is organic coffee good for you

Organic coffee is certainly healthier than its conventional counterparts due to the fact that it's grown without health-harming pesticides. One is not necessarily cleaner, better for you, or better for the environment than the other. There are many factors that go into creating a. Organic farms also combat climate change by emitting less carbon than chemical farms, while also sequestering significant amounts of carbon. As.

Is organic coffee good for you -

Benefits of Drinking Organic Coffee

Coffee lovers, rejoice! There's no better time to be a caffeine fiend than the present day. With access to so many different beans from farms around the world, passionate brewers from all walks of life are experimenting with different blends in hopes of creating the perfect cup for every coffee drinker.

There are so many options, however, one of the biggest choices is also one of the broadest — do you pick traditional coffee or organic beans? Many coffee drinkers face this dilemma as they purchase their next bag of beans. When it comes to the organic coffee vs. regular coffee debate, people want to know if organic coffee is healthier or tastes better. Let's look at the organic coffee benefits and how those compare to the benefits of coffee grown and processed through standard methods.

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What Is Organic Coffee?

Walk through any grocery store and you'll surely find plenty of foods and drinks that are labeled organic, including coffee. What is organic coffee? Thedictionary definitionstates that organic food products are those which have not had any contact with antibiotics, pesticides, growth stimulants or chemically formulated fertilizers during its growth or processing. This includes foods that are derived from plants and animals. However, a food product may very well meet this definition of organic yet fail to meet the qualifications for a certified organic label.

The United StatesDepartment of Agriculture National Organic Programsets the definition and standards for all food products to be certified organic. The USDA NOP lists the following requirements for a food product to receive their organic certification:

 Farmers must proactively use renewable resources and attempt to conserve water and soil to maintain or strengthen the environment's long-term quality.

  • Any foods produced from animals must not have come in contact with growth hormones or antibiotics.
  • All food must be produced without coming in contact with most conventional pesticides, synthetic fertilizers, bio-engineered substances or ionizing radiation.
  • Each organic farm must be thoroughly inspected by a government-approved official to ensure the most current qualifications for organic certification are met.
  • Any organic food derived from plants or animals that undergo additional handling or processing after leaving the farm but before being made available to the public may only be sold at establishments that are certified organic providers.

 What is coffee that's been certified organic? It's coffee that was grown and processed without the use of most synthetic chemicals. This coffee comes from a farm that prioritizes sustainability, renewable resources and preserving the quality of the land, groundwater, and air — all verified by official USDA NOP representatives. If you're purchasing coffee from a bean distributor, their roasting and preserving processes do not use any chemicals. If you're purchasing coffee that's freshly brewed, no synthetic chemicals were used during the brewing process.

Benefits of Organic Coffee vs. Regular Coffee

No matter if you take your cup with milk, sugar, cold-brewed or French pressed, you've got a choice to make when choosing your coffee beans — traditional or organic. This decision is harder for some than for others. Plenty of questions enter the mind of the coffee drinker — which is more affordable, better for the body or better for the environment? Let's look at some benefits of organic coffee and compare them to the benefits of regular coffee.

Benefits of Organic Coffee

Coffee to Start the Dat

A cup of coffee is a great way to start the day, and the benefits of organic coffee make it all the more enjoyable. As with many other organic products, you won't be surprised to learn that there are numerous reasons why organic coffee has become a popular choice for coffee drinkers around the world. Among the many perks, here are three benefits of organic coffee we love the most:

  1. Almost completely free of chemicals:What you put in your body is just as important as what you choose to not consume. Synthetic substances and chemicals can pose serious health risks to the land, animals, and people that they contact. Pesticides, fertilizers, hormones, and other synthetic chemicals can negatively influence bodily changes in some cases. Research is ongoing, but some studies show that chemicals such as those used in the growth or processing of non-organic foods can potentiallytrigger health issues.
  2. Organic coffee farms promote eco-friendly practices:Coffee farms that commit to organic practices are actively protecting and preserving our environment. Aside from the growing and processing practices, those who distribute organic coffee may also try to conduct other aspects of their business in more environmentally-friendly ways such as using renewable resources, manufacturing products with recyclable materials, donating proceeds to sustainability or conservation efforts, and promoting environmentally responsible practices to their employees and customers.
  3. Natural compounds are good for the body:Organic coffee health benefits are definitely enhanced by the lack of synthetic and man-made chemicals used to grow and process the beans. Organic nutrients found in coffee are also effective for reducing stress, increasing your mood, strengthening your immune system and boosting your metabolism. If you choosedecaffeinated organic coffee black coffee, you can limit your caffeine intake to ensure you're putting exactly the right amount of this stimulant in your diet.

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Benefits of Regular Coffee

There is no denying that the benefits of organic coffee are welcomed by coffee drinkers around the world — we can't imagine a coffee lover not appreciating the lack of chemicals in their morning cup or the steadfast dedication to preserving the environment so they can continue to enjoy quality cups of coffee year after year. However, when debating organic coffee vs. regular coffee, the conventional process yields several benefits as well:

  1. Traditional coffee is healthy too:Coffee in any form has been scientifically proven toprovide health benefits. Along with energy and focus enhancements, caffeine can help you burn fat and improve your physical performance. It also has the potential to reduce your risk of developing diseases such as Type 2 diabetes, dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, hepatitis, fatty liver disease, depression, and certain cancers like liver and colorectal cancer. Organic or not, the nutrients and antioxidants found in a cup of coffee have positive impacts on your health.
  2. More options for regular coffee:Although organic food sales are continuing to increase year after year, thequantity of organic farmshas stayed relatively the same. With fewer organic farms, there simply cannot be as many diverse options for organic foods as there are conventional foods. This offers coffee drinkers more options when it comes to regular coffee beans. Average drinkers and coffee connoisseurs alike have opportunities to sample different blends and beans from more conventional coffee farms than organic farms.
  3. Some traditional coffees are more affordable:Not all organic coffees cost more than conventional coffees. However, higher costs canresult from several factors. Organic farmers often lack subsidies from governmental organizations, increasing their growing costs. The organic farming process typically requires more labor and thorough management to ensure the products meets the USDA NOP's strict certification requirements. Most of these organic farms are also smaller and don't receive the same economic benefits or tax breaks as larger farms may.

Organic Coffee Farms

From an environmental standpoint, organic coffee farms may have a more positive impact on the planet than some conventional coffee farms. Comparing the prices of organic black coffee to regular coffee is difficult, as a variety of factors can increase or decrease the price of each specific batch of beans. While there may be more options for regular coffee, there are still plenty of organic alternatives available. Is organic coffee good for you? Yes. Is organic coffee healthier? Not necessarily.

Is Organic Coffee Healthier?

When comparing organic to regular coffee, it's often assumed that organic coffee beans are healthier. In fact, many people may believe that any organic foods are healthy alternatives to foods grown or processed through standard methods because organic products contain fewer pesticides and chemicals. Although certified organic products were grown, harvested, and processed with fewer of these chemicals, the truth is that organic products aren't necessarily healthier from a nutrition perspective. While you do consume fewer chemicals, the nutritional value of the foods remains the same.

The American Journal of Clinical Nutritioncompared organic foods to conventional foodsand were unable to confirm that organic products are inherently healthier than regular foods. The American Dietetic Association echoes this statement, claiming that both organic and regular foods share that same quality and quantity of minerals, vitamins, and antioxidants. Nutritionally, organic coffee isn't necessarily any healthier than conventional coffee. However, if you are a coffee drinker who prefers a diet that's limited in synthetic chemicals, organic coffee is a good option.

Which Coffee Is Better for the Planet?

This is a bit of a tricky question, especially considering the many diverse factors that influence the coffee plants' initial growth all the way through when the bean is brewed for our consumption. Since organic coffee farms do not use potentially harmful chemicals, neither the environment and the farm's employees are exposed to these possibly hazardous substances. Many organic coffee farms alsolimit their use of non-renewable resourcesand may engage in other practices that promote sustainability and conservation of natural resources.

However, just as organic does not necessarily mean healthier across the board, organic coffee growers don't necessarily practice the same environmentally or socially-conscious methods. Organic coffee producers that received certification fromFairtrade Internationalmay engage in stricter sustainable and fair practices than an organic farm that does not have the same certification. If you want to purchase coffee that's as environmentally or socially conscious as possible, do thorough research on both organic and non-organic coffee growers and roasters.

For example, we are proud to provide coffee drinkers throughout the country with Real Good Coffee Company USDA Certified Organic whole bean coffee. We provide this single-origin Sumatran blend in whole bean bags, and we are proud tooffer it in Nespresso PodsandKeurig Organic Coffee Coffee Pods. We care about our planet as much as we care about our coffee, which is why our organic coffee cups for Keurig and pods are made with100% recyclable materials.

Does Organic Coffee Taste Different?

Here's the million-dollar question — which coffee tastes the best? Or more specifically, does organic coffee taste any different than regular coffee? As professional roasters and avid coffee drinkers, our team has asked and has been asked these questions more times than we can count. Our opinion? Yes! Organic coffee can taste different than regular coffee. In fact, one organic coffee may taste better than a conventional bean while another regular brew will taste worlds better than an organic blend.

The truth is that all coffee beans, blends, and brews can taste better, worse, or simply different than others — whether you're drinking a cup made with organic coffee beans or not. Every coffee drinker has their own unique preference for taste. You may prefer 100% Arabica beans in a cold brew while someone else thinks organic Robusta beans that have been French pressed deliver the best taste. Aside from personal preference, there are many other factors that do alter the final flavor.

What Makes Coffee's Taste Change?

You've picked up a fresh cup of coffee, and it tastes amazing. A day later, you grab another cup of the same type of coffee, and suddenly, it's not up to par. Whether the coffee is organic or not, several other factors can cause a change in the taste of your morning cup of joe. Understanding why organic coffee and regular coffee can vary in taste profiles will help you identify quality in every cup and become a better homebrewer.

A lot of effort goes into your jug of java. The type of bean, where it's grown geographically, how it's grown, and how it's processed on the farm can all influence taste before the bean is even roasted. The way it's roasted, blended, and brewed also have an impact. Factors like grind size, coffee to water ratio, temperature of the water, how long the coffee is extracted from the bean, and how fresh the grinds are can dramatically alter the taste.

Which coffee tastes best — organic black coffee or conventional black coffee? That's for your palate to decide.

Premium-Quality Cup Every Time

Discover Which Real Good Coffee Benefits Your Morning Most

The benefits of organic coffee can be quite advantageous, especially if you're a coffee drinker with a focus on the environment.Organic or regular — when you order from Real Good Coffee Co. coffee, you're guaranteed to get a premium-quality cup every time. We invite you to try our Organic Dark Roast Whole Bean Coffee as well as our non-organic Breakfast Blend Light Roast, Donut Shop Medium Roast, and Dark French Roast. Don't settle for any cup. Always start your morning with Real Good Coffee Co.

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Источник: https://realgoodcoffeeco.com/blogs/realgoodblog/what-are-the-benefits-of-drinking-organic-coffee

The 10 Best Instant Coffees in 2021

Final Verdict

Those looking for reliable instant coffee should turn to Mount Hagen's Freeze-Dried Instant Coffee (view at Amazon) first. It's widely available both in-store and online, and the freeze-dried crystals smoothly dissolve into a tasty cup of coffee. As a unique alternative, Four Sigmatic's Mushroom Coffee Mix (view at Amazon) is a worthwhile splurge.

What to Look for in Instant Coffee

Single Serve vs. Jar

Walk into your local grocery store or search online and you'll find instant coffee sold in either single-serve packets and sticks or in jars. The advantages to single-serve instant coffee include that it's easier to travel with and that the proper amount of coffee crystals per cup are measured out for you. On the other hand, buying instant coffee in a jar usually saves money, allows you to buy more coffee at once, and many jars can still be stored in a bag or suitcase if you're traveling.

Tasting Notes

Identifying the type of roast you like—light, medium, or dark—is a great place to start when trying a new coffee. But it can get even trickier than that. Keep an eye out for a blend's tasting notes, usually written somewhere on the packaging. With a dark roast, for instance, you might like one that has notes of chocolate but not notes of smokiness, or vice versa.

Price

Instant coffee is generally less expensive per serving than regular coffee. In fact, many people choose instant over the real thing simply to save money and because they don't mind the difference in taste. However, instant coffee itself can vary in price, from very cheap little packets to more expensive products from boutique brands. Experiment with a few different options. Just because a coffee is more expensive doesn't mean it's the right one for your taste buds.

Why Trust The Spruce Eats?

This piece was written by Derek Rose, the coffee and tea expert for The Spruce Eats. He researches a variety of products, from measuring scoops to commercial espresso machines, and interviews field experts for their insight. Before recommending these products, he gathered information from customer reviews and third-party articles. He received an MFA in Creative Writing from Columbia University and a BA in Communications from Marist College.

The 17 Best Gifts for Coffee Lovers in 2021

Источник: https://www.thespruceeats.com/best-instant-coffee-4690937

When given the choice between organic coffee and conventional, there’s no question that organic coffee is the healthier option. However, while organic coffee is grown without harmful pesticides, it falls short when it comes to standards that are essential for a truly healthy cup of joe. The healthiest coffee goes beyond organic, and additionally qualifies as specialty-grade coffee, is rigorously tested for mold and mycotoxins, and is roasted in a smokeless machine to reduce dangerous byproducts like acrylamide.  

In this article you will learn:

Is Organic Coffee Better for Health?

Organic coffee is certainly healthier than its conventional counterparts due to the fact that it’s grown without health-harming pesticides, herbicides, or fungicides, but it’s not perfect.

For perspective, conventionally grown coffee is one of the most chemically-treated beverages on the market. On top of being grown with large amounts of chemical fertilizers and pesticides that can harm your health, these same chemicals often hurt both the coffee farmers and ecosystems that come in contact with them as well.

However, even organic coffee can fall short. For instance, organic certification doesn’t address essential factors like the quality grade of the coffee beans or testing for mold and mycotoxins. The organic label also doesn’t ensure that coffee manufacturers have roasted their beans with the safest methods to avoid unsafe byproducts and preserve coffee’s healthy antioxidants.

3 Things that Make Organic Coffee Healthy

While organic coffee doesn’t check all the boxes for the healthiest cup of joe, it certainly has its benefits for your health, the environment, and the farmers who grow it.

1. It’s Grown without Pesticides, Herbicides, or Fungicides

97% of the world’s coffee beans are non-organic and treated with pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, and other chemicals. And unfortunately, these chemicals make it all the way into your morning brew.

In developing countries like Colombia, Indonesia, and Brazil, where the majority of coffee is grown, there are few to no regulations on the chemicals and pesticides used, which means farmers can spray their crops with just about anything. In fact, some of the chemicals these farmers use are chemicals that have already been banned in America, Europe, and Japan due to their harmful effects on health.

Because organic coffee is grown without these toxic substances, it’s the simplest solution to ensuring a cup of coffee without pesticide residues, which is the healthier choice!

