home remedies for migraine during periods

Black cohosh has an ancient history of use among Native American women for menstruation and menopausal health issues. Western research has yet. Drink lots of water to stay hydrated. Painkillers are not your only friend. These 7 effective home remedies for period pain are worth an honest shot. · 1. Ginger and Black Pepper Tea.
home remedies for migraine during periods

Home remedies for migraine during periods -

Headaches, migraines, and the menstrual cycle

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Top things to know:

  • The menstrual cycle has been linked to some types of headaches, specifically tension-type headaches and migraines

  • Women are more likely than men to get migraine headaches, which researchers think is due to the influence of the hormones related to the menstrual cycle

  • Treatment for menstrually-related headaches includes pain relief medication and hormonal therapy

How headaches are related to the menstrual cycle

There are many different types and causes of headaches, but only two that can be linked to the menstrual cycle.

Tension-type headaches

This is a very common type of headache. These headaches are often felt on both sides of the head and have a mild or moderate pressing or tightening quality (1). Some people experience headaches similar to these around the time of their period (2). More research is needed about this type of headache and how it may be linked to the cycle.

Migraine

Migraine is a disorder with characteristic headaches that can be debilitating. In the US, 17.6% of women and 5.7% of men report experiencing at least one migraine headache within the past year (3).

Migraine headaches are usually quite severe, often have a throbbing type quality, and are usually felt on one side of the head. Migraines can have additional side effects, including feelings of nausea, vomiting, aggravated by normal activity, and a sensitivity to light or sound (1). Some people who have migraine disorder may experience aura symptoms, such as visual or sensory symptoms, which occur before or during an attack, which can signal that a migraine headache is coming (1). Migraines can last up to three days (1).

Women are three times more likely to experience at least one migraine over a year than men (3), which researchers think is due to the influence of the hormones related to the menstrual cycle, specifically estrogen (4,5). Menstrual migraines are thought to be caused by a drop in hormones before the start of the period (4,5).

A small percentage of women get migraine headaches at the start of their period. These migraines often last longer and involve more nausea than migraines that happen at other timesand they usually do not have an aura (1). Migraines that occur only with the start of the period are called Pure menstrual migraines.

In Clue, you can also use custom tags to track migraine headaches or other symptoms.

Menstrually-related migraines and headaches

illustration of hormones

The menstrual cycle and related hormonal changes can affect people with migraine disorder. In a study of women referred to headache specialists, about 1 in 10 of the participants stated that their migraines started at the time of menarche (the first menstrual period) (6). This may not be true for all women or people with cycles, since this study was among women seeking care, but it does suggest that menstrual hormones can have an impact.

Other reproductive stages in life can also impact when migraines show up. In the same study as above, two thirds of people reported a decrease or disappearance of their migraines during pregnancy (6).

Some people also get mid-cycle headaches as well, which could be in relation to ovulation. In one study, about 16% of participants experienced primarily mid-cycle headaches, while half experienced headaches that followed their menstrual cycle (7).

Headaches can also sometimes be part of PMS (8).

3 colorful lightning bolts on a red background

Treatment

This is only a small collection of medications available to treat headaches and migraines, and there are other therapeutic and preventative medications available. Speak to your healthcare provider about which option would be best for you.

Science-backed remedies for tension-headaches

NSAIDs and over the counter painkillers: NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) are a class of painkillers and anti-inflammatory medications, many of which are available without a prescription in many countries. Ibuprofen and ketoprofen are more effective than placebo at providing a person with tension headaches (9). Acetaminophen (paracetamol), which often gets grouped together with NSAIDs, also has been demonstrated to provide similar pain relief (9).

Although the above medications are helpful, they might not be as helpful as people think. A meta-analysis of 3,094 people with tension headaches showed that taking a dose of ibuprofen only provides a small number of people with pain relief (23 out of 100 people) compared to taking a placebo (16 out of 100) (10).

Acupuncture: Acupuncture may offer some help in decreasing the frequency of tension headache occurrences when treated at the start of symptoms (11). More research is needed. Treatment with acupuncture for frequent migraines may offer some relief in decreasing the frequency of migraine attacks (12).

