per 100g
    Fat: 0.1g
    Saturated Fat: None
    Sugar: 6.2g
    Salt: 0.15g
    Price: £2 for 4 x 115g from Tesco 

    Verdict: With a low calorie count, low fat content, and super low amount of salt, the Danone Light & Free Peach and Passion Fruit yoghurt is one of the healthiest yoghurt choices you can make!

    Dr Sana Khan says, “This yogurt is low in fat, has a reasonable sugar content and is low in calories. The only concern is it may not be as filling as other yogurts with more fat content. It’s a good idea to add some flaxseeds or chia seeds on top otherwise you may be hungry again just an hour after consuming.”

    Alpro Soya Strawberry Yogurts

    Alpro Soya Strawberry Yogurts

    Credit: Tesco

    Rating for calorie-counters: 6/10
    Calories: 68 kcal per 100g
    Fat: 2.1 g
    Saturated Fat: 0.4 g
    Sugar: 7.9 g
    Salt: 0.23 g
    Price: £1.60 for 500g from Tesco

    Verdict: Soya is often considered a healthier alternative to fatty cow’s milk, however with 10g of sugar per 100g, Alpro’s soya yogurts aren’t as ‘healthy’ as we might have assumed. Saying this, they do taste incredible, we’d bet that even soya-phobes would enjoy one.

    Dr Sana Khan says, “Soya makes this yogurt vegan and vegetarian friendly and claims to have good probiotic strains added to it. However, sugar content is pretty high at 10g per serving.”

    Worst yogurt for saturated fat: Perle de Lait Coconut Yoghurt

    Perle de Lait, one of the least healthiest yogurts

    Credit: Sainsbury’s

    Rating for calorie-counters: 4/10
    Calories: 131kcal per 100g
    Fat: 8.7g
    Saturated Fat: 6.0g
    Sugar: 7.9g
    Salt: 0.12g
    Price: £1.50 for 4 pots at Sainsbury’s

    Verdict: With 163 calories, this is definitely one of the most calorific yogurts we tested – but that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s bad. Its sugar content isn’t as high as some of the more kid-focused offerings, but it’s still up there among the highest. So while it may be deliciously creamy, the Perle de Lait coconut might not be the best choice if you’re after a healthy snack.

    Dr Sana Khan says, “Sugar content is slightly less here which makes this an average option.”

    Waitrose Natural Fat Free Fromage Frais

    Waitrose Natural Fat Free Fromage Frais

    Credit: Waitrose

    Rating for calorie-counters: 8/10
    Calories: 50kcal per 100g
    Fat: 0.1g
    Saturated Fat: 0.1g
    Sugar: 4.2g
    Salt: 0.09g
    Price: £1.20 for 500g from Waitrose

    Verdict: This creamy Waitrose yoghurt has one of the lowest calorie counts of the lot, and very low amounts of fat and salt, making it one of the most healthiest yogurts available! It does have a significant amount of sugar however that you should be aware of.

    Dr Sana Khan says, “I like this fromage frais – it can be used over a salad, on top of fruit, or even by itself. It’s filling, protein dense and not sugar laden.”

    Best yogurt for low calories: Weight Watchers Summer Fruit Yogurts

    Weight Watchers Summer Fruit Yogurts

    Credit: Asda

    Rating for calorie-counters: 5/10
    Calories: 45kcal per 100g – lowest calorie count!
    Fat: 0.1g
    Saturated Fat: None
    Sugar: 5.5g
    Salt: 0.15g
    Price: £1 for 4 x 110g from Asda 

    Verdict: True to the name, has come out on top with these tasty yogurts. Whether you’re looking to battle lockdown weight gain or simply want to lose a couple of pounds, these healthy yogurts are a great choice for a mid-morning or healthy afternoon snack.

    Dr Sana Khan says, “Sugar content is quite high at 6.3g, even though the calories are on the lower end.”

    Worst yogurt overall: Muller Crunch Corner Toffee Hoops

    Muller Crunch Corner Toffee Hoops

    Credit: Tesco

    Rating for calorie-counters: 1/10
    Cal: 144kcal per 100g – highest calorie count!
    Fat: 5.2g
    Saturated Fat: 3.3g
    Sugar: 16.8g
    Salt: 0.18g
    Price: 50p for 130g pot from Tesco

    Verdict: We don’t know a family who doesn’t like Muller Crunch Corner yogurts. Unfortunately with the highest amount of calories and sugar, these aren’t the healthiest yogurt, so one to save for a special treat.

    Dr Sana Khan says, “Sugar laden, not so much yoghurt is often present in these Muller corners. “

    Onken Cherry Yogurt

    Onken Cherry Yogurt

    Credit: Tesco

    Rating for calorie-counters: 5/10
    Calories: 100kcal per 100g
    Fat: 2.7g
    Saturated Fat: 1.7g
    Sugar: 13g
    Salt: 0.22g
    Price: £1.30 for 450g from Tesco

    Verdict: For flavour, this is without a doubt one of our favourite yogurts. However the calorie and sugar levels could leave a sour taste for those looking to lose weight. Rather than avoiding this altogether, we’ve been enjoying it on a Sunday morning as more of a treat than our usual healthy yogurt.

