who voted for impeachment in the house list

Latest news on Donald Trump's impeachment trial - from MailOnline. These 10 Republicans voted Wednesday to impeach Donald Trump for inciting supporters to storm the Capitol last week over his false election. 1712. to which is prefixed a speech upon the impeachment of Sauce for an 1713 A list of the members of the house of commons who voted ten by John duke.

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Here are the 10 Republicans who voted to impeach President Donald Trump

Who voted for impeachment in the house list -

How every lawmaker from PA voted on Trump’s impeachment

It’s an ignominious first for an alum of a Philadelphia college.

U.S. House members vote on impeachment on Wednesday

Hewing mostly to party lines, the U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday night voted to impeach President Donald Trump for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

He became the third president in American history to receive the federal government’s ultimate censure — and the first with a strong Philadelphia connection: Trump is an alumnus of Penn’s Wharton School, graduating with a bachelor’s degree in 1968.

The two different articles of impeachment received slightly different outcomes. On abuse of power, the count was 230 to 197, with just two Democrats joining the Republicans in voting against. On obstruction of Congress, a third Dem broke ranks to end up with a vote of 229 to 198.

What happens next? As written in the U.S. Constitution, the House sends the articles to the Senate, which then holds a trial presided over by the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. A two-thirds “super majority” is required to convict.

However, Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi indicated yesterday she might not immediately hand things over to the GOP-controlled Senate.

Neither of the two previous impeached presidents, Bill Clinton (1998) or Andrew Johnson (1868) were convicted. Unlike those two, Trump is only in his first term, so the general public will have a chance to weigh in when he runs for reelection in November.

Pundits think the impeachment vote could also have an effect further down the ticket, as voters consider how their congresspersons did or did not act in their best interests during this historic action.

Here’s how all the representatives from Pennsylvania voted when it came to impeaching Donald Trump.

Note: there’s no effective difference between “yea” and “aye” or “no” and “nay.”

Brian Fitzpatrick, Republican (PA-1, Bucks County)

Nay, No

Brendan Boyle, Democrat (PA-2, Philadelphia)

Yea, Aye

Dwight Evans, Democrat (PA-3, Philadelphia)

Yea, Aye

Madeleine Dean, Democrat (PA-4, Montgomery County)

Yea, Aye

Mary Gay Scanlon, Democrat (PA-5, Delaware County)

Yea, Aye

Chrissy Houlahan, Democrat (PA-6, Chester County)

Yea, Aye

Susan Wild, Democrat (PA-7, Lehigh County)

Yea, Aye

Matt Cartwright, Democrat (PA-8, Luzerne County)

Yea, Aye

Daniel Meuser, Republican (PA-9, Lebanon County)

Nay, No

Scott Perry, Republican (PA-10, York County)

Nay, No

Lloyd Smucker, Republican (PA-11, Lancaster County)

Nay, No

Fred Keller, Republican (PA-12, Snyder County)

Nay, No

John Joyce, Republican (PA-13, Blair County)

Nay, No

Guy Reschenthaler, Republican (PA-14, Washington County)

Nay, No

Glenn Thompson, Republican (PA-15, Centre County)

Nay, No

Mike Kelly, Republican (PA-16, Butler County)

Nay, No

Conor Lamb, Democrat (PA-17, Beaver County)

Yea, Aye

Michael Doyle, Democrat (PA-18, Allegheny County)

Yea, Aye

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Источник: https://billypenn.com/2019/12/19/how-every-lawmaker-from-pa-voted-on-trumps-impeachment/

6 Alabama Republicans vote against Trump impeachment; Terri Sewell votes for it


The Alabama House delegation Wednesday split down party lines on the impeachment of Donald Trump in the wake of a deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol last week. 

U.S. Reps. Jerry Carl, R-Mobile; Barry Moore, R-Enterprise; Mike Rogers, R-Saks; Robert Aderholt, R-Haleyville; Mo Brooks, R-Huntsville and Gary Palmer, R-Hoover all voted against sending charges of inciting an insurrection to the U.S. Senate. U.S. Rep. Terri Sewell, D-Birmingham, voted to impeach the president. 

"Blood is on this house," said Sewell, whose district includes Montgomery. "We must do something about it. I ask we move from 'stopping the steal' to to healing. But healing requires accountability."

The vote mirrored the delegation's vote last week on whether or not to accept the presidential choice of the voters of Arizona and Pennsylvania. All the Republican members of Alabama's House delegation voted to throw them out; Sewell voted to accept them. 

More: 6 Alabama congressmen, 1 senator support moves to throw out votes of Arizona, Pennsylvania

That vote came after a violent mob, goaded by Trump, invaded the U.S. Capitol and attacked Capitol police officers, broke into congressional offices and committed major acts of vandalism. At least five people died during the riot, including a Capitol police officer and Kevin Greeson, a 55-year-old from Athens who suffered a heart attack. 

More: Alabama man dies amid pro-Trump rally, riot at U.S. Capitol

Dozens of arrests have taken place in the wake of the riot, and more are expected. Police have charged Lonnie Coffman, a 70-year-old from Falkville, with 17 separate weapons charges. Authorities said they found guns and Molotov cocktails in Coffman's pickup truck, and had a list singling out a federal judge appointed by U.S. President Barack Obama and a Muslim congressman from Indiana.  

More: 'Bad guy,' 'Good Girl': Alabama man with Molotov cocktails in D.C. left alarming notes in truck, records show

The House voted 232 to 197 Wednesday afternoon to impeach Trump. 10 Republicans joined 222 Democrats in voting for impeachment.

Republicans during the debate condemned the violence but attacked the process of impeachment.  Moore, a first-term representative whose campaign stressed his loyalty to Donald Trump, said in brief remarks during the debate that if the House pursued the charges, "impeachment will always be a political process."

"We're going to impeach a president for what reasons?" said Moore, whose district includes Montgomery, Autauga and Elmore counties. "For what reasons? There have been no hearings. There have been no committees."

Palmer said in a statement that the process had no investigative process or chance for the accused to respond. He also denounced the violence at the Capitol last week.

"There is no excuse for it, and I hope everyone who took any part will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law," he said. "But I do not believe an impeachment is beneficial to our country at this difficult moment."

Rogers said in a statement on Twitter that he believed impeachment "will only further divide our nation." Carl said he did not believe the charges reached "the necessary threshold for impeachment."

"The President has publicly conceded the election and committed to a peaceful transition of power, and I trust he will uphold his promise to ensure a smooth transition to the next administration," Carl's statement said.

More: Senate impeachment trial likely won’t begin until after Biden sworn in

There has been fallout for the state delegation. Brooks faces a censure resolution for speaking at the March to Save America rally, in which he encouraged "American patriots" to "start taking names and kicking ass." Brooks released a statement Tuesday where he condemned the violence but refused to apologize for his remarks, which he claimed were meant to "reinvigorate people for the 2022 election cycle."

Ali Alexander, a far-right activist who organized a "Stop the Steal" rally, said he coordinated with Brooks and two Arizona congressmen to plan the rally. Brooks denied knowing Alexander in a statement to the Washington Post. 

Moore closed his personal Twitter account over the weekend after sending tweets that belittled the arrests of people charged with rioting and making an irrelevant reference to the race of one of the Capitol police officers. 

"I Understand it was a black police officer that shot the white female veteran," Moore wrote in one of the deleted tweets. "You know that doesn't fit the narrative."

The Rule of Law Defense Fund, a dark money group affiliated with the Republican Attorneys General Association, recorded robocalls encouraging people to attend the rally that preceded the violence at the Capitol. Adam Piper, the head of RAGA, resigned earlier this week amid the fallout. Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall, the chair of the fund, said he did not authorize the robocalls and ordered an internal review. 

The impeachment charges now go to the U.S. Senate. It is not clear when the chamber may hold a trial on them. Trump is set to leave office on Jan. 20, but Congress could hold a trial after that. If Trump was convicted, he could be banned from holding federal office again. 

Contact Montgomery Advertiser reporter Brian Lyman at 334-240-0185 or [email protected]

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Источник: https://www.montgomeryadvertiser.com/story/news/2021/01/13/alabama-republicans-vote-impeachment-against-donald-trump-terri-sewell-democrat/6652208002/

Former presidential hopeful Evan McMullin looks to disrupt senate race as an Independent


Political divisiveness has been an issue at the forefront of the American consciousness since the 2016 presidential election.

In early November, the Pew Research Center released a new political typology study that groups Americans into nine different groups, one category more than its list created four years ago. It shows that there are multiple factions among both Democrats and Republicans, which makes it harder to govern within a two-party system.

“They complicate the already difficult task of governing in a divided nation,” read the report, which cited how political parties must walk a tight-rope of appealing to an ideological base while also needing to attract support from less politically involved moderates.

One candidate for Utah’s open senate seat in 2022 — Evan McMullin — said he sees the fractured political state of the country as a sign that an unaffiliated independent candidate like himself has a real chance to win. 

“I'm running because our politics are broken,” McMullin told The Spectrum. “We've got to have better leadership in Washington that will find common ground and advance solutions to all kinds of challenges.”

McMullin, a political activist and former Central Intelligence Agency operations officer best known for his presidential run in 2016, is campaigning for office again, this time challenging incumbent U.S. Sen. Mike Lee, a Republican seeking his third term.

McMullin describes himself as a “Lincoln conservative” and is looking to build a coalition of “cross-partisan” support to be Utah's first non-Republican senator since 1977. This plan includes drumming up support from southern Utah, according to McMullin. 

This region of the state is traditionally conservative yet willing to express an independent view from both the state and national Republican Party, according to Mary Bennett Weaver, the director of the Leavitt Center for Politics at Southern Utah University.

“The Republican Party here is also very independent and not necessarily adopting the national party line,” Bennett Weaver said. “And for many years, there's been a feeling that elected officials don't pay attention to southern Utah, they focus their time and efforts up in Salt Lake.” 

The two most populated counties in southern Utah are Iron and Washington County, each of which has grown by more than 24% since 2010, which was higher than the state's overall growth rate. Bennett Weaver says this rapid growth makes southern Utah more important than ever for statewide elections. 

"You ignore Southern Utah to your peril because those two counties are where all the new voters are," she said.

The 'Utah Way'

For his senate run, McMullin says he won’t focus on one area of the state over another and will try to be a senator for “all Utahns." He said he thinks many problems are shared between southern and northern Utahns. These problems include rising costs for healthcare and housing as well as the need for updated infrastructure and better drought protection measures. 

McMullin believes these problems won’t be solved in a meaningful way by the current Congress due to the fractured nature of politics where “tribalism” is prevalent

“We've unfortunately entered into an era of tribalism in our politics, in which many of our leaders are more concerned with remaining loyal to party leadership,” McMullin said. “And they therefore fail to serve all Utahns and fail to advance solutions to help us overcome our problem.”

He says he would practice the “Utah Way” if elected and could encourage other members of Utah's congressional delegation to do the same. This term is a common buzzword used by Utah politicians to show a willingness to listen and compromise on certain political issues. Fellow Utah 2022 senate candidate Becky Edwards has used this term a lot in her campaign. 

This isn’t the first time McMullin has looked to Utah for support. In 2016, he threw his hat into the ring of the presidential election as an independent candidate to offer voters a choice between two candidates that couldn’t “unify” Americans. As an independent, McMullin positioned himself as a conservative ‘Never-Trumper’ who spoke out against the politics practiced by former President Donald Trump. He wasn't competitive in the rest of the U.S. but he was able to gain 21.5% of the presidential vote in Utah.  

This election effort was described by McMullin as an “emergency presidential election” and focused much of its efforts on Utah voters. The campaign didn’t get much traction outside of McMullin’s home state and it accrued nearly $670,000 of debt, an amount that McMullin said isn’t uncommon for unsuccessful campaigns.

But McMullin attributes those negatives to the last-minute nature of his campaign and argued he is in a “much better position” for a senate election since he’s spent the last five years connecting with people and building resources. 

After the 2016 election, McMullin started Stand Up Republic, a non-profit government reform advocacy group meant to “unite Americans from across the political spectrum,” according to McMullin. But as the 2022 elections approach, McMullin is setting that work aside to gain focus on beating another controversial conservative, Sen. Lee. 

McMullin has already gotten several endorsements from other moderate politicians like former congressman Ben McAdams — the most recent Democrat to be part of Utah’s federal delegation — and from U.S. Rep. Adam Kinzinger, a Republican from Illinois. Kinzinger was of the 10 Republicans who voted to impeach Trump and highlighted on social media how he thought McMullin would be a candidate that would “stand up to extremism in every form."

Lee, approaching his 12th year in the Senate, has a job approval rating of less than 50% among Utahns, according to a poll from the Deseret News and the Hinckley Institute of Politics. Lee is also facing two prominent and funded challengers from within the Republican party for the nomination, Ally Isom and Becky Edwards.

For or against Trump

McMullin said he suspects Utahns’ view of Lee has been impacted by the persona Lee has created for himself, with supporters calling him a constitutionalist conservative and detractors like McMullin describing him as a partisan obstructionist. 

“I think it's safe to say that, at least over the last few years, Mike Lee has lost his way in Washington,” McMullin argued, pointing to the senator’s track record on President Trump. 

In October 2016, Lee called for Trump to drop out of the race and for conservatives to find a different candidate. Lee said he voted for McMullin over Trump that year. But four years later in October 2020, Lee fully endorsed Trump for another term, saying Utah members of the state's predominant religion, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saint, thought of the former president as being similar to Captain Moroni, a prominent figure in the Book of Mormon.

Lee told The Atlantic his viewpoint on the 45th president changed as a result of the two developing a positive “working relationship” while Trump was in office.

Lee later tried to clarify that statement on social media, saying via a Facebook post that he had been attempting to make a point about Trump but that it may have come out awkwardly.

“Some people found that comparison upsetting, blasphemous, and otherwise wrong,” he wrote. “I respect their right to feel that way, and realize that my impromptu comments may not have been the best forum for drawing a novel analogy from scripture.”

McMullin also criticized Lee’s actions after the 2020 election, including efforts he had made to vet the arguments being made by Trump's legal team contesting official election results, as first reported in a book by Washington Post associate editor Bob Woodward and national political reporter Robert Costa. McMullin also mentioned Lee’s support of Trump after January 6th, including a television interview where he said the former president deserved a “mulligan” for his role in the violent events of that day.

“He defended those challenges, even though they had no purpose other than to further what we now know was an attempt to overturn our election and that has to be sacred in our system of self-government,” McMullin said. “When the barbarians were at the gate, he was absent at best.” 

Ultimately, Lee voted to certify the 2020 election results, to the displeasure of Trump, who said both Lee and fellow Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham “should be ashamed of themselves for not putting up the fight necessary to win." The 2020 election was described as one of the “most secure in American history” by federal election officials. 

Running as an independent

Despite Lee’s apparent low approval rating and controversial news coverage, McMullin said he knows that it will be tough to unseat a Republican in a state that’s safety conservative. The last time a Republican lost a statewide race was in the 1980 gubernatorial election.