Science-backed remedies for menstrual migraine

Pain relief therapies

Triptans (including sumatripin): This is a type of medication used to treat both acute menstrual migraines, as well as migraines unrelated to the menstrual cycle (4,13). In order for the medication to work best, sumatripin should be taken promptly while pain levels are still mild. Don’t hold off on the medication and try to be a hero. This will only make the medication less likely to provide effective pain relief (13). You may need a prescription for this medication, so be sure to talk to your healthcare provider first.

Over the counter pain medication like naproxen (NSAID) and acetaminophen (paracetamol): While these therapies offer more pain relief than doing nothing, neither of these are reliable in terms of eliminating migraine pain (14,15). Consider asking your healthcare provider about triptans instead.

Preventative menstrual migraine treatments

Triptans: This medication can also be taken to prevent future migraines from happening. In one study, using triptans for a few days before the start of the period helped reduce both severity and frequency of menstrual migraine headaches (16).

Hormone stabilization techniques: Preventative treatment using hormone therapy may help to decrease the frequency of severe menstrual migraines. In one study, researchers looked at how two treatments with hormonal contraception affected migraines. The majority of participants (95%) were prescribed combined oral contraceptives (the pill) and additionally took estrogen during the week of their withdrawal bleed (“period”), which helped to make the drop in estrogen less severe. Fewer participants (5%) used the estrogen patch during their normal menstrual period to prevent the drop in hormones. Among all participants, eight out of 10 people reported a decrease in their menstrual migraines and were able to reduce their pain-medication use by half (17).

Continuous birth control: Using a form of continuous/extended-use birth control may be an option to decrease menstrually related migraine attacks or headaches. People who took extended use combined oral contraceptives had fewer headache symptoms, and were more productive (18). Talk to your healthcare provider about extended use hormonal birth control, though this may not be the right therapy for everyone, especially those with migraine with aura—see the section below on hormonal birth control for more info.

Natural treatments and lifestyle adjustments for menstrual migraines

Lifestyle treatments are always tricky to study, since they are hard to control and not as well-funded as pharmaceutical medicine.

Magnesium: There’s some evidence that magnesium can relieve migraine pain (19). In a small preliminary trial, participants took magnesium supplements three times per day starting from Day 15 of their cycle until the start of their next period (20). This treatment helped decrease the participants’ total pain and also improved their PMS symptoms (20). In a randomized control trial where participants received either a placebo or a drug containing magnesium, vitamin B2, and coenzyme Q10, the severity of migraines was lower among those taking the drug, though the number of days in which migraines were experienced was not statistically different from the placebo (21).

Recommended lifestyle adjustments for migraines and headaches

Not all lifestyle changes are studied, but these recommendations are fairly standard for how to help you cope with your headaches. Give them a try, see what works best for you.

Get enough sleep: Since fatigue and sleep disturbances are linked to being migraine/headache triggers (1,22-24), be sure to adjust your bedtime accordingly so that you wake up relaxed and well rested. If you commonly have headaches in the morning after waking up, it may be a good idea to get checked for sleep apnea (1).

Reduce your stress levels: Stress, whether it’s particular events, feelings, or time periods, are linked to triggering migraines and headache (22-25). For this reason, stress management techniques like relaxation therapy, cognitive behavioural therapy, and biofeedback could help (25). It’s easier said than done, but prioritize de-stressing as best you can.

Avoid extreme weather: Weather changes, both hot and cold, can trigger migraines and headaches (22-24). Check the weather forecast and plan ahead. Be extra cautious about extreme heat and sun exposure, as exhaustion and dehydration can also cause headaches (26).

Find a dark and quiet space: For people experiencing a migraine headache, light and sound can aggravate migraine symptoms (1). Some people find relief by lying in dark, quiet rooms.

Download Clue to track your headaches.

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Migraine and hormonal birth control

Is your birth control causing headaches?

Headaches are sometimes a side effect of hormonal birth control (4). In one study, taking oral contraceptives affected migraines, with 24% of people experiencing increased frequency of migraines (6).

Estrogen-withdrawal headaches are a type of headache that people get during their “pill-free” or “sugar-pill week” when they are taking oral contraceptives. This type of headache usually goes away within 3 days, but then will return during the estrogen-free week of the next cycle  (1).

