home remedies for cough caused by acid reflux

Reflux of gastric acid can cause several throat problems These powerful medications suppress stomach acid and relieve acid reflux. Home remedies include natural herbs and supplements like ginger, honey, turmeric, and mint. When gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) causes a cough. Gastro-oesophageal reflux is common after head and neck You may find that you experience stomach acid or stomach repeated coughing. • sore throat.
home remedies for cough caused by acid reflux

Home remedies for cough caused by acid reflux -

Cough

A cough is a reflex action to clear your airways of mucus and irritants such as dust or smoke. It's rarely a sign of anything serious. 

Most coughs clear up within 3 weeks and don't require any treatment.

A dry cough means it's tickly and doesn't produce any phlegm (thick mucus). A chesty cough means phlegm is produced to help clear your airways.

Non-urgent advice: Speak to a GP if:

  • you've had a cough for more than 3 weeks
  • your cough is particularly severe
  • you cough up blood 
  • you experience shortness of breath, breathing difficulties or chest pain
  • you have any other worrying symptoms, such as unexplained weight loss, a persistent change in your voice, or lumps or swellings in your neck

If your GP is unsure what's causing your cough, they may refer you to a hospital specialist for an assessment. They may also request some tests, such as a chest X-ray, allergy tests, breathing tests, and an analysis of a sample of your phlegm to check for infection.

Short-term coughs

Common causes of a short-term cough include:

In rare cases, a short-term cough may be the first sign of a health condition that causes a persistent cough.

Persistent coughs

A persistent cough may be caused by:

  • a long-term respiratory tract infection, such as chronic bronchitis  
  • asthma – this also usually causes other symptoms, such as wheezing, chest tightness and shortness of breath
  • an allergy
  • smoking – a smoker's cough can also be a symptom of COPD
  • bronchiectasis – where the airways of the lungs become abnormally widened
  • postnasal drip – mucus dripping down the throat from the back of the nose, caused by a condition such as rhinitis or sinusitis
  • gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) – where the throat becomes irritated by leaking stomach acid
  • a prescribed medicine, such as an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE inhibitor), which is used to treat high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease

In most cases, a doctor won't worry whether a cough is dry or chesty, but will need to know if you are producing much more or darker phlegm than usual.

Rarely, a persistent cough can be a symptom of a more serious condition, such aslung cancer,heart failure, a pulmonary embolism (blood clot on the lung) or tuberculosis. 

Coughs in children

Coughs in children often have similar causes to those mentioned above. For example, respiratory tract infections, asthma and GORD can all affect children.

Causes of coughs that are more common in children than adults include:

  • bronchiolitis – a mild respiratory tract infection that usually causes cold-like symptoms
  • croup – this causes a distinctive barking cough and a harsh sound known as stridor when the child breathes in
  • whooping cough – look out for symptoms such as intense, hacking bouts of coughing, vomiting, and a 'whoop' sound with each sharp intake of breath after coughing

Occasionally, a persistent cough in a child can be a sign of a serious long-term condition, such as cystic fibrosis.

Read more about what to do if your child has cold or flu symptoms

Cough treatments

Treatment isn't always necessary for short-term coughs because it's likely to be a viral infection that will get better on its own within a few weeks.

Do

  • rest
  • drink plenty of fluids
  • take painkillers such as paracetamol or ibuprofen

Cough medicines and remedies

Although some people find them helpful, medicines that claim to suppress your cough or stop you bringing up phlegm are not usually recommended. This is because there's little evidence to suggest they're any better than simple home remedies, and they're not suitable for everyone.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) recommends that over-the-counter cough and cold medicines shouldn't be given to children under the age of six. Children aged 6 to 12 should only use them on the advice of a pharmacist or doctor.

A homemade remedy containing honey and lemon is likely to be just as useful and safer to take. Honey shouldn't be given to babies under the age of one because of the risk of infant botulism.

Treating the underlying cause

If your cough has a specific cause, treating this may help. For example:

  • asthma can be treated with inhaled steroids to reduce inflammation in your airways
  • allergies can be treated by avoiding things you're allergic to and taking antihistamines to dampen down your allergic reactions
  • bacterial infections can be treated with antibiotics
  • GORD can be treated with antacids to neutralise your stomach acid and medication to reduce the amount of acid your stomach produces
  • COPD can be treated with bronchodilators to widen your airways

If you smoke, quitting is also likely to help improve your cough. Read more about stopping smoking.

Urgent advice: Contact your GP or, if your GP's closed, phone 111 if your child:

  • is under 3 months old and has a temperature of 38°C or above
  • is older than 3 months and has a temperature of 39°C or above
  • has fewer wet nappies or nappies that seem drier than usual or has a dry nappy for over 12 hours
  • isn't getting better after a few days
  • is taking less than half their usual amount during their last 2 or 3 feeds

If you're very concerned about your child trust your instincts and phone your GP or 111 for advice, or phone 999 in an emergency.