2. Better Soil & Water Quality

Not only is organic farming result in coffee that's safer for human consumption, but it’s also significantly more beneficial for the environment in which the coffee is grown.

Without toxic chemicals, farmers must use more sustainable practices of growing coffee, and these practices have been proven to significantly increase nutrients in the soil. 

One such eco-friendly coffee farming method is the use of “shade trees” to naturally protect coffee plants from overexposure to sunlight. Shade trees keep the coffee beans in prime condition and their foliage supplies extra nutrients to the soil, resulting in higher quality coffee beans. 

Shade trees eliminate the need for chemical pesticides, preserving the local ecosystem by creating cleaner soil and water, which in turn helps to fight deforestation and reduce carbon dioxide levels!

3. Safer for Coffee Growers

Not only is organic coffee healthier for personal consumption and more sustainable for the environment, but it’s even safer for coffee growers!

One survey of 81 coffee farmers in Eastern Jamaica found that most of them suffered from at least one negative health side effect linked to pesticide handling.

But when coffee is grown organically, hard-working coffee growers are no longer in contact with dangerous chemicals, creating a healthier, happier work environment.

a chemex of coffee beside two bags of mold and mycotoxin free natural force clean coffee and a hand crafted natural force mug

4 Reasons Organic Coffee Isn’t the Healthiest Coffee

1. It Doesn’t Address Bean Quality

Just because a coffee is certified organic doesn’t mean the coffee beans are high-quality. 

The Specialty Coffee Association (SCA) has three quality-based categories of coffee: specialty grade, premium grade, and below-specialty grade.

Specialty-grade is the highest quality of coffee. 

For a coffee to be assigned a grade, expert coffee testers look for major defects in the coffee like unripened beans, coffee pods, sour beans, as well as minor defects like husks present, broken or chipped beans, minor insect damage, and small sticks and stones.

To qualify as a specialty grade coffee, the beans must be mostly uniform in size, have a distinctive body, taste, aroma, and healthy moisture content (between 9-13%).

Specialty-grade coffees also tend to have more complex aromas. Our Clean Coffee, for example, offers fresh hints of citrus and lightly sweet notes of caramel.

2. Organic Coffee Can Contain Mold and Mycotoxins

Just because a coffee is organic, that doesn't mean it’s free of harmful mold and mycotoxins. Often, due to poor processing and storage, coffee beans can grow mycotoxin-producing mold which can cause a wide variety of health issues.

Exposure to mold and mycotoxins can cause fatigue, sinus infection, mitochondrial function, memory problems, brain fog, night sweats, hair loss, DNA damage, liver disease, kidney disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and cancer.

So be sure to read the packaging and find evidence of third-party testing to make sure your coffee is mold and mycotoxin free!

3. Organic Coffee Can Be Improperly Roasted

While buying organic coffee may ensure that it’s free of pesticide residues, it doesn’t mean that it was properly roasted.

Many popular coffee brands today roast their beans at overly high temperatures which comes with consequences. This can result in dangerous roasting byproducts like HCAs and acrylamide that can make their way into your bloodstream, causing damage to the nervous system and increasing the risk of cancer. 

Alternatively, the healthiest coffee brands roast their beans in small batches inside a smokeless machine. This not only ensures that each bean is roasted more evenly with fewer burnt edges, but it also eliminates the most harmful compounds and increases healthy antioxidants like chlorogenic acid.

4. There’s No Requirement that Organic Coffee is Lab Tested

While it’s long been argued that the pesticide residues on coffee beans are removed during the roasting process, new studies suggest that up to 10% of these chemicals can soak inside the coffee bean. This means that pesticides are likely to end up in your cup of coffee. 

As it turns out, exposure to pesticides can lead to negative health consequences like: 

  • Respiratory diseases
  • Endocrine disruption (hormonal imbalances)
  • Low IQ and ADHD in children
  • Weakened immune system
  • Cancer (most commonly in the breast, prostate, and ovaries)

The safest coffee is one that’s been held accountable by a third party organization with each batch rigorously tested for different types of pesticide residue and other common health-harming compounds like ochratoxin A, aflatoxin, acrylamide, fungus, and yeast. It's only with test results like these that you can be 100% confident that the coffee you're getting is as healthy as possible!

natural force clean coffee

Learn more!

What is the Healthiest Coffee?

The healthiest choice of coffee is one that goes beyond organic. In addition to organic certification, you should look for coffee that is specialty grade, mold and mycotoxin-free, properly roasted in a smokeless machine, and third-party lab tested to ensure it's free of harmful toxins.

Of course, these are the standards we put in place for our Natural Force Clean Coffee.

We lab test each batch of Clean Coffee for common coffee health offenders including the mycotoxins Ochratoxin A, Aflatoxin, Acrylamide, mold, fungus, yeast, and 165 different types of pesticides, so you know exactly what is - and isn't - in your cup and in your body.

And, unlike most brands, we actually share our third-party lab results (you can view them right here.)

Clean Coffee also tastes amazing, which is why we think it is the healthiest and tastiest coffee you will ever find!

UP NEXT: Top 5 Best Mold and Mycotoxin Free Coffee Brands of 2019

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Источник: https://naturalforce.com/blogs/nutrition/organic-coffee

What’s the Real Difference Between Organic and Conventional Coffee?

Benefits of Brewing and Drinking Organic Coffee

Coffee beans are one of the most widely consumed commodities in the world, with over 12 billion pounds produced annually worldwide. Because of coffee’s sky-high demand, coffee farming methods have developed over time to maximize efficiency, sometimes at the expense of human and environmental health.

Organic coffee uses no harsh fertilizers or chemicals in growing or production. Certified organic coffee means that the grower takes care to ensure that the both the beans and soil are chemical- and fertilizer-free, which usually takes about three coffee growing seasons.

Anyone who has tried it can attest that the flavor of your morning cup of coffee is improved when you go organic, but that’s just the beginning. Read on to learn more about the many benefits of switching to organic coffee.

Environmental Benefits of Choosing Organic Coffee

In order to meet the high demand of coffee production and keep costs low, some non-organic coffee growers clear-cut rain forests to create full-sun coffee plantations that seriously damage the environment.

Many of these coffee plantations will use chemical fertilizers to feed the plant, and pesticides to keep the pests away because along with deforestation, the nutrient-dense soil and natural predators of coffee pests are gone, too.

Choosing to purchase organic coffee helps to lessen this environmental damage since most organic coffee growers use the shade-growing method, taking advantage of the natural canopy of the rainforest. With this method, the biodiversity within the ecosystem itself provides adequate nutrition and protection for plants.

Additionally, organic coffee farmers steer clear of chemical pesticides or fertilizer, which means no nasty chemicals seeping into the soil, water, or air, to cause harm to farmers or nearby communities.

Benefits of Brewing and Drinking Organic Coffee

Further Health Benefits of Organic Coffee

Still not sure if you’re ready to make the switch? You’ve probably heard that consuming coffee has health benefits, but you won’t get any of those benefits with over-processed instant coffee. You’ll only obtain those health benefits from drinking high-quality organic coffee, and trust us, you’ll want them. We’re talking benefits like protection from Alzheimer’s disease, type 2 diabetes, and more.

Conversely, the harsh chemicals used in the production of non-organic coffee can actually harm you, causing cancer, hormone imbalances, and nervous system troubles.

Ready for Organic Coffee? What Can You Do?

As a consumer, you have a right to feel good about what you’re putting in your body. Yes, it’s a little more expensive, but it’s cheaper than you might think to make a substantial positive impact on the environment as you enjoy greater health benefits, by choosing organic coffee.

So what do you say? Ready for a big upgrade to your daily cup of coffee? Make organic coffee a staple in your home today.

Источник: https://theexoticbean.com/blog/organic-coffee/benefits-brewing-drinking-organic-coffee-comprehensive-guide/

13 Health Benefits of Coffee, Based on Science

Coffee is one of the world’s most popular beverages.

Thanks to its high levels of antioxidants and beneficial nutrients, it also seems to be quite healthy.

Studies show that coffee drinkers have a much lower risk of several serious diseases.

Here are the top 13 health benefits of coffee.

1. Can Improve Energy Levels and Reaction Times

Coffee can help people feel less tired and increase energy levels (, 2).

That’s because it contains a stimulant called caffeine — the most commonly consumed psychoactive substance in the world (3).

After you drink coffee, the caffeine is absorbed into your bloodstream. From there, it travels to your brain (4).

In the brain, caffeine blocks the inhibitory neurotransmitter adenosine.

When this happens, the amount of other neurotransmitters like norepinephrine and dopamine increases, leading to enhanced firing of neurons (, ).

Many controlled studies in humans show that coffee improves various aspects of brain function — including memory, mood, vigilance, energy levels, reaction times and general mental function (, 8, 9).

Summary

Caffeine blocks an inhibitory neurotransmitter in your brain, which causes a stimulant effect. This improves energy levels, mood and various aspects of brain function.

2. Can Help You Burn Fat

Caffeine is found in almost every commercial fat-burning supplement — and for good reason. It’s one of the few natural substances proven to aid fat burning.

Several studies show that caffeine can boost your metabolic rate by 3–11% (, ).

Other studies indicate that caffeine can specifically increase fat burning by as much as 10% in obese individuals and 29% in lean people ().

However, it’s possible that these effects diminish in long-term coffee drinkers.

Summary

Several studies show that caffeine can increase fat burning and boost your metabolic rate.

3. Can Drastically Improve Physical Performance

Caffeine stimulates your nervous system, signaling fat cells to break down body fat (, 14).

But it also increases epinephrine (adrenaline) levels in your blood (, ).

This is the fight-or-flight hormone, which prepares your body for intense physical exertion.

Caffeine breaks down body fat, making free fatty acids available as fuel (, 18).

Given these effects, it’s unsurprising that caffeine can improve physical performance by 11–12%, on average (, ).

Therefore, it makes sense to have a strong cup of coffee about half an hour before you head to the gym.

Summary

Caffeine can increase adrenaline levels and release fatty acids from your fat tissues. It also leads to significant improvements in physical performance.

4. Contains Essential Nutrients

Many of the nutrients in coffee beans make their way into the finished brewed coffee.

A single cup of coffee contains (21):

  • Riboflavin (vitamin B2): 11% of the Reference Daily Intake (RDI).
  • Pantothenic acid (vitamin B5): 6% of the RDI.
  • Manganese and potassium: 3% of the RDI.
  • Magnesium and niacin (vitamin B3): 2% of the RDI.

Though this may not seem like a big deal, most people enjoy several cups per day — allowing these amounts to quickly add up.

Summary

Coffee contains several important nutrients, including riboflavin, pantothenic acid, manganese, potassium, magnesium and niacin.

5. May Lower Your Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a major health problem, currently affecting millions of people worldwide.

It’s characterized by elevated blood sugar levels caused by insulin resistance or a reduced ability to secrete insulin.

For some reason, coffee drinkers have a significantly reduced risk of type 2 diabetes.

Studies observe that people who drink the most coffee have a 23–50% lower risk of getting this disease. One study showed a reduction as high as 67% (22, , , 25, 26).

According to a large review of 18 studies in a total of 457,922 people, each daily cup of coffee was associated with a 7% reduced risk of type 2 diabetes ().

Summary

Several observational studies show that coffee drinkers have a much lower risk of type 2 diabetes, a serious condition that affects millions of people worldwide.

6. May Protect You From Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common neurodegenerative disease and the leading cause of dementia worldwide.

This condition usually affects people over 65, and there is no known cure.

However, there are several things you can do to prevent the disease from occurring in the first place.

This includes the usual suspects like eating healthy and exercising, but drinking coffee may be incredibly effective as well.

Several studies show that coffee drinkers have up to a 65% lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease (, ).

Summary

Coffee drinkers have a much lower risk of getting Alzheimer’s disease, which is a leading cause of dementia worldwide.

7. May Lower Your Risk of Parkinson’s

Parkinson’s disease is the second most common neurodegenerative condition, right behind Alzheimer’s.

It’s caused by the death of dopamine-generating neurons in your brain.

As with Alzheimer’s, there is no known cure, which makes it that much more important to focus on prevention.

Studies show that coffee drinkers have a much lower risk of Parkinson’s disease, with a risk reduction ranging from 32–60% (, , , ).

In this case, the caffeine itself appears to be beneficial, as people who drink decaf don’t have a lower risk of Parkinson’s ().

Summary

Coffee drinkers have up to a 60% lower risk of getting Parkinson’s disease, the second most common neurodegenerative disorder.

8. May Protect Your Liver

Your liver is an amazing organ that carries out hundreds of important functions.

Several common diseases primarily affect the liver, including hepatitis, fatty liver disease and many others.

Many of these conditions can lead to cirrhosis, in which your liver is largely replaced by scar tissue.

Interestingly, coffee may protect against cirrhosis — people who drink 4 or more cups per day have up to an 80% lower risk (, , ).

Summary

Coffee drinkers have a much lower risk of cirrhosis, which can be caused by several diseases that affect the liver.

9. Can Fight Depression

Depression is a serious mental disorder that causes a significantly reduced quality of life.

It’s very common, as about 4.1% of people in the US currently meet the criteria for clinical depression.

In a Harvard study published in 2011, women who drank 4 or more cups of coffee per day had a 20% lower risk of becoming depressed ().

Another study in 208,424 individuals found that those who drank 4 or more cups per day were 53% less likely to die by suicide ().

Summary

Coffee appears to lower your risk of developing depression and may dramatically reduce suicide risk.

10. May Lower Risk of Certain Types of Cancer

Cancer is one of the world’s leading causes of death. It is characterized by uncontrolled cell growth in your body.

Coffee appears to be protective against two types of cancer: liver and colorectal cancer.

Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death in the world, while colorectal cancer ranks fourth ().

Studies show that coffee drinkers have up to a 40% lower risk of liver cancer (41, ).

Similarly, one study in 489,706 people found that those who drank 4–5 cups of coffee per day had a 15% lower risk of colorectal cancer ().

Summary

Liver and colorectal cancer are the third and fourth leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Coffee drinkers have a lower risk of both.

11. Doesn’t Cause Heart Disease and May Lower Stroke Risk

It’s often claimed that caffeine can increase your blood pressure.

This is true, but with a rise of only 3–4 mm/Hg, the effect is small and usually dissipates if you drink coffee regularly (, ).

However, it may persist in some people, so keep that in mind if you have elevated blood pressure (, 47).

That being said, studies don’t support the idea that coffee raises your risk of heart disease (, 49).

On the contrary, there is some evidence that women who drink coffee have a reduced risk (50).

Some studies also show that coffee drinkers have a 20% lower risk of stroke (, ).

Summary

Coffee may cause mild increases in blood pressure, which usually diminish over time. Coffee drinkers do not have an increased risk of heart disease and have a slightly lower risk of stroke.

12. May Help You Live Longer

Given that coffee drinkers are less likely to get many diseases, it makes sense that coffee could help you live longer.

Several observational studies indicate that coffee drinkers have a lower risk of death.

In two very large studies, drinking coffee was associated with a 20% reduced risk of death in men and a 26% decreased risk of death in women, over 18–24 years ().