Hormonal contraception for people with migraine

People with migraine with aura are not recommended to use combined hormonal contraceptives (like the pill, the ring, or the patch) (27). Having migraines with aura is a risk factor for experiencing a stroke (28-30), plus taking combined hormonal contraceptives up to doubles that risk (31,32). The combination of these risk factors is associated with a 3x increased risk of stroke, compared to people with migraine who don’t use combined hormonal contraceptives (27).

The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says people with chronic migraine are safe to use certain forms of contraception:

Most people who experience migraine without aura can use combined hormonal contraceptives, too, as the risk of increased stroke is outweighed by the benefits that the pill offers (27); however, people with other risk factors for stroke, such as older age and cigarette smoking, may be advised not to use combined hormonal birth control (27).

People with non-migraine headaches do not have any restrictions on hormonal birth control (27).

Some birth control options may be safer than others, depending on your age and other risk factors (27). Speak to your healthcare provider to figure out what is the best contraceptive method for you.

Do you have migraine disorder or headaches, but are not sure if they are if are related to your cycle? Get tracking. You can use Clue to track your headaches, and even add custom tags. Do this consistently for a couple of cycles so that you and your healthcare provider can see if there is a pattern.

Download Clue to track your headaches and see how they appear in relation to your cycle.


References

  1. Headache Classification Committee of the International Headache Society (IHS). The international classification of headache disorders, 3rd edition. Cephalalgia. 2018 Jan;38(1):1-211. Available from: https://www.ihs-headache.org/binary_data/3245_ichd-3-cephalalgia-2018-issue-1.pdf
  2. Arjona A, Rubi-Callejon J, Guardado-Santervas P, Serrano-Castro P, Olivares J. Menstrual tension-type headache: evidence for its existence. Headache. 2007 Jan;47(1):100-3.
  3. Stewart WF, Lipton RB, Celentano DD, Reed ML. Prevalence of migraine headache in the United States. Relation to age, income, race, and other sociodemographic factors. JAMA. 1992 Jan 1;267(1):64-9.
  4. Ashkenazi A, Silberstein SD. Hormone-related headache: pathophysiology and treatment. CNS Drugs. 2006;20(2):125-141.
  5. Allais G, Chiarle G, Sinigaglia S, Benedetto C. Menstrual migraine: a review of current and developing pharmacotherapies for women. Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2018 Feb;19(2):123-136.
  6. Granella F, Sances G, Zanferrari C, Costa A, Martignoni E, Manzoni GC. Migraine without aura and reproductive life events: a clinical epidemiological study in 1300 women. Headache. 1993 Jul-Aug;33(7):385-9.
  7. Kiesner J, Martin VT. Mid-cycle headaches and their relationship to different patterns of premenstrual stress symptoms. Headache. 2013 Jun;53(6):935-46.
  8. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. FAQ057 - Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS). 2015. Available from: https://www.acog.org/Patients/FAQs/Premenstrual-Syndrome-PMS
  9. Moore RA, Derry S, Wiffen PJ, Straube S, Bendtsen L. Evidence for efficacy of acute treatment of episodic tension-type headache: methodological critique of randomised trials for oral treatments. Pain. 2014 Nov;155(11):2220-8.
  10. Derry S, Wiffen PJ, Moore RA, Bendtsen L. Ibuprofen for acute treatment of episodic tension-type headache in adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 Jul 31;(7):CD011474.
  11. Linde K, Allais G, Brinkhaus B, Fei Y, Mehring M, Shin BC, Vickers A, White AR. Acupuncture for the prevention of tension-type headache. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2016 Apr 19;4:CD007587.
  12. Linde K, Allais G, Brinkhaus B, Fei Y, Mehring M, Vertosick EA, Vickers A, White AR. Acupuncture for the prevention of episodic migraine. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2016 Jun 28;(6):CD001218.