McMullin said he wants to appeal to pragmatic sentiments among Utah voters during the campaign and thinks he’ll be a senator that can bring more to the state than Lee has proven to vote on partisan lines in Congress.

“If we remain divided … we'll send Senator Lee back to Washington for another six years,” he said. 

Getting that wide coalition of support is easier said than done, according to Bennett Weaver. She said Utah’s solid-red voting record for statewide elections is a sign McMullin’s candidacy is a longshot.

“You just would have to bring together so many to defeat a mainstream party candidate. I don't think the odds of that are very good,” she said.

McMullin we’ll need to convince people both outside and inside the Republican Party. About 50.9% of the state's active voters are Republican, with 29.2% registered as unaffiliated and 14.7% registered as Democrats, according to Utah’s voter registration data. 

McMullin says if he is able to get elected he won’t caucus with either Republicans or Democrats. He believes this move would make Utah one of the most “influential states” in the country because Senators that don’t always align with party values can have great influence, pointing to Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia as an example of this. 

“We've seen how when senators act independently on either side of the political aisle and they act independently of their parties they garner a lot of influence for their states,” McMullin said. 

The 2022 Senate election will be held during a midterm year without a presidential election, meaning the voter turnout rate will likely be lower than it was in 2020. Bennett Weaver said low-turnout elections favor incumbents like Lee but incumbents are also susceptible to attacks if they don’t have a proven record, especially in areas that often brush up against the federal government, like southern Utah. 

“That is a vulnerability for an incumbent is when you come south is, you know, what can you tell southern Utah voters that you have worked on to their benefit?” said Bennett Weaver. 

McMullin argued Lee is more focused on partisan issues for Republicans rather than solving issues that impact Utahns. He pointed to how Lee was one of two senators to vote against a bill that would give states $35 billion to improve their water infrastructure, a vote that ultimately passed the Senate by a vote of 89-2.

“I think that's a classic example of the way Mike Lee works in Washington,” McMullin said.

Crowded field of challengers

It’s still no guarantee McMullin will face off against Lee for the senate seat since Lee first has to overcome two well-funded Republican challengers. Edwards, a former Utah state representative, has over $725,000 in campaign funds while Isom, a former Republican staffer, has over $415,000, according to finance reports from the Federal Election Commission.

But Lee is the definite favorite to come out of the primary since neither Isom or Edwards are polling above 10% among Utah Republicans. Lee also has a much larger war chest to fund his effort to get elected for a third term. FEC data shows he has over $4.2 million in campaign cash.

Sean Hemmersmeier covers local government, growth and development in Southwestern Utah. Follow on Twitter @seanhemmers34. Our work depends on subscribers so if you want more coverage on these issues you can subscribe here: http://www.thespectrum.com/subscribe. 

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Источник: https://www.thespectrum.com/story/news/2021/11/27/evan-mcmullin-looks-disrupt-2022-senate-race-independent/8749645002/

8 House Republicans say they’ll vote for Trump’s impeachment

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Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Illinois) (Photo by Eric Hanson for The Washington Post via Getty Images); Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images); Rep. John Katko, R-N.Y., (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

WASHINGTON - Amid an apparent rift in the Republican Party in the wake of a pro-Trump riot inside the U.S. Capitol, at least eight GOP lawmakers have said they’re voting for the second impeachment of President Donald Trump on Wednesday. 

The Republicans who have said they will vote to impeach Trump are Rep. John Katko, R-N.Y.; Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo.; Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill., Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich.; Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, R-Wash; Rep. Dan Newhouse, R-Wash.; Rep. Peter Meijer, R-Mich.; and Rep. Anthony Gonzalez, R-Ohio. 

"To allow the President of the United States to incite this attack without consequence is a direct threat to the future of democracy, " Katko said in a statement Tuesday. "For that reason, I cannot sit by without taking action. I will vote to impeach this President."

Cheney, the No. 3 Republican in the House, said in a statement Tuesday that Trump "summoned" the mob that attacked the Capitol last week, "assembled the mob, and lit the flame of this attack." She said, "Everything that followed was his doing."

She also noted that Trump could have immediately intervened to stop his supporters, but he did not.

Cheney, daughter of former Republican Vice President Dick Cheney, said, "There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution."

Kinzinger tweeted that he, too, will vote for Trump’s impeachment, laying the blame for the pro-Trump Capitol riot on the president.

"On January 6, 2020, the President of the United States encouraged an angry mob to storm the United States Capitol to stop the counting of electoral votes," Kinzinger’s statement read in part. 

Upton released a statement on Facebook Tuesday night. 

"The Congress must hold President Trump to account and send a clear message that our country cannot and will not tolerate any effort by any President to impede the peaceful transfer of power from one President to the next. Thus, I will vote to impeach," he wrote. 

Congresswoman Herrera Beutler released a statement Tuesday saying she will be voting "yes" on impeachment. 

"The President of the United States incited a riot aiming to halt the peaceful transfer of power from one administration to the next. That riot led to five deaths. People everywhere watched in disbelief as the center of American democracy was assaulted. The violent mob bludgeoned to death a Capitol police officer as they defaced symbols of our freedom. These terrorists roamed the Capitol, hunting the Vice President and the Speaker of the House," her statement begins. 

"I believe President Trump acted against his oath of office, so I will vote to impeach him," she wrote.

Newhouse posted his decision on Facebook Wednesday as House lawmakers debated.

"The mob was inflamed by the language and misinformation of the President of the United States," he wrote. "A vote against this impeachment is a vote to validate the unacceptable violence we witnessed in our nation’s capital."

Meijer wrote on Twitter Wednesday afternoon, just minutes before the House ended their debate, that he is also voting to impeach.

Gonzalez shared his thoughts on Facebook Wednesday afternoon as the vote began to take place, saying he is "compelled to support" impeachment.

RELATED: Trump takes no responsibility for Capitol riot, says 25th Amendment is ‘zero risk’ to him

House lawmakers will debate and vote on an impeachment resolution Wednesday.

Trump faces a single charge — "incitement of insurrection" — in the impeachment resolution after the most serious and deadly domestic incursion at the Capitol in the nation’s history.

Before the violent riot at the U.S. Capitol, Trump held a rally near the White House, during which he encouraged thousands of his supporters to "fight like hell" and march to the Capitol, where lawmakers were in the process of certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s Electoral College votes after he won the 2020 election. Trump maintained that he won the election over Biden, falsely claiming voter fraud and irregularities. None of his lawsuits have prevailed in court. 

Timeline of the riot at the US Capitol on Jan. 6

What started as a congressional and democratic exercise in the peaceful transfer of power, devolved into death, destruction and chaos.

The pro-Trump mob overpowered police, broke through security lines and windows and rampaged through the Capitol, forcing lawmakers to scatter and take shelter.

Five people were killed, including U.S. Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick. Another woman was shot to death and three others died after succumbing to medical emergencies. A second Capitol Police officer, Officer Howard Libengood, reportedly died from an apparent suicide but it’s not clear if his death was related to the riot.

Prosecutors have brought dozens of cases after the deadly attack at the U.S. Capitol, and they vowed more charges as investigators work to identify members of the pro-Trump mob.

The top federal prosecutor for the District of Columbia said Tuesday that 70 people have been charged so far. About 20 federal cases have been made public, and 40 others have been filed in D.C. Superior Court.

The people charged in Superior Court are mainly accused of things like curfew violations and gun crimes. Those being tried in federal court, where prosecutors can generally secure longer sentences, are charged with offenses such as violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds, assaulting a federal law enforcement officer and threatening House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

"It cannot be ignored that President Trump encouraged this insurrection," Katko added in his statement. "When this manifested in violent acts on January 6th, he refused to promptly and forcefully call it off, putting countless lives in danger."

Trump denied he incited the riot Tuesday as the House moved closer to impeaching him.

He targeted lawmakers who are pushing for his ouster, saying that it's "a really terrible thing that they’re doing."

"To continue on this path, I think it’s causing tremendous danger to our country, and it’s causing tremendous anger," Trump said. He accepted no blame for the Capitol attack and said, "I want no violence."

President Donald Trump says the 25th Amendment is of no concern to him

President Donald Trump addresses the recent pro-Trump Capitol rioters.

However, more GOP lawmakers could also join the list of those siding with Democrats to oust Trump.

In the Senate, Republican Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania joined GOP Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska over the weekend in calling for Trump to "go away as soon as possible."

However, some have stated impeachment wouldn’t be the best course of action.

Among Trump's closest allies in Congress, McCarthy was among those echoing the president, saying "impeachment at this time would have the opposite effect of bringing our country together."

House lawmakers will first try to convince the vice president and Cabinet to act even more quickly to remove Trump from office, warning he is a threat to democracy in the remaining days of his presidency.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. The story was filed from Los Angeles.

Источник: https://www.fox6now.com/news/rep-john-katko-1st-house-republican-to-say-hell-vote-for-trumps-impeachment

Here are the 10 Republicans who voted to impeach Trump after the Capitol riot

Ten Republicans of the US House of Representatives voted to impeach President Donald Trump after rioters stormed the Capitol building last week, making him the first president in US history to be impeached twice.

Trump’s support within the Republican party appears to be wavering. While only 10 Republicans voted for impeachment, during Trump’s first impeachment in 2019 the party closed ranks, with zero votes for impeachment at the time.

For all the latest headlines follow our Google News channel online or via the app.

All House Democrats voted in favor of the impeachment; 197 Republicans voted against it. The 10 Republican votes for this impeachment trial made history as the tally exceeded the previous record of five Democrat votes during Bill Clinton’s 1988 impeachment trial.

The US House of Representatives, the lower house of Congress, first decide if a President should be impeached. If the house finds in favor the Senate, the upper house of Congress, will then hold a trial overseen by the US chief justice.

The Senate’s response to the president’s second impeachment is yet to be determined. In order to render a guilty verdict, 17 Republicans would have to join Democrats.

As of yet, only a small number of Republican senators have shown interest in potentially convicting Trump in a Senate trial. The trial would begin after Trump has left office and after President-elect Joe Biden is sworn into office on January 20.

The Republicans of the House of Representatives who voted for Trump’s impeachment on Wednesday are: Liz Cheney, Jaime Herrera Beutler, Adam Kinzinger, John Katko, Anthony Gonzalez, Fred Upton, Tom Rice, David Valadao, Peter Meijer, and Dan Newhouse.

Liz Cheney

Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., speaks with reporters at the Capitol in Washington. (File photo: AP)

Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., speaks with reporters at the Capitol in Washington. (File photo: AP)

Liz Cheney, the No.3 House Republican, was the most senior member of her party to vote against efforts to challenge electoral college results confirming Trump’s loss.

She is also the daughter of Dick Cheney, former Republican vice president under George W. Bush.

“There has never been a greater betrayal by a president of the United States of his office and his oath to the constitution,” Cheney said, in a statement released on Tuesday.

In a tweet posted immediately after the riot took place, Cheney said, “There is no question that the President formed the mob, the President incited the mob, the President addressed the mob. He lit the flame.”

Jaime Herrera Beutler

Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, R-Wash., speaks during a Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Subcommittee hearing about the COVID-19 response on Capitol Hill. (AP)

Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, R-Wash., speaks during a Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Subcommittee hearing about the COVID-19 response on Capitol Hill. (AP)

Herrera Beutler, a moderate from Washington state who is in her sixth term, said in a statement that Trump’s offenses were “impeachable”, citing that her decision was “based on the indisputable evidence we already have.”

“Truth sets us free from fear. My vote to impeach a sitting president is not a fear-based decision. I am not choosing a side. I’m choosing truth,” she added.

Adam Kinzinger

Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill., speaks to the media at the White House in Washington. (AP)

Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill., speaks to the media at the White House in Washington. (AP)

Adam Kinzinger is a US Air Force veteran currently in his sixth term representing northern Illinois. Kinzinger, a regular Trump critic, has said that he did not doubt that Trump had broken his oath of office and incited the violence at the Capitol on January 6.

John Katko

Rep. John Katko, R-N.Y., at Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP)

Rep. John Katko, R-N.Y., at Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP)

Former federal prosecutor John Katko was the first member of the House Republicans to outwardly say that he would vote for Trump’s impeachment.
“To allow the president of the United States to incite this attack without consequence is a direct threat to the future of our democracy,” he said in a statement Tuesday. “I cannot sit by without taking action.”

Anthony Gonzalez

Rep.-elect Anthony Gonzalez, R-Ohio is photographed in a studio at the National Republican Congressional Committee offices in Washington. (AP)

Rep.-elect Anthony Gonzalez, R-Ohio is photographed in a studio at the National Republican Congressional Committee offices in Washington. (AP)

In his statement, Republican Gonzalez of Ohio accused Trump of having “abandoned his post” amidst the violence that took place at the Capitol.

“When I consider the full scope of the event leading up to January 6th including the president’s lack of response as the United States Capitol was under attack, I am compelled to support impeachment,” he added.

He also argued that Trump’s failure to act during the riots only further endangered those present on the premises. He went on to describe the president’s actions as “fundamental threats” to democracy.

Fred Upton

Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., left, speaks to reporters outside the White House in Washington. (File photo: AP)

Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., left, speaks to reporters outside the White House in Washington. (File photo: AP)

In November 2020, Upton stated that Trump showed no proof of his claims that his election defeat was the result of widespread fraud.

“The Congress must hold President Trump to account and send a clear message,” said Upton.

He also mentioned that a bipartisan, formal censure would have been preferably over impeachment, but that the president’s refusal to be held accountable for the riots left him no choice.

Tom Rice

File photo, taken from video, Rep. Tom Rice, R-S.C., speaks as the House of Representatives debates the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump at the Capitol in Washington. (File photo: AP)

File photo, taken from video, Rep. Tom Rice, R-S.C., speaks as the House of Representatives debates the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump at the Capitol in Washington. (File photo: AP)

Tom Rice’s coastal South Carolina district backed Trump strongly in the presidential election, and just last week Rice also voted to object the certification of electoral votes in Arizona and Pennsylvania in line with Trump’s wishes, making his vote for impeachment probably the most surprising of all.

“I have backed this president through thick and thin for four years. I’ve campaigned for him and voted for him twice. But this utter failure is inexcusable,” said Rice in a statement.

Rice then expressed his disappointment in Trump for his failure to show remorse over the insurrection or address the country to ask for calm.

David Valadao

Rep. David Valadao, R-Calif., poses during a ceremonial re-enactment of his swearing-in ceremony in the Rayburn Room on Capitol Hill in Washington. (File photo: AP)

Rep. David Valadao, R-Calif., poses during a ceremonial re-enactment of his swearing-in ceremony in the Rayburn Room on Capitol Hill in Washington. (File photo: AP)

In November, David Valadao reclaimed his former seat from the Democrats.

“Based on the facts before me, I have to go with my gut and vote my conscience. I voted to impeach President Trump. His inciting rhetoric was un-American, abhorrent, and absolutely an impeachable offense. It’s time to put country over politics,” Tweeted Valadao on Wednesday.