This effect appears particularly strong in people with type 2 diabetes. In one 20-year study, individuals with diabetes who drank coffee had a 30% lower risk of death (54).

Summary

Several studies show that coffee drinkers live longer and have a lower risk of premature death.

13. The Biggest Source of Antioxidants in the Western Diet

For people who eat a standard Western diet, coffee may be one of the healthiest aspects of their diet.

That’s because coffee is quite high in antioxidants. Studies show that many people get more antioxidants from coffee than from fruits and vegetables combined (, , 57).

In fact, coffee may be one of the healthiest beverages on the planet.

Summary

Coffee is rich in powerful antioxidants, and many people get more antioxidants from coffee than from fruits and veggies combined.

The Bottom Line

Coffee is a highly popular beverage around the globe that boasts a number of impressive health benefits.

Not only can your daily cup of joe help you feel more energized, burn fat and improve physical performance, it may also lower your risk of several conditions, such as type 2 diabetes, cancer and Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

In fact, coffee may even boost longevity.

If you enjoy its taste and tolerate its caffeine content, don’t hesitate to pour yourself a cup or more throughout the day.

Источник: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/top-13-evidence-based-health-benefits-of-coffee

This Is How 19 Health Experts Take Their Coffee

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We often think of health experts as being superhuman with chiseled abs or crazy scientific dietary knowledge. (Conjugated linoleic acid, is that Dothraki?) But they start their day the same way most of us do: with a cup of coffee.

Seeing the way someone prepares their morning mug becomes shorthand for their nutritional philosophy: Is dairy a do or a don’t? What about sweeteners? And butter? Coconut oil? Do these belong in coffee — or coffee cake?

Health experts are human. They put on their pants one leg at a time and grind their coffee beans in a grinder (not pulverized by a series of kettlebell swings).

But they’ve also given a lot of thought to what goes into their bodies, coffee included, and used their vast knowledge to create the optimal cup.

That’s why we asked experts to share their ideal way to kick-start the day. Read on for their (often surprising) java testimonials and details on what motivates them to add certain ingredients (or not).

Authors

1. Adam Bornstein, founder of Born Fitness, NY Times bestselling author, @BornFitness

Morning Rx: Dark to medium roast coffee, occasionally with cinnamon

“I might be the only person in the world that doesn’t drink coffee for the caffeine. I wake up at 4:30 a.m. each day, ready to take on the world. I just like drinking something hot, and I believe in the health benefits of coffee beans.

As someone that practices intermittent fasting, the best benefit is that coffee completely blunts my appetite. So that is a nice bonus.

I only take my coffee two ways: black (90 percent of the time) or with some cinnamon for a little extra flavor. If I’m making my coffee at home, everything starts with the beans.

I’m an organic roast kind of guy, and I tend to prefer dark to medium roasts. I grind the beans fresh every morning, and then preferably use a French press. No sweeteners or creamer.

I won’t make any crazy claims about the magic of coffee. I wrote about why I drink coffee now, after 30 years of avoiding the stuff. That said, if my cup is “better” it’s only because I don’t add any extra crap to make it unhealthy.

[I’d never add] syrups. I don’t get that idea. Syrup belongs on ice cream, pancakes, or waffles. Not in coffee.”

2. Holly Rilinger, bestselling author, motivational speaker, Nike master trainer, @hollyrilinger

Morning Rx: Almond milk cappuccino

“Almond milk cappuccinos are the way I start my days! I use my Nespresso Espresso machine and foam my own organic almond milk. I like cappuccinos over lattés because there is less milk.

There are a few almond milks out there that taste great in an iced coffee situation, but others that are thin and I find disgusting. My favorite is Califia Farms Almond Milk. It’s certified non-GMO and organic.

[When I drank milk cappuccinos] I would always start my day with a heavy FULL feeling in my stomach. [But] I couldn’t fathom giving up that little slice of heaven, so I just dealt with the discomfort.

That is until I gave almond milk a try. I didn’t love it right away, [but] I did love that I no longer had stomach pain.

I now LOVE the taste of almond milk in my coffee and really can’t stand that filmy taste of dairy in my mouth. And my grandparents were dairy farmers in Kansas! I grew up around milk my whole life!”

3. Mark Sisson, author of “The Primal Blueprint,” founder of Mark’s Daily Apple, @marksdailyapple

Morning Rx: Dark roast coffee with heavy whipping cream and one teaspoon of sugar or raw eggs with honey and salt

“My staple morning coffee is simple: dark roast French press coffee, heavy whipping cream (pasture-raised, of course), and one teaspoon of sugar (just to cut the bitterness). That’s my go-to cup, but I also like to experiment.

My latest creation is the Primal Egg Coffee, which involves a couple of raw egg yolks or whole raw eggs (from pastured hens) added to freshly brewed coffee, along with a little honey, salt, and sometimes some cinnamon, cocoa, turmeric, and/or cayenne. It all goes into the blender.

The yolks allow a thorough emulsion — so it’s smooth and rich — and the coffee’s temperature denatures and increases the digestibility of the egg white proteins without cooking the yolk.

Coffee is famous for increasing metabolism and boosting energy levels, but that increased energy isn’t conjured out of thin air. It’s created by the oxidation of stored body fat.

When you drink coffee, you get a little jolt of adrenaline, which increases lipolysis (the release of stored body fat into circulation for oxidation/burning), and a boost in heat production (from the energy being expended).

Unfortunately the typical cup of coffee — full of sugar and low-fat or skim milk — doesn’t provide these benefits. This is for two main reasons. First, sugar intake increases insulin, which suppresses lipolysis and fat-burning.

Second, the caffeine in coffee briefly increases glucose intolerance, especially when taken with carbohydrates, which means the body needs more insulin to handle the same amount of sugar it normally would.

So, ironically enough, drinking [super] sugary coffee actually inhibits the release of body fat for energy — the exact opposite of what a good cup of coffee should do.”

4. Marion Nestle, professor of nutrition, food studies, and public health at NYU, author of “Food Politics,” @marionnestle

Morning Rx: Black coffee with skim milk

“I’m not a breakfast eater, at least not first thing, but I do like my coffee. I particularly like Gourmet Garage’s SoHo blend.

I buy beans, grind them as needed, throw a tablespoon or two into a filter, pour hot water into the filter right over the cup, add skim milk, and am good to go. It’s better for me because I don’t like coffee too strong or over-roasted.

My nutritional philosophy is everything in moderation, but never hazelnut or any other kind of flavored coffee. They don’t work for me.”

5. Dave Asprey, creator of Bulletproof Coffee, author of “The Bulletproof Diet,” @bpnutrition

Morning Rx: Coffee beans with unsalted, grass-fed butter and Bulletproof Brain Octane Oil

“I drink Bulletproof Coffee blended with the authentic Bulletproof ingredients. I use Bulletproof Process coffee beans that are lab tested to minimize mold toxin levels that limit human performance.

I brew it using a metal (not paper) filter to allow coffee oils into the final brew. I blend it (in a blender) with unsalted, grass-fed butter and Bulletproof Brain Octane Oil, a flavorless extract of coconut oil that is 18 times stronger than plain coconut oil.

Blending in butter (or better yet, ghee) is important because it creates a small droplet of fat suspended in water called a micelle, which means the fat doesn’t separate from the coffee.

Grass-fed butter is superior to grain-fed because it tastes better and provides substantially more conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), vitamins A, D, and E; and, very importantly, K2.

It also doesn’t contain nearly as many omega-6 inflammatory polyunsaturated oils compared to industrial butter.”

Doctors

6. Frank Lipman, leader in functional medicine, founder of Eleven Eleven Wellness Center, @DrFrankLipman

Morning Rx: Organic coffee with MCT Oil and grass-fed butter

“[In the morning] you can’t beat the energy and nutrition of a healthy protein shake for breakfast.

I make mine with my Be Well Chocolate Whey Protein, MCT Oil, and Greens Powder, blended with chia seeds, kale, blueberries, avocado, and almond milk.

[It leaves me] energized and satisfied — not jittery or wired as coffee often makes me feel.

[I do have coffee] once or occasionally twice a week. [I make] bulletproof coffee. It’s a good way to supercharge your morning cup of coffee to support cognitive function and fat-burning.

I blend organic coffee with one tablespoon MCT Oil (or regular coconut oil) and one tablespoon of grass-fed butter.

Butter that’s from grass-fed or pasture raised cows, not regular butter, is an important ingredient in bulletproof coffee because it adds health-supporting vitamins and minerals.

This includes CLA, or conjugated linoleic acid, which helps reduce belly fat, protects against cancer, and encourages muscle growth. There’s also vitamin A to help maintain thyroid, adrenal, and cardiovascular health.

Vitamin K2 supports bone density and possibly reverses arterial calcification. Vitamin A, D, and E, are all key antioxidants that are essential to good health.

7. David Katz, director of Yale University’s Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, founder of the True Health Initiative, @DrDavidKatz

Morning Rx: French roast coffee with nonfat, organic powdered milk

“I like coffee first thing in the morning to accelerate that transition from the residual frowstiness that follows sleep to my busy day. [I drink] French roast coffee with nonfat, organic powdered milk.

The powdered milk avoids adding water so the coffee isn’t diluted or cooled. Powdered milk also adds protein, calcium, vitamin D, and vitamin A for very few calories.

If you acclimate to the taste of coffee as is, you don’t miss sweeteners at all. These can take a healthy, stimulating, natural drink rich in antioxidants and turn it into another vehicle for sugar, calories, or chemicals your body doesn’t need.

That said, when in France, I do have a café au lait at times, and those are sweetened. I think of those as a treat, not my daily drink. You gotta live a little too!”

Nutritionists

8. Joy Bauer, nutrition and health expert for NBC’s “Today” show, @joybauer

Morning Rx: Black coffee

“I’ve been drinking my coffee black ever since, well, since I started drinking coffee. I typically pop a pod into my Keurig machine, pour a cup that’s already been brewed at the “Today” show, or grab something to go from the corner deli.

I love the smell, the flavor, the experience. And the jolt of caffeine helps kick-start my day.

[I’m aware of the] coffee pros and cons. A typical cup of coffee tends to be loaded with fattening fixings like whole milk, cream, or half-and-half, plus sugar (and more sugar!). Or some people go heavy on artificial sweeteners and syrups.

My straight-up version comes packed with antioxidants and caffeine without unnecessary calories or chemicals. Consider this: one black cup of coffee equals 5 calories. One cup with half-and-half and sugar equals about 120 calories.

Make the swap every day and you could lose up to 12 pounds by the end of the year.”

9. Brian St. Pierre, sports nutritionist at Precision Nutrition, @BSPNutrition

Morning Rx: Black coffee

“About 67 percent of Americans put cream and sugar in their coffee, but I tend to take mine black because I prefer to get my calories from food.

The research on the benefits of coffee is mostly on [black, conventional drip-brewer style], since it’s the most common.

It’s important to keep the big picture in mind. If you’re only consuming one coffee per day, a little cream and sugar is unlikely to be a problem. But since the average American coffee drinker consumes three cups per day, that can start adding up quickly.

We’re all allowed some discretionary calories, just don’t use them all up in your three daily cups. A few teaspoons of sugar and a few tablespoons of your creamer of choice are probably fine — beyond that, you start asking for trouble.”

Trainers

10. Lacey Stone, bi-coastal fitness professional, celebrity trainer, motivational speaker, @laceystonefitness

Morning Rx: Ice red eye with one shot of espresso and agave nectar

“I take a leisurely stroll to Starbucks every morning. I get an iced red eye, that’s a regular iced coffee with one shot of espresso. I add a little agave nectar and I’m good to go.

I have that ‘A-HA’ moment where I’m like, ‘Let’s go day, I’m ready!’ The espresso is my rocket fuel. I believe that caffeine is good, if it’s used properly.

It increases your basal metabolic rate and it increases your senses, which leads to improved performance in your workouts. (Your basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the rate at which you burn fat.)”

I also use agave nectar rather than unnatural sweeteners.

11. Brian Gallagher, co-founder of Throwback Fitness, @ThrowbackFit

Morning Rx:Coffee blended with butter or coconut oil and a few dashes of cinnamon

“I usually prepare coffee myself in the mornings using a French press. I pour the coffee right from the French press into my blender, adding either butter or coconut oil and a few dashes of cinnamon.

I blend for 30 seconds since coconut oil or butter don’t mix too well when stirred with a spoon (no matter how fast I stir!), and the blender adds a nice froth to it.

I typically don’t eat my first meal until around noon, so I find that the coconut oil or butter keeps me full until then. I’ve also come to love the taste of butter in coffee. It takes a little of the bitterness out.

[And I] like the strange looks I get when a server asks me if I want milk and sugar and I instead ask for two butters!”

12. Kira Stokes, fitness expert, creator of the Stoked Method and Stoked Series Workouts, @kirastokesfit

Morning Rx: Dark roast coffee with coconut milk creamer and liquid stevia

“I race to my Nespresso Vertuoline machine in the early morning… I use the Stormio dark roast pods as I love a good strong cup to start my day. My creamer of choice is So Delicious Coconut Milk Creamer because it has a rich flavor without lactose or hydrogenated oils.

I add a touch of liquid stevia, but the coconut milk creamer is a bit sweet so only a dab is necessary. Stevia is a naturally occurring substance from a plant.”

13. Nia Shanks, coach and writer, author of “Lift Like a Girl,” @NiaShanks

Morning Rx: Dark roast coffee with raw sugar and either heavy whipping cream or plain cocoa powder

Coffee always starts my day. I enjoy sipping it while I settle in to the morning and start writing. I drink dark roasts exclusively. The darker the better.

I use my standard coffee maker during the week, but on the weekends, my beloved spouse makes phenomenal French press with freshly roasted whole beans we grind just before use.

I rotate between two types of additions: either plain, raw sugar and heavy whipping cream, or raw sugar and plain cocoa powder. (This makes an incredible mocha and works beautifully with a dark espresso roast.)

I’m not a fan of flavored coffee creams, simply because many have a ton of other ingredients like high fructose corn syrup and even trans fat. I prefer to keep my coffee additions as natural as possible without sacrificing taste and satisfaction.

Athletes

14. Rich Roll, plant-powered ultra athlete, author of “Finding Ultra,” @richroll

Morning Rx: Pu-erh tea

“The first thing I do [in the morning] is drink a tall glass of water with some fresh lemon or a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar, which has an alkalizing effect on my system.

My next step is to prepare a Pu-erh tea. It’s a post-fermented tea product produced in the Yunnan province of China and carefully aged.

The harvesting, creation, and ceremony of Pu-erh is an art steeped in preserved tradition dating back millennia. But what makes it unique is the process by which the leaves are fermented by microbes after drying and then aged.

It’s believed that the microbial activity in the tea provides probiotic health benefits, such as reducing arterial plaque and LDL cholesterol levels, as well as aiding in weight loss by reducing blood sugar levels and improving the body’s ability to metabolize fat.

Unlike coffee and other teas, Pu-erh [gives me] a long-lasting, even-keeled energy.