  13. Derry CJ, Derry S, Moore RA. Sumatriptan (all routes of administration) for acute migraine attacks in adults - overview of Cochrane reviews. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014 May 28;(5):CD009108.
  14. Law S, Derry S, Moore RA. Naproxen with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 Oct 20;(10):CD009455.
  15. Derry S, Moore RA. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 Apr 30;(4):CD008040.
  16. Brandes JL, Poole Ac, Kallela M, Schreiber CP, MacGregor EA, Silberstein SD, Tobin J, Shaw R. Short-term frovatriptan for the prevention of difficult-to-treat menstrual migraine attacks. Cephalalgia. 2009 Nov;29(11):1133-48.
  17. Calhoun A, Ford S. Elimination of menstrual-related migraine beneficially impacts chronification and medication overuse. Headache. 2008 Sep;48(8):1186-93.
  18. Sulak P, Willis S, Kuehl T, Coffee A, Clark J. Headaches and oral contraceptives: impact of eliminating the standard 7-day placebo interval. Headache. 2007 Jan;47(1):27-37.
  19. Gröber U, Schmidt J, Kisters K. Magnesium in prevention and therapy. Nutrients. 2015;7(9):8199-226.
  20. Facchinetti F, Sances G, Borella P, Genazzani AR, Nappi G. Magnesium prophylaxis of menstrual migraine: effects on intracellular magnesium. Headache. 1991 May;31(5):298-301.
  21. Gaul C, Diener HC, Danesch U. Improvement of migraine symptoms with a proprietary supplement containing riboflavin, magnesium and Q10: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter trial. The journal of headache and pain. 2015 Dec;16(1):32.
  22. Chabriat H, Danchot J, Michel P, Joire JE, Henry P. Precipitating factors of headache. A prospective study in a national control-matched survey in migraineurs and nonmigraineurs. Headache. 1999 May;39(5):335-8.
  23. Martin VT, Behbehani MM. Toward a rational understanding of migraine trigger factors. Med Clin North Am. 2001 Jul;85(4):911-41.
  24. Kelman L. The triggers or precipitants of the acute migraine attack. Cephalalgia. 2007 May;27(5):394-402.
  25. Sauro KM, Becker WJ. The stress and migraine interaction. Headache. 2009 Oct;49(9):1378-86.
  26. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Heat stress - heat related illness. 2018. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/heatstress/heatrelillness.html
  27. Curtis KM, Tepper NK, Jatlaoui TC, Berry-Bibee E, Horton LG, Zapata LB, Simmons KB, et al. U.S. Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use, 2016. MMWR Recomm Rep. 2016 Jul 29;65(3):1-103.
  28. Etminan M, Takkouche B, Isorna FC, Samii A. Risk of ischaemic stroke in people with migraine: systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. BMJ. 2005 Jan 8;330(7482):63.
  29. Schürks M, Rist PM, Bigal ME, Buring JE, Lipton RB, Kurth T. Migraine and cardiovascular disease: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ. 2009 Oct 27;339:b3914.
  30. Spector JT, Kahn SR, Jones MR, Jayakumar M, Dalal D, Nazarian S. Migraine headache and ischemic stroke risk: an updated meta-analysis. Am J Med. 2010 Jul;123(7):612-24.
  31. Gillum LA, Mamidipudi SK, Johnston SC. Ischemic stroke risk with oral contraceptives: A meta-analysis. JAMA. 2000 Jul 5;284(1):72-8.
  32. Xu Z, Li Y, Tang S, Huang X, Chen T. Current use of oral contraceptives and the risk of first-ever ischemic stroke: A meta-analysis of observational studies. Thromb Res. 2015 Jul;136(1):52-60.
Источник: https://helloclue.com/articles/cycle-a-z/headaches-migraines-and-the-menstrual-cycle

Menstrual migraine

Treatment options for menstrual migraine

There are several treatment options depending on the regularity of your menstrual cycle, whether or not you have painful or heavy periods, menopausal symptoms  or if you also need contraception.

If you have regular periods your doctor may suggest taking medication for a few days around the time of menstruation (generally two days before and up to three days after bleeding starts).

There are different options available and your doctor should suggest the option that suits you. It could include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as naproxen or mefenamic acid, oestrogen supplements or triptans.