He also tweeted that Trump was undoubtedly “a driving force in the catastrophic events that took place on January 6 by encouraging masses of rioters to incite violence on elected officials, staff members, and our representative democracy as a whole.”

Peter Meijer

Michigan's 3rd District Congressional Republican candidate Peter Meijer speaks at a campaign rally, in Grand Rapids, Michigan. (AP)

Michigan's 3rd District Congressional Republican candidate Peter Meijer speaks at a campaign rally, in Grand Rapids, Michigan. (AP)

Congress freshman Peter Meijer of Michigan said that he was voting for impeachment with a “heavy heart”.

“The president betrayed his oath of office by seeking to undermine our constitutional process, and he bears responsibility for inciting the violent acts of insurrection last week,” he said in a statement.

Dan Newhouse

Rep. Dan Newhouse, R-Wash., center, flanked by Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., left, and Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., at a news conference on Capitol Hill. (AP)

Rep. Dan Newhouse, R-Wash., center, flanked by Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., left, and Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., at a news conference on Capitol Hill. (AP)

Dan Newhouse has represented Washington state’s 4th district since 2014 and announced his intention to impeach the president on the House floor during Wednesday’s debate to the applause of almost two dozen Democrats.

“There is no excuse for President Trump’s actions,” he said.

Read more:

Trump on verge of 2nd impeachment after Capitol siege

Republican lawmakers support impeachment of US President Trump after Capitol riot

Tempers flare as Democrats race to impeach Trump over US Capitol rampage

Get the latest stories from AlArabiya on Google News

Источник: https://english.alarabiya.net/features/2021/01/14/Here-are-the-10-republicans-who-voted-to-impeach-Trump-after-the-Capitol-riot
who voted for impeachment in the house list
who voted for impeachment in the house list

Who voted for impeachment in the house list -

8 House Republicans say they’ll vote for Trump’s impeachment

article

Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Illinois) (Photo by Eric Hanson for The Washington Post via Getty Images); Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images); Rep. John Katko, R-N.Y., (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

WASHINGTON - Amid an apparent rift in the Republican Party in the wake of a pro-Trump riot inside the U.S. Capitol, at least eight GOP lawmakers have said they’re voting for the second impeachment of President Donald Trump on Wednesday. 

The Republicans who have said they will vote to impeach Trump are Rep. John Katko, R-N.Y.; Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo.; Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill., Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich.; Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, R-Wash; Rep. Dan Newhouse, R-Wash.; Rep. Peter Meijer, R-Mich.; and Rep. Anthony Gonzalez, R-Ohio. 

"To allow the President of the United States to incite this attack without consequence is a direct threat to the future of democracy, " Katko said in a statement Tuesday. "For that reason, I cannot sit by without taking action. I will vote to impeach this President."

Cheney, the No. 3 Republican in the House, said in a statement Tuesday that Trump "summoned" the mob that attacked the Capitol last week, "assembled the mob, and lit the flame of this attack." She said, "Everything that followed was his doing."

She also noted that Trump could have immediately intervened to stop his supporters, but he did not.

Cheney, daughter of former Republican Vice President Dick Cheney, said, "There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution."

Kinzinger tweeted that he, too, will vote for Trump’s impeachment, laying the blame for the pro-Trump Capitol riot on the president.

"On January 6, 2020, the President of the United States encouraged an angry mob to storm the United States Capitol to stop the counting of electoral votes," Kinzinger’s statement read in part. 

Upton released a statement on Facebook Tuesday night. 

"The Congress must hold President Trump to account and send a clear message that our country cannot and will not tolerate any effort by any President to impede the peaceful transfer of power from one President to the next. Thus, I will vote to impeach," he wrote. 

Congresswoman Herrera Beutler released a statement Tuesday saying she will be voting "yes" on impeachment. 

"The President of the United States incited a riot aiming to halt the peaceful transfer of power from one administration to the next. That riot led to five deaths. People everywhere watched in disbelief as the center of American democracy was assaulted. The violent mob bludgeoned to death a Capitol police officer as they defaced symbols of our freedom. These terrorists roamed the Capitol, hunting the Vice President and the Speaker of the House," her statement begins. 

"I believe President Trump acted against his oath of office, so I will vote to impeach him," she wrote.

Newhouse posted his decision on Facebook Wednesday as House lawmakers debated.

"The mob was inflamed by the language and misinformation of the President of the United States," he wrote. "A vote against this impeachment is a vote to validate the unacceptable violence we witnessed in our nation’s capital."

Meijer wrote on Twitter Wednesday afternoon, just minutes before the House ended their debate, that he is also voting to impeach.

Gonzalez shared his thoughts on Facebook Wednesday afternoon as the vote began to take place, saying he is "compelled to support" impeachment.

RELATED: Trump takes no responsibility for Capitol riot, says 25th Amendment is ‘zero risk’ to him

House lawmakers will debate and vote on an impeachment resolution Wednesday.

Trump faces a single charge — "incitement of insurrection" — in the impeachment resolution after the most serious and deadly domestic incursion at the Capitol in the nation’s history.

Before the violent riot at the U.S. Capitol, Trump held a rally near the White House, during which he encouraged thousands of his supporters to "fight like hell" and march to the Capitol, where lawmakers were in the process of certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s Electoral College votes after he won the 2020 election. Trump maintained that he won the election over Biden, falsely claiming voter fraud and irregularities. None of his lawsuits have prevailed in court. 

Timeline of the riot at the US Capitol on Jan. 6

What started as a congressional and democratic exercise in the peaceful transfer of power, devolved into death, destruction and chaos.

The pro-Trump mob overpowered police, broke through security lines and windows and rampaged through the Capitol, forcing lawmakers to scatter and take shelter.

Five people were killed, including U.S. Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick. Another woman was shot to death and three others died after succumbing to medical emergencies. A second Capitol Police officer, Officer Howard Libengood, reportedly died from an apparent suicide but it’s not clear if his death was related to the riot.

Prosecutors have brought dozens of cases after the deadly attack at the U.S. Capitol, and they vowed more charges as investigators work to identify members of the pro-Trump mob.

The top federal prosecutor for the District of Columbia said Tuesday that 70 people have been charged so far. About 20 federal cases have been made public, and 40 others have been filed in D.C. Superior Court.

The people charged in Superior Court are mainly accused of things like curfew violations and gun crimes. Those being tried in federal court, where prosecutors can generally secure longer sentences, are charged with offenses such as violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds, assaulting a federal law enforcement officer and threatening House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

"It cannot be ignored that President Trump encouraged this insurrection," Katko added in his statement. "When this manifested in violent acts on January 6th, he refused to promptly and forcefully call it off, putting countless lives in danger."

Trump denied he incited the riot Tuesday as the House moved closer to impeaching him.

He targeted lawmakers who are pushing for his ouster, saying that it's "a really terrible thing that they’re doing."

"To continue on this path, I think it’s causing tremendous danger to our country, and it’s causing tremendous anger," Trump said. He accepted no blame for the Capitol attack and said, "I want no violence."

President Donald Trump says the 25th Amendment is of no concern to him

President Donald Trump addresses the recent pro-Trump Capitol rioters.

However, more GOP lawmakers could also join the list of those siding with Democrats to oust Trump.

In the Senate, Republican Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania joined GOP Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska over the weekend in calling for Trump to "go away as soon as possible."

However, some have stated impeachment wouldn’t be the best course of action.

Among Trump's closest allies in Congress, McCarthy was among those echoing the president, saying "impeachment at this time would have the opposite effect of bringing our country together."

House lawmakers will first try to convince the vice president and Cabinet to act even more quickly to remove Trump from office, warning he is a threat to democracy in the remaining days of his presidency.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. The story was filed from Los Angeles.

Источник: https://www.fox6now.com/news/rep-john-katko-1st-house-republican-to-say-hell-vote-for-trumps-impeachment

Here are the House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump

Ten GOP House members joined Democrats in voting to impeach President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden heading to Kansas City to promote infrastructure packageTrump calls Milley a 'f---ing idiot' over Afghanistan withdrawalFirst rally for far-right French candidate Zemmour prompts protests, violence MORE on Wednesday for inciting a riot at the Capitol last week. 

It marks the first time in the country's history that a president has been impeached twice in one term.

It's also the most bipartisan impeachment vote in the nation's history.

Rep. Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerKevin McCarthy is hostage to the GOP's 'exotic wing'GOP infighting takes stupid to a whole new levelThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Congress avoids shutdownMORE (R-Ill.) said he is “in total peace” with his vote even if it costs him his seat. 

Rep. Tom RiceHugh (Tom) Thompson RiceLIVE COVERAGE: Tax hikes take center stage in Ways and Means markupRepublicans hit Biden over Afghanistan, with eye on midtermsBiden says deadly attack won't alter US evacuation mission in AfghanistanMORE (R-S.C.) was the most conservative of the members who supported the effort.

He said a reasonable person would see Trump's remarks to a crowd before the mob attacked the Capitol as having the potential to lead to violence.

“Under the strict definition of the law, I don’t know if the president’s speech last Wednesday morning amounted to incitement of a riot, but any reasonable person could see the potential for violence,” he said.

Rice also took aim at the president for going after Vice President Pence. 

"I have backed this President through thick and thin for four years. I campaigned for him and voted for him twice. But, this utter failure is inexcusable,” he said in a statement. 

The ten Republicans in the House who voted for Trump's impeachment were House Republican Conference Chair Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyKevin McCarthy is hostage to the GOP's 'exotic wing'Jan. 6 panel faces new test as first witness pleads the FifthProsecutors say North Carolina woman deserves prison for bringing 14-year-old to Capitol riotMORE (Wyo.) and Reps. Anthony GonzalezAnthony GonzalezPowell, Yellen say they underestimated inflation and supply snarlsTexas Democrat Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson announces retirement at end of termThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by ExxonMobil - Will Biden's big bill pass the House this week?MORE (Ohio), Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerAdams: Maternal health is in 'a crisis within a crisis'The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden talks up bright side beneath omicron's cloudOvernight Health Care — Presented by March of Dimes — Supreme Court weighs abortion restrictionsMORE (Wash.), John Katko (N.Y.), Kinzinger (Ill.) Peter Meijer (Mich.), Dan Newhouse (Wash.), Rice (S.C.), Fred Upton (Mich.) and David ValadaoDavid Goncalves ValadaoJarring GOP divisions come back into spotlightTrump allies target Katko over infrastructure voteTwo House Democrats to retire ahead of challenging midtermsMORE (Calif.). 

Multiple Republicans who didn't vote to impeach said they also felt the president’s role in the insurrection — which left five dead, including Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick — warrants repercussions, but took issue with the process and said it would further divide the country.

While House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyPressure grows to remove Boebert from committeesSenate leaders face pushback on tying debt fight to defense billNews reporting in an age of rampant mendacityMORE (R-Calif.) granted members of the conference permission to vote via proxy. Reps. Kay GrangerNorvell (Kay) Kay GrangerTwo women could lead a powerful Senate spending panel for first time in historyConservative women's group endorses Sarah Huckabee Sanders for Arkansas governor Bottom lineMORE (R-Texas), Andy HarrisAndrew (Andy) Peter HarrisGOP lawmaker fined ,000 for failing to complete House security screeningGeorgia Republicans advance map that aims to pick up House seat in redistrictingThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by ExxonMobil - House to vote on Biden social spending bill after McCarthy delay MORE (R-Md.), Greg Murphy (R-N.C.) and Daniel WebsterDaniel Alan WebsterLaura Loomer says she's tested positive for COVID-19How Donald Rumsfeld helped save the presidencyGun deaths surge in Iowa ahead of loosened handgun restrictionsMORE (R-Fla.) did not partake in the vote.  

Источник: https://thehill.com/homenews/house/534126-here-are-the-house-republicans-who-voted-for-impeachment

How every lawmaker from PA voted on Trump’s impeachment

It’s an ignominious first for an alum of a Philadelphia college.

U.S. House members vote on impeachment on Wednesday

Hewing mostly to party lines, the U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday night voted to impeach President Donald Trump for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

He became the third president in American history to receive the federal government’s ultimate censure — and the first with a strong Philadelphia connection: Trump is an alumnus of Penn’s Wharton School, graduating with a bachelor’s degree in 1968.

The two different articles of impeachment received slightly different outcomes. On abuse of power, the count was 230 to 197, with just two Democrats joining the Republicans in voting against. On obstruction of Congress, a third Dem broke ranks to end up with a vote of 229 to 198.

What happens next? As written in the U.S. Constitution, the House sends the articles to the Senate, which then holds a trial presided over by the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. A two-thirds “super majority” is required to convict.

However, Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi indicated yesterday she might not immediately hand things over to the GOP-controlled Senate.

Neither of the two previous impeached presidents, Bill Clinton (1998) or Andrew Johnson (1868) were convicted. Unlike those two, Trump is only in his first term, so the general public will have a chance to weigh in when he runs for reelection in November.

Pundits think the impeachment vote could also have an effect further down the ticket, as voters consider how their congresspersons did or did not act in their best interests during this historic action.

Here’s how all the representatives from Pennsylvania voted when it came to impeaching Donald Trump.

Note: there’s no effective difference between “yea” and “aye” or “no” and “nay.”

Brian Fitzpatrick, Republican (PA-1, Bucks County)

Nay, No

Brendan Boyle, Democrat (PA-2, Philadelphia)

Yea, Aye

Dwight Evans, Democrat (PA-3, Philadelphia)

Yea, Aye

Madeleine Dean, Democrat (PA-4, Montgomery County)

Yea, Aye

Mary Gay Scanlon, Democrat (PA-5, Delaware County)

Yea, Aye

Chrissy Houlahan, Democrat (PA-6, Chester County)

Yea, Aye

Susan Wild, Democrat (PA-7, Lehigh County)

Yea, Aye

Matt Cartwright, Democrat (PA-8, Luzerne County)

Yea, Aye

Daniel Meuser, Republican (PA-9, Lebanon County)

Nay, No

Scott Perry, Republican (PA-10, York County)

Nay, No

Lloyd Smucker, Republican (PA-11, Lancaster County)

Nay, No

Fred Keller, Republican (PA-12, Snyder County)

Nay, No

John Joyce, Republican (PA-13, Blair County)

Nay, No

Guy Reschenthaler, Republican (PA-14, Washington County)

Nay, No

Glenn Thompson, Republican (PA-15, Centre County)

Nay, No

Mike Kelly, Republican (PA-16, Butler County)

Nay, No

Conor Lamb, Democrat (PA-17, Beaver County)

Yea, Aye

Michael Doyle, Democrat (PA-18, Allegheny County)

Yea, Aye

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Источник: https://billypenn.com/2019/12/19/how-every-lawmaker-from-pa-voted-on-trumps-impeachment/

Only three U.S. presidents have been formally impeached by Congress—Andrew Johnson, Bill Clinton and Donald Trump. One of those presidents, Donald Trump, was impeached twice during his single term. No U.S. president has ever been removed from office through impeachment.

In addition to Johnson, Clinton and Trump, only one other U.S. president has faced formal impeachment inquiries in the House of Representatives: Richard Nixon. Many other presidents have been threatened with impeachment by political foes without gaining any real traction in Congress. 