The tea accompanies my 20-minute morning meditation. After that, I prepare a vegetable based green smoothie in my Vitamix. Every day is different, but this blend generally comprises a mix of dark leafy greens, beet, berries, hemp seeds, spirulina, chia seeds, and macca root.”

15. Matt Frazier, ultrarunner, founder of the No Meat Athlete Movement, @NoMeatAthlete

Morning Rx: Low-temperature roasted coffee, black

“I’ve really fallen in love with what’s called “third wave” coffee, where the beans are roasted at a lower temperature than, say, Starbucks beans.

The result is an almost complete lack of smoky character, so you can actually taste all the incredible fruity and citrus flavors of different coffees.

Almost nobody who drinks this type of coffee adds any sweeteners or creamers.

I grind it by hand with a Hario mill, then brew with a simple pour-over method. I’m energized, creative, and perfectly satisfied with just 12 savored ounces.”

Entrepreneurs

16. Jennipher Walters, founder and CEO of Fit Bottomed World, co-author of “The Fit Bottomed Girls Anti-Diet,” @fitbottomedgirl

Morning Rx: Blended coffee with one tablespoon each of coconut oil and ghee

“My normal morning routine involves a big cup of black coffee that’s been blended with a tablespoon of coconut oil and a tablespoon of ghee (clarified butter).

This high-fat coffee may seem odd, but it’s so rich, creamy, and filling. Simply delicious! The trick is that you have to blend it in a high-powered blender. Then it gets all frothy and delicious — almost like a (non-sweet) latté!

I’m a big fan of eating healthy fat at every meal. It’s good for focus, brain function, energy, and it just makes me feel good and full. We’ve been trained over the years to fear the fat, but I find that when I eat more fat, I have fewer cravings, more energy, and my workouts are better.”

17. Heather Crosby, founder of YumUniverse, founder of the Gluten-Free Baking Academy, @yumuniverse

Morning Rx:Chicory root tea latté

“My favorite morning bevvies are either a plant based, gluten-free protein smoothie with fresh berries or my favorite green smoothie. These drinks give me the natural fuel I need for sustained energy all day long — stimulant free!

[But] one of my favorite alternatives to coffee is a maca and chicory root tea latté. Maca is known to assist in hormone regulation, while chicory root has a long-standing reputation as a liver detoxifier and digestion booster.

Both have a rich, dark flavor that comforts and satisfies like coffee without the acidic qualities — it’s a popular coffee substitute in New Orleans and Europe.”

18. Tara Stiles, founder of Strala Yoga in New York City, @tarastiles

Morning Rx: Black coffee on-the-go or black coffee with cashew milk at home

“My coffee at home is from Kitsuné in Paris, and I serve it with cashew milk. On the go, I’ll go to La Calombe on Lafayette and Prince Streets or Gasoline Alley on Lafayette and Houston Streets.

I order a regular coffee, black. I’d never add any syrups or sugars.”

19. Suzanne Hall, co-founder and editor in chief at The Chalkboard Mag, @chalkboardmag

Morning Rx:French press coffee with a little grass-fed butter at home and a half-decaf americano with stevia, cinnamon, and almond milk on the go

“I’m always double-fisted: coffee in one hand, green juice in the other. At home, I French press a mix of decaf, shade-grown beans and Ethiopian beans from Caffe Luxxe in Brentwood.

If I have a long day in front of me, I’ll make the coffee “bulletproof” style and add a little raw, grass-fed butter. The butter and coffee together are healthy for your hormones and for brain health — and taste incredible!

Out and about, I order americanos from any number of LA’s great coffee shops, half-decaf (It’s an effort!) with stevia (which I keep on me), cinnamon, and Pressed Juicery almond milk.

Stevia is the perfect sweetener: nothing artificial, I love the taste, plus it slightly alkalizes your coffee. Cinnamon helps to regulate blood sugar from the caffeine spike and is surprisingly nutritious.

Lastly, Pressed Juicery makes some of the best almond milk around with just a hint of vanilla.

Drinking coffee bulletproof style is a remarkably different feeling. Butter helps the body to metabolize coffee without jitters, but gives sustained energy. Skipping the sugar and reducing caffeine intake in my Americanos definitely keeps my blood sugar (read: mood!) more stable.”

Bottom line

Coffee is one of those built-in routines that becomes totally mindless after a few years, especially when we’re only half awake. Our goal is to provide a little inspiration to think outside the box (or, rather, cylindrical cup).

However, with so many studies and health claims out there, we know it can be tricky to figure out the best fix-ins for your morning cup of joe.

The research on the pros and cons of coffee, sugar, cinnamon, and everything else is always being updated, so be sure to sit down with your doc and hash out the best options for you. Practice everything in moderation.

Do your own research, too. And of course, always listen to your body.

The bottom line is, we want you to do a little experimenting to get out of that coffee rut. Figure out what works for you and mix and match until you hit that sweet spot — or savory, if that’s your thing. Enjoy!

Источник: https://greatist.com/eat/health-fitness-experts-favorite-coffee

Let’s face it, it just feels good to buy organic coffee. After all, the packaging is always attractive, and they write the nicest blurbs on the back. Instead of subsidizing Coffee Inc. (and slave labor) with your purchase, you can save the planet and enjoy a fresher cup of coffee straight from the hands of artisans living in the deepest jungles or the highest mountains – you need only buy organic!

View in galleryOrganic coffee integrity - Coffee plantation landscape

Well, today we’re putting these virtuous claims to the test. Is organic coffee really organic, or is it mostly just marketing?

Our critical approach to organic coffee

As with any popular product, there’s a certain vocabulary generally used to sell organic coffee.

Below, we consider three of the most common coffee labels to ascertain whether they really do yield a healthier, tastier, more responsible cup of joe – or whether they’re just feel-good buzzwords.

1. “Organic” coffee

Organic is a venerable label with a lot of baggage. We’re not here to dismiss or promote it, but to educate you on what organic is – and what it isn’t.

Let’s start with something of an eye-opener: Within the letter of US law, “organic” doesn’t actually guarantee the integrity of your coffee. In other words, organic coffee is not, by default, safer or healthier to drink than non-organic brands.

Instead, that coveted organic label narrowly defines a few factors:

  • Coffee growers must only use organic fertilizer – no synthetic stuff like potash, rock phosphate, ammonium nitrate, etc.
  • No inorganic chemicals must be used in the three years leading up to the harvest of a coffee crop.
  • Growers, roasters, and importers must adhere to an “organic plan” overseen by USDA-approved certifying agents, which examines the entire production process and prohibits the use of genetically modified crops.

It seems pretty environmentally responsible on the surface, but there are loopholes to consider. 

View in galleryOrganic coffee research

Exceptions, loopholes, and the question of integrity

First, the Organic Foods Production Act of 1990 makes provisions for a “National List”, granting exceptions to certain synthetic chemicals during the growing phase. This isn’t necessarily nefarious, as each chemical must be vetted for human health before inclusion on the list. 

But, it does immediately cast doubt on manufacturer claims that their coffee beans are indeed grown in 100% organic soil. To reiterate the point: organic producers are allowed to use certain synthetic fertilizers and pesticides. 

Yes, these compounds are ostensibly safe. But they certainly fall short of the popular understanding of what organic farming entails – and marketers definitely take advantage of that. Take absolute claims of purity with a grain of salt.

The National Organic Program

To administer and enforce the standards set by the OFPA, the USDA created an agency and regulatory body known as the National Organic Program. The NOP has a three-pronged function

  1. Defining and clarifying standards furthering the plain-language, generalized rules of the OFPA to fit real-world applications and scenarios;
  2. Accrediting agents who will certify whether a company is compliant with NOP standards, both domestically and abroad;
  3. And, enforcing compliance.

There have been and continue to be a few issues with the NOP in practice, however.

Accreditation loopholes – “Who watches the watchmen?”

You’d probably assume agents accredited by the NOP to hold an advanced degree, extensive experience in the organic agricultural industry, or both. You’d also expect them not to hold any conflicts of interest which could influence their decision on who they’ll give the organic certification to.

Surprisingly, this isn’t always the case. Certifying agents don’t even have to be part of the US government. They can be private individuals or entities, and they don’t even have to be American.

In fact, the USDA has specifically not followed through establishing a peer-review committee to vet applicants, even though the OFPA specifically allows them to do so. 

(When attempting to find a source to back this claim, we found that the link to the audit on usda.gov went to a 404. Luckily, it’s hard to remove things entirely from the Internet. Here’s an archived snapshot of the 2010 audit of the USDA by the Inspector General, report 01601-03-HY. Shady.)

We’re not going to delve into speculation as to why this seemingly basic step hasn’t been taken to ensure the integrity of the organic label. But the point is, they haven’t, and the lack of transparency is unsettling.

Also worth thinking about is the fact that food producers – including coffee growers – will often approach multiple certifiers to hedge against the possibility of one denying them that coveted, premium organic label. If the process of vetting was airtight and the standards rigorously upheld, there wouldn’t be the perception that different certifiers would yield different verdicts.

The organic status quo challenged – Harvey v. Veneman

Moreover, there’s precedent for the USDA overstepping the authority granted them by Congress. In the 2003 lawsuit, Harvey v. Veneman, the court found the USDA had wrongfully permitted non-organic chemicals in the processing and handling phase of crop production, thereby undermining the integrity and standards of the organic label.

There was a laundry list of other complaints which were upheld by the courts. Yet the ruling was overturned with an amendment to the OFPA by congress in 2005. The grievances about synthetic chemicals and USDA overreach were retroactively legitimized.

Standards weakened by a rushed, reactionary Congress

Critics have pointed out that this action by Congress eroded the standards of the OFPA. Indeed, the National List of exempt non-organic compounds was voted in only with hesitation by the National Organic Standards Board (NOSB). It passed under the assumption that these chemicals would be removed from the list within 5 years, barring new evidence to prove their food safety. 

The 2005 OFPA Amendment changed that assumption, allowing existing loopholes to become even looser. It even introduced leeway for the USDA to greenlight non-organic components in food production absent any “commercially available” organic alternative. Problem is, Congress failed to specify the mechanisms by which the NOSB will determine commercial availability, leaving it open to interpretation – and abuse.

USDA budget cuts

It could be easy to call corruption shenanigans at the USDA. But negligence and lax standards can, at least in part, be explained by aggressive budget cuts over the years. And this isn’t something endemic to one side of the political aisle, either; “Big Ag” is a popular bipartisan whipping boy for deficit hawks of all stripes and feathers.

The lack of resources makes it difficult enough to supervise USDA certification agents domestically – and the problem only compounds with NOP agents abroad. Deadlines get stretched as staff is overwhelmed with the sheer gravity of ensuring 350 million+ Americans have access to safe, affordable food, as well as information enough to correctly identify it amidst a crowded marketplace.

And remember, the legislation controlling “organic” is old and feeble in the face of rising globalism. With political deadlock making actionable compromise ever more difficult, governing bodies are understandably slow to respond to rapidly developing challenges. 

“A day late and a dollar short” might be a good slogan for the USDA.

Tricky labeling on organic coffee

View in gallery

Going beyond politics and possible backdoor dealing, the organic label itself is fraught, leading to confusion in the marketplace. There are actually several tiers of organic-ness:

Coffee with this label was grown, processed, and handled with 100% all-organic ingredients. It adheres to the highest standards (such as they are), and justifies the premium price.

No, this isn’t just a catch-all; it’s a specific designation for coffee which contains at least 95% organic ingredients. The remainder of non-organic ingredients must appear on the National List of exemptions. Usually, the beans themselves will still be what we commonly understand as organic, but that 5% falls out somewhere between fertilizing, pest control, and processing.

You’ve gotta be careful here though if you’re searching exclusively for the highest quality coffee. Brands can still proudly display the same “USDA Organic” badge as 100% organic coffee. And you better believe advertisers are going to minimize that missing 5%! It’s probably still going to be tasty, healthy coffee, but that National List might make some think twice.

This is where any doubts about the USDA and its myriad loopholes, oversights, and exemptions will start to compound. Made with Organic coffee won’t have the “USDA Organic” badge, but still contains ≥70% of ingredients which are up to NOP standard. 

Made with Organic packaging will really hammer home the feel-good verbiage. You’ll read about how the company is socially just and supports Fair Trade, artisanal practices, and family heritage.

This tier does still require certification from an NOP agent. And while it probably won’t command absolute top-shelf prices, coffee producers still have to offset the often considerable costs of the certification process. It may or may not be worth it to you.

This lowest tier makes no solid promises of being legally organic. It may or may not contain GMOs, use synthetic compounds, or be handled and processed in non USDA-approved way. 

Nevertheless, you may still find these brands advertise what virtues they can with some creative writing. You should expect not to pay organic prices for this stuff.

That said, it might not be fair to write this tier off altogether. Here’s why…

Non-organic growers may still follow organic practices

As we illustrated above, the US government has been proactive in (more or less) rigidly defining “organic”. However, the certification process itself is often a barrier to small coffee growers in poorer countries. 

In many cases, these growers lack the funds to buy into chemical pesticides and fertilizers. They’ll operate at a smaller scale by default, often employing family and members of the community. For all intents and purposes, these “passive organic” sources embody what we commonly understand as the organic, clean, natural ideal.

Of course, there’s no guarantee that is or isn’t the case; it’s just evidence that the situation is complex. And yes, despite the lack of USDA Organic certification, these products still make it to market in the US. 

When covering the various tiers of organic in the previous section, we were careful to illustrate how branding plays into perception. A lot of it is marketing hype, but sometimes you really are getting coffee from a small family that’s been producing the same delicious roast for generations. 

How smallholders get screwed doing the right thing

View in galleryOrganic coffee - small holders

The unfortunate reality is that “USDA Organic” is something of a double-edged sword. We want the people who are following natural, healthy farming practices to make it to market; to reap rewards for their environmental stewardship, social responsibility, and dedication to a damn-fine cup of coffee. We also want to encourage people to do the right thing and switch over from harmful practices.

But again, the certification process itself is expensive. Small farms will typically pay north of $700, while processors are asked to pony up over $1200. This might not seem like that much, but when you reckon your accounts in quetzals, pesos, or birr, those American dollars quickly become prohibitively costly.

And even if you can get over that hump, you still have to go through the process of conversion. Remember that bit about needing to prove your soil hasn’t seen a drop of (non-approved) synthetic fertilizer or pesticide for at least three years? That’s a long time to dramatically change your production process without having a market handy to compensate for the added cost and lowered production.

One of the higher-profile examples of this phenomenon is Oscar Omar Alonzo, a Honduran coffee farmer who suffered a 90% drop in productivity switching over to organic. He managed to survive the long three years, and found a suitable substitute for chemical fertilizers in the form of moisture-retaining coconut husks. His is a success story, though it’s exceptional in every sense of the word.

Other considerations for non-organic farming

Coffee is a unique crop in many ways. For one, it is grown most harmoniously under shady forest canopies. Yes, it grows slower than it would in direct sunlight, but this allows the beans to mature more slowly and develop a higher density of delicious sugars. 