Источник: https://www.nhsinform.scot/illnesses-and-conditions/lungs-and-airways/cough

Dry Cough Causes and Prevention Tips

It’s that hacking that just won’t seem to let go. Dry coughing can go from a tickle in your throat to exhausting pain, keeping you up at night and struggling to rest during the day. While the symptoms of a dry cough are pretty similar from person-to-person, the causes can vary significantly. Knowing what prompted your own symptoms can help you better manage or even prevent them.

Colds or Flu

The common cold or influenza may be the cause of your symptoms. Usually called the flu, influenza is a virus-caused infection that can leave you with body aches, headache, chills and fever and a dry or a wet cough. Colds, also caused by viruses, can also cause a dry cough in some cases. If you’re otherwise healthy, you probably won’t need medical care for the flu or a cold. Rest and stay well-hydrated to expedite healing, and prevent the spread of the virus to others. Acetaminophen or ibuprofen can help reduce aches and fever caused by the flu.

Environmental Irritants

If your dry cough is chronic, there’s a good chance it’s caused by irritation from cigarette smoke or allergens, but you should consult a physician. You may also start coughing after breathing in heated, dry air. This type of cough worsens when you first turn on your heater during colder months, as dust that has collected over the summer blows into the air. Using a humidifier, treating your allergies and avoiding smoking can help alleviate your dry cough — along with over-the-counter (OTC) cough medicine as directed by your doctor.

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

Your cough could be caused by GERD, or gastroesophageal reflux disease. This chronic digestive disease happens when acid or other content in your stomach flows back up into your esophagus. This irritates the lining of your esophagus, causing a dry cough and other symptoms, such as heartburn, chest pain and hoarseness. Antacids, PPI or doctor-prescribed medications and lifestyle shifts, such as avoiding certain foods and maintaining a healthy weight, can help manage GERD.

Other Causes

Less common causes for a dry cough include whooping cough, mycoplasma pneumonia, inhaling or swallowing an object and side effects of certain blood pressure medications. Whooping cough is a highly contagious infection caused by bacteria in your nose and throat. Mycoplasma pneumonia is a bacterial infection that affects the lungs. If a drug is causing your cough, your doctor may opt to switch medications. If you have a bacterial infection, you may need antibiotics.

Tips for Prevention

To prevent dry cough and other symptoms of infections, keep a distance from people with the viruses and wash your hands well and often. Taking cough suppressing medicines can help keep the symptoms from getting worse. If a cough sets in, Delsym® Adult 12-Hour Cough Relief can help control coughing by reducing the urge to cough.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends an annual flu vaccine as well. Seek your doctor's guidance for any severe or long-lasting symptoms, regardless of the cause.

Источник: https://www.delsym.com/cough-learning-center/adult-cough/what-is-causing-my-dry-cough/

Most people get heartburn once in a while—that achy, fiery feeling in your chest after polishing off a big, fatty meal, also known as acid reflux. What is that, exactly? “At base, reflux is stomach juice moving from the stomach up into the esophagus or further up,” says Kevin Ghassemi, MD, a gastroenterologist and associate director of clinical programs at UCLA’s Center for Esophageal Disorders. (Your esophagus is the canal that connects your throat to your stomach.)

This unwanted backflow of stomach juice can happen for several reasons. Being overweight or obese can create “abdominal pressure” that forces food back up into the esophagus, Dr. Ghassemi says. Or sometimes, taking certain medications (like painkillers, antihistamines, calcium channel blockers, or antidepressants) can cause the valve that links your stomach and esophagus to malfunction, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. When this happens, the stomach contents can migrate into the esophagus, where they don't belong, Dr. Ghassemi says.

If you're experiencing acid reflux more than a couple times a week, you may be among the one in five people in the United States who have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Patients with GERD are typically prescribed proton-pump inhibitors (brand names include Prilosec, Nexium, and Prevacid, among others), which block the production of stomach acids.

If you don't want to rely on medication, experts say there are natural remedies for acid reflux that may also provide relief. We’ll get to those home remedies in a minute. But first, one important warning: If whatever you try doesn’t work—that is, if your heartburn or other symptoms keep coming back—you need to let your doctor know.

“People think heartburn is just heartburn, but it can have very serious consequences,” says Bruce Greenwald, MD, a gastroenterologist, and professor of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Reflux is the number one risk factor for esophageal cancer. It can also cause scarring and narrowing of the esophagus, as well as breathing problems—including asthma—and lost dental enamel, Dr. Greenwald cautions. So don’t just ignore your reflux symptoms; tell your doc.

That warning aside, here are six home remedies for acid reflux that health experts say are worth trying.