The framers of the Constitution intentionally made it difficult for Congress to remove a sitting president. The impeachment process starts in the House of Representatives with a formal impeachment inquiry. If the House Judiciary Committee finds sufficient grounds, its members write and pass articles of impeachment, which then go to the full House for a vote.

A simple majority in the House is all that’s needed to formally impeach a president. But that doesn’t mean he or she is out of a job. The final stage is the Senate impeachment trial. Only if two-thirds of the Senate find the president guilty of the crimes laid out in the articles of impeachment is the POTUS removed from office.

Although Congress has impeached and removed eight federal officials—all federal judges—no president has ever been found guilty during a Senate impeachment trial. Andrew Johnson came awfully close, though; he barely escaped a guilty verdict by one vote.

If Convicted, Removal From Office, Possible Disqualification from Government Service

If a president is acquitted by the Senate, the impeachment trial is over. But if he or she is found guilty, the Senate trial moves to the sentencing or “punishment” phase. The Constitution allows for two types of punishments for a president found guilty of an impeachable offense: “Judgment in Cases of Impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from Office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any Office of honor, Trust or Profit under the United States.”

The first punishment, removal from office, is automatically enforced following a two-thirds guilty vote. But the second punishment, disqualification from holding any future government position, requires a separate Senate vote. In this case, only a simple majority is required to ban the impeached president from any future government office for life. That second vote has never been held since no president has been found guilty in the Senate trial.

READ MORE: What Happens After a President Is Impeached?

Andrew Johnson: Impeached in 1868

Johnson was elected as Abraham Lincoln’s vice president in 1864. The toughest decision facing Lincoln’s second term was how to reestablish ties with the Confederate states now that the Civil War was over. Lincoln’s plan for Reconstruction favored leniency while so-called “Radical Republicans” in his party wanted to punish Southern politicians and extend full civil rights to freed slaves.

Lincoln was assassinated only 42 days into his second term, leaving Johnson in charge of Reconstruction. He immediately clashed with the Radical Republicans in Congress, calling for pardons for Confederate leaders and vetoing political rights for freedmen. In 1867, Congress retaliated by passing the Tenure of Office Act, which barred the president from replacing members of his cabinet without Senate approval.

Believing the law to be unconstitutional, Johnson went ahead and fired his Secretary of War, an ally of the Radical Republicans in Congress. Johnson’s political enemies responded by drafting and passing 11 articles of impeachment in the House.

"Sir, the bloody and untilled fields of the ten unreconstructed States, the unsheeted ghosts of the two thousand murdered negroes in Texas, cry [...] for the punishment of Andrew Johnson," wrote the abolitionist Republican Representative William D. Kelley from Pennsylvania.

Johnson was impeached in the House of Representatives by 126 votes to 47, but narrowly avoided a two-thirds guilty verdict in the Senate by a single vote. After his acquittal, he served out the rest of his term and became the first (and only) former U.S. president to be elected to the Senate.

READ MORE: 150 Years Ago, a President Could Be Impeached for Firing a Cabinet Member

Bill Clinton: Impeached in 1998

Clinton was plagued by legal troubles and scandals from the moment he entered the White House. In 1993, Clinton and his First Lady, Hillary, were the subject of a Justice Department investigation into the so-called Whitewater controversy, a botched business deal from their days in Arkansas. And in 1994, Clinton was sued for sexual harassment by Paula Jones, who claimed Clinton exposed himself to her in a hotel room in 1991.

Interestingly, it was a combination of both legal cases that would ultimately lead to Clinton’s impeachment. Independent counsel Kenneth Starr was appointed by the Justice Department to investigate the Whitewater affair, but he couldn’t find any impeachable evidence. Meanwhile, lawyers for Jones got a tip that Clinton had an affair with a 21-year-old White House intern named Monica Lewinsky, a claim that both Lewinsky and Clinton denied under oath.

Starr switched the focus of his investigation when he received 20 hours of taped phone conversations between Lewinsky and Linda Tripp, a former White House colleague, in which Lewinsky alludes to the affair. Starr then got the FBI to fit Tripp with a wire to meet with Lewinsky at a Ritz-Carlton hotel outside Washington, DC, when Lewinsky again admitted to a sexual relationship with the president.

When the story went public, Clinton was forced to address the accusations on national television.

“I want you to listen to me,” Clinton famously said. “I did not have sexual relations with that woman, Miss Lewinsky. I never told anybody to lie, not a single time, never.”

Starr’s investigative team ended up producing a long and lurid report detailing Clinton’s sexual dalliances with Lewinsky and providing evidence that Clinton lied under oath (perjury) in an effort to obstruct the Starr investigation.

On December 19, 1998, the House of Representatives voted to impeach Clinton on two separate counts: perjury and obstruction of justice. But in the ensuing five-week Senate trial, Clinton was acquitted on both counts.

Despite a very public and embarrassing scandal, and being only the second president in history to be impeached, Clinton’s job approval rating peaked at 73 percent in 1999.

READ MORE: Why Clinton Survived Impeachment While Nixon Resigned After Watergate

Donald Trump: Impeached in 2019 and 2021

On September 24, 2019, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced a formal impeachment inquiry into President Trump regarding his alleged efforts to pressure the President of Ukraine to investigate possible wrongdoings by his political rival, former Vice President Joe Biden.

The decision to authorize the impeachment inquiry came after a leaked whistleblower complaint detailed a July phone conversation between Trump and President Volodymyr Zelensky in which Trump allegedly tied Ukrainian military aid to personal political favors. The White House later released a reconstructed transcript of the phone call, which many Democrats argued demonstrated that Trump had violated the Constitution.

On December 18, 2019, President Trump became the third U.S. president in history to be impeached as the House of Representatives voted nearly along party lines to impeach him over abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. No Republicans voted in favor of either article of impeachment, while three Democrats voted against one or both. On February 5, 2020, the Senate voted largely along party lines to acquit Trump on both charges.

On January 11, 2021, House Democrats introduced a second article of impeachment that accused the president of “incitement of insurrection.” The article cited phone calls, speeches and tweets by President Trump that allegedly incited a violent crowd that attacked the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021. 

The House of Representatives voted to impeach President Trump again on January 13, 2021, making him the only president in history to be impeached twice. Unlike Trump’s first impeachment, 10 Republicans joined House Democrats who unanimously voted in favor of impeachment. One hundred and ninety-seven Republicans voted against the second impeachment. The Senate trial took place after President Trump left office. He was found not guilty, though seven Republican senators joined Democrats in voting to convict, making it the most bi-partisan Senate impeachment vote in history.

Richard Nixon: Resigned in 1974

Despite being complicit in one of the greatest political scandals in U.S. presidential history, Richard Nixon was never impeached. He resigned before the House of Representatives had a chance to impeach him. If he hadn’t quit, Nixon would likely have been the first president ever impeached and removed from office, given the crimes he committed to cover up his involvement in the Watergate break-ins.

On July 27, 1974, after seven months of deliberations, the House Judiciary Committee approved the first of five proposed articles of impeachment against Nixon, charging the president with obstruction of justice in an effort to shield himself from the ongoing Watergate investigation. Only a handful of Republicans in the judiciary committee voted to approve the articles of impeachment, and it was unclear at the time if there would be enough votes in the full House to formally impeach the president.

But everything changed on August 5, 1974, when the Supreme Court ordered Nixon to release unedited tapes of his Oval Office conversations with White House staffers during the Watergate investigation. The so-called “smoking gun” tapes included Nixon proposing the use of the CIA to obstruct the FBI investigation, and paying hush money to the convicted Watergate burglars. The transcript included the following:

NIXON: How much money do you need?

JOHN W. DEAN: I would say these people are going to cost, uh, a million dollars over the next, uh, two years. (Pause)

NIXON: We could get that.

Once the tapes were made public, Nixon got word from Republican congressional leadership that all but 15 Senators would likely vote against him in an impeachment trial, more than enough to remove him from office. To save himself the indignity of becoming the first sitting president fired by Congress, Nixon resigned on August 8, 1974.

Nixon was pardoned of criminal charges by Gerald Ford, but many of his Watergate conspirators weren’t so lucky. Most of his White House legal counsel, including John Dean, went to jail for their involvement in Watergate.

READ MORE:The Watergate Scandal

A significant number of U.S. presidents have faced calls for impeachment, including five of the past six Republican presidents. But few of those accusations were taken seriously by Congress.

There were even rumblings about impeaching the nation's first president, George Washington, by those who opposed his policies. Those calls, however, did not reach the point of becoming formal resolutions or charges. 

John Tyler was the first president to face impeachment charges. Nicknamed “His Accidency” for assuming the presidency after William Henry Harrison died after just 30 days in office, Tyler was wildly unpopular with his own Whig party. A House representative from Virginia submitted a petition for Tyler’s impeachment, but it was never taken up by the House for a vote.

Between 1932 and 1933, a congressman introduced two impeachment resolutions against Herbert Hoover. Both were eventually tabled by large margins. 

More recently, both Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush were the subject of impeachment resolutions submitted by Henry B. Gonzales, a Democratic representative from Texas, but none of the resolutions were taken up for a vote in the House Judiciary Committee.

George W. Bush faced a slightly more serious impeachment threat when Democratic Representative Dennis Kucinich introduced a House resolution charging Bush with a litany of high crimes and misdemeanors, including war crimes. The House voted 251 to 166 to refer the resolution to the House Judiciary Committee, but House Speaker Pelosi said any talk of impeachment was “off the table.”

Barack Obama was also accused of “high crimes and misdemeanors” befitting impeachment. In 2012, Republican Representative Walter Jones submitted a House resolution charging the president with authorizing military action in Libya without the consent of Congress. The resolution was referred to the Judiciary Committee where it was never brought up for a vote. 

WATCH: The Presidents Collection on HISTORY Vault

Источник: https://www.history.com

What to Know About the U.S. Presidents Who’ve Been Impeached

On January 13, Donald Trump became the third President in American history to be impeached and the first President to be impeached twice.

Impeachment is very rare in the U.S.’s nearly 250 years of history, and none of the three men to have faced it — Presidents Bill Clinton, Andrew Johnson and Donald Trump — have been removed from office. (However, after Clinton and Johnson were impeached, both of their parties lost the next Presidential election.)

To be impeached, a President or other federal official must have committed one of the violations described by the Constitution as “treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors.” But history shows that if a President is to be impeached, the biggest factor may be political will — whether members of a President’s own party are willing to turn against him, and whether enough members of Congress believe that trying to remove the President is worth the risk of losing popular support.

Impeachment alone isn’t the only step to take a President out of office, but is actually the first part of a two-pronged process. To impeach an official, the House of Representatives must pass articles of impeachment, which formally accuse the President of misbehavior. Once the House votes to impeach, the Senate must hold a trial to decide if the President should be removed from office.

Read more:Here’s How the Impeachment Process Actually Works

Here’s what you need to know about the Presidents who have been impeached — and why they stayed in office.

Andrew Johnson

Lincoln's successor President Andrew Johnson of Tennessee.

PhotoQuest—Getty Images

Why was Johnson impeached?

The aftermath of the Civil War set the stage for the first impeachment of a U.S. President. After President Abraham Lincoln’s death, he was succeeded by his Vice President, Andrew Johnson.

Johnson was a pro-Union Democrat who had refused to secede from the Union along with his state, Tennessee, during the war. However, he was also a racist who favored a lenient approach to Reconstruction, the process of bringing the states of the Confederacy back into the nation. He clashed with Congress throughout his term, vetoing bills he felt were too harsh on the South — including the Freedmen’s Bureau Acts, which gave displaced southerners, including African Americans, access to food, shelter, medical aid and land.

This approach put him at odds with Congress. The final straw came when he replaced Secretary of War Edwin Stanton, a Lincoln appointee who sided with the Radical Republicans, a faction of the party that favored enfranchisement and civil rights for freed African Americans.

Congress produced 11 articles of impeachment, which alleged that Johnson had violated the Tenure of Office Act — a law intended to limit presidential power to remove federal appointees from office — and had found a replacement without consulting the Senate. Johnson was impeached by a two-thirds super majority of the House, and the case moved to the Senate for trial. Years later, the Supreme Court determined that the act was unconstitutional.

Why wasn’t Johnson removed from office?

When he was tried in the Senate, Johnson ultimately held onto his presidency by a single vote, after seven Republicans decided to vote with Senate Democrats to keep him in office.

Johnson’s defense argued that he hadn’t appointed Secretary of War Stanton in the first place, which meant that he wasn’t violating the Tenure of Office Act. They also claimed that Johnson intended to push the Act before the Supreme Court. Historian Hans L. Trefousse argues that the Senators who voted against removal decided that Johnson was being pushed out of office for political reasons: “[The] weakness of the case… convinced many that the charges were largely political, and that the violation of the Tenure of Office Act constituted neither a crime nor a violation of the Constitution but merely a pretext for Johnson’s opponents.”

This result set a major precedent for future presidential impeachments: that Presidents shouldn’t be impeached for political reasons, but only if they commit, as the Constitution stipulates, “treason, bribery or other high crimes and misdemeanors.”

As one of the defecting Republicans, Senator James Grimes, said, “I cannot agree to destroy the harmonious working of the Constitution for the sake of getting rid of an Unacceptable President.”

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Bill Clinton

Pres. Bill Clinton emphatically denying having affair with former White House intern Monica Lewinsky.

Diana Walker—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Image

Why was Clinton impeached?

Like Johnson, President Bill Clinton had stirred up a lot of anger in Congress. After his affair with former White House intern Monica Lewinsky became public in January 1998, Clinton at first adamantly denied to federal investigators — and the public — having had “sexual relations” with her.

The articles of impeachment alleged that Clinton had perjured himself by lying to investigators about his relationship with Lewinsky. They also said that he had obstructed justice by encouraging White House staff to deny the affair.

Why wasn’t Clinton removed from office?

The outcome of Clinton’s trial reinforced the precedent that Presidents should only be removed from office only in limited circumstances. While many Senators agreed that Clinton had behaved badly, they ultimately decided that his misconduct wasn’t at the level of “high crimes and misdemeanors.”

Michael Gerhardt, a University of North Carolina professor who specializes in constitutional law, said, “A lot of these people found that there was misconduct, but there wasn’t enough to impeach him.”

Susan Collins, a Republican who ultimately voted against conviction, said in a statement that she didn’t believe that Clinton had committed a crime, but that he had behaved badly. “In voting to acquit the President, I do so with grave misgivings for I do not mean in any way to exonerate this man,” Collins said.

Experts say that the effort to remove Clinton from office was doomed because public opinion turned against removing Clinton from office. In fact, Clinton’s job-approval rating peaked during the week of the impeachment, according to Gallup.

Donald Trump

President Donald J. Trump in the Oval Office at the White House on Dec 17, 2019 in Washington, D.C.

Jabin Botsford—The Washington Post via Getty Images

Why was Trump impeached?