  • Frovatriptan tablet (2.5 mg twice daily on the days migraine is expected  – generally from two days before until three days after bleeding starts)
  • Zolmitriptan tablet (2.5 mg twice or three times a day on the days migraine is expected  – generally from two days before until three days after bleeding starts)

(Taken from the British Association for the Study of Headache’s National Headache Management System for Adults 2019)

It is possible that these treatments may delay the migraine attack rather than prevent it.

Contraception

If you have irregular periods or need contraception, there are a range of contraceptives that may help with your menstrual migraine. Your doctor should be able to suggest an appropriate option for you.

If you take the combined pill and have migraine during the pill free week you can take the pill without a break to help manage the menstrual migraine.

In migraine with aura progestogen (another hormone) only options are recommended, and can be effective for some women with menstrual migraine. However, some women do experience irregular bleeding and this can be accompanied by migraine.

Hormone supplements

Some women find topping up their oestrogen levels before and during their period can help with menstrual migraine. Oestrogen can be taken as skin patches or gel. This is most likely to be effective when your periods are regular and you can top up the oestrogen for seven days, starting 3 days before your period. You should not use oestrogen supplements if you think you are pregnant or you are trying to get pregnant.

For more information about using oestrogen supplements speak to your doctor.

Источник: https://migrainetrust.org/understand-migraine/types-of-migraine/menstrual-migraine/

Cure for migraine headache and nausea, include fruits and veggies in diet

Migraine headaches can eat away your peace of mind. After all, you need to have a steady head to perform to the best of your ability. If you’ve been suffering from persistent headache for more than two days, it is advisable to get it checked from a physician at the earliest.

Surprisingly, a few diet hacks can also help you relieve that pain. According to a 2016 study, eliminating coffee and processed foods high in nitrites or monosodium glutamate (MSG) can help fight headaches and migraine.

Apart from coffee, alcohol and processed food, nutritionist Janvi Chitalia suggests eating more of water and potassium rich foods such as watermelon. “Sometimes a headache is caused by dehydration. Loading up on fruits and vegetables that are high in water content such as berries, cucumber, melon, soups, tomatoes can help,” she adds.

A healthy dose of carbs may also help. “A diet that has less of carbohydrates tends to deplete glycogen stores that lead to fluid losses and can trigger dehydration related headaches. A healthy boost of carbs may also improve your mood, as they help your body to release serotonin, the feel-good hormone,” she adds.

Here are some other foods that you can include to relieve migraine or a headache. Dried apricots, avocados, almonds, cashews and brown rice are full of magnesium. These help prevent headaches by relaxing the blood vessels.

Similarly, green leafy vegetables, low fat dairy products and other calcium rich sources of food can also help relieve chronic headache. “If you regularly suffer from headaches during your periods, you can add some sesame seeds to your diet. Sesame seeds are a rich source of vitamin E, which helps stabilise estrogen levels and prevents headaches,” adds Chitalia.

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Migraine

Migraine has no cure. But your migraines can be managed with your doctor's help. Together, you will find ways to treat migraine symptoms when they happen, as well as ways to help make your migraines less frequent and severe. Your treatment plan may include some or all of these methods.

Medicine. There are two ways to approach the treatment of migraines with drugs: stopping a migraine in progress (called "abortive" or "acute" treatment) and prevention. Many people with migraine use both forms of treatment.

Acute treatment. Over-the-counter pain-relief drugs such as aspirin, acetaminophen, or NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) like ibuprofen relieve mild migraine pain for some people. If these drugs don't work for you, your doctor might want you to try a prescription drug. Two classes of drugs that doctors often try first are:

  • Triptans, which work by balancing the chemicals in the brain. Examples include sumatriptan (Imitrex®), rizatriptan (Maxalt®), zolmitriptan (Zomig®), almotriptan (Axert®), eletriptan (Relpax®), naratriptan (Amerge®), and frovatriptan (Frova®). Triptans can come as tablets that you swallow, tablets that dissolve on your tongue, nasal sprays, and as a shot. They should not be used if you have heart disease or high blood pressure.
  • Ergot derivatives (ergotamine tartrate and dihydoergotamine), which work in the same way as triptans. They should not be used if you have heart disease or high blood pressure.