Drink aloe vera juice

You already know that aloe can help soothe a sunburn, but some people with acid reflux and GERD swear that the plant can soothe heartburn symptoms, too. “A number of patients have told me aloe vera juice helps them,” Dr. Ghassemi says. “Aloe has lots of healing properties, and patients say drinking it relieves heartburn.” Dr. Greenwald says he’s heard the same from his patients, too. “Aloe vera is thought to be protective of the GI tract, and people say it helps them,” he says. Both doctors say the evidence in support of drinking aloe vera is far from conclusive. But one recent study found drinking about an ounce of aloe vera syrup could safely relieve reflux symptoms. Nature’s Way makes one well-reviewed ingestible aloe vera product ($11 per liter, amazon.com).

Identify your triggers

"For years, reflux patients were cautioned to avoid acidic or acid-promoting foods. Greasy or fatty foods are some examples,” Dr. Greenwald says. Tomato-based foods, spicy foods, caffeinated or carbonated beverages, chocolate, and fast foods are also foods patients are often told to avoid, Dr. Ghassemi says. But we now know this precaution may not be necessary. "A lot of people will not have any symptoms related to those foods. Different individuals have different food triggers, and if you’re cutting out all those foods, that’s a really restrictive diet that may not be needed to control your reflux,” Dr. Ghassemi says.

A better (and easier) option: Start writing down or taking photos of the foods or drinks that seem to instigate your reflux symptoms. In some cases, you may be able to cut a few prime offenders without making large dietary sacrifices, he says. 

Eat smaller meals

What you eat is just as important as how much you eat. Overeating can cause or worsen reflux symptoms, Dr. Ghassemi says. But eating smaller, more frequent meals can help, he says. To ensure your mini-meals don't result in weight gain—something that can make acid reflux worse—be careful to pay attention to total calorie intake and food quality. In other words, just because you're eating snack-sized meals doesn't mean they should be comprised of packaged, high-calorie snack foods like chips and cookies.

Avoid late-night eating

You want everything in your stomach flowing down, not up. And when you’re upright or on your feet, gravity helps encourage that downward flow, Dr. Ghassemi says. But when you lie down, gravity is no longer an ally in that push to empty your stomach of its contents. To make sure your dinner stay down, Dr. Ghassemi recommends enjoying your last meal or snack of the day at least two hours before lying down. This maximizes the effect of gravity on stomach emptying, he explains.

If you tend to suffer from reflux at night, he also recommends placing some thin, firm cushions under the head of your mattress to tilt your whole bed at a slight downward angle. “Elevating the head of the bed can alleviate nighttime symptoms,” he says. Just be sure you’re not only elevating the top half of your body. If your top half is bent forward while your lower body is flat, that can compress your abdomen and worsen symptoms, he says. (Read about the six other things you should never do before bed.)

Try acupuncture

A small Chinese study compared six weeks of acupuncture to prescription reflux drugs. The surprising result: both worked equally well. Even four weeks after the study ended, the reflux patients who had received acupuncture were still enjoying a drop in symptoms. The people in the study received acupuncture two to three times a week for six weeks. There isn't too much additional research to back up the idea of treating reflux with acupuncture, but there’s also very little evidence that acupuncture is risky. So, cost aside, there’s not a big downside to trying it. (Sessions cost anywhere from $40 to $350, depending on where you live, where you seek treatment and the experience level of your care provider.)

Sip apple cider vinegar

Like aloe vera, apple cider vinegar (ACV) seems to provide some reflux patients with relief, Dr. Ghassemi says. “It’s a very acidic liquid, and I can’t explain why it helps them, but some do tell me it helps,” he says. But unlike aloe vera, there is almost no research backing up the idea that ACV can combat reflux. A graduate student at Arizona State University compared ACV to an antacid or a placebo and found no difference among the three—although all three did help relieve heartburn. While ACV may turn out to be bogus as a reflux remedy, it may be worth a shot. (Just ask your doctor before giving it a try.) To help the ACV go down a bit easier, dilute 1 to 2 tablespoons with 8 ounces of water.

Markham HeidMarkham Heid is an experienced health reporter and writer, has contributed to outlets like TIME, Men’s Health, and Everyday Health, and has received reporting awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and the Maryland, Delaware, and D.C.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Источник: https://www.prevention.com/health/g20517791/home-remedies-acid-reflux/

That Sore Throat Could be Caused by Acid Reflux

Acid Reflux, sore throat, stomach acid, Heartburn,

More than 60% of Americans experience acid reflux every month. If you’ve ever felt a burning sensation or felt as if there were a lump in your throat, chances are high that you’ve had acid reflux.

It’s a common condition in which the acid in your stomach escapes and travels into your food tube, or esophagus. The highly acidic fluid irritates the lining of your esophagus and brings with it common symptoms like burning in the throat, hoarseness, and more. A common, but lesser-known, symptom of acid reflux is a sore throat. If you have a sore throat, you might think you’re getting sick. But, the irritation that acid reflux causes can give you a sore throat.

Though acid reflux itself isn’t life-threatening, it can lead to esophagus damage and discomfort. To learn more about the symptoms of acid reflux and get help finding a treatment plan for you, talk to Yadwinder Kang, MD at First Choice Urgent Care.