President Donald Trump was impeached on Dec. 18, 2019, on two charges: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

The two charges against the President — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — stem from a July 25 phone call with the President of Ukraine, Volodymyr Zelensky. The content of the call first came to national attention after a whistleblower filed a report expressing concern that Trump had pushed Ukraine to investigate an energy company for which the son of his political rival, former Vice President Joe Biden, sat on the board. At around that time, the Trump administration also withheld military aid from Ukraine, and Ukraine was working to secure a meeting between Zelensky and Trump.

Testimony by current and former U.S. government officials in Fall 2019 fleshed out a narrative about how officials affiliated with the Trump Administration — including his personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani and E.U. ambassador Gordon Sondland — urged Ukraine to conduct that investigation, as well as one into the debunked theory that Ukraine interfered in the 2016 election.

The Democrat-led House Judiciary Committee, in outlining its case against the President, said that Trump had “betrayed the nation by abusing his high office to enlist a foreign power in corrupting democratic elections,” and tried to interfere with Congress’ Constitutionally protected power to impeach a President.

The legislators also argue that Trump’s misconduct continued during the impeachment inquiry. They allege that he attempted to interfere with the investigation by ordering Executive Branch officials not to comply with Congressional subpoenas for testimony and documents.

According to the articles of impeachment approved by Congress, these charges fall under the “high crimes and misdemeanors” provision of impeachment power—which, many constitutional experts say, is not necessarily about breaking the law, but rather about having violated the public trust.

Why wasn’t Trump removed from office?

On Feb. 5, 2020, Trump became the third president in U.S. history to be impeached by the House and then acquitted by the Senate. His acquittal came on a near party-line vote, reinforcing divisions at the end of a bitterly partisan process. The Senate voted 52-48 to acquit Trump on abuse of power and 53-47 to acquit him on obstruction of Congress; Sen. Mitt Romney, a Republican from Utah, was the only senator of either party to break ranks, voting to convict Trump on the abuse of power charge.

Many of the Republican senators who voted to acquit Trump said the final verdict should be left up to the voters at the ballot box in 2020. It’s still an open question whether the impeachment process will help or hurt Trump at the polls. Trump and some of his associates say that impeachment could benefit him politically by mobilizing his base, while others have argued that the proceedings will contribute to the aura of chaos around his administration. Tad Devine, a strategist for Al Gore, previously told the LA Times that he believes that, although many people think Bill Clinton’s impeachment helped the Democrats, it actually boosted Republicans into the White House.

“It allowed George W. Bush to promise that he would restore honor and dignity to the White House — and it worked,” Devine said.

Immediately after the acquittal, Trump’s campaign was projecting extreme confidence. “Since the President’s campaign only got bigger and stronger as a result of this nonsense,” Trump’s campaign manager Brad Parscale said in a statement after the conclusion of the trial, “this impeachment hoax will go down as the worst miscalculation in American political history.”

Other Presidents also faced impeachment threats

A demonstration outside the White House in support of the impeachment of President Richard Nixon (1913 - 1994) following the Watergate revelations.

MPI—Getty Images

Given that only three presidents have ever been impeached, more of them have faced Congressional calls for impeachment than one might expect.

The first President the House of Representatives moved to impeach was John Tyler. After succeeding President William Henry Harrison, who died after just one month in office, Tyler vetoed legislation backed by his own Whig Party and that Harrison had promised to support. The Whigs kicked Tyler out of their party, and the House received a petition for a resolution asking him to resign or else face the possibility of impeachment. Yet Congress ultimately didn’t pursue an impeachment.

The President best known for coming to the brink of impeachment — but not actually getting impeached — was Richard Nixon. During the Watergate scandal, the House Judiciary Committee filed three articles of impeachment against the President for “high crimes and misdemeanors.” However, Nixon resigned his office on Aug. 9, 1974, before the impeachment could move forward.

In recent American history, Presidents from Herbert Hoover to Barack Obama have faced discussion, ranging from credible to dubious and politically charged, of their impeachment. And even at moments of great popularity, all Presidents will know, in the back of their minds, that impeachments are, however rare, a possibility — which is just what the Constitution’s framers intended.

“A good magistrate will not fear them,” said Elbridge Gerry of impeachments, at the Constitutional Convention. “A bad one ought to be kept in fear of them.”

Additional reporting by Tessa Berenson

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Источник: https://time.com/5552679/impeached-presidents/

6 Alabama Republicans vote against Trump impeachment; Terri Sewell votes for it


The Alabama House delegation Wednesday split down party lines on the impeachment of Donald Trump in the wake of a deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol last week. 

U.S. Reps. Jerry Carl, R-Mobile; Barry Moore, R-Enterprise; Mike Rogers, R-Saks; Robert Aderholt, R-Haleyville; Mo Brooks, R-Huntsville and Gary Palmer, R-Hoover all voted against sending charges of inciting an insurrection to the U.S. Senate. U.S. Rep. Terri Sewell, D-Birmingham, voted to impeach the president. 

"Blood is on this house," said Sewell, whose district includes Montgomery. "We must do something about it. I ask we move from 'stopping the steal' to to healing. But healing requires accountability."

The vote mirrored the delegation's vote last week on whether or not to accept the presidential choice of the voters of Arizona and Pennsylvania. All the Republican members of Alabama's House delegation voted to throw them out; Sewell voted to accept them. 

More: 6 Alabama congressmen, 1 senator support moves to throw out votes of Arizona, Pennsylvania

That vote came after a violent mob, goaded by Trump, invaded the U.S. Capitol and attacked Capitol police officers, broke into congressional offices and committed major acts of vandalism. At least five people died during the riot, including a Capitol police officer and Kevin Greeson, a 55-year-old from Athens who suffered a heart attack. 

More: Alabama man dies amid pro-Trump rally, riot at U.S. Capitol

Dozens of arrests have taken place in the wake of the riot, and more are expected. Police have charged Lonnie Coffman, a 70-year-old from Falkville, with 17 separate weapons charges. Authorities said they found guns and Molotov cocktails in Coffman's pickup truck, and had a list singling out a federal judge appointed by U.S. President Barack Obama and a Muslim congressman from Indiana.  

More: 'Bad guy,' 'Good Girl': Alabama man with Molotov cocktails in D.C. left alarming notes in truck, records show

The House voted 232 to 197 Wednesday afternoon to impeach Trump. 10 Republicans joined 222 Democrats in voting for impeachment.

Republicans during the debate condemned the violence but attacked the process of impeachment.  Moore, a first-term representative whose campaign stressed his loyalty to Donald Trump, said in brief remarks during the debate that if the House pursued the charges, "impeachment will always be a political process."

"We're going to impeach a president for what reasons?" said Moore, whose district includes Montgomery, Autauga and Elmore counties. "For what reasons? There have been no hearings. There have been no committees."

Palmer said in a statement that the process had no investigative process or chance for the accused to respond. He also denounced the violence at the Capitol last week.

"There is no excuse for it, and I hope everyone who took any part will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law," he said. "But I do not believe an impeachment is beneficial to our country at this difficult moment."

Rogers said in a statement on Twitter that he believed impeachment "will only further divide our nation." Carl said he did not believe the charges reached "the necessary threshold for impeachment."

"The President has publicly conceded the election and committed to a peaceful transition of power, and I trust he will uphold his promise to ensure a smooth transition to the next administration," Carl's statement said.

More: Senate impeachment trial likely won’t begin until after Biden sworn in

There has been fallout for the state delegation. Brooks faces a censure resolution for speaking at the March to Save America rally, in which he encouraged "American patriots" to "start taking names and kicking ass." Brooks released a statement Tuesday where he condemned the violence but refused to apologize for his remarks, which he claimed were meant to "reinvigorate people for the 2022 election cycle."

Ali Alexander, a far-right activist who organized a "Stop the Steal" rally, said he coordinated with Brooks and two Arizona congressmen to plan the rally. Brooks denied knowing Alexander in a statement to the Washington Post. 

Moore closed his personal Twitter account over the weekend after sending tweets that belittled the arrests of people charged with rioting and making an irrelevant reference to the race of one of the Capitol police officers. 

"I Understand it was a black police officer that shot the white female veteran," Moore wrote in one of the deleted tweets. "You know that doesn't fit the narrative."

The Rule of Law Defense Fund, a dark money group affiliated with the Republican Attorneys General Association, recorded robocalls encouraging people to attend the rally that preceded the violence at the Capitol. Adam Piper, the head of RAGA, resigned earlier this week amid the fallout. Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall, the chair of the fund, said he did not authorize the robocalls and ordered an internal review. 

The impeachment charges now go to the U.S. Senate. It is not clear when the chamber may hold a trial on them. Trump is set to leave office on Jan. 20, but Congress could hold a trial after that. If Trump was convicted, he could be banned from holding federal office again. 

Contact Montgomery Advertiser reporter Brian Lyman at 334-240-0185 or [email protected]

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Источник: https://www.montgomeryadvertiser.com/story/news/2021/01/13/alabama-republicans-vote-impeachment-against-donald-trump-terri-sewell-democrat/6652208002/

Former presidential hopeful Evan McMullin looks to disrupt senate race as an Independent


Political divisiveness has been an issue at the forefront of the American consciousness since the 2016 presidential election.

In early November, the Pew Research Center released a new political typology study that groups Americans into nine different groups, one category more than its list created four years ago. It shows that there are multiple factions among both Democrats and Republicans, which makes it harder to govern within a two-party system.

“They complicate the already difficult task of governing in a divided nation,” read the report, which cited how political parties must walk a tight-rope of appealing to an ideological base while also needing to attract support from less politically involved moderates.

One candidate for Utah’s open senate seat in 2022 — Evan McMullin — said he sees the fractured political state of the country as a sign that an unaffiliated independent candidate like himself has a real chance to win. 

“I'm running because our politics are broken,” McMullin told The Spectrum. “We've got to have better leadership in Washington that will find common ground and advance solutions to all kinds of challenges.”

McMullin, a political activist and former Central Intelligence Agency operations officer best known for his presidential run in 2016, is campaigning for office again, this time challenging incumbent U.S. Sen. Mike Lee, a Republican seeking his third term.

McMullin describes himself as a “Lincoln conservative” and is looking to build a coalition of “cross-partisan” support to be Utah's first non-Republican senator since 1977. This plan includes drumming up support from southern Utah, according to McMullin. 

This region of the state is traditionally conservative yet willing to express an independent view from both the state and national Republican Party, according to Mary Bennett Weaver, the director of the Leavitt Center for Politics at Southern Utah University.

“The Republican Party here is also very independent and not necessarily adopting the national party line,” Bennett Weaver said. “And for many years, there's been a feeling that elected officials don't pay attention to southern Utah, they focus their time and efforts up in Salt Lake.” 

The two most populated counties in southern Utah are Iron and Washington County, each of which has grown by more than 24% since 2010, which was higher than the state's overall growth rate. Bennett Weaver says this rapid growth makes southern Utah more important than ever for statewide elections. 

"You ignore Southern Utah to your peril because those two counties are where all the new voters are," she said.

The 'Utah Way'

For his senate run, McMullin says he won’t focus on one area of the state over another and will try to be a senator for “all Utahns." He said he thinks many problems are shared between southern and northern Utahns. These problems include rising costs for healthcare and housing as well as the need for updated infrastructure and better drought protection measures. 

McMullin believes these problems won’t be solved in a meaningful way by the current Congress due to the fractured nature of politics where “tribalism” is prevalent

“We've unfortunately entered into an era of tribalism in our politics, in which many of our leaders are more concerned with remaining loyal to party leadership,” McMullin said. “And they therefore fail to serve all Utahns and fail to advance solutions to help us overcome our problem.”

He says he would practice the “Utah Way” if elected and could encourage other members of Utah's congressional delegation to do the same. This term is a common buzzword used by Utah politicians to show a willingness to listen and compromise on certain political issues. Fellow Utah 2022 senate candidate Becky Edwards has used this term a lot in her campaign. 

This isn’t the first time McMullin has looked to Utah for support. In 2016, he threw his hat into the ring of the presidential election as an independent candidate to offer voters a choice between two candidates that couldn’t “unify” Americans. As an independent, McMullin positioned himself as a conservative ‘Never-Trumper’ who spoke out against the politics practiced by former President Donald Trump. He wasn't competitive in the rest of the U.S. but he was able to gain 21.5% of the presidential vote in Utah.  

This election effort was described by McMullin as an “emergency presidential election” and focused much of its efforts on Utah voters. The campaign didn’t get much traction outside of McMullin’s home state and it accrued nearly $670,000 of debt, an amount that McMullin said isn’t uncommon for unsuccessful campaigns.

But McMullin attributes those negatives to the last-minute nature of his campaign and argued he is in a “much better position” for a senate election since he’s spent the last five years connecting with people and building resources. 

After the 2016 election, McMullin started Stand Up Republic, a non-profit government reform advocacy group meant to “unite Americans from across the political spectrum,” according to McMullin. But as the 2022 elections approach, McMullin is setting that work aside to gain focus on beating another controversial conservative, Sen. Lee. 

McMullin has already gotten several endorsements from other moderate politicians like former congressman Ben McAdams — the most recent Democrat to be part of Utah’s federal delegation — and from U.S. Rep. Adam Kinzinger, a Republican from Illinois. Kinzinger was of the 10 Republicans who voted to impeach Trump and highlighted on social media how he thought McMullin would be a candidate that would “stand up to extremism in every form."

Lee, approaching his 12th year in the Senate, has a job approval rating of less than 50% among Utahns, according to a poll from the Deseret News and the Hinckley Institute of Politics. Lee is also facing two prominent and funded challengers from within the Republican party for the nomination, Ally Isom and Becky Edwards.

For or against Trump

McMullin said he suspects Utahns’ view of Lee has been impacted by the persona Lee has created for himself, with supporters calling him a constitutionalist conservative and detractors like McMullin describing him as a partisan obstructionist. 

“I think it's safe to say that, at least over the last few years, Mike Lee has lost his way in Washington,” McMullin argued, pointing to the senator’s track record on President Trump. 

In October 2016, Lee called for Trump to drop out of the race and for conservatives to find a different candidate. Lee said he voted for McMullin over Trump that year. But four years later in October 2020, Lee fully endorsed Trump for another term, saying Utah members of the state's predominant religion, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saint, thought of the former president as being similar to Captain Moroni, a prominent figure in the Book of Mormon.

Lee told The Atlantic his viewpoint on the 45th president changed as a result of the two developing a positive “working relationship” while Trump was in office.

Lee later tried to clarify that statement on social media, saying via a Facebook post that he had been attempting to make a point about Trump but that it may have come out awkwardly.

“Some people found that comparison upsetting, blasphemous, and otherwise wrong,” he wrote. “I respect their right to feel that way, and realize that my impromptu comments may not have been the best forum for drawing a novel analogy from scripture.”

McMullin also criticized Lee’s actions after the 2020 election, including efforts he had made to vet the arguments being made by Trump's legal team contesting official election results, as first reported in a book by Washington Post associate editor Bob Woodward and national political reporter Robert Costa. McMullin also mentioned Lee’s support of Trump after January 6th, including a television interview where he said the former president deserved a “mulligan” for his role in the violent events of that day.