Most acute drugs for migraine work best when taken right away, when symptoms first begin. Always carry your migraine medicine with you in case of an attack. For people with extreme migraine pain, a powerful “rescue” drug might be prescribed, too. Because not everyone responds the same way to migraine drugs, you will need to work with your doctor to find the treatment that works best for you.

Prevention. Some medicines used daily can help prevent attacks. Many of these drugs were designed to treat other health conditions, such as epilepsy and depression. Some examples are:

  • Antidepressants, such as amitriptyline (Elavil®) or venlafaxine (Effexor®)
  • Anticonvulsants, such as divalproex sodium (Depakote®) or topiramate (Topamax®)
  • Beta-blockers, such as propranolol (Inderal®) or timolol (Blocadren®)
  • Calcium channel blockers, such as verapamil

These drugs may not prevent all migraines, but they can help a lot. Hormone therapy may help prevent attacks in women whose migraines seem to be linked to their menstrual cycle. Ask your doctor about prevention drugs if:

  • Your migraines do not respond to drugs for symptom relief
  • Your migraines are disabling or cause you to miss work, family activities, or social events
  • You are using pain-relief drugs more than two times a week

Lifestyle changes. Practicing these habits can reduce the number of migraine attacks:

  • Avoid or limit triggers.
  • Get up and go to bed the same time every day.
  • Eat healthy foods and do not skip meals.
  • Engage in regular physical activity.
  • Limit alcohol and caffeine intake.
  • Learn ways to reduce and cope with stress.

Alternative methods. Biofeedback has been shown to help some people with migraine. It involves learning how to monitor and control your body's responses to stress, such as lowering heart rate and easing muscle tension. Other methods, such as acupuncture and relaxation, may help relieve stress. Counseling also can help if you think your migraines may be related to depression or anxiety. Talk with your doctor about these treatment methods.

Источник: https://www.womenshealth.gov/a-z-topics/migraine

So, periods stink: You’ve got PMS, agonizing cramps and body aches, bloating, cravings, and, of course, bleeding. Can it get worse? Well, you may also deal with a lovely aching, throbbing headache before or during your period. UGH.

Yep, it’s not just you—the period headache is real. “Indeed, many women do suffer from the fancy diagnosis of ‘premenstrual migraines,’” says Mary Jane Minkin, MD, a board-certified ob-gyn and clinical professor of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive sciences at Yale School of Medicine.

“It is very difficult to tell if a migraine is hormonally related or not just from the symptoms, but it’s the timing that’s the usual clue,” Dr. Minkin says. “Many women get these headaches the day before or so and the first day of their period.”

Some good news? By day two or three of menstruation, period headaches *usually* fade, Dr. Minkin says. But until then (and for next month!), it helps to know how to tell if it’s period-related head pain you’re dealing with—and how to ease your discomfort.

Here, everything you need to know about premenstrual headaches from a couple of period pros.

Why do some women get period headaches?

Blame estrogen, says Sheeva Talebian, MD, a board-certified reproductive endocrinologist at CCRM in New York and a Women’s Health advisory board member. “Most menstrual-related headaches are due to the rapid drop in estrogen right before the onset of your period,” she says.

A mini menstruation lesson: When you ovulate (as in, an egg is released from your ovary), your estrogen peaks and your ovary makes progesterone. For a while, your womanly hormones stay up. But if you’re *not* pumping pregnancy hormones a week or so later, your body halts estrogen and progesterone production, triggering your period, Dr. Talebian explains.

That sudden drop in estrogen (a.k.a. “estrogen withdrawal”) tweaks chemicals in your brain that affect how you experience pain, and up goes your sensitivity, the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services’ Office on Women’s Health (OWH) explains. Add to that constricted blood vessels, which happens to some women when they’re low in estrogen, et voilà: the dreaded period headache.

Other potential factors that can play into period headaches? Dehydration, blood loss (especially if you’re anemic), and poor sleep, Dr. Talebian notes. Already prone to migraines? Then there’s a 60 percent chance you’ll suffer from menstrual migraines as well, per the National Headache Foundation (NHF). And if you’re on birth control, that can bring on more headaches when you switch to your sugar pills and your estrogen levels tank (yay, hormones!).