Why acid reflux makes your throat sore

Acid reflux occurs when stomach acid travels backward out of your stomach and up into your esophagus. Your esophagus is the tube through which food travels, connecting your mouth to your stomach. The lower esophageal sphincter is a small band of muscle at the bottom of your esophagus that typically keeps stomach acid from flowing up. However, the lower esophageal sphincter can weaken, and stomach acid can leak into your esophagus.

Stomach acid is a fluid that helps your body digest food, but when it gets into your esophagus, it can cause discomfort and irritation. Symptoms of heartburn, like a burning sensation in your throat, are due to stomach acid traveling back up your esophagus.

Acid reflux can irritate and damage the lining of your esophagus, and this can cause a sore throat. Other common symptoms of heartburn include:

  • A burning sensation in the throat
  • The feeling of a lump in the throat
  • Chronic cough
  • Hoarseness
  • Bad breath
  • Chest discomfort

Although sore throats that come with the flu or other viruses often go away once your body heals, a sore throat from acid reflux is best managed by treating the cause of the discomfort. GERD is a term for gastroesophageal reflux disease, or chronic heartburn.

Managing heartburn

Many patients find relief from GERD and acid reflux by making lifestyle changes. Certain foods and drinks can increase your risk of heartburn, including carbonated or caffeinated drinks. Keep in mind that everyone’s triggers are different. Consider keeping a food journal to learn which foods and beverages might cause your acid reflux symptoms to increase.

Common heartburn remedies include:

  • Avoiding spicy food
  • Avoiding fatty foods
  • Avoiding carbonated, caffeinated, or alcoholic beverages
  • Avoiding citrus and tomato juices, which are acidic
  • Not smoking

Eating smaller, more frequent meals can help aid in digestion. Maintaining a healthy weight and not wearing tight clothes might also help prevent acid reflux. Over-the-counter medications like antacids help neutralize stomach acid with salts and hydroxide or bicarbonate ions. Other medications keep your stomach from producing excessive stomach acid.

For more serious cases of acid reflux, Dr. Kang can give you a prescription medication. These medications can help eliminate or neutralize stomach acid to decrease esophagus irritation. Combined with lifestyle changes, medication can treat a sore throat due to acid reflux.

When you come to First Choice Urgent Care for treatment, our caring team is here to help. Together, you and Dr. Kang review your medical history and symptoms to determine the best course of treatment for your acid reflux. If you think you might have GERD or acid reflux, call our Bakersfield, California office, or schedule your first appointment online today.

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1st Choice Urgent Care, Bakersfield, CA

Phone (appointments): 661-230-9334 Phone (general inquiries): (661) 735-3041

Address: 6515 Panama Lane, Suite 106-107, Bakersfield, CA93313

1st Choice Urgent Care, Bakersfield, CA

Phone (appointments): 661-214-8477

GERD and Sleep

Our medical review team has recently evaluated this page to ensure accuracy. We will continue to monitor and revise this article as new literature is published on the impact GERD has on sleep health.

Acid reflux, also known as gastroesophageal reflux, describes a backflow of acid from the stomach into the esophagus. Occasional episodes of reflux are normal, but when they occur regularly, they can have serious consequences and are known as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

GERD is estimated to affect 20% of adults in the United States. Most patients with GERD experience an increase in the severity of symptoms, including heartburn, while sleeping or attempting to sleep. Beyond just heartburn, if stomach acid backs up as far as the throat and larynx, a sleeper may wake up coughing and choking or with major chest pain.

In addition to having troubling immediate symptoms, GERD can over time cause significant damage to the esophagus and raise a person’s risk of esophageal cancer.

Understanding GERD, including its symptoms, causes, and treatments can help people with this condition manage it more effectively. Because many people find GERD to be worse around bedtime, focusing on how to sleep with GERD may help reduce symptoms and improve sleep.

What Is GERD?

GERD is a condition marked by repeated episodes of reflux that affect quality of life.

Acid reflux, also known as acid indigestion, happens when stomach acid moves up from the stomach and into the esophagus. Under normal circumstances, muscles at the bottom of the esophagus — known as the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) — act as a barrier to prevent this from happening, but if those muscles are weak or relaxed and don’t close all the way, then reflux can occur.

Virtually everyone experiences reflux from time to time, but for most people, it is mild, infrequent, and goes away quickly on its own.

For people with GERD, on the other hand, acid reflux typically happens at least once per week and often involves more severe and bothersome symptoms. While it is usually thought of as affecting adults, it can occur in infants and children as well.

What Are the Symptoms of GERD?

Heartburn, which involves a painful burning sensation in the chest, is the most common symptom of GERD, but not all cases of GERD involve heartburn.

Another common symptom of GERD is regurgitation, which means a small amount of stomach acid and sometimes bits of food come up into the mouth or back of the throat.

When leaks of stomach acid rise to the mouth and throat, it can cause coughing and a feeling of choking. It may cause a sore throat, including a hoarse voice. Some patients experience difficulty swallowing, known as dysphagia, or the feeling of something blocking their throat.