“He defended those challenges, even though they had no purpose other than to further what we now know was an attempt to overturn our election and that has to be sacred in our system of self-government,” McMullin said. “When the barbarians were at the gate, he was absent at best.” 

Ultimately, Lee voted to certify the 2020 election results, to the displeasure of Trump, who said both Lee and fellow Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham “should be ashamed of themselves for not putting up the fight necessary to win." The 2020 election was described as one of the “most secure in American history” by federal election officials. 

Running as an independent

Despite Lee’s apparent low approval rating and controversial news coverage, McMullin said he knows that it will be tough to unseat a Republican in a state that’s safety conservative. The last time a Republican lost a statewide race was in the 1980 gubernatorial election.

McMullin said he wants to appeal to pragmatic sentiments among Utah voters during the campaign and thinks he’ll be a senator that can bring more to the state than Lee has proven to vote on partisan lines in Congress.

“If we remain divided … we'll send Senator Lee back to Washington for another six years,” he said. 

Getting that wide coalition of support is easier said than done, according to Bennett Weaver. She said Utah’s solid-red voting record for statewide elections is a sign McMullin’s candidacy is a longshot.

“You just would have to bring together so many to defeat a mainstream party candidate. I don't think the odds of that are very good,” she said.

McMullin we’ll need to convince people both outside and inside the Republican Party. About 50.9% of the state's active voters are Republican, with 29.2% registered as unaffiliated and 14.7% registered as Democrats, according to Utah’s voter registration data. 

McMullin says if he is able to get elected he won’t caucus with either Republicans or Democrats. He believes this move would make Utah one of the most “influential states” in the country because Senators that don’t always align with party values can have great influence, pointing to Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia as an example of this. 

“We've seen how when senators act independently on either side of the political aisle and they act independently of their parties they garner a lot of influence for their states,” McMullin said. 

The 2022 Senate election will be held during a midterm year without a presidential election, meaning the voter turnout rate will likely be lower than it was in 2020. Bennett Weaver said low-turnout elections favor incumbents like Lee but incumbents are also susceptible to attacks if they don’t have a proven record, especially in areas that often brush up against the federal government, like southern Utah. 

“That is a vulnerability for an incumbent is when you come south is, you know, what can you tell southern Utah voters that you have worked on to their benefit?” said Bennett Weaver. 

McMullin argued Lee is more focused on partisan issues for Republicans rather than solving issues that impact Utahns. He pointed to how Lee was one of two senators to vote against a bill that would give states $35 billion to improve their water infrastructure, a vote that ultimately passed the Senate by a vote of 89-2.

“I think that's a classic example of the way Mike Lee works in Washington,” McMullin said.

Crowded field of challengers

It’s still no guarantee McMullin will face off against Lee for the senate seat since Lee first has to overcome two well-funded Republican challengers. Edwards, a former Utah state representative, has over $725,000 in campaign funds while Isom, a former Republican staffer, has over $415,000, according to finance reports from the Federal Election Commission.

But Lee is the definite favorite to come out of the primary since neither Isom or Edwards are polling above 10% among Utah Republicans. Lee also has a much larger war chest to fund his effort to get elected for a third term. FEC data shows he has over $4.2 million in campaign cash.

Sean Hemmersmeier covers local government, growth and development in Southwestern Utah. Follow on Twitter @seanhemmers34. Our work depends on subscribers so if you want more coverage on these issues you can subscribe here: http://www.thespectrum.com/subscribe. 

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Источник: https://www.thespectrum.com/story/news/2021/11/27/evan-mcmullin-looks-disrupt-2022-senate-race-independent/8749645002/

Former presidential hopeful Evan McMullin looks to disrupt senate race as an Independent


Political divisiveness has been an issue at the forefront of the American consciousness since the 2016 presidential election.

In early November, the Pew Research Center released a new political typology study that groups Americans into nine different groups, one category more than its list created four years ago. It shows that there are multiple factions among both Democrats and Republicans, which makes it harder to govern within a two-party system.

“They complicate the already difficult task of governing in a divided nation,” read the report, which cited how political parties must walk a tight-rope of appealing to an ideological base while also needing to attract support from less politically involved moderates.

One candidate for Utah’s open senate seat in 2022 — Evan McMullin — said he sees the fractured political state of the country as a sign that an unaffiliated independent candidate like himself has a real chance to south florida state college panther central running because our politics are broken,” McMullin told The Spectrum. “We've got to have better leadership in Washington that will find common ground and advance solutions to all kinds of challenges.”

McMullin, a political activist and former Central Intelligence Agency operations officer best known for his presidential run in 2016, is campaigning for office again, this time challenging incumbent U.S. Sen. Mike Lee, a Republican seeking his third term.

McMullin describes himself as a “Lincoln conservative” and is looking to build a coalition of “cross-partisan” support to be Utah's first non-Republican senator since 1977. This plan includes drumming up support from southern Utah, according to McMullin. 

This region of the state is traditionally conservative yet willing to express an independent view from both the state and national Republican Party, according to Mary Bennett Weaver, the director of the Leavitt Center for Politics at Southern Utah University.

“The Republican Party here is also very independent and not necessarily adopting the national party line,” Bennett Weaver said. “And for many years, there's been a feeling that elected officials don't pay attention to southern Utah, they focus their time and efforts up in Salt Lake.” 

The two most populated counties in southern Utah are Iron and Washington County, each of which has grown by more than 24% since 2010, which was higher than the state's overall growth rate. Bennett Weaver says this rapid growth makes southern Utah more important than ever for statewide elections. 

"You ignore Southern Utah to your peril because those two counties are where all the new voters are," she said.

The 'Utah Way'

For his senate run, McMullin says he won’t focus on one area of the state over another and will try to be a senator for “all Utahns." He said he thinks many walmart money card number are shared between southern and northern Utahns. These problems include rising costs for healthcare and housing as well as the need for updated infrastructure and better drought protection measures. 

McMullin believes these problems won’t be solved in a meaningful way by the current Congress due to the fractured nature of who voted for impeachment in the house list where “tribalism” is prevalent

“We've unfortunately entered into an era of tribalism in our politics, in which many of our leaders are more concerned with remaining loyal to party leadership,” McMullin said. “And they therefore fail to serve all Utahns and fail to advance solutions to help us overcome our problem.”

He says he would practice the “Utah Way” if elected and could encourage other members of Utah's congressional delegation to do the same. This term is a common buzzword used by Utah politicians to show a willingness to listen and compromise on certain political issues. Fellow Utah 2022 senate candidate Becky Edwards has used this term a lot in her campaign. 

This isn’t the first time McMullin has looked to Utah for support. In 2016, he threw his hat into the ring of the presidential election as an independent candidate to offer voters a choice between two candidates that couldn’t “unify” Americans. As an independent, McMullin positioned himself as a conservative ‘Never-Trumper’ who spoke out against the politics practiced by former President Donald Trump. He wasn't competitive in the rest of the U.S. but he was able to gain 21.5% of the presidential vote in Utah.  

This election effort was described by McMullin as an bank of america contact us number presidential election” and focused much of its efforts on Utah voters. The campaign didn’t get much traction outside of McMullin’s home state and it accrued nearly $670,000 of debt, an amount that McMullin said isn’t uncommon for unsuccessful campaigns.

But McMullin attributes those negatives to the last-minute nature of his campaign and argued he is in a “much better position” for a senate election since he’s spent the last five years connecting with people and building resources. 

After the 2016 election, McMullin started Stand Up Republic, a non-profit government reform advocacy group meant to “unite Americans from across the political spectrum,” according to McMullin. But as the 2022 elections approach, McMullin is setting that work aside to gain focus on beating another controversial conservative, Sen. Lee. 

McMullin has already gotten several endorsements from other moderate politicians like former congressman Ben McAdams — the most recent Democrat to be part of Utah’s federal delegation — and from U.S. Rep. Adam Kinzinger, a Republican from Illinois. Kinzinger was of the 10 Republicans who voted to impeach Trump and highlighted on social media how he thought McMullin would be a candidate that would “stand up to extremism in every form."

Lee, approaching his 12th year in the Senate, has a job approval rating of less than 50% among Utahns, according to a poll from the Deseret News and the Hinckley Institute of Politics. Lee is also facing two prominent and funded challengers from within the Republican party for the nomination, Ally Isom and Becky Edwards.

For or against Trump

McMullin said he suspects Utahns’ view of Lee has been impacted by the persona Lee has created for himself, with supporters calling him a constitutionalist conservative and detractors like McMullin describing him as a partisan obstructionist. 

“I think it's safe to say that, at least over the last few years, Mike Lee has lost his way in Washington,” McMullin argued, pointing to the senator’s track record on President Trump. 

In October 2016, Lee called for Trump to drop out of the race and for conservatives to find a different candidate. Lee said he voted for McMullin over Trump that year. But four years later in October 2020, Lee fully endorsed Trump for another term, saying Utah members of the state's predominant religion, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saint, thought of the former president as being similar to Captain Moroni, a prominent figure in the Book of Mormon.

Lee told The Atlantic his viewpoint on the 45th president changed as a result of the two developing a positive “working relationship” while Trump was in office.

Lee later tried to clarify that statement on social media, saying via a Facebook post that he had been attempting to make a point about Trump but that it may have come out awkwardly.

“Some people found that comparison upsetting, blasphemous, and otherwise wrong,” he wrote. “I respect their right to feel that way, and realize that my impromptu comments may not have been the best forum for drawing a novel analogy from scripture.”

McMullin also criticized Lee’s actions after the 2020 election, including efforts he had made to vet the arguments being made by Trump's legal team contesting official election results, as first reported in a book by Washington Post associate editor Bob Woodward and national political reporter Robert Costa. McMullin also mentioned Lee’s support of Trump after January 6th, including a television interview where he said the former president deserved a “mulligan” for his role in the violent events of that day.

“He defended those challenges, even though they had no purpose other than to further what we now know was an attempt to overturn our election and that has to be sacred in our system of self-government,” McMullin said. “When the barbarians were at the gate, he was absent at best.” 

Ultimately, Lee voted to certify the 2020 election results, to the displeasure of Trump, who said both Lee and fellow Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham “should be ashamed of themselves for not putting up the fight necessary to win." The 2020 election was described as one of the “most secure in American history” by federal election officials. 

Running as an independent

Despite Lee’s apparent low approval rating and controversial news coverage, McMullin said he knows that it will be tough to unseat a Republican in a state that’s safety conservative. The last time a Republican lost a statewide race was in 1st financial federal credit union routing number 1980 gubernatorial election.

McMullin said he wants to appeal to pragmatic sentiments among Utah voters during the campaign and thinks he’ll be a senator that can bring more to the state ameren illinois collections Lee has proven to vote on partisan lines in Congress.

“If we remain divided … we'll send Senator Lee back to Washington for another six years,” he said. 

Getting that wide coalition of support is easier said than done, according to Bennett Weaver. She said Utah’s solid-red voting record for statewide elections is a sign McMullin’s candidacy is a longshot.

“You just would have to bring together so many to defeat a mainstream party candidate. I don't think the odds of that are very good,” she said.

McMullin we’ll need to convince people both outside and inside the Republican Party. About 50.9% of the state's active voters are Republican, with 29.2% registered as unaffiliated and 14.7% registered as Democrats, according to Utah’s voter registration data. 

McMullin says if he is able to get elected he won’t caucus with either Republicans or Democrats. He believes this move would make Utah one of the most “influential states” in the country because Senators that don’t always align with party values can have great influence, pointing to Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia as an example of this. 

“We've seen how when senators act independently on either side of the political aisle and they act independently of their parties they garner a lot of influence for their states,” McMullin said. 

The 2022 Senate election will be held during a midterm year without a presidential election, meaning the voter turnout rate will likely be lower than it was in 2020. Bennett Weaver said low-turnout elections favor incumbents like Lee but incumbents are also susceptible to attacks if they don’t have a proven record, especially in areas that often brush up against the federal government, who voted for impeachment in the house list southern Utah. 

“That is a vulnerability for an incumbent is when you come south is, you know, what can you tell southern Utah voters that you have worked on to their benefit?” said Bennett Weaver. 

McMullin argued Lee is more focused on partisan issues for Republicans rather than solving issues that impact Utahns. He pointed to how Lee was one of two senators to vote against a bill that would give states $35 billion to improve their water infrastructure, a vote that ultimately passed the Senate by a vote of 89-2.

“I think that's a classic example of the way Mike Lee works in Washington,” McMullin said.

Crowded field of challengers

It’s still no guarantee McMullin will face off against Lee for the senate seat since Lee first has to overcome two well-funded Republican challengers. Edwards, a former Utah state representative, has over $725,000 in campaign funds while Isom, a former Republican staffer, has over $415,000, according to finance reports from the Federal Election Commission.

But Lee is the who voted for impeachment in the house list favorite to come out of the primary since neither Isom or Edwards are polling above 10% among Utah Republicans. Lee also has a much larger war chest to fund his effort to get elected for a third term. FEC data shows he has over $4.2 million in campaign cash.

Sean Hemmersmeier covers local government, growth and development in Southwestern Utah. Follow on Twitter @seanhemmers34. Our work depends on subscribers so if you want more coverage on these issues you can subscribe here: http://www.thespectrum.com/subscribe. 

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Источник: https://www.thespectrum.com/story/news/2021/11/27/evan-mcmullin-looks-disrupt-2022-senate-race-independent/8749645002/

How every lawmaker from PA voted on Trump’s impeachment

It’s an ignominious first for an alum of a Philadelphia college.

U.S. House members vote on impeachment on Wednesday

Hewing mostly to party lines, the U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday night voted to impeach President Donald Trump for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

He became the third president in American history to receive the federal government’s ultimate censure — and the first with a strong Philadelphia connection: Trump is an alumnus of Penn’s Wharton School, graduating with a bachelor’s degree in 1968.

The two different articles of impeachment received slightly different outcomes. On abuse of power, the count was 230 to 197, with just two Democrats joining the Republicans in voting against. On obstruction of Congress, a third Dem broke ranks to end up with a vote of 229 to 198.

What happens next? As written in the U.S. Constitution, the House sends the articles to the Senate, which then holds a trial presided over by the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. A two-thirds “super majority” is required to convict.

However, Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi indicated yesterday she might not immediately hand things over to the GOP-controlled Senate.

Neither of the two previous impeached presidents, Bill Clinton (1998) or Andrew Johnson (1868) were convicted. Unlike those two, Trump is only in his first term, so the general public will have a chance to weigh in when he runs for reelection in November.

Pundits think the impeachment vote could also have an effect further down the ticket, as voters consider how their congresspersons did or did not act in their best interests during this historic action.

Here’s how all the representatives from Pennsylvania voted when it came to impeaching Donald Trump.

Note: there’s no effective difference between “yea” and “aye” or “no” and “nay.”