Does this feel like your typical headache or…?

They may present a little differently than a typical headache or migraine. Menstrual headaches can range from mild to severe when it comes to pain, says Dr. Talebian, and they tend to start on one side of your head before spreading (docs aren’t sure why this is, she says).

Classic migraine symptoms could strike, too; for instance, you might feel super-sensitive to light and sick to your stomach.

Okay, gimme the fix: How do I get rid of mine?

The first step is prevention. Stay hydrated, get some rest, and make sure you’re logging enough hours of sleep. If you know a headache tends to come with your period, try using a period tracker and then start taking over-the-counter pain meds like aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin), or naproxen (Aleve) a few days before, Dr. Talebian suggests. These meds will help fight the inflammation causing that pounding in your head. Take ‘em as needed with food (to avoid upsetting your stomach and developing ulcers), and follow the recommended dosage on the back of the box.

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If you’re on the Pill, you may be able to prevent your headaches by simply taking pills through your period and skipping the sugar pills to keep estrogen levels up. But always consult with your doctor first before making any changes to your medication regimen.

Got pain or killer nausea on top of a headache? It’s best to see your MD. You may need prescription meds to treat more severe migraine symptoms.

Another option if you’re really struggling with menstrual migraines: Ask your doctor about a script for an estradiol pill, suggests Dr. Minkin. Simply put, it’s like a boost of estrogen that you put under your tongue and can give you sweet relief in as little as 30 minutes, as estrogen is absorbed right into your bloodstream, she explains. “It’s truly amazing.”

Cassie ShortsleeveFreelance WriterCassie Shortsleeve is a skilled freelance writer and editor with almost a decade of experience reporting on all things health, fitness, and travel.

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Источник: https://www.womenshealthmag.com/health/a27492791/period-headache/
Office on Women's Health." Office on Women's Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, https://www.womenshealth.gov/menstrual-cycle/your-menstrual-cycle.

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  • Kirkland AE, Sarlo GL, Holton KF. The Role of Magnesium in Neurological Disorders. Nutrients. 2018;10(6):730. Published 2018 Jun 6.

  • Maghbooli M, Golipour F, Moghimi Esfandabadi A, Yousefi M. Comparison between the efficacy of ginger and sumatriptan in the ablative treatment of the common migraine. Phytother Res. 2014;28(3):412-415.

  • Maasumi K, Tepper SJ, Kriegler JS. Menstrual Migraine and Treatment Options: Review. Headache. 2017;57(2):194-208.

  • Chai NC, Peterlin BL, Calhoun AH. Migraine and estrogen. Curr Opin Neurol. 2014;27(3):315-324.

  • Becker WJ. Acute Migraine Treatment. Continuum (Minneap Minn). 2015;21(4 Headache):953-972.

  • Do TP, Guo S, Ashina M. Therapeutic novelties in migraine: new drugs, new hope? [published correction appears in J Headache Pain. 2019 May 17;20(1):55]. J Headache Pain. 2019;20(1):37. Published 2019 Apr 17.

  • "Alternative Migraine Remedies." American Migraine Foundation, American Headache Society, 18 Feb. 2021.

  • Источник: https://blog.thepillclub.com/how-to-get-rid-of-period-headache-menstrual-migraine-treatment/

    Yes, Period Headaches Are a Real Thing—and Here's How You Can Prevent Them

    Periods can be annoying enough, even if we’re only talking about symptoms like cramping, bloating, and, of course, bleeding. But on top of that, many women find they also experience headaches at this time of the month, as well—adding yet another layer to an already less-than-pleasant few days.

    If you’re one of those women, it may help to know that your recurring headaches aren’t just your imagination. Menstrual migraines and other types of headaches during (or before) your period are a real medical phenomenon, and experts say they’re actually quite common. Here’s what to know about this type of pain, and what you can do about it.

    RELATED: 6 Things You Should Know About Having Sex During Your Period

    Why do I get period headaches?

    Your hormones fluctuate throughout your monthly menstrual cycle, says James Woods, MD, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Rochester. Just before your period begins—assuming you didn’t become pregnant after ovulation—your estrogen levels drop sharply.