A shade-grown coffee farm exists in greater ecological balance with its surrounding environment. But that biodiversity comes with certain challenges as well. Pests are a natural feature of the forest, and will enjoy “coexisting” amidst coffee crops to the detriment of yields. 

Without chemical pesticides, farmers resort to far more labor-intensive measures of pest control. And sometimes, Mother Nature still gets the upper hand, forcing farmers to choose between losing their entire crop, or spraying pesticides or herbicides to salvage their precious lifeline. Complicating the situation further is that NOP certifiers will poo-poo this last-ditch effort, and revoke the farmer’s access to the valuable organic market.

On the other hand, there may be a competing organic coffee farm growing crops in isolated fields under direct sun. Their coffee plants grow fast and yield prodigiously, and it’s a lot easier to keep them alive without risking the farm’s organic certification battling pests. 

And yet, the rapidly grown coffee just isn’t as tasty. Moreover, this certified farm doesn’t exist within its natural context. Absent the dense, carbon-sucking foliage, this organic farm is a net emitter of greenhouse gasses. And as the hot sun bakes the soil, farmers must increase irrigation to the detriment of local freshwater sources. There’s also erosion and runoff to consider, as well. 

…It almost makes the non-certified shade-grown farm that occasionally sprays fertilizers and pesticides the more ecologically responsible and more consumer-friendly option. The point is, the USDA’s one-size-fits-all certification approach often rewards the more destructive model.

2. “Fair Trade”

Much like “organic”, “Fair Trade” is an ambitiously progressive concept that hasn’t quite kept pace with globalism. While Fair Trade offers another badge of desirability to a given coffee product, it doesn’t enjoy quite the same level of market demand as its “USDA Organic” counterpart.

View in galleryFair Trade stamp - organic coffee study

This is an important distinction, because lower demand creates perverse incentives for democratically run cooperatives of small growers operating on thinner margins than corporate behemoths like Nestlé. It’s a complicated issue, but we’ll try to break it down.

Here’s some perspective: Coffee is the second most valuable trade commodity after oil. It primarily flows from poor countries to rich countries, and the resulting power imbalance has long proven ripe for abuse. 

In the wake of the Soviet Union’s collapse, corrupt cartel control of coffee lead to highly volatile price swings. This pretty much ensured no one walked away from the markets a winner. Eventually, several activist organizations formed across Europe to seek more mutually equitable trade solutions between rich consumer and poor producer countries. In 1997, these merged into the Fairtrade Labelling Organization.

This now-massive organization had the power and influence to set standards which sought not only to stabilize the commodities markets, but to ensure producers got their fair shake. Yes, beyond mere self-interest, social justice was and is indeed the driving goal of FLO.

The mechanics of Fair Trade

There are two main ways by which the FLO – via its subsidiary regional arms like Fair Trade USA – enforces fairer trading conditions for smaller coffee producers in poor countries. These are:

  • Price floors
  • Consumer premiums

Price floors ensure that Fair Trade certified growers and producers always have access to a predictable minimum selling price for their goods. In order to qualify, you must be a part of a democratic cooperative of growers and/or roasters.

This model is important not just for Western ideological reasons; it also ensures that the revenue generated by the consumer premiums (currently $0.20 per pound) levied on coffee sales go towards enriching the people and infrastructure that make sustainable production possible in poor countries. It’s power directly to the people, as the coops make the decisions for themselves where to allocate funds.

And you know what? It has done quite a lot to alleviate or even eliminate poverty in producer communities around the world.

In the past 20 years, overall demand for coffee has reached historic highs. This should be a boon for Fair Trade coffee, but unfortunately it hasn’t quite kept pace with other types of commodity coffee. Here’s how price floors factor into that deflating demand:

The pitfalls of price floors

First, understand that there are several distinct quality grades of coffee, each commanding different prices on the open market. Certified Fair Trade farms can (and usually do) produce multiple grades of coffee, yet they will only find limited buyers at Fair Trade prices due to limited demand.

Now, say the Fair Trade price floor of a bag of organic washed Arabica beans is $1.70. (And it currently is at the time of writing.) Your farm has produced two bags of this coffee, though of different quality. (Maybe you watered or fertilized one crop more than the other, or one side of your field is shadier than the other.)

The lesser bag fetches $1.50 on the open market, while the tastier beans garner $2.00. Of course, both bags – regardless of quality grade – qualify to be sold at the $1.70 price floor. You are a certified Fair Trade farm, after all.

Because Fair Trade coffee is a specialty product with limited demand, however, there’s a buyer for justone of your bags at the Fair Trade price floor of $1.70, leaving you to sell the remaining bag on the open market as an ordinary commodity coffee at a price befitting its grade. 

Thus, you are strongly incentivized to sell your lesser-quality bag under the Fair Trade label. Meanwhile, your premium organic washed Arabica commands full price, netting you a nice profit! 

So, you plan your next harvest, and decide to cut costs even further on the bag that will get sold as Fair Trade – the price is guaranteed by Fair Trade USA, so what do you care if it doesn’t taste as good? You’re going to reallocate funds to make your premium bean even better. 

This perverse incentive is self-reinforcing, unsustainable, and taints the Fair Trade brand.

The problem with premiums

We’ll restate something said earlier: Each bag of Fair Trade coffee effectively has a $0.20 tax on it, which goes directly to the coffee cooperatives that produced it. Of course, individual farmers who are members of those coops actually produced the individual bags, and yet they must all vote on where to allocate those funds.

And it usually isn’t to remunerate the individual growers. In the best case scenario, local medical or educational centers get funded, thereby raising the overall prosperity of the community. Or, crumbling infrastructure is restored, making it more efficient for everyone in the coop to conduct business.

But, it is also ripe for abuse, and the FLO has limited power of oversight. Critics are increasingly pointing out how unfair this practice can be, while proponents of premiums stand by the core ideology behind them. So who’s right?

Well, it’s complicated. Any good solution will require nuance, but there’s a startling lack of data to illustrate the true nature of the problem. Time will tell how effective we are at bringing this model into the 21st century.

So, is Fair Trade a bust?

It doesn’t have to be, and it isn’t always. After all, a lot of people truly believe in what the label stands for, and are willing to resist the temptation of perverse incentives and corruption. This also means that it is perfectly possible to find a delicious bag of Fair Trade coffee. Just beware that it will require trial and error, and always at a premium. 

3. “Single Origin”

The latest craze in coffee is Single Origin, which is defined as coffee grown, produced, and imported from a single source. It might all come from one country, or it could be as granular as single coop or farm.

View in gallerySingle Origin - organic coffee

Typically, Single Origin branding will feature the smiling faces of actual human beings. You’ll learn their names, family histories, and hear stories of inspiration, artisanship, and perseverance. You might even learn about the exact microlot your brew came from, complete with pictures, soil facts, and educational reports on other relevant environmental and production factors.

Given the controversy and confusion surrounding the “Organic” and “Fair Trade” labels, it’s not hard to understand why Single Origin is in vogue. It allows the coffee to really speak for itself, and empowers low-information consumers (i.e. not deeply versed in the complexities of international coffee markets) to identify, connect emotionally with, and buy into quality coffee.

How it all comes together for coffee lovers

Single Origin, Organic, and Fair Trade are also by no means mutually exclusive. There’s a ton of room for overlap, and building awareness of these points of intersection can help you reap greater enjoyment and satisfaction of coffee, without overspending.

And despite the controversies and misinformation, people are more passionate about coffee than ever – whether they’re producers, promoters, or consumers of this magical black liquid. There’s no lack of deep-dive reviews, grower profiles, thought pieces, and even hard socio-economic analyses to guide your discovery.

We recommend you start your search for the perfect you-brew by going broad first, then deep later. BrewSmartly wrote a great piece concisely reviewing a smorgasbord of 10 modern organic coffee brands. Give it a quick look, keeping in mind what you’ve learned in this article to help you discern helpful information from hype.

Just How Organic Is Organic Coffee? CONCLUSION

If you’ve ever wondered “just how organic is organic?”, we hope today’s article has helped provide some clarity on the matter. In order to get a holistic understanding of the humble coffee bean and its impact on humanity, we’ve taken a critical look into the three most common labels used to differentiate and sell coffee: Organic, Fair Trade, and Single Origin.

Our purpose is to neither endorse nor damn the industries surrounding these keywords, but to educate you that they’re more than just empty buzzwords.

Did you learn something new today? What factors into which coffee you buy and drink at home, the office, or out and about? Do you have a favorite brew we’ve absolutely got to try? Sound off in a comment below!

Источник: https://www.thecoolist.com/organic-coffee/

Benefits of Drinking Organic Coffee

Coffee lovers, rejoice! There's no better time to be a caffeine fiend than the present day. With access to so many different beans from farms around the world, passionate brewers from all walks of life are experimenting with different blends in hopes of creating the perfect cup for every coffee drinker.

There are so many options, however, one of the biggest choices is also one of the broadest — do you pick traditional coffee or organic beans? Many coffee drinkers face this dilemma as they purchase their next bag of beans. When it comes to the organic coffee vs. regular coffee debate, people want to know if organic coffee is healthier or tastes better. Let's look at the organic coffee benefits and how those compare to the benefits of coffee grown and processed through standard methods.

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What Is Organic Coffee?

Walk through any grocery store and you'll surely find plenty of foods and drinks that are labeled organic, including coffee. What is organic coffee? Thedictionary definitionstates that organic food products are those which have not had any contact with antibiotics, pesticides, growth stimulants or chemically formulated fertilizers during its growth or processing. This includes foods that are derived from plants and animals. However, a food product may very well meet this definition of organic yet fail to meet the qualifications for is organic coffee good for you certified organic label.

The United StatesDepartment of Agriculture National Organic Programsets the definition and standards for all food products to be certified organic. The USDA NOP lists the following requirements for a food product to receive bank midwest online organic certification:

 Farmers must proactively use renewable resources and attempt to conserve water and soil to maintain or strengthen the environment's long-term quality.

  • Any foods produced from animals must not have come in contact with growth hormones or antibiotics.
  • All food must be produced without coming in contact with most conventional pesticides, synthetic fertilizers, bio-engineered substances or ionizing radiation.
  • Each organic farm must be thoroughly inspected by a government-approved official to ensure the most current qualifications for organic certification are met.
  • Any organic food derived from plants or animals that undergo additional handling or processing after leaving the farm but before being made available to the public may only be sold at establishments that are certified organic providers.

 What is coffee that's been certified organic? It's coffee that was grown and processed without the use of most synthetic chemicals. This coffee comes from a farm that prioritizes sustainability, renewable resources and preserving the quality of the land, groundwater, and air — all verified by official USDA NOP representatives. If you're purchasing coffee from a bean distributor, their roasting and preserving processes do not use any chemicals. If you're purchasing coffee that's freshly brewed, no synthetic chemicals were used during the brewing process.

Benefits of Organic Coffee vs. Regular Coffee

No matter if you take your cup with milk, sugar, cold-brewed or French pressed, you've got a choice to make when choosing your coffee beans — traditional or organic. This decision is harder for some than for others. Plenty of questions enter the mind of the coffee drinker — which is more affordable, better for the body or better for the environment? Let's look at some benefits of organic coffee and compare them to the benefits of regular coffee.

Benefits of Organic Coffee

Coffee to Start the Dat

A cup of coffee is a great way to start the day, and the benefits of organic coffee make it all the more enjoyable. As with many other organic products, you won't be surprised to learn that there are numerous reasons why organic coffee has become a popular choice for coffee drinkers around the world. Among the many perks, here are three benefits of organic coffee we amazon com visa login the most:

  1. Almost completely free of chemicals:What you put in your body is just as important as what you choose to not consume. Synthetic substances and chemicals can pose serious health risks to the land, animals, and people that they contact. Pesticides, fertilizers, hormones, and other synthetic chemicals can negatively influence bodily changes in some cases. Research is ongoing, but some studies show that chemicals such as those used in the growth or processing of non-organic foods can potentiallytrigger health issues.
  2. Organic coffee farms promote eco-friendly practices:Coffee farms that commit to organic practices are actively protecting and preserving our environment. Aside from the growing and processing practices, those who distribute organic coffee may also try to conduct other aspects of their business in more environmentally-friendly ways such as using renewable resources, manufacturing products with recyclable materials, donating proceeds to sustainability or conservation efforts, and promoting environmentally responsible practices to their employees and customers.
  3. Natural compounds are good for the body:Organic coffee health benefits are definitely enhanced by the lack of synthetic and man-made chemicals used to grow and process the beans. Organic nutrients found in coffee are also effective for reducing stress, increasing your mood, strengthening your immune system and boosting your metabolism. If you choosedecaffeinated organic coffee black coffee, you can limit your ulta pay bill online intake to ensure you're putting exactly the right amount of this stimulant in your diet.

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Benefits of Regular Coffee

There is no denying that the benefits of organic coffee are welcomed by coffee drinkers around the world holliday grainger nude pics we can't imagine a coffee lover not appreciating the lack of chemicals in their morning cup or the steadfast dedication to preserving the environment so they can continue to enjoy quality cups of coffee year after year. However, when debating organic coffee vs. regular coffee, the conventional process yields several benefits as well:

  1. Traditional coffee is healthy too:Coffee in any form has been scientifically proven toprovide health benefits. Along with energy and focus enhancements, caffeine can help you burn fat and improve your physical performance. It also has the potential to reduce your risk of developing diseases such as Type 2 diabetes, dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, hepatitis, fatty liver disease, depression, and certain cancers like liver and colorectal cancer. Organic or not, the nutrients and antioxidants found in a cup of coffee have positive impacts on your health.
  2. More options for regular coffee:Although organic food sales are continuing to increase year after year, thequantity of organic farmshas stayed relatively the same. With fewer organic farms, there simply cannot be as many diverse options for organic foods as there are conventional foods. This offers coffee drinkers more options when it comes to regular coffee beans. Average drinkers and coffee connoisseurs alike have opportunities to sample different blends and beans from more conventional coffee farms than organic farms.
  3. Some traditional coffees are more affordable:Not all organic coffees cost more than conventional coffees. However, higher costs canresult from several factors. Organic farmers often lack subsidies from governmental organizations, increasing their growing costs. The organic farming philippines to usa flight hours typically requires more labor and thorough management to ensure the products meets the USDA NOP's strict certification requirements. Most of these organic farms are also smaller and don't receive the same economic benefits or tax breaks as larger farms may.

Organic Coffee Farms

From an environmental standpoint, organic coffee farms may have a more positive impact on the planet than some conventional coffee farms. Comparing the prices of organic black coffee to regular coffee is difficult, as a variety of factors can increase or decrease the price of each specific batch of beans. While there may be more options for regular coffee, there are still plenty of organic alternatives available. Is organic coffee good for you? Yes. Is organic coffee healthier? Not necessarily.

Is Organic Coffee Healthier?