On top of the discomfort from heartburn, GERD can cause radiating chest pain that can affect the neck, back, jaw, or arms and last for minutes to hours. This symptom is frequently associated with nighttime awakenings for people with GERD.

Why is GERD Worse After Going to Bed?

There are several explanations for why GERD is commonly worse at night after going to bed:

  • When lying down, gravity no longer helps keep stomach acid down, making it easier for reflux to occur.
  • Decreased swallowing during sleep reduces an important force that pushes stomach acid downward.
  • Saliva can help neutralize stomach acid, but production of saliva is reduced during deeper stages of sleep.

A combination of these effects can facilitate the leakage of stomach acid into the esophagus and allow the acid to remain in place for longer, potentially causing more severe GERD symptoms, including those that can disturb sleep. The problem may be even greater if a person goes to bed soon after eating and/or eats foods that trigger GERD.

What Are the Health Consequences of GERD?

Chronic reflux and GERD can cause serious complications. These include inflammation and ulcers of the esophagus, scar tissue that narrows the esophagus, spasms affecting the airway, chronic cough, damage to teeth, and exacerbated asthma symptoms.

In about 10-20% of cases of GERD, damage to the esophagus from stomach acid becomes a condition called Barrett esophagus. Barrett esophagus is considered to be the primary risk factor for esophageal cancer although not everyone with the condition develops cancer.

What Causes GERD?

The immediate cause of GERD is the inability of the muscles at the bottom of the esophagus to block reflux of stomach acid, but other underlying elements have been found to make that condition more likely.

These risk factors contribute to the chances of developing GERD. However, not everyone with these risk factors will develop GERD, and not everyone with GERD has these risk factors.

  • Obesity: GERD occurs at a higher rate in people who are overweight or obese although the exact explanation for why this occurs is uncertain.
  • Smoking Cigarettes: Smoking has been found to affect the pressure near the lower esophageal sphincter and may slow the clearance of stomach acid.
  • Drinking Alcohol:Alcohol impacts the processes for emptying the esophagus and stomach in ways that can facilitate acid indigestion.
  • Using Certain Medications: A number of medications, including many anti-asthma, blood pressure, antidepressant, and sedatives medications can increase the risk of reflux.
  • Hiatal Hernia: In this condition, the stomach moves upward inside the body, above the diaphragm and into a position that makes reflux more common.
  • Dietary Choices: Certain foods and beverages are often reported to induce heartburn or reflux. Examples include chocolate, tomatoes, spicy food, vinegar, citrus, fatty foods, carbonated beverages, coffee, and mint.
  • Pregnancy: Pregnant women often experience GERD, but their symptoms usually cease shortly after giving birth.

How Are GERD and Sleep Related?

GERD is often cited as a cause of sleeping problems, including in the National Sleep Foundation’s 2001 Sleep in America Poll. In a more recent survey of people with frequent heartburn, nearly 60% said it affected their sleep, and more than 30% said it hurt their daytime functioning.

Flare ups of GERD symptoms after lying down can make it hard to fall asleep and can cause nighttime interruptions from heartburn, chest pain, and coughing. Studies in sleep clinics of people with GERD have found that these symptoms are correlated with lower sleep quality.

GERD and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Research has also identified a link between GERD and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a sleep disorder that involves blockage of the airway that incites pauses in breathing during sleep. Debate exists among experts about whether GERD causes OSA, OSA causes GERD, or if they simply share similar risk factors.

It is possible that GERD affects the airway and ability to breathe normally, causing more apneas during the night. At the same time, people with OSA wake up frequently at night and may then detect GERD symptoms. Lack of sleep from OSA may make the esophagus more susceptible to reflux.

In addition, factors like alcohol consumption, smoking, and obesity can increase risk for both GERD and OSA, so the correlation between the conditions may be a result of these factors.

While the exact relationship between GERD and OSA is subject to further research, it is clear that the conditions can occur together and create significant complications for a person’s sleep, comfort, and overall health.

How Can People With GERD Get Better Sleep?

It’s natural for people with GERD to want to know how they can reduce their symptoms and get better sleep. Although there’s no single solution that works for everyone, there are meaningful steps to get relief from heartburn and GERD and get longer, more restorative sleep.

Work With a Doctor

It is important to see a doctor if you have chronic or severe symptoms of GERD and/or frequent problems with sleep or daytime drowsiness. Because these are complex medical issues, a doctor can best examine the situation, determine the potential cause, order necessary tests, and recommend treatment.

A doctor’s focus may be on addressing GERD directly or on treating an underlying condition, such as obstructive sleep apnea, with the goal of reducing nighttime awakenings.

Treatment options can include both medical and non-medical approaches. The following sections describe some of those treatments, but a doctor is best suited to discussing the pros and cons in any patient’s particular case.