Brian Fitzpatrick, Republican (PA-1, Bucks County)

Nay, No

Brendan Boyle, Democrat (PA-2, Philadelphia)

Yea, Aye

Dwight Evans, Democrat (PA-3, Bbva banca privada online, Aye

Madeleine Dean, Democrat (PA-4, Montgomery County)

Yea, Aye

Mary Gay Scanlon, Democrat (PA-5, Delaware County)

Yea, Aye

Chrissy Houlahan, Democrat (PA-6, Chester County)

Yea, Aye

Susan Wild, Democrat (PA-7, Lehigh County)

Yea, Aye

Matt Cartwright, Democrat (PA-8, Luzerne County)

Yea, Aye

Daniel Meuser, Republican (PA-9, Lebanon County)

Nay, No

Scott Perry, Republican (PA-10, York County)

Nay, No

Lloyd Smucker, Republican (PA-11, Lancaster County)

Nay, No

Fred Keller, Republican (PA-12, Snyder County)

Nay, No

John Joyce, Republican (PA-13, Blair County)

Nay, No

Guy Reschenthaler, Republican (PA-14, Washington County)

Nay, No

Glenn Thompson, Republican (PA-15, Centre County)

Nay, No

Mike Kelly, Republican (PA-16, Butler County)

Nay, No

Conor Lamb, Democrat (PA-17, Beaver County)

Yea, Aye

Michael Doyle, Democrat (PA-18, Allegheny County)

Yea, Aye

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Источник: https://billypenn.com/2019/12/19/how-every-lawmaker-from-pa-voted-on-trumps-impeachment/

Republican Groups Censure Party Lawmakers Who voted for impeachment in the house list Voted to Impeach, Convict Trump

State and local Republican groups in the United States are rebuking national lawmakers from their own party who voted to impeach or convict former President Donald Trump of inciting an insurrection at the U.S. Capitol last month.

The Senate acquitted Trump on Saturday of a single charge of having incited the deadly January 6 attack on the seat of the U.S. Congress as that body was meeting to certify that Democrat Joe Biden had defeated Trump in the November presidential election.

However, seven Senate Republicans joined all 50 Democrats in voting in favor of conviction, providing a 57-43 margin that was 10 votes short of the required two-thirds majority needed for a conviction.

Since the acquittal, state Republican committees in North Carolina and Louisiana censured two of their respective Republican senators, Richard Burr and Bill Cassidy, for voting to convict Trump — a fellow Republican whose only term in office ended with Biden’s inauguration January 20.

“The Republicans across North Carolina, the party leaders that I talked to, were shocked and disappointed with Senator Burr’s vote and wanted to put out a statement saying that we disagreed with him,” state Republican chairman Michael Whatley told CNN on Tuesday.

Burr, who is not running for reelection next year after three six-year terms in the Senate, said in response, “It is truly a sad day for North Carolina Republicans. My party’s leadership has chosen loyalty to one man (Trump) over the core principles of the Republican Party and the founders of our great nation.”

Whatley said he did not think Trump, who urged hundreds of his supporters to confront lawmakers as they certified Biden’s election victory, was to blame for the January 6 riot at the Capitol that left five people dead, including a Capitol Police officer whose death is being investigated as a homicide.

“I think the fault lies with the people who attacked the Capitol,” Whatley said.

In Louisiana, the state Republican Party’s executive committee unanimously censured Cassidy after he joined the six other Republicans in voting against Trump.

FILE - <a href=Houston food bank locations near me Senator Bill Cassidy leaves the chamber as the Senate voted to consider hearing from witnesses in the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, at the Capitol in Washington, Feb. 13, 2021." src="https://gdb.voanews.com/be07285f-7db1-4108-acf6-4176832bdf2e_w250_r0_s.jpg">

“We condemn, in the strongest possible terms, the vote … by Sen. Cassidy to convict former President Trump,” the group said in a tweet Saturday. “Fortunately, clearer heads prevailed, and President Trump has been acquitted of the impeachment charge filed against him.”

Cassidy said, "Our Constitution and our country is more important than any one person. I voted to convict President Trump because he is guilty."

Other state Republican organizations are attacking or considering rebukes of the other five Republican senators who voted against Trump: Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania, Mitt Romney of Utah, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Ben Sasse of Nebraska.

Dave Ball, a county Republican official in Pennsylvania, rebuked Toomey for his vote, saying, “We did not send him there to vote his conscience. We did not send him there to do the right thing or whatever he said he was doing. We sent him there to represent us.”

Toomey, who is retiring after two terms in the Senate, said, “I did what I thought was right, and I would certainly like to think that regardless of my political circumstances or whether I was running for office again or not, I would do the same thing.”

Ten Republicans in the House of Representatives who joined all 222 Democrats in the chamber to impeach Trump a week after the mayhem at the Capitol and a week before he left office have also faced censures and rebukes from party officials.

A group of conservative House Republicans who opposed Trump’s impeachment tried to remove Congresswoman Liz Cheney of Wyoming from her No. 3 leadership position in the party caucus, but she easily survived a vote of confidence.

Congressman Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, an outspoken Trump critic, has been disowned by his own family for his vote to impeach Trump.

FILE - In this image from video, Republican Congressman Adam Kinzinger speaks at a House debate, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Jan. 7, 2021. (House Television via AP)

Kinzinger said 11 family members sent him a handwritten two-page note that started, “Oh my, what a disappointment you are to us and to God!”

The letter accused him of working with “the devil’s army,” which it said included Democrats and the “fake news media.”

“We thought you were ‘smart’ enough to see how the left is brainwashing many ‘so called good people’ including yourself” and other Republicans. “You have even fallen for their socialism ideals! So, so sad!”

“It is now most embarrassing to us that we are related to you,” the family members wrote. “You have embarrassed the Kinzinger family name.”

Kinzinger said the family members suffered from “brainwashing” at conservative churches.

“I hold nothing against them,’’ he said, “but I have zero desire or feel the need to reach out and repair that. That is 100% on them to reach out and repair, and quite honestly, I don’t care if they do or not.”

Kinzinger said he knows his vote against Trump could imperil his political career but that he “couldn't live with myself” if “the one time I was called to do a really tough duty, I didn't do it.”

Источник: https://www.voanews.com/a/usa_us-politics_republican-groups-censure-party-lawmakers-who-voted-impeach-convict-trump/6202113.html

6 Alabama Republicans vote against Trump impeachment; Terri Sewell votes for it


The Alabama House delegation Wednesday split down party lines on the impeachment of Donald Trump in the wake of a deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol last week. 

U.S. Reps. Jerry Carl, R-Mobile; Barry Moore, R-Enterprise; Mike Rogers, R-Saks; Robert Aderholt, R-Haleyville; Mo Brooks, R-Huntsville and Gary Palmer, R-Hoover all voted against sending charges of inciting an insurrection to the U.S. Senate. U.S. Rep. Terri Sewell, D-Birmingham, voted to impeach the president. 

"Blood is on this house," said Sewell, whose district includes Montgomery. "We must do something about it. I ask we move from 'stopping the steal' to to healing. But healing requires accountability."

The vote mirrored the delegation's vote last week on whether or not to accept the presidential choice of the voters of Arizona and Pennsylvania. All the Republican members of Alabama's House delegation voted to throw them out; Sewell voted to accept them. 

More: 6 Alabama congressmen, 1 senator support moves to throw out votes of Arizona, Pennsylvania

That vote came after a violent mob, goaded by Trump, invaded the U.S. Capitol and attacked Capitol police officers, broke into congressional offices and committed major acts of vandalism. At least five people died during the riot, including a Capitol police officer and Kevin Greeson, a who voted for impeachment in the house list from Athens who suffered a heart attack. 

More: Alabama jose avidan martinez dies amid pro-Trump rally, riot at U.S. Capitol

Dozens of arrests have taken place in the wake of the riot, and more are expected. Police have charged Lonnie Coffman, a 70-year-old from Falkville, with 17 separate weapons charges. Authorities said they found guns and Molotov cocktails in Coffman's pickup truck, and had a list singling out a federal judge appointed by U.S. President Barack Obama and a Muslim congressman from Indiana.  

More: 'Bad guy,' 'Good Girl': Alabama man with Molotov cocktails in D.C. left alarming notes in truck, records show

The House voted 232 to 197 Wednesday afternoon to impeach Trump. 10 Republicans joined 222 Democrats in voting for impeachment.

Republicans during the debate condemned the violence but attacked the process of impeachment.  Moore, a first-term representative whose campaign stressed his loyalty to Donald Trump, said in brief remarks during the debate that if the House pursued the charges, "impeachment will always be a political process."

"We're going to impeach a president for what reasons?" said Moore, whose district includes Montgomery, Autauga and Elmore counties. "For what reasons? There have been no hearings. There have been no committees."

Palmer said in a statement that the process had no investigative process or chance for the accused to respond. He also denounced the violence at the Capitol last week.

"There is no excuse for it, and I hope everyone who took any part will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law," he said. "But I do not believe an impeachment is beneficial to our country at this difficult moment."

Rogers said in a statement on Who voted for impeachment in the house list that he believed impeachment "will only further divide our nation." Carl said he did not believe the charges reached "the necessary threshold for impeachment."

"The President has publicly conceded the election and committed to a peaceful transition of power, and I trust he will uphold his promise to ensure a smooth transition to the next administration," Carl's statement said.

More: Senate impeachment trial likely won’t begin until after Biden sworn in

There has been fallout for the state delegation. Brooks faces a censure resolution for speaking at the March to Save America rally, in which he encouraged "American patriots" to "start taking names and kicking ass." Brooks released a statement Tuesday where he condemned the violence but refused to apologize for his remarks, which he claimed were meant to "reinvigorate people for the 2022 election cycle."

Ali Alexander, a far-right activist who organized who voted for impeachment in the house list "Stop the Steal" rally, said he coordinated with Brooks and two Arizona congressmen to plan the rally. Brooks denied knowing Alexander in a statement to the Washington Post. 

Moore closed his personal Twitter account over the weekend after sending tweets that belittled the arrests of people charged with rioting and making an irrelevant reference to the race of one of the Capitol police officers. 

"I Understand it was a black police officer that shot the white female veteran," Moore wrote in one of the deleted tweets. "You know that doesn't fit the narrative."

The Rule of Law Defense Fund, a dark money group affiliated with the Republican Attorneys General Association, recorded robocalls encouraging people to attend the rally that preceded the violence at the Capitol. Adam Piper, the head of RAGA, resigned earlier this week amid the fallout. Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall, the chair of the fund, said he did not authorize the robocalls and ordered an internal review. 

The impeachment charges now go to the U.S. Senate. It is not clear when the chamber may hold a trial on them. Trump is set to leave office on Jan. 20, but Congress could hold a trial after that. If Trump was convicted, he could be banned from holding federal office again. 

Contact Montgomery Advertiser reporter Brian Lyman at 334-240-0185 or [email protected]

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Источник: https://www.montgomeryadvertiser.com/story/news/2021/01/13/alabama-republicans-vote-impeachment-against-donald-trump-terri-sewell-democrat/6652208002/

What to Know About the U.S. Presidents Who’ve Been Impeached

On January 13, Donald Trump became the third President in American history to be impeached and the first President to be impeached twice.

Impeachment is very rare in the U.S.’s nearly 250 years of history, and none of the three men to have faced it — Presidents Bill Clinton, Andrew Johnson and Donald Trump — have been removed from office. (However, after Clinton and Johnson were impeached, both of their parties lost the next Presidential election.)

To be impeached, a President or other federal official must have committed one of the violations described by the Constitution as “treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors.” But history shows that if a President is to be impeached, the biggest factor may be political will — whether members of a President’s own party are willing to turn against him, and whether enough members of Congress believe that trying to remove the President is worth the risk of losing popular support.

Impeachment alone isn’t the only step to take a President out of office, but is actually the first part of a two-pronged process. To impeach an official, the House of Representatives must pass articles of impeachment, which formally accuse the President of misbehavior. Once the House votes to impeach, the Senate must hold a trial to decide if the President should be removed from office.

Read more:Here’s How the Impeachment Process Actually Works

Here’s what you need to know about the Presidents who have been impeached — and why they stayed in office.

Andrew Johnson

Lincoln's successor President Andrew Johnson of Tennessee.

PhotoQuest—Getty Images

Why was Johnson impeached?

The aftermath of the Civil War set the stage for the first impeachment of a U.S. President. After President Abraham Lincoln’s death, he was succeeded by his Vice President, Andrew Johnson.

Johnson was a pro-Union Democrat who had refused to secede from the Union along with his state, Tennessee, during the war. However, he was also a racist who favored a lenient approach to Reconstruction, the process of bringing the states of the Confederacy back into the nation. He clashed with Congress throughout his term, vetoing bills he felt were too harsh on the South — including the Freedmen’s Bureau Acts, which gave displaced southerners, including African Americans, access to food, shelter, medical aid and land.

This approach put him at odds with Congress. The final straw came when he replaced Secretary of War Edwin Stanton, a Lincoln appointee who sided with the Radical Republicans, a faction of the party that favored enfranchisement and civil rights for freed African Americans.

Congress produced 11 articles of impeachment, which alleged that Johnson had violated the Tenure of Office Act — a law intended to limit presidential power to remove federal appointees from office — and had found a replacement without consulting the Senate. Johnson was impeached by a two-thirds super majority of the House, and the case moved to the Senate for trial. Years later, the Supreme Court determined that the act was unconstitutional.

Why wasn’t Johnson removed from office?

When he was tried in the Senate, Johnson ultimately held onto his presidency by a single vote, after seven Republicans decided to vote with Senate Democrats to keep him in office.

Johnson’s defense argued that he hadn’t appointed Secretary of War Stanton in the first place, which meant that he wasn’t violating the Tenure of Office Act. They also claimed that Johnson intended to push the Act before the Supreme Court. Historian Hans L. Trefousse argues that the Senators who voted against removal decided that Johnson was being pushed out of office for political reasons: “[The] weakness of the case… convinced many that the charges were largely political, and that the violation of the Tenure of Office Act constituted neither a crime nor a violation of the Constitution but merely a pretext for Johnson’s opponents.”

This result set a major precedent for future presidential impeachments: that Presidents shouldn’t be impeached for political reasons, but only if they commit, as the Constitution stipulates, “treason, bribery or other high crimes and misdemeanors.”

As one of the defecting Republicans, Senator James Grimes, said, “I cannot agree to destroy the harmonious working of the Constitution for the sake of getting rid of an Unacceptable President.”

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Bill Clinton

Pres. Bill Clinton emphatically denying having affair with former White House intern Monica Lewinsky.

Diana Walker—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Image

Why was Clinton impeached?

Like Johnson, President Bill Clinton had stirred up a lot of anger in Congress. After his affair with former White House intern Monica Lewinsky became public in January 1998, Clinton at first adamantly denied to federal investigators — and the public — having had “sexual relations” with her.

The articles of impeachment alleged that Clinton had perjured himself by lying to investigators about his relationship with Lewinsky. They also said that he had obstructed justice by encouraging White House staff to deny the affair.

Why wasn’t Clinton removed from office?