When comparing organic to regular coffee, it's often assumed that organic coffee beans are healthier. In fact, many people may believe that any organic foods are healthy alternatives to foods grown or processed through standard methods because organic products contain fewer pesticides and chemicals. Although certified organic products were grown, harvested, and processed with fewer of these chemicals, the truth is that organic products aren't necessarily healthier from a nutrition perspective. While you do consume fewer chemicals, the nutritional value of the foods remains the same.

The American Journal of Clinical Nutritioncompared organic foods to conventional foodsand were unable to confirm that organic products are inherently healthier than regular foods. The American Dietetic Association echoes this statement, claiming that both organic and regular foods share that same quality and quantity of minerals, vitamins, and antioxidants. Nutritionally, organic coffee isn't necessarily any healthier than conventional coffee. However, if you are a coffee drinker who is organic coffee good for you a diet that's limited in synthetic chemicals, organic coffee is a good option.

Which Coffee Is Better for the Planet?

This is a bit of a tricky question, especially considering the many diverse factors that influence the coffee plants' initial growth all the way through when the bean is brewed for our consumption. Since organic coffee farms do not use potentially harmful chemicals, neither the environment and the farm's employees are exposed to these possibly hazardous substances. Many organic coffee farms alsolimit their use of non-renewable resourcesand may engage in other practices that promote sustainability and conservation of natural resources.

However, just as organic does not necessarily mean healthier across the board, organic coffee growers don't necessarily practice the same environmentally or socially-conscious methods. Organic coffee producers that received certification fromFairtrade Internationalmay engage in stricter sustainable and fair practices than an organic farm that does not have the same certification. If you want to purchase coffee that's as environmentally or socially conscious as possible, do thorough research on both organic and non-organic coffee growers and roasters.

For example, we are proud to provide coffee drinkers throughout the country with Real Good Coffee Company USDA Certified Organic whole bean coffee. We provide this single-origin Sumatran blend in whole bean bags, and we are proud tooffer it in Nespresso PodsandKeurig Organic Coffee Coffee Pods. We care about our planet as much as we care about our coffee, which is why our organic coffee cups for Keurig and pods are made with100% recyclable materials.

Does Organic Coffee Taste Different?

Here's the million-dollar question — which coffee tastes the best? Or more specifically, does organic coffee taste any different than regular coffee? As professional roasters and avid coffee drinkers, our team has asked and has been asked these questions more times than we can count. Our opinion? Yes! Organic coffee can taste different than regular coffee. In fact, one organic coffee may taste better than a conventional bean while another regular brew will taste worlds better than an organic blend.

The truth is that all coffee beans, blends, and brews can taste better, worse, or simply different than others — whether you're drinking a cup made with organic coffee beans or not. Every coffee drinker has their own unique preference for taste. You may prefer 100% Arabica beans in a cold brew while someone else thinks organic Robusta beans that have opening an account with pnc bank French pressed deliver the best taste. Aside from personal preference, there are many other factors that do alter the final flavor.

What Makes Coffee's Taste Change?

You've picked up a fresh cup of coffee, and huntington bank giant eagle dover ohio tastes amazing. A day later, capital one travel notification debit card grab another cup of the same type of coffee, and suddenly, it's not up to par. Whether the coffee is organic or not, several other factors can cause a change in the taste of your morning cup of joe. Understanding why organic coffee and regular coffee can vary in taste profiles will help you identify quality in every cup and become a better homebrewer.

A lot of effort goes into your jug of java. The type of bean, where it's grown geographically, how it's grown, and how it's processed on the farm can all influence taste before the bean is even roasted. The way it's roasted, blended, and brewed also have an impact. Factors like grind size, coffee to water ratio, temperature of the water, how long the coffee is extracted from the bean, and how fresh the grinds are can dramatically alter the taste.

Which coffee tastes best — organic black coffee or conventional black coffee? That's for your palate to decide.

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Discover Which Real Good Coffee Benefits Your Morning Most

The benefits of organic coffee can be quite advantageous, especially if you're a coffee drinker with a focus on the environment.Organic or regular — when you order from Real Good Coffee Co. coffee, you're guaranteed to get a premium-quality cup every time. We invite you to try our Organic Dark Roast Whole Bean Coffee as well as our non-organic Breakfast Blend Light Roast, Donut Shop Medium Roast, and Dark French Roast. Don't settle for any cup. Always start your morning with Real Good Coffee Co.

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Источник: https://realgoodcoffeeco.com/blogs/realgoodblog/what-are-the-benefits-of-drinking-organic-coffee

The Real Reason You Shouldn't Drink Instant Coffee

Instant coffee is made to have a long shelf life, so yup, maybe that canister in your mom's pantry is still good. But is it good for you? While instant coffee offers many of the health benefits that regular coffee does, such as boosting your metabolism, increasing longevity, and decreasing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, there are also a couple of downsides to drinking it.

One of the obvious drawbacks is that instant coffee has less caffeine than regular coffee, and though that's not necessarily bad for your health, it could have unintended consequences for coffee lovers who need their daily fix, leading to more cups and more caffeine than they realize. Additionally, because instant coffee is so convenient and easy to make, there is the potential of drinking more cups than you would if you had to make a more labor intensive pour-over. Both are important to consider because if you have any type of sensitivity to caffeine, this could lead to sleep disruption, and upset is organic coffee good for you (via Healthline). 

Источник: https://www.mashed.com/218519/the-real-reason-you-shouldnt-drink-instant-coffee/

13 Health Benefits of Coffee, Based on Science

Coffee is one of the world’s most popular beverages.

Thanks to its high levels of antioxidants and beneficial nutrients, it also seems to be quite healthy.

Studies show that coffee drinkers have a much lower risk of several serious diseases.

Here are the top 13 health benefits of coffee.

1. Can Improve Energy Levels and Reaction Times

Coffee can help people feel less tired and increase energy levels (, 2).

That’s because it contains a stimulant called caffeine — the most commonly consumed psychoactive substance in the world (3).

After you drink coffee, the caffeine is absorbed into your bloodstream. From there, it travels to your brain (4).

In the brain, caffeine blocks the inhibitory neurotransmitter adenosine.

When this happens, the amount of other neurotransmitters like norepinephrine and dopamine increases, leading to enhanced firing of neurons (, ).

Many controlled studies in humans show that coffee improves various aspects of brain function — including memory, mood, vigilance, energy levels, reaction times and general mental function (, 8, 9).

Summary

Caffeine blocks an inhibitory neurotransmitter in your brain, which causes a stimulant effect. This improves energy levels, mood and various aspects of brain function.

2. Can Help You Burn Fat

Caffeine is found in almost every commercial fat-burning supplement — and for good reason. It’s one of the few natural substances proven to aid fat burning.

Several studies show that caffeine can boost your metabolic rate by 3–11% (, ).

Other studies indicate that caffeine can specifically increase fat burning by as much as 10% in obese individuals and 29% in lean people ().

However, it’s possible that these effects diminish in long-term coffee drinkers.

Summary

Several studies show that caffeine can increase fat burning and boost your metabolic rate.

3. Can Drastically Improve Physical Performance

Caffeine stimulates your nervous system, signaling fat cells to break down body fat (, 14).

But it also increases epinephrine (adrenaline) levels in your blood (, ).

This is the fight-or-flight hormone, which prepares your body for intense physical exertion.

Caffeine breaks down body fat, making free fatty acids available as fuel (, 18).

Given these effects, it’s unsurprising that caffeine can improve physical performance by 11–12%, on average (, ).

Therefore, it makes sense to have a strong cup of coffee about half an hour before you head to the gym.

Summary

Caffeine can increase adrenaline levels and release fatty acids from your fat tissues. It also leads to significant improvements in physical performance.

4. Contains Essential Nutrients

Many of the nutrients in coffee beans make their way into the finished brewed coffee.

A single cup of coffee contains (21):

  • Riboflavin (vitamin B2): 11% of the Reference Daily Intake (RDI).
  • Pantothenic acid (vitamin B5): 6% of the RDI.
  • Manganese and potassium: 3% of the RDI.
  • Magnesium and niacin (vitamin B3): 2% of the RDI.

Though this may not seem like a big deal, most people enjoy several cups per day — allowing these amounts to quickly add up.

Summary

Coffee contains several important nutrients, including riboflavin, pantothenic acid, manganese, potassium, magnesium and niacin.

5. May Lower Your Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a major health problem, currently affecting millions of people worldwide.

It’s characterized by elevated blood sugar levels caused by insulin resistance or a reduced ability to secrete insulin.

For some reason, coffee drinkers have a significantly reduced risk of type 2 diabetes.

Studies observe that people who drink the most coffee have a 23–50% lower risk of getting this disease. One study showed a reduction as high as 67% (22, 25, 26).

According to a large review of 18 studies in a total of 457,922 people, each daily cup of coffee was associated with a 7% reduced risk of type 2 diabetes ().

Summary

Several observational studies show that coffee south florida state college panther central have a much lower risk of type 2 diabetes, a serious condition that affects millions of people worldwide.

6. May Protect You From Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common neurodegenerative disease and the leading cause of dementia worldwide.

This condition usually affects people over 65, and there is no known cure.

However, there are several things you can do to prevent the disease from occurring in the first place.

This includes the usual suspects like eating healthy and exercising, but drinking coffee may be incredibly effective as well.

Several studies show that coffee drinkers have up to a 65% lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease (, ).

Summary

Coffee drinkers have a much lower risk of getting Alzheimer’s disease, which is a leading cause of dementia worldwide.

7. May Lower Your Risk of Parkinson’s

Parkinson’s disease is the second most common neurodegenerative condition, right behind Alzheimer’s.

It’s caused by the death of dopamine-generating neurons in your brain.

As with Alzheimer’s, there is no known cure, which makes it that much more important to focus on prevention.

Studies show that coffee drinkers have a much lower risk of Are there any grocery stores open today disease, with a risk reduction ranging from 32–60% (, ).

In this case, the caffeine itself appears to be beneficial, as people who drink decaf don’t have a lower risk of Parkinson’s ().

Summary

Coffee drinkers have up to a 60% lower risk of getting Parkinson’s disease, the second most common neurodegenerative disorder.

8. May Protect Your Liver

Your liver is an amazing organ that carries out hundreds of important functions.

Several common diseases primarily affect the liver, including hepatitis, fatty liver disease and many others.

Many of these conditions can lead to cirrhosis, in which your liver is largely replaced by scar tissue.

Interestingly, coffee may protect against cirrhosis — people who drink 4 or more cups per day have up to an 80% lower risk (,).

Summary

Coffee drinkers have a much lower risk of cirrhosis, which can be caused by several diseases that affect the liver.

9. Can Fight Depression

Depression is a serious mental disorder that causes a significantly reduced quality of life.

It’s very common, as about 4.1% of people in the US currently meet the criteria for clinical depression.

In a Harvard study published in 2011, women who drank 4 or more cups of coffee per day had a 20% lower risk of becoming depressed ().

Another study in 208,424 individuals found that those who drank 4 or more cups per day were 53% less likely to die by suicide ().

Summary

Coffee appears to lower your risk of developing depression and may dramatically reduce suicide risk.

10. May Lower Risk of Certain Types of Cancer

Cancer is one of the world’s leading causes of death. It is characterized by uncontrolled cell growth in your body.

Coffee appears to be protective against two types of cancer: liver and colorectal cancer.

Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death in the world, while colorectal cancer ranks fourth ().

Studies show that coffee drinkers have up to a 40% lower risk of liver cancer (41, ).

Similarly, one study in 489,706 people found that those who drank 4–5 cups of coffee per day had a 15% lower risk of colorectal cancer ().

Summary

Liver and colorectal cancer are the third and fourth leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Coffee drinkers have a lower risk of both.

11. Doesn’t Cause Heart Disease and May Lower Stroke Risk

It’s often claimed that caffeine can increase your blood pressure.

This is true, but with a rise of only 3–4 mm/Hg, the effect is small and usually dissipates if you drink coffee regularly (, ).

However, it may persist in some people, so keep that in mind if you have elevated blood pressure (, 47).

That being said, studies don’t support the idea that coffee raises your risk of heart disease (, 49).

On the contrary, there is some evidence that women who drink coffee have a reduced risk (50).

Some studies also show that coffee drinkers have a 20% lower risk of stroke (, ).

Summary

Coffee may cause mild increases in blood pressure, which usually diminish over time. Coffee drinkers do not have an increased risk of heart disease and have a slightly lower risk of stroke.

12. May Help You Live Longer

Given that coffee drinkers are less likely to get many diseases, it makes sense that coffee could help you live longer.

Several observational studies indicate that coffee drinkers have a lower risk of death.

In two very large studies, drinking coffee was associated with a 20% reduced risk of death in men and a 26% decreased risk of death in women, over 18–24 years ().

This effect appears particularly strong in people with type 2 diabetes. In one 20-year study, individuals with diabetes who drank coffee had a 30% lower risk of death (54).

Summary

Several studies show that coffee drinkers live longer and have a lower risk of premature death.

13. The Biggest Source of Antioxidants in the Western Diet

For people who eat a standard Western diet, coffee may be one of the healthiest aspects of their diet.

That’s because coffee is quite high in antioxidants. Studies show that many people get more antioxidants from coffee than from fruits and vegetables combined (,57).

In fact, coffee may be one of the healthiest beverages on the planet.

Summary

Coffee is rich in powerful antioxidants, and many people get more antioxidants from coffee than from fruits and veggies combined.

The Bottom Line

Coffee is a highly popular beverage around the globe that boasts a number of impressive health benefits.

Not only can your daily cup of joe help you feel more energized, burn fat and improve physical performance, it may also lower your risk of several conditions, such as type 2 diabetes, cancer and Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

In fact, coffee may even boost longevity.

If you enjoy its taste and tolerate its caffeine content, don’t hesitate to pour yourself a cup or more throughout the day.

Источник: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/top-13-evidence-based-health-benefits-of-coffee

Ask a Dermatologist: Is Coffee Bad For Your Skin?

You always hear people swear that giving up [insert vice here] changed everything for their skin. Most often, it’s dairy, sugar, or wheat, but lately, the rumors have been centered around coffee. As is the case with most of our favorite vices, rumor has it that your daily caffeine habit could be wreaking havoc on your skin. But is drinking coffee really all that bad? We wish the answer was a simple yes or no, but as it turns out, it's a little more complicated than that. To find out the truth about our favorite caffeinated beverage, we interviewed dermatologists Gary Goldenberg, MD, and Whitney Bowe, MD. Before you decide to quit coffee cold turkey, keep reading to see what they have to say.

Meet the Expert

Gary South florida state college panther central is a cosmetic dermatologist at Goldenberg Dermatology in NYC and an assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital.

Coffee Can Raise Your Stress Levels

One of the biggest rumors surrounding coffee is that it causes acne, and well, that's not entirely false. As Goldenberg explains it, the overconsumption of caffeine has been associated with stress, which is associated with acne. So how much coffee is too much? The FDA suggests a maximum of 400 milligrams a day (roughly four or five cups). But when it comes to your skin, Bowe suggests limiting yourself to one or two cups a day. Too much of anything can be a bad thing, so when you drink coffee, do so in moderation.