Lifestyle Changes

Lifestyle changes to reduce potential GERD triggers are a common aspect of managing the condition. Examples include reducing consumption of spicy and acidic foods, maintaining a healthy weight, and not smoking.

Since many GERD problems flare up at night, some lifestyle changes focus on tips for how to sleep with GERD.

Medication

Medications can be used to treat GERD and may be necessary because lifestyle changes don’t always resolve symptoms.

Over-the-counter medications like antacids can bring temporary relief but may be of limited effectiveness in many people. Other drugs, known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and H2 blockers, try to reduce acid produced in the stomach. These drugs may be available over-the-counter or with a prescription, but because they can have side effects, it’s best to talk with a doctor before taking them.

In rare cases when neither lifestyle changes nor medications have been effective, certain types of surgery may be considered to address GERD.

Improve Sleep Hygiene

People with GERD who want to sleep better may be helped by considering their sleep hygiene, which includes all of the elements that shape their sleep environment and sleep-related habits.

A high level of sleep hygiene can cut down on sleep interruptions and create more consistency in your nightly rest. Many tips for healthy sleep overlap with lifestyle changes for GERD such as avoiding excess caffeine and alcohol. A stable sleep schedule, a relaxing pre-bed routine, and a quiet and comfortable bedroom are other central components of sleep hygiene.

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  • Orr W. C. (2007). Management of nighttime gastroesophageal reflux disease. Gastroenterology & hepatology, 3(8), 605–606.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21960870/
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  • A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia [Internet]. Atlanta (GA): A.D.A.M., Inc.; c1997-2019. Hiatal hernia. Updated July 2, 2020. Retrieved July 13, 2020. Available from: https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001137.htm
  • Vela, M. F., Kramer, J. R., Richardson, P. A., Dodge, R., & El-Serag, H. B. (2014). Poor sleep quality and obstructive sleep apnea in patients with GERD and Barrett's esophagus. Neurogastroenterology and motility : the official journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society, 26(3), 346–352. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24460751/
  • Shaker, R., Castell, D. O., Schoenfeld, P. S., & Spechler, S. J. (2003). Nighttime heartburn is an under-appreciated clinical problem that impacts sleep and daytime function: the results of a Gallup survey conducted on behalf of the American Gastroenterological Association. The American journal of gastroenterology, 98(7), 1487–1493. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12873567/
  • Kim, Y., Lee, Y. J., Park, J. S., Cho, Y. J., Yoon, H. I., Lee, J. H., Lee, C. T., & Kim, S. J. (2018). Associations between obstructive sleep apnea severity and endoscopically proven gastroesophageal reflux disease. Sleep & breathing = Schlaf & Atmung, 22(1), 85–90. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28687968/
  • Person, E., Rife, C., Freeman, J., Clark, A., & Castell, D. O. (2015). A Novel Sleep Positioning Device Reduces Gastroesophageal Reflux: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of clinical gastroenterology, 49(8), 655–659.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26053170/
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  • The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Health Information Center. (2014, November). Treatment for GER & GERD. Retrieved July 13, 2020, from https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/acid-reflux-ger-gerd-adults/treatment
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Источник: https://www.sleepfoundation.org/physical-health/gerd-and-sleep

: Home remedies for cough caused by acid reflux

Home remedies for cough caused by acid reflux
ALLY CHECKING MINIMUM BALANCE
Home remedies for cough caused by acid reflux
Home remedies for cough caused by acid reflux
Home remedies for cough caused by acid reflux

That Sore Throat Could be Caused by Acid Reflux

Acid Reflux, sore throat, stomach acid, Heartburn,

More than 60% of Americans experience acid reflux every month. If you’ve ever felt a burning sensation or felt as if there were a lump in your throat, chances are high that you’ve had acid reflux.

It’s a common condition in which the acid in your stomach escapes and travels into your food tube, or esophagus. The highly acidic fluid irritates the lining of your esophagus and brings with it common symptoms like burning in the throat, hoarseness, and more. A common, but lesser-known, symptom of acid reflux is a sore throat. If you have a sore throat, you might think you’re getting sick. But, the irritation that acid reflux causes can give you a sore throat.

Though acid reflux itself isn’t life-threatening, it can lead to esophagus damage and discomfort. To learn more about the symptoms of acid reflux and get help finding a treatment plan for you, talk to Yadwinder Kang, MD at First Choice Urgent Care.

Why acid reflux makes your throat sore

Acid reflux occurs when stomach acid travels backward out of your stomach and up into your esophagus. Your esophagus is the tube through which food travels, connecting your mouth to your stomach. The lower esophageal sphincter is a small band of muscle at the bottom of your esophagus that typically keeps stomach acid from flowing up. However, the lower esophageal sphincter can weaken, and stomach acid can leak into your esophagus.

Stomach acid is a fluid that helps your body digest food, but when it gets into your esophagus, it can cause discomfort and irritation. Symptoms of heartburn, like a burning sensation in your throat, are due to stomach acid traveling back up your esophagus.