The outcome of Clinton’s trial reinforced the precedent that Presidents should only be removed from office only in limited circumstances. While many Senators agreed that Clinton had behaved badly, they ultimately decided that his misconduct wasn’t at the level of “high crimes and misdemeanors.”

Michael Gerhardt, a University of North Carolina professor who specializes in constitutional law, said, “A lot of these people found that there was misconduct, but there wasn’t enough to impeach him.”

Susan Collins, a Republican who ultimately voted against conviction, said in a statement that she didn’t believe that Clinton had committed a crime, but that he had behaved badly. “In voting to acquit the President, I do so with grave misgivings for I do not mean in any way to exonerate this man,” Collins said.

Experts say that the effort to remove Clinton from office was doomed because public opinion turned against removing Clinton from office. In fact, Clinton’s job-approval rating peaked during the week of the impeachment, according to Gallup.

Donald Trump

President Donald J. Trump in the Oval Office at the White House on Dec 17, 2019 in Washington, D.C.

Jabin Botsford—The Washington Post via Getty Images

Why was Trump impeached?

President Donald Trump was impeached on Dec. 18, 2019, on two charges: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

The two charges against the President — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — stem from a July 25 phone call with the President of Ukraine, Volodymyr Zelensky. The content of the call first came to national attention after a whistleblower filed a report expressing concern that Trump had pushed Ukraine to investigate an energy company for which the son of his political rival, former Vice President Joe Biden, sat on the board. At around that time, the Trump administration also withheld military aid from Ukraine, and Ukraine was working to secure a meeting between Zelensky and Trump.

Testimony by current and former U.S. government officials in Fall 2019 fleshed out a narrative about how officials affiliated with the Trump Administration — including his personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani and E.U. ambassador Gordon Sondland — urged Ukraine to conduct that investigation, as well as one into the debunked theory that Ukraine interfered in the 2016 election.

The Democrat-led House Judiciary Committee, in outlining its case against the President, said that Trump had “betrayed the nation by abusing his high office to enlist a foreign power in corrupting democratic elections,” and tried to interfere with Congress’ Constitutionally protected power to impeach a President.

The legislators also argue that Trump’s misconduct continued during the impeachment inquiry. They allege that he attempted to interfere with the investigation by ordering Executive Branch officials not to comply with Congressional subpoenas for testimony and documents.

According to the articles of impeachment approved by Congress, these charges fall under the “high crimes and misdemeanors” provision of impeachment power—which, many constitutional experts say, is not necessarily about breaking the law, but rather about having violated the public trust.

Why wasn’t Trump removed from office?

On Feb. 5, 2020, Trump became the third president in U.S. history to be impeached by the House and then acquitted by the Senate. His acquittal came on a near party-line vote, reinforcing divisions at the end of a bitterly partisan process. The Senate voted 52-48 to acquit Trump on abuse of power and 53-47 to acquit him on obstruction of Congress; Sen. Mitt Romney, a Republican who voted for impeachment in the house list Utah, was the only senator of either party to break ranks, voting to convict Trump on the abuse of power charge.

Many of the Republican senators who voted to acquit Trump said the final verdict should be left up to the voters at the ballot box in 2020. It’s still an open question whether the impeachment process will help or hurt Trump at the polls. Trump and some of his associates say that impeachment could benefit him politically by mobilizing his base, while others have argued that the proceedings will contribute to the aura of chaos around his administration. Tad Devine, a strategist for Al Gore, previously told the LA Times that he believes that, although many people think Bill Clinton’s impeachment helped the Democrats, it actually boosted Republicans into the White House.

“It allowed George W. Bush to promise that he would restore honor and dignity to the White House — and it worked,” Devine said.

Immediately after the acquittal, Trump’s campaign was projecting extreme confidence. “Since the President’s campaign only got bigger and stronger as a result of this nonsense,” Trump’s campaign manager Brad Parscale said in a statement after the conclusion of the trial, “this impeachment hoax will go down as the worst miscalculation in American political history.”

Other Presidents also faced impeachment threats

A demonstration outside the White House in support of the impeachment of President Richard Nixon (1913 - 1994) following the Watergate revelations.

MPI—Getty Images

Given that only three presidents have ever been impeached, more of them have faced Congressional calls for impeachment than one might expect.

The first President the House of Representatives moved to impeach was John Tyler. After succeeding President William Henry Harrison, who died after just one month in office, Tyler vetoed legislation backed by his own Whig Party and that Harrison had promised to support. The Whigs kicked Tyler out of their party, and the House received a petition for a resolution asking him to resign or else face the possibility of impeachment. Yet Congress ultimately didn’t pursue an impeachment.

The President best known for coming to the brink of impeachment — but not actually getting impeached — was Richard Nixon. During the Watergate scandal, the House Judiciary Committee filed three articles of impeachment against the President for “high crimes and misdemeanors.” However, Nixon resigned his office on Aug. 9, 1974, before the impeachment could move forward.

In recent American history, Presidents from Herbert Hoover to Barack Obama have faced discussion, ranging from credible to dubious and politically charged, of their impeachment. And even at moments of great popularity, all Presidents will know, in the back of their minds, that impeachments are, however rare, a possibility — which is just what the Constitution’s framers intended.

“A good magistrate will not fear them,” said Elbridge Gerry of impeachments, at the Constitutional Convention. “A bad one ought to be kept in fear of them.”

Additional reporting by Tessa Berenson

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Источник: https://time.com/5552679/impeached-presidents/

Topline

A small but growing group of Republicans in Congress say they will vote to impeach President Donald Trump for his alleged role in last week’s brutal assault on the U.S. Capitol – an unprecedented loss of control for the president at a time when he is at his most vulnerable.

Key Facts

Anywhere from 10 to 20 Republicans have indicated privately that they will back impeachment, according to multiplereports.  

Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.), the chair of the Republican conference and third-ranking GOP House member, said Tuesday she will back impeachment: "There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution,” Cheney said in a statement.

Rep. John Katko (R-N.Y.) became the first Republican to publicly back impeachment on Tuesday, according to a statement the congressman relayed to Syracuse, New York-based Post-Standard.

Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.), a vocal opponent of Trump’s efforts to overturn the election, alleged in a statement that the president “broke his oath of office and incited this insurrection,” asking, “if these actions. are not worthy of impeachment, then what is an impeachable offense?"

Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.) said in a statement will vote to impeach Trump, calling for a “clear message that our country cannot and will not tolerate any effort by any President to impede the peaceful transfer of power.”

Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler (R-Wash.) said there is “indisputable evidence” that Trump’s conduct was impeachable, arguing that the GOP is “best served when those among us choose south florida state college panther central

Rep. Dan Newhouse (R-Wash.) said in a floor speech that the articles of impeachment are “flawed” but said he would “not use process as an excuse” because Trump “did nothing to stop” the riot.

Rep. Peter Meijer (R-Mich.) said in a statement that the vote “is not a victory. It isn't a victory for my party, and it isn't the victory the Democrats might think it is,” adding that he will vote to impeach Trump for “seeking to undermine our constitution process” and “inciting the violent acts of insurrection.”

Most House Republicans are opposed to the move, including the two top-ranking GOP leaders in the House, Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) and Minority Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.).

Key Background

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) introduced one article of impeachment against Trump on Monday, moving to charge the president with “incitement of insurrection” after he riled up a crowd that later infiltrated the Capitol. Rep. David Cicilline (D-R.I.), one of the Democrats who has helped draft the impeachment article, said Monday Democrats “have the votes to impeach.” Although there are just days left in Trump’s presidency, Congress could restrict him from running for office in the future if the House impeaches Trump and the Senate votes to convict. The Constitution is somewhat unclear about this process, but in the past, the Senate has voted by a simple majority to disqualify them from public office.

Surprising Fact

A group of House Republicans who voted to certify President-elect Joe Biden’s victory asked the incoming president to help block the effort “in the spirit of healing and fidelity to our Constitution” in a letter Saturday.

Not-So-Big Number

0. That’s how many House Republicans supported impeaching Trump the first time around. 

Chief Critic

“I don’t think anybody can look and say an impeachment of this president is the thing that’s going to help unite and bring our country together,” Scalise said Saturday.  

Tangent

In a letter to Congress sent out Monday, 22 former Republican lawmakers called for Trump to be impeached. 


What To Watch For

While Trump’s impeachment in the House is a foregone conclusion, conviction in the Senate is a far murkier question. A handful of senators have advocated Trump’s resignation or removal without explicitly voicing support for impeachment, but Democrats may struggle to muster the 17 GOP votes needed to get the necessary two-thirds majority. Additionally, McConnell has signaled a Senate impeachment trial likely wouldn’t occur until after Trump has left office.

Further Reading

House Democrats Introduce Article Of Impeachment Against Trump (Forbes)

Leading House Democrat Says Republicans Have ‘Confidentially’ Signaled They’ll Vote To Impeach Trump (Forbes)

House Republicans Ask For Biden To Help Stop Trump Impeachment (Forbes)

Источник: https://www.forbes.com/sites/jackbrewster/2021/01/12/all-the-republicans-who-say-theyll-vote-to-impeach-trump/

8 House Republicans say they’ll vote for Trump’s impeachment

article

Rep. Adam Who voted for impeachment in the house list (R-Illinois) (Photo by Eric Hanson for The Washington Post via Getty Images); Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images); Rep. John Katko, R-N.Y., (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

WASHINGTON - Amid an apparent rift in the Republican Party in the wake of a pro-Trump riot inside the U.S. Capitol, at least eight GOP lawmakers have said they’re voting for the second impeachment of President Donald Trump on Wednesday. 

The Republicans who have said they will vote to impeach Trump are Rep. John Katko, R-N.Y.; Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo.; Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill., Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich.; Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, R-Wash; Rep. Dan Newhouse, R-Wash.; Rep. Peter Meijer, R-Mich.; and Rep. Anthony Gonzalez, R-Ohio. 

"To allow the President of the United States to incite this attack without consequence is a direct threat to the future of democracy, " Katko said in a statement Tuesday. "For that reason, I cannot sit by without taking action. I will vote to impeach this President."

Cheney, the No. 3 Republican in the House, said in a statement Tuesday that Trump "summoned" the mob that attacked the Capitol last week, "assembled the mob, and lit the flame of this attack." She said, "Everything that followed was his doing."

She also noted that Trump could have immediately intervened to stop his supporters, but he did not.

Cheney, daughter of former Republican Vice President Dick Cheney, said, "There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution."

Kinzinger tweeted that he, too, will vote for Trump’s impeachment, laying the blame for the merchants bank bangor online banking Capitol riot on the president.

"On January 6, 2020, the President of the United States encouraged an angry who voted for impeachment in the house list to storm the United States Capitol to stop the counting of electoral votes," Kinzinger’s statement read in part. 

Upton released a statement on Facebook Tuesday night. 

"The Congress must hold President Trump to account and send a clear message that our country cannot and will not tolerate any effort by any President to impede the peaceful transfer of power from one President to the next. Thus, I will vote to impeach," he wrote. 

Congresswoman Herrera Beutler released a statement Tuesday saying she will be voting "yes" union savings bank com impeachment. 

"The President of the United States incited a riot aiming to halt the peaceful transfer of power from one administration to the next. That riot led to five deaths. People everywhere watched in disbelief as the center of American democracy was assaulted. The violent mob bludgeoned to death a Capitol police officer as they defaced symbols of our freedom. These terrorists roamed the Capitol, hunting the Vice President and the Speaker of the House," her statement begins. 

"I believe President Trump acted against his oath of office, so I will vote to impeach him," she wrote.

Newhouse posted his decision on Facebook Wednesday as House lawmakers debated.

"The mob was inflamed by the language and misinformation of the President of the United States," he wrote. "A vote against this impeachment is a vote to validate the unacceptable violence we witnessed in our nation’s capital."

Meijer wrote on Twitter Wednesday afternoon, just minutes before the House ended their debate, that he is also voting to impeach.

Gonzalez shared his thoughts on Facebook Wednesday afternoon as the vote began to take place, saying he is "compelled to support" impeachment.

RELATED: Trump takes no responsibility for Capitol riot, says 25th Amendment is ‘zero risk’ to him

House lawmakers will debate and vote on an impeachment resolution Wednesday.

Trump faces a single charge — "incitement of insurrection" — in the impeachment resolution after the most serious and deadly domestic incursion at the Capitol in the nation’s history.

Before the violent riot at the U.S. Capitol, Trump held a rally near the White House, during which he encouraged thousands of his supporters to "fight like hell" and march to the Capitol, where lawmakers were in the process of certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s Electoral College votes after he won the 2020 election. Trump maintained that he won the election over Biden, falsely claiming voter fraud and irregularities. None of his lawsuits have prevailed in court. 

Timeline of the riot at the US Capitol on Jan. 6

What is columbus day a holiday for fedex as a congressional and democratic exercise in the peaceful transfer of power, devolved into death, destruction and chaos.

The pro-Trump mob overpowered police, broke through security lines and windows and rampaged through the Capitol, forcing lawmakers to scatter and take shelter.

Five people were killed, including U.S. Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick. Another woman was shot to death and three others died after succumbing to medical emergencies. A second Capitol Police officer, Officer Howard Libengood, reportedly died from an apparent suicide but it’s not clear if his death was related to the riot.

Prosecutors have brought dozens of cases after the deadly attack at the U.S. Capitol, and they vowed more charges as investigators work to identify members of the pro-Trump mob.

The top federal prosecutor for the District of Columbia said Tuesday that 70 people have been charged so far. About 20 federal cases have been made public, and 40 others have been filed in D.C. Superior Court.

The people charged in Superior Court are mainly accused of things like curfew violations and gun crimes. Those being tried in federal court, where prosecutors can generally secure longer sentences, are charged with offenses such as violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds, assaulting a federal law enforcement officer and threatening House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

"It cannot be ignored that President Trump encouraged this insurrection," Katko added in his statement. "When this manifested in violent acts on January 6th, he refused to promptly and forcefully call it off, putting countless lives in danger."

Trump denied he incited the riot Tuesday as the House moved closer to impeaching him.

He targeted lawmakers who are pushing for his ouster, saying that it's "a really terrible thing that they’re doing."

"To continue on this path, I think it’s causing tremendous danger to our country, and it’s causing tremendous anger," Trump said. He accepted no blame for the Capitol attack and said, "I want no violence."

President Donald Trump says the 25th Amendment is of no concern to him

President Donald Trump addresses the recent pro-Trump Capitol rioters.

However, more GOP lawmakers could also join the list of those siding with Democrats to oust Trump.

In the Senate, Republican Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania joined GOP Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska over the weekend in calling for Trump to "go away as soon as possible."

However, some have stated impeachment wouldn’t be the best course of action.

Among Trump's closest allies in Congress, McCarthy was among those echoing the president, saying "impeachment at this time would have the opposite effect of bringing our country together."

House lawmakers will first try to convince the vice president and Cabinet to act even more quickly to remove Trump from office, warning he is a threat to democracy in the remaining days of his presidency.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. The story was filed from Los Angeles.

Источник: https://www.fox6now.com/news/rep-john-katko-1st-house-republican-to-say-hell-vote-for-trumps-impeachment

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