Meet the Expert

Whitney Bowe is a board-certified dermatologist and the author of Dirty Looks: The Secret to Beautiful Skin. She is based in NY.

How You Take Your Coffee Could Cause Breakouts

Goldenberg says inorganic milk, white sugar, and syrup can negatively affect your hormones and lead to acne. So, if you regularly take your coffee with sweetener and whatever cream you have on hand, then, yes, your coffee drink could be the source of your breakouts. Pass on the sugar and dairy milk (and yep, that means scale back on apple ipad mini 1st generation fancy, sugary Starbucks concoction), and opt for an unsweetened nondairy creamer instead.

Bad Coffee Can Disrupt Your Gut Flora

It's also important to note that not all coffee beans are created equal. "Poor quality coffee, especially if drank with dairy products sourced from cows injected with antibiotics, can disrupt gut flora," Goldenberg says. "Organic coffee has not been associated with gut flora disruption." But why exactly is a gut flora important? As Bowe explains it, if your gut is inflamed, that will show up as inflammation in your skin. "Eating the wrong types of foods, unfortunately, slows down digestion and creates a shift in the type of bacterial environment in your gut," Bowe says. "It affects your gut microbiome, and that, in turn, leads to leaky gut, and leaky gut translates to leaky skin." In short, coffee quality is key. If you're going to drink coffee every day, splurge on the organic beans.

Poor quality coffee, especially if drank with dairy products sourced from cows injected with antibiotics, can disrupt gut flora.

Coffee Beans Are Packed With Antioxidants

But wait—before you decide to quit your morning cup of coffee, you should know that when done right, coffee is actually a good habit to have. "Caffeine has been shown to be beneficial for your skin," Goldenberg says. "It has antioxidant properties and has been shown to be anti-inflammatory." You might be familiar with free radicals, but for the uninitiated, they're the damaging molecules that cause premature aging, and according to some studies, they can even lead to acne. In other words, they're the skin enemy. Antioxidants work to fight free-radical damage, and they can be applied topically or also ingested. Bowe recommends that her patients who are particularly prone to breakouts up their intake of antioxidants. If you're a big-time coffee drinker, good news: Caffeine is a great source of antioxidants. Actually, studies show it's one of the biggest sources of antioxidants for many people. Who knew?

Coffee Can Be Beneficial When Applied Topically

If you'd rather quit drinking coffee altogether than drink it black, we don't blame you. It can be hard to adjust to the bitter taste of coffee when you're used to is organic coffee good for you the sweeteners and creamers. But that doesn't mean you have to forgo all the skin-loving benefits of the morning beverage. Goldenberg says topical products that contain caffeine also have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Although the effects are short-term, Goldenberg says the caffeine in topical products can decrease the appearance of cellulite by dehydrating the tissue. Bowe adds that coffee grounds also work to reduce swelling and puffiness, which is why you'll commonly find this ingredient in eye creams and treatments.

The takeaway: When consumed correctly, coffee is good for your skin. But if you're one of those who can't bear the taste of plain coffee, shop some coffee-infused products below to make caffeine-free mornings a little more bearable.

Byrdie takes every opportunity to use high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial guidelines to learn more about how we keep our content accurate, reliable and trustworthy.

  1. United States Food and Drug Administration. Spilling the beans: how much caffeine is too much? Updated December 12, 2018.

  2. Mills OH, Criscito MC, Schlesinger TE, Verdicchio R, Szoke E. Addressing free radical oxidation in acne vulgaris. J Clin Aesthet Dermatol. 2016;9(1):25-30.

  3. Bhatti SK, O'Keefe JH, Lavie CJ. Coffee and tea: perks for health and longevity? Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2013;16(6):688-697. doi:10.1097/MCO.0b013e328365b9a0

Источник: https://www.byrdie.com/coffee-effects

This Is How 19 Health Experts Take Their Coffee

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We often think of health experts as being superhuman with chiseled abs or crazy scientific dietary knowledge. (Conjugated linoleic acid, is that Dothraki?) But they start their day the same way most of us do: with a cup of coffee.

Seeing the way someone prepares their morning mug becomes shorthand for their nutritional philosophy: Is dairy a do or a don’t? What about sweeteners? And butter? Coconut oil? Do these belong in coffee — or coffee cake?

Health experts are human. They put on their pants one leg at a time and grind their coffee beans in a grinder (not pulverized by a series of kettlebell swings).

But they’ve also given a lot of thought to what goes into their bodies, coffee included, and used their vast knowledge to create the optimal cup.

That’s why we asked is organic coffee good for you to share their ideal way to kick-start the day. Read on for their (often surprising) java testimonials and details on what motivates them to add certain ingredients (or not).

Authors

1. Adam Bornstein, founder of Born Fitness, NY Times bestselling author, @BornFitness

Morning Rx: Dark to medium roast coffee, occasionally with cinnamon

“I might be the only person in the world that doesn’t drink coffee for the caffeine. I wake up at 4:30 a.m. each day, ready to take on the world. I just like drinking something hot, and I believe in the health benefits of coffee beans.

As someone that practices intermittent fasting, the best benefit is that coffee completely blunts my appetite. So that is a nice bonus.

I only take my coffee two walmart money card number black (90 percent of the time) or with some cinnamon for a little extra flavor. If I’m making my coffee at home, everything starts with the beans.

I’m an organic roast kind of guy, and I tend to prefer dark to medium roasts. Is organic coffee good for you grind the beans fresh every morning, and then preferably use a French press. No sweeteners or creamer.

I won’t make any crazy claims about the magic of coffee. I wrote about why I drink coffee now, after 30 years of avoiding the stuff. That said, if my cup is “better” it’s only because I don’t add any extra crap to make it unhealthy.

[I’d never add] syrups. I don’t get that idea. Syrup belongs on ice cream, pancakes, or waffles. Not in coffee.”

2. Holly Rilinger, bestselling author, motivational speaker, Nike master trainer, @hollyrilinger

Morning Rx: Almond milk cappuccino

“Almond milk cappuccinos are the way I start my days! I use my Nespresso Espresso machine and foam my own organic almond milk. I like cappuccinos over lattés because there is less milk.

There are a few almond milks out there that taste great in an iced coffee situation, but others that are thin and I find disgusting. My favorite is Califia Farms Almond Milk. It’s certified non-GMO and organic.

[When I drank milk cappuccinos] I would always start my day with a heavy FULL feeling in my stomach. [But] I couldn’t fathom giving up that little slice of heaven, so I just dealt with the discomfort.

That is until I gave almond milk a try. I didn’t love it right away, [but] I did love that I no longer had stomach pain.

I now LOVE the taste of almond milk in my coffee and really can’t stand that filmy taste of dairy in my mouth. And my grandparents were dairy farmers in Kansas! I grew up around milk my whole life!”

3. Mark Sisson, author of “The Primal Blueprint,” founder of Mark’s Daily Apple, @marksdailyapple

Morning Rx: Dark roast coffee with heavy whipping cream and one teaspoon of sugar or raw eggs with honey and salt

“My staple morning coffee is simple: dark roast French press coffee, heavy whipping cream (pasture-raised, liberty bank for savings park ridge il course), and one teaspoon of sugar (just to cut the bitterness). That’s my go-to cup, but I also like to experiment.

My latest creation is the Primal Egg Coffee, which involves a couple of raw egg yolks or whole raw eggs (from pastured hens) added to freshly brewed coffee, along with a little honey, salt, and sometimes some cinnamon, cocoa, turmeric, and/or cayenne. It all goes into the blender.

The yolks allow a thorough emulsion — so it’s smooth and rich — and the coffee’s temperature denatures and increases the digestibility of the egg white proteins without cooking the yolk.

Coffee is famous for increasing metabolism and boosting energy levels, but that increased energy isn’t conjured out of thin air. It’s created by the oxidation of stored body fat.

When you drink coffee, you get a little jolt of adrenaline, which increases lipolysis (the release of stored body fat into circulation for oxidation/burning), and a boost in heat production (from the energy being expended).

Unfortunately the typical cup of coffee — full of sugar and low-fat or skim milk — doesn’t provide these benefits. This is for two main reasons. First, sugar intake increases insulin, which suppresses lipolysis and fat-burning.

Second, the caffeine in coffee briefly increases glucose intolerance, especially when taken with carbohydrates, which means the body needs more insulin to handle the same amount of sugar it normally would.

So, ironically enough, drinking [super] sugary coffee actually inhibits the release of body fat for energy — the exact opposite of what a good cup of coffee should do.”

4. Marion Nestle, professor of nutrition, food studies, and public health at NYU, author of “Food Politics,” @marionnestle

Morning Rx: Black coffee with skim milk

“I’m not a breakfast eater, at least not first thing, but I do like my coffee. I particularly like Gourmet Garage’s SoHo blend.

I buy beans, grind them as needed, throw a tablespoon or two into a filter, pour hot water into the filter right over the cup, add skim milk, and am good to go. It’s better for me because I don’t like coffee too strong or over-roasted.

My nutritional philosophy is everything in moderation, but never hazelnut or any other kind of flavored coffee. They don’t work for me.”

5. Dave Asprey, creator of Bulletproof Coffee, author of “The Bulletproof Diet,” @bpnutrition

Morning Rx: Coffee beans with unsalted, grass-fed butter and Bulletproof Brain Octane Oil

“I drink Bulletproof Coffee blended with the authentic Bulletproof ingredients. I use Bulletproof Process coffee beans that are lab tested to minimize mold toxin levels that limit human performance.

I brew it using a metal (not paper) filter to allow coffee oils into the final brew. I blend it (in a blender) with unsalted, grass-fed butter and Bulletproof Brain Octane Oil, a flavorless extract of coconut oil that is 18 times stronger than plain coconut oil.

Blending in butter (or better yet, ghee) is important because it creates a small droplet of fat suspended in water called a micelle, which means the fat doesn’t separate from the coffee.

Grass-fed butter is superior to grain-fed because it tastes better and provides substantially more conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), vitamins A, D, and E; and, very importantly, K2.

It also doesn’t contain nearly as many omega-6 inflammatory polyunsaturated oils compared to industrial butter.”

Doctors

6. Frank Lipman, leader in functional medicine, founder of Eleven Eleven Wellness Center, @DrFrankLipman

Morning Rx: Organic coffee with MCT Oil and grass-fed butter

“[In the morning] you can’t beat the energy and nutrition of a healthy protein shake for breakfast.

I make mine with my Be Well Chocolate Whey Protein, MCT Oil, and Greens Powder, blended with chia seeds, kale, blueberries, avocado, and almond milk.

[It leaves me] energized and satisfied — not jittery or wired as coffee often makes me feel.

[I do have coffee] once or occasionally twice a week. [I make] bulletproof coffee. It’s a good way to supercharge your morning cup of coffee to support cognitive function and fat-burning.

I blend organic coffee with one tablespoon MCT Oil (or regular coconut oil) and one tablespoon of grass-fed butter.

Butter that’s from grass-fed or pasture raised cows, not regular butter, is an important ingredient in bulletproof coffee because it adds health-supporting vitamins and minerals.

This includes CLA, or conjugated linoleic acid, which helps reduce belly fat, protects against cancer, and encourages muscle growth. There’s also vitamin A to help key bank hours plattsburgh ny thyroid, adrenal, and cardiovascular health.

Vitamin K2 supports bone density and possibly reverses arterial calcification. Vitamin A, D, and E, are all key antioxidants that are essential to good health.

7. David Katz, director of Yale University’s Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, founder of the True Health Initiative, @DrDavidKatz

Morning Rx: French roast coffee with nonfat, organic powdered milk

“I like coffee first thing in the morning to accelerate that transition from the residual frowstiness that follows sleep to my busy day. [I drink] French roast coffee with nonfat, organic powdered milk.

The powdered milk avoids adding water so the coffee isn’t diluted or cooled. Powdered milk also bankofamerica com eddcard sign up protein, calcium, vitamin D, and vitamin A for very few calories.

If you acclimate to the taste of coffee as is, you don’t miss sweeteners at all. These can take a healthy, stimulating, natural drink rich in antioxidants and turn it into another vehicle for sugar, calories, or chemicals your body doesn’t need.

That said, when in France, I do have a café au lait at times, and those are sweetened. I think of those as a treat, not my daily drink. You gotta live a little too!”

Nutritionists

8. Joy Bauer, nutrition and health expert for NBC’s “Today” show, @joybauer

Morning Rx: Black coffee

“I’ve been drinking my coffee black ever since, well, since I started drinking coffee. I typically pop a pod into my Keurig machine, pour a cup that’s already been brewed at the “Today” show, or grab something to go from the corner deli.

I love the smell, the flavor, the experience. And the jolt of caffeine helps kick-start my day.

[I’m aware of the] coffee pros and cons. A typical cup of coffee tends to be loaded with fattening fixings like whole milk, cream, or half-and-half, plus sugar (and more sugar!). Or some people go heavy on artificial sweeteners and syrups.

My straight-up version comes packed with antioxidants and caffeine without unnecessary calories or chemicals. Consider this: one black cup of coffee equals 5 calories. One cup with half-and-half and sugar equals about 120 calories.

Make the swap every day and you could lose up to 12 pounds by the end of the year.”

9. Brian St. Pierre, sports nutritionist at Precision Nutrition, @BSPNutrition

Morning Rx: Black coffee

“About 67 percent of Americans put cream and sugar in their coffee, but I tend to take mine black because I prefer to get my calories from food.

The research on the benefits of coffee is mostly on [black, conventional drip-brewer style], since it’s the most common.

It’s important to keep the big picture in mind. If you’re only consuming one coffee per day, a little cream and sugar is unlikely to be a problem. But since the average American coffee drinker consumes three cups per day, that can start adding up quickly.

We’re all allowed some discretionary calories, just don’t use them all up in your three daily cups. A few teaspoons of sugar and a few tablespoons of your creamer of choice are probably fine — beyond that, you start asking for trouble.”

Trainers

10. Lacey Stone, bi-coastal fitness professional, celebrity trainer, motivational speaker, @laceystonefitness

Morning Rx: Ice red eye with one shot of espresso and agave nectar

“I take a leisurely stroll to Starbucks every morning. I get an iced red eye, that’s a regular iced coffee with one shot of espresso. I add a little agave nectar and I’m good to go.

I have that ‘A-HA’ moment where I’m like, ‘Let’s go day, I’m ready!’ The espresso is my rocket fuel. I believe that caffeine is good, if it’s used properly.

It increases your basal metabolic rate and it increases your senses, which leads to improved performance in your workouts. (Your basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the rate at which you burn fat.)”

I also use agave nectar rather than unnatural sweeteners.

11. Brian Gallagher, co-founder of Throwback Fitness, @ThrowbackFit

Morning Rx:Coffee blended is organic coffee good for you butter or coconut oil and a few dashes of cinnamon

“I usually prepare coffee myself in the mornings using a French press. I pour the coffee right from the French press into my blender, adding either butter or coconut oil and a few dashes of cinnamon.

I blend for 30 seconds since coconut oil or butter don’t mix too well when stirred with a spoon (no matter how fast I stir!), and the blender adds a nice froth to it.