Acid reflux can irritate and damage the lining of your esophagus, and home remedies for cough caused by acid reflux can cause a sore throat. Other common symptoms of heartburn include:

  • A burning sensation in the throat
  • The feeling of a lump in the throat
  • Chronic cough
  • Hoarseness
  • Bad breath
  • Chest discomfort

Although sore throats that come with the flu or other viruses often go away once your body heals, a sore throat from acid reflux is best managed by treating the cause of the discomfort. GERD is a term for gastroesophageal reflux disease, or chronic heartburn.

Managing heartburn

Many patients find relief from GERD and acid reflux by making lifestyle changes. Certain foods and drinks can increase your risk of heartburn, including carbonated or caffeinated drinks. Keep in mind that everyone’s triggers are different. Consider keeping a food journal to learn which foods and beverages might cause your acid reflux symptoms to increase.

Common heartburn remedies include:

  • Avoiding spicy food
  • Avoiding fatty foods
  • Avoiding carbonated, caffeinated, or alcoholic beverages
  • Avoiding citrus and tomato juices, which are acidic
  • Not smoking

Eating smaller, more frequent meals can help aid in digestion. Maintaining a healthy weight and not wearing tight clothes might also help prevent acid ye banks and braes o bonnie doon percy grainger. Over-the-counter medications like antacids help neutralize stomach acid with salts and hydroxide or bicarbonate ions. Other medications keep your stomach from producing excessive stomach acid.

For more serious cases of acid reflux, Dr. Kang can give you a prescription medication. These medications can help eliminate or neutralize stomach ww bank of america online banking to decrease esophagus irritation. Combined with home remedies for cough caused by acid reflux changes, medication can treat a sore throat due to acid reflux.

When you come to First Choice Urgent Care for treatment, our caring team is here to help. Together, you and Dr. Kang review your medical history and symptoms to determine the best course of treatment for your acid reflux. If you think you might have GERD or acid reflux, call our Bakersfield, California office, or schedule your first appointment online today.

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If you need to diagnose an injury, examine an area that hurts, or monitor a condition, X-rays are still a common method of medical imaging home remedies for cough caused by acid reflux help. Read on to find out more about why X-rays are still important to monitor your health.

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1st Choice Urgent Care, Bakersfield, CA

Phone (appointments): 661-230-9334

Heartburn and acid reflux

Heartburn is a burning feeling in the chest caused by stomach acid travelling up towards the throat (acid reflux). If it keeps happening, it's called gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD).

Check if you have acid reflux

The main symptoms of acid reflux are:

  • heartburn – a burning sensation in the middle of your chest
  • an unpleasant sour taste in your mouth, caused by stomach acid

You may also have:

  • a cough or hiccups that keep coming back
  • a hoarse voice
  • bad breath
  • bloating and feeling sick

Your symptoms will probably be worse after eating, when lying down and when bending over.

Causes of heartburn and acid reflux

Lots of people get heartburn from time to time. There's often no obvious reason why.

Sometimes it's caused or made worse by:

  • certain food and drink – such as coffee, tomatoes, alcohol, chocolate and fatty or spicy foods
  • being overweight
  • smoking
  • pregnancy
  • stress and anxiety
  • some medicines, such as anti-inflammatory painkillers (like ibuprofen)
  • a hiatus hernia – when part of your stomach moves up into your chest

How you can ease heartburn and acid reflux yourself

Simple lifestyle changes can help stop or reduce heartburn.

Do

  • eat smaller, more frequent meals

  • raise 1 end of your bed 10 to 20cm by putting something under your bed or mattress – your chest and head should be above the level of your waist, so stomach acid does not travel up towards your throat

  • try to lose weight if you're overweight

  • try to find ways to relax

Don’t

  • do not have food or drink that triggers your symptoms

  • do not eat within 3 or 4 hours before bed

  • do not wear clothes that are tight around your waist

  • do not smoke

  • do not drink too much alcohol

  • do not stop taking any prescribed medicine without speaking to a doctor first

A pharmacist can help with heartburn and acid reflux

Speak to a pharmacist for advice if you keep getting heartburn.

They can recommend medicines called antacids that can help ease your symptoms.

It's best to take these with food or soon after eating, as this is when you're most likely to get heartburn. They may also south florida state college panther central for longer if taken with food.

Find a pharmacy

Non-urgent advice: See a GP if:

  • lifestyle changes and pharmacy medicines are not helping
  • you have heartburn most days for 3 weeks or more
  • you have other symptoms, like home remedies for cough caused by acid reflux getting stuck in your throat, frequently being sick or losing weight for no reason

A GP can provide stronger treatments and help rule out any more serious causes of your symptoms.

Information:

Coronavirus (COVID-19) update: how to contact a GP

It's still important to get help from a GP if you need it. To contact your GP surgery:

  • visit their website
  • use the NHS App
  • call them

Find out about using the NHS during COVID-19

Treatment from a GP

A GP may prescribe a medicine called a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) that reduces how much acid your stomach makes. PPIs include:

You'll usually need to take this type of medicine for 4 or 8 weeks, depending on how serious your acid reflux is.