    Spelga low fat bio yogurt

    Credit: Sainsbury’s

    Rating for calorie-counter: 4/10
    Calories: 93kcal per 100g
    Fat: 1.7g
    Saturated Fat: 1.1g
    Sugar: 13.0g
    Salt: 0.10g
    Price: 50p for 120g from Sainsbury’s – cheapest yogurt!

    Verdict: While this yogurt pot is light on your purse, it might not help you lose as weight as fast as you’d like to due to the high levels of sugar. If you’re trying to budget don’t be deterred completely, just try to eat smaller quantities and mix with fresh fruit like blueberries.

    Dr Sana Khan says, “Terms such as low fat and peach can falsify that this is a great weight loss healthy option. But this isn’t the case as the sugar content is not exactly low (13g per 100g).”

    Worst yogurt for sugar content: Total Greek 0% Fat Free Yogurt with Honey

    Total Greek 0% Fat Free Yogurt with Honey

    Credit: Tesco

    Rating for calorie-counters: 2/10
    Calories: 106 kcal per 100g
    Fat: None
    Saturated Fat: None
    Sugar: 18.8g – highest sugar amount!
    Salt: 0.08g
    Price: £1 for 170g from Tesco

    Verdict: Despite containing only the tiniest trace of fat and saturated fat as it’s aptly named, Total Greek 0% Fat Free Yogurt with Honey has the highest amount of sugar in the seventeen yogurts we tested. However, Total is high in protein, so you’ll probably find it’ll satisfy you for longer than some other pots.

    Dr Sana Khan says, “The fat free aspect is quite misleading. Often when fat is removed, it is replaced by sugar as is in this case. Making something low in fat isn’t necessarily healthier and in this case will be more of a reason to result in an insulin surge meaning you are likely to crave for another sugar rich food a few hours later.”

    Danone Oykos Strawberry Yogurts

    Danone Oykos Strawberry Yogurts

    Credit: Tesco

    Rating for calorie-counters: 3/10
    Calories: 145kcal per 100g
    Fat: 8.2g
    Saturated Fat: 5.3g
    Sugar: 14.2g
    Salt: 0.13g
    Price: £2.00 for 4 pots x 110g at Tesco

    Verdict: Despite their fruit content, Danone aren’t the healthiest yogurts out there. Plus they’re not too friendly on the purse either. Save these for a once-in-a-while dessert, rather than a between-meal snack.

    Dr Sana Khan says, “These do contain quite a bit of sugar. There is a protein content and fat content combined, then this should not cause an insulin surge and therefore from a ‘diet’ perspective, it isn’t the worst choice in terms of blood sugar balance. However, the sugars and fat present are far from ideal. The ‘fruit’ aspect may falsify this being a ‘healthy’ option.”

    Wildlife Strawberry And Peach Fromage Frais

    Wildlife Strawberry And Peach Fromage Frais

    Credit: Tesco

    Rating for calorie-counters: 5/10
    Calories: 89kcal per 100g
    Fat: 2.4g
    Saturated Fat: 1.6g
    Sugar: 10.0g
    Salt: 0.13g
    Price: £2 for 18 pots x 45g at Tesco

    Verdict: These tasty little pots contain more sugar than you might expect so make sure they’re a treat rather than your regular go-to yogurt.

    Dr Sana Khan says, “Kiddi’s targeted but not ideal for kids or adults because sugar isn’t ideal. But what is good is the portion size is smaller, it’s definitely a cheaper option compared to some of the others, fat content is average and per serving the calories is 95.”

    Petits Filous Strawberry & Raspberry Fromage Frais

    Petits Filous

    Credit: Tesco

    Rating for calorie-counters: 5/10
    Calories: 86 kcal per 100g
    Fat: 2.4g
    Saturated Fat: 1.6g
    Sugar: 9.4g
    Salt: 0.12g
    Price: £1.50 for 6 x 47G from Tesco 

    Verdict: Who doesn’t love a mini pot of Petit Filous? While these yummy little pots aren’t the healthiest yogurts, they do have a high level of calcium and minimal salt content. If your little one is a fan, limit them to one pot every now and then rather than taking these yogurts out of their diet completely.

    Dr Sana Khan says, “Sometimes in my opinion, when yoghurts are packaged in smaller portions, they may be better for someone who can easily indulge in a large family sized pot. It can help with portion control for those who are on a ‘diet’.”

    Nestle Smarties Vanilla Split Pot Yogurt Dessert

    Nestle Smarties Vanilla Split Pot Yogurt Dessert

    Credit: Iceland

    Rating for calorie-counters: 2/10
    Calories: 135kcal per 100g
    Fat: 5.5g
    Saturated Fat: 3.4g
    Sugar: 14.8g
    Salt: 0.25g
    Price: £2 for 6 x 107g from Iceland

    Verdict: If you’re looking for a treat and need a little hit of chocolate, this yogurt it great. It’s definitely not one of the healthiest yogurts on the list but it also isn’t the worst.

    Dr Sana Khan says, “This yogurt is not necessarily the best or worst option. It does contain a whopping 15g of sugar, and the portion of yoghurt seems to be quite small therefore it isn’t ideal choice for kids or adults.”

    Источник: https://www.goodto.com/wellbeing/yogurt-best-and-worst-for-diet-30927
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