I typically don’t eat my first meal until around noon, so I find that the coconut oil or butter keeps me full until then. I’ve also come to love the taste of butter in coffee. It takes a little of the bitterness out.

[And I] like the strange looks I get when a server asks me if I want milk and sugar and I instead ask for two butters!”

12. Kira Stokes, fitness expert, creator of the Stoked Method and Stoked Series Workouts, @kirastokesfit

Morning Rx: Dark roast coffee with coconut milk creamer and liquid stevia

“I race to my Nespresso Vertuoline machine in the early morning… I use the Stormio dark roast pods as I love a good strong cup to start my day. My creamer of choice is So Delicious Coconut Milk Creamer because it has a rich flavor without lactose or hydrogenated oils.

I add a touch of liquid stevia, but the coconut milk creamer is a bit sweet so only a dab is necessary. Stevia is a naturally occurring substance from a plant.”

13. Nia Shanks, coach and writer, author of “Lift Like a Girl,” @NiaShanks

Morning Rx: Dark roast coffee with raw sugar and either heavy whipping cream or plain cocoa powder

Coffee always starts my day. I enjoy sipping it while I settle in to the morning and start writing. I drink dark roasts exclusively. The darker the better.

I use my standard coffee maker during the week, but on the weekends, my beloved spouse makes phenomenal French press with freshly roasted whole beans we grind just is organic coffee good for you use.

I rotate between two types of additions: either plain, raw sugar and heavy whipping cream, or raw sugar and plain cocoa powder. (This makes an incredible mocha and works beautifully with a dark espresso roast.)

I’m not a fan of flavored coffee creams, simply because many have a ton of other ingredients like high fructose corn syrup and even trans fat. I prefer to keep my coffee additions as natural as possible without sacrificing taste and satisfaction.

Athletes

14. Rich Roll, plant-powered ultra athlete, author of “Finding Ultra,” @richroll

Morning Rx: Pu-erh tea

“The first thing I do [in the morning] is drink a tall glass of water with some fresh lemon or a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar, which has an alkalizing effect on my system.

My next step is to prepare a Pu-erh tea. It’s a post-fermented tea product produced in the Yunnan province of China and carefully aged.

The harvesting, creation, and ceremony of Pu-erh is an art steeped in preserved tradition dating back millennia. But what makes it unique is the process by which the leaves are fermented by microbes after drying and then aged.

It’s believed that the microbial activity in the tea provides probiotic health benefits, such as reducing arterial plaque and LDL cholesterol levels, as well as aiding in weight loss by reducing blood sugar levels and improving the body’s ability to metabolize fat.

Unlike coffee and other teas, Pu-erh [gives me] a long-lasting, even-keeled energy.

The tea accompanies my 20-minute morning meditation. After that, I prepare a vegetable based green smoothie in my Vitamix. Every day is different, but this blend generally comprises a mix of dark leafy greens, beet, berries, hemp seeds, spirulina, chia seeds, and macca root.”

15. Matt Frazier, ultrarunner, founder of the No Meat Athlete Movement, @NoMeatAthlete

Morning Rx: Low-temperature roasted coffee, black

“I’ve really fallen in love with what’s called “third wave” coffee, where the beans are roasted at a lower temperature than, say, Starbucks beans.

The result is an almost complete lack of smoky character, so you can actually taste all the incredible fruity and citrus flavors of different coffees.

Almost nobody who drinks this type of coffee adds any sweeteners or creamers.

I grind it by hand with a Hario mill, then brew with a simple pour-over method. I’m energized, creative, and perfectly satisfied with just 12 savored ounces.”

Entrepreneurs

16. Jennipher Walters, founder and CEO of Fit Bottomed World, co-author of “The Fit Bottomed Girls Anti-Diet,” @fitbottomedgirl

Morning Rx: Blended coffee with one tablespoon each of coconut oil and ghee

“My normal morning routine involves a big cup of black coffee that’s been blended with a tablespoon of coconut oil and a tablespoon of ghee (clarified butter).

This high-fat coffee may seem odd, but it’s so rich, creamy, and filling. Simply delicious! The trick is that you have to blend it in a high-powered is organic coffee good for you. Then it gets all frothy and delicious — almost like a (non-sweet) latté!

I’m a big fan of eating healthy fat at every meal. It’s good for focus, brain function, energy, and it just makes me feel good and full. We’ve been trained over the years to fear the fat, but I find that when I eat more fat, I have fewer cravings, more energy, and my workouts are better.”

17. Heather Crosby, founder of YumUniverse, founder of the Gluten-Free Baking Academy, @yumuniverse

Morning Rx:Chicory root tea latté

“My favorite morning bevvies are either a plant based, gluten-free protein smoothie with fresh berries or my favorite green smoothie. These drinks give me the natural fuel I need for sustained energy all day long — stimulant free!

[But] one of my favorite alternatives to coffee is a maca fnb login reset chicory root tea latté. Maca is known to assist in hormone regulation, while chicory root has a long-standing reputation as a liver detoxifier and digestion booster.

Both have a rich, dark flavor that comforts and satisfies like coffee without the acidic qualities — it’s a popular coffee substitute in New Orleans and Europe.”

18. Tara Stiles, founder of Strala Yoga in New York City, @tarastiles

Morning Rx: Black coffee on-the-go or black coffee with cashew milk at home

“My coffee at home is from Kitsuné in Paris, and I serve it with cashew milk. On the go, I’ll go to La Calombe on Lafayette and Prince Streets or Gasoline Alley on Lafayette and Houston Streets.

I order a regular coffee, black. I’d never add any syrups or sugars.”

19. Suzanne Hall, co-founder and editor in chief at The Chalkboard Mag, @chalkboardmag

Morning Rx:French press coffee with a little grass-fed butter at home and a half-decaf americano with stevia, cinnamon, and almond milk on the go

“I’m always double-fisted: coffee in one hand, green juice in the other. At home, I French press solar panels for your home minnesota mix of decaf, shade-grown beans and Ethiopian beans from Caffe Luxxe in Brentwood.

If I have a long day in front of me, I’ll make the coffee “bulletproof” style and add a little raw, grass-fed butter. The butter and coffee together are healthy for your hormones and for brain health — and taste incredible!

Out and about, I order americanos from any number of LA’s great coffee shops, half-decaf (It’s an effort!) with stevia (which I keep on me), cinnamon, and Pressed Juicery almond milk.

Stevia is the perfect sweetener: nothing artificial, I love the taste, plus it slightly alkalizes your coffee. 1st financial federal credit union routing number helps to regulate blood sugar from the caffeine spike and is surprisingly nutritious.

Lastly, Pressed Juicery makes some of the best almond milk around with just a hint of vanilla.

Drinking coffee bulletproof style is a remarkably different feeling. Butter helps the body to metabolize coffee without jitters, but gives sustained energy. Skipping the sugar and reducing caffeine intake in my Americanos definitely keeps my blood sugar (read: mood!) more stable.”

Bottom line

Coffee is one of those built-in routines that becomes totally mindless after a few years, especially when we’re only half awake. Our goal is to provide a little inspiration to think outside the box (or, rather, cylindrical cup).

However, with so many studies and health claims out there, we know it can be tricky to figure out the best fix-ins for your morning cup of joe.

The research on the pros and cons of coffee, sugar, cinnamon, and everything else is always being updated, so be sure to sit down with your doc and hash out the best options for you. Practice everything in moderation.

Do your own research, too. And of course, always listen to your body.

The bottom line chase bank chicago, we want you to do a little experimenting to get out of that coffee rut. Figure out what works for you and mix and match until you hit that sweet spot — or savory, if that’s your thing. Enjoy!

Источник: https://greatist.com/eat/health-fitness-experts-favorite-coffee

When given the choice between organic coffee and conventional, there’s no question that organic coffee is the healthier option. However, while organic coffee is grown without harmful pesticides, it falls short when it comes to standards that are essential for a truly healthy cup of joe. The healthiest coffee goes beyond organic, and additionally qualifies as specialty-grade coffee, is rigorously tested for mold and mycotoxins, and is roasted in a smokeless machine to reduce dangerous byproducts like acrylamide.  

In this article you will learn:

Is Organic Coffee Better for Health?

Organic coffee is certainly healthier than its conventional counterparts due to the fact that it’s grown without health-harming pesticides, herbicides, or fungicides, but it’s not perfect.

For perspective, conventionally grown coffee is one of the most chemically-treated beverages on the market. On top of being grown with large amounts of chemical fertilizers and pesticides that can harm your health, these same chemicals often hurt both first financial bank texas customer service number coffee farmers and ecosystems that come in contact with them as first financial bank texas customer service number, even organic coffee can fall short. For instance, organic certification doesn’t address essential factors like the quality grade of the coffee beans or testing for mold and mycotoxins. The organic label also doesn’t ensure that coffee manufacturers have roasted their beans with the safest methods to avoid unsafe byproducts and preserve coffee’s healthy antioxidants.

3 Things that Make Organic Coffee Healthy

While organic coffee doesn’t check all the boxes for the healthiest cup of joe, it certainly has its benefits for your health, the environment, and the farmers who grow it.

1. It’s Grown without Pesticides, Herbicides, or Is organic coffee good for you of the world’s coffee beans are non-organic and treated with pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, and other chemicals. And unfortunately, these chemicals make it all the way into your morning brew.

In developing countries like Colombia, Indonesia, and Brazil, where the majority of coffee is grown, there are few to no regulations on the chemicals and pesticides used, which means farmers can spray their crops with just about anything. In fact, some of the chemicals these farmers use are chemicals that have already been banned in America, Apple ipad mini 1st generation, and Japan due to their harmful effects on health.

Because organic coffee is grown without these toxic substances, it’s the simplest solution to ensuring a cup of coffee without pesticide residues, which is the healthier choice!

2. Better Soil & Water Quality

Not only is organic farming result in coffee that's safer for human consumption, but it’s also significantly more beneficial for christmas tree in the park san jose environment in which the coffee is grown.

Without toxic chemicals, farmers must use more sustainable practices of growing coffee, and these practices have been proven to significantly increase nutrients in the soil. 

One such eco-friendly coffee farming method is the use of “shade trees” to naturally protect coffee plants from overexposure to sunlight. Shade trees keep the coffee beans in prime condition and their foliage supplies extra nutrients to the soil, resulting in higher quality coffee beans. 

Shade trees eliminate the need for chemical pesticides, preserving the local ecosystem by creating cleaner soil and water, which in turn helps to fight deforestation and reduce carbon dioxide levels!

3. Safer for Coffee Growers

Not only is organic coffee healthier for personal consumption and more sustainable for the environment, but it’s even safer for coffee growers!

One survey of 81 coffee farmers in Eastern Jamaica found that most of them suffered from at least one negative health side effect linked to pesticide handling.

But when coffee is grown organically, hard-working coffee growers are no longer in contact with dangerous chemicals, creating a healthier, happier work environment.

a chemex of coffee beside two bags of mold and mycotoxin free natural force clean coffee and a hand crafted natural force mug

4 Reasons Organic Coffee Isn’t the Healthiest Coffee

1. It Doesn’t Address Bean Quality

Just because a coffee is certified organic doesn’t mean the coffee beans are high-quality. 

The Specialty Coffee Association (SCA) has three quality-based categories of coffee: specialty grade, premium grade, and below-specialty grade.

Specialty-grade is the highest quality of coffee. 

For a coffee to be assigned a grade, expert coffee testers look for major defects in the coffee like unripened beans, coffee pods, sour beans, as well as minor defects like husks present, broken or chipped beans, minor insect damage, and small sticks and stones.

To qualify as a specialty grade coffee, the beans must be mostly uniform in size, have a distinctive body, taste, aroma, and healthy moisture content (between 9-13%).

Specialty-grade coffees also tend to have more complex aromas. Our Clean Coffee, for example, offers fresh hints of citrus and lightly sweet notes of caramel.

2. Organic Coffee Can Contain Mold and Mycotoxins

Just because a coffee is organic, that doesn't mean it’s free of harmful mold and mycotoxins. Often, due to poor processing and storage, coffee beans can grow mycotoxin-producing mold which can cause a wide variety of health issues.

Exposure to mold and mycotoxins can cause fatigue, sinus infection, mitochondrial function, memory problems, brain fog, night sweats, hair loss, DNA damage, liver disease, kidney disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and cancer.

So be sure to read the packaging and find evidence of third-party testing to make sure your coffee is mold and mycotoxin free!

3. Organic Coffee Can Be Improperly Roasted

While buying organic coffee may ensure that it’s free of pesticide residues, it doesn’t mean that it was properly roasted.

Many popular coffee brands today roast their beans at overly high temperatures which comes with consequences. This can result in dangerous roasting byproducts like HCAs and acrylamide that can make their way into your bloodstream, causing damage to the nervous system and increasing the risk of cancer. 

Alternatively, the healthiest coffee brands roast their beans in small batches inside a smokeless machine. This not only ensures that each bean is roasted more evenly with fewer burnt edges, but it also eliminates the most harmful compounds and increases healthy antioxidants like chlorogenic acid.

4. There’s No Requirement that Organic Coffee is Lab Tested

While it’s long been argued that the pesticide residues on coffee beans are removed is organic coffee good for you the roasting process, new studies suggest that up to 10% of these chemicals can soak inside the coffee bean. This means that pesticides are likely to end up in your cup of coffee. 

As it turns out, exposure to pesticides can lead to negative health consequences like: 

  • Respiratory diseases
  • Endocrine disruption (hormonal imbalances)
  • Low IQ and ADHD in children
  • Weakened immune system
  • Cancer (most commonly in the breast, prostate, and ovaries)

The safest coffee is one that’s been held accountable by a third party organization with each batch rigorously tested for different types of pesticide residue and other common health-harming compounds like ochratoxin A, aflatoxin, acrylamide, fungus, and yeast. It's only with test results like these that you can be 100% confident that the coffee you're getting is as healthy as possible!

natural force clean coffee

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What is the Healthiest Coffee?

The healthiest choice of coffee is one that goes beyond organic. In addition to organic certification, you should look for coffee that is specialty grade, mold and mycotoxin-free, properly roasted in a smokeless machine, and third-party lab tested to ensure it's free of harmful toxins.

Of course, these are the standards we put icici corporate login place for our Natural Force Clean Coffee.

We lab test each batch of Clean Coffee for common coffee health offenders including the mycotoxins Ochratoxin A, Aflatoxin, Acrylamide, mold, fungus, yeast, and 165 different types of pesticides, so you know exactly what is - how tall is trindon holliday isn't - in your cup and in your body.

And, unlike most brands, we actually share our third-party lab results (you can view them right here.)

Clean Coffee also tastes amazing, which is why we think it is the healthiest and tastiest coffee you will ever find!

UP NEXT: Top 5 Best Mold and Mycotoxin Free Coffee Brands of 2019

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Источник: https://naturalforce.com/blogs/nutrition/organic-coffee
is organic coffee good for you

: Is organic coffee good for you

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Is organic coffee good for you
is organic coffee good for you

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