Important

Go back to the GP if your symptoms return after stopping your medicine. You may need a long-term prescription.

Tests and surgery for heartburn and acid reflux

If medicines do not help or your symptoms are severe, a GP may refer you to a specialist for:

  • tests to find out what's causing your symptoms, such as a gastroscopy (where a thin tube with a camera is passed down your throat)
  • an operation on your stomach to stop acid reflux – called a laparoscopic fundoplication

Page last reviewed: 09 September 2020
Next review due: 09 September 2023

Источник: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/heartburn-and-acid-reflux/

How to get rid of heartburn - 10 top tips on how to stop acid reflux

Many of us know the tell-tale signs – a burning sensation in the chest and uncomfortable burping after a big meal.

Horribly, around 40% of people in Britain endure the agony of heartburn on a regular basis.

People could even suffer from a ‘silent’ form of the condition – without the more obvious heartburn symptoms.

Silent acid reflux leads to problems such as difficulty swallowing, a sore throatnagging cough – and, in the long run, an increased risk of throat cancer and oesophageal cancer.

Don't worry though, as we have some top tips to help you reduce acid reflux and calm your heartburn symptoms.

1. Cut out smoking and avoid passive inhalation of cigarette smoke.

Yes, another thing smoking is really bad for! Nicotine in cigarettes relaxes the muscles in the lower part of the esophagus, and as such is less likely to keep stomach acid at bay inside your stomach, causing the reflux.

As such, steer clear of smoking, and avoid being near others smoking home remedies for cough caused by acid reflux passive inhalation can have the same effect.

2. Improve your posture.

Once again, the focus is on the lower part of esophagus, which we don't want to be forcing to relax by union savings bank com or standing walmart money card number poor posture, as a result this will cause acid reflux.

Stand up straight, and if sitting ensure your upper body is elevated and as vertical as possible.

3. Introduce more ginger to your diet.

But not where to find ifsc code for hdfc bank in netbanking ale though! Raw ginger, crystallized ginger or ginger extracts have been an old folk remedy for heartburn for centuries, and some still swear by it today.

Consume it by itself or home remedies for cough caused by acid reflux it to a meal that doesn't include any potential trigger ingredients.

4. Home remedies for cough caused by acid reflux triggering foods.

There are quite a few foods that are associated with increasing heartburn symptoms and here they are:

  • fried foods
  • high fat foods
  • whole dairy products
  • chocolate
  • spicy foods
  • black pepper
  • garlic
  • citrus fruits, such as lemon and orange
  • tomato-based products
  • generally acidic foods

You could avoid all of these and still get heartburn from sheer volume at meals, instead just eat little and often.

5. Avoid triggering liquids.

Sadly, all your favourites should be avoided. These include:

  • alcohol in general (especially red wine)
  • fizzy drinks
  • caffeinated drinks (maybe switch to de-caff for your hot drinks)
  • citrus fruit juices

6. Drink Baking Soda mixed with Water.

Baking soda, or sodium bicarbonate is a natural antacid, and has a neutralising effect on the stomach acid.

Mix a small amount with water and drink slowly, otherwise there may be a laxative effect!

7. Keep yourself at a healthy weight for your age and height.

The more overweight you are, the more pressure there is on your stomach, and as a result the likelihood for acid reflux increases.

Even if you are a healthy weight, losing a little bit of weight (avoiding being underweight though!) should lessen the pressure on your gut.

8. Don't wear overly-tight clothing.

A bit like being overweight, tight clothes add unwanted pressure to your stomach and therefore will increase acid reflux.

Go looser around your upper body to avoid exacerbating symptoms.

9. Enjoy chewing gum and liquorice.

This one is a bit nicer - chewing gum and foods containing the liquorice root have been shown to have a neutralising effect on stomach acid, and therefore reduces heartburn symptoms.

Don't blast through the gum though - or you may have that laxative effect!

10.O ver-the-counter medicines.

A woman with heartburn

There are a host of medicines available in pharmacies and shops that can help put a stop to heartburn.

The most popular tend to be antacids or oral suspension tablets.

If in doubt, then check with your pharmacist.

Do you have any top tips to help reduce heartburn? Let us know in the comments below.

Источник: https://www.mirror.co.uk/lifestyle/health/how-get-rid-heartburn-reflux-12583171
Phone (general inquiries): 661-735-1185

Address: 4420 Coffee Road, Suite A, Bakersfield, CA93308

Источник: https://www.firstchoiceuc.com/blog/that-sore-throat-could-be-caused-by-acid-reflux
Phone (general inquiries): (661) 735-3041

Address: 6515 Panama Lane, Suite 106-107, Bakersfield, CA93313

1st Choice Urgent Care, Bakersfield, CA

Phone (appointments): 661-214-8477

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