    “People sometimes don’t realize that our hormones are linked to brain chemicals and to our mental state,” says Dr. Woods. “Any sudden change in hormones can mean changes in mood or anxiety levels, or it can mean experiencing more symptoms like headaches.”

    Research suggests that up to 20% of women (and up to 60% of women who get regular migraines) experience a form of migraine tied to their period, known as menstrual migraines. These tend to occur in the two days leading up to a period and the three days after a period starts.

    It’s hard to say whether all period-related headaches are migraines, says Dr. Woods, since the definition of migraines has changed and expanded over the years. “But what we can say is that the vast majority of these headaches are linked to this drop in hormones,” he says.

    RELATED: 10 Things That Mess With Your Period

    Menstrual migraine treatment and prevention

    Since period-related headaches are fueled by hormonal changes, it can help to prevent large fluctuations, explains Dr. Woods. “A birth control pill that levels out those hormones throughout the month ... can really help,” he says.

    Some women will still get headaches during the placebo week of a 28-day pill regimen, Dr. Woods adds. If that happens, he says, doctors may recommend that patients skip the placebo week and start right in on a new pack of pills.

    “You can do that for a couple years, and you effectively level the playing field across the whole month,” he says. “If there’s no change in hormones, you’re less likely to get those headaches.”

    RELATED: Is It Really OK to Skip a Period Using Birth Control?

    Women who are going through menopause often experience menstrual migraines as well. Wearing an estrogen patch or taking estrogen can help keep hormone levels stable during this transition and may help reduce headaches. Once a woman has stopped having periods altogether, those migraines are likely to stop as well.

    Over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and prescription pain relievers (like triptans) can also help treat period headaches and may be good solutions for women who choose not to or cannot take hormonal birth control. (Some types of birth control may not be safe for women who get migraines with auras, for example.)

    “Some people benefit from strong coffee, some people take Excedrin, and people increase their doses of their migraine medication,” says Dr. Woods. He recommends talking to your doctor about what type of medication regimen is best for you.

    To get our top stories delivered to your inbox, sign up for the Healthy Living newsletter

    Stress can also contribute to headaches, says Dr. Woods. Finding ways to relax during your period—and all month long—may help relieve symptoms. Alternative therapies, like acupuncture, yoga, or hypnosis, may benefit some people as well.

    “There’s no one simplistic treatment that works for everyone," Dr. Woods adds. "It’s often a trial of different approaches until we find something that fits.”

    Источник: https://www.health.com/condition/headaches-and-migraines/period-headaches

    Similar video

    home remedies for migraine during periods
    Office on Women's Health." Office on Women's Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, https://www.womenshealth.gov/a-z-topics/migraine.

  • Abdullah M, Qaiser S, Malik A, et al. Comparison Between Menstrual Migraine and Menstrual-Unrelated Migraine in Women Attending Gynecology Clinics. Cureus. 2020;12(10):e10976. Published 2020 Oct 16.

  • "Your menstrual cycle

    Yes, Period Headaches Are a Real Thing—and Here's How You Can Prevent Them

    Periods can be annoying enough, even if we’re only talking about symptoms like cramping, bloating, and, of course, bleeding. But on top of that, many women find they also experience headaches at this time of the month, as well—adding yet another layer to an already less-than-pleasant few days.

    If you’re one of those women, it may help to know that your recurring headaches aren’t just your imagination. Rockland nissan route 303 blauvelt ny migraines and other types of headaches during (or before) your period are a real medical phenomenon, and experts say they’re actually quite common. Here’s what to know about this type of pain, and what you can do about it.

    RELATED: 6 Things You Should Know About Having Sex During Your Period

    Why do I get period headaches?

    Your hormones fluctuate throughout your monthly menstrual cycle, says James Woods, MD, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Rochester. Just before your period begins—assuming you didn’t become pregnant after ovulation—your estrogen levels drop sharply.

    “People sometimes don’t realize that our hormones are linked to brain chemicals and to our mental state,” says Dr. Woods. “Any sudden change in hormones can mean changes in mood or anxiety levels, or it can mean experiencing more symptoms like headaches.”

    Research suggests us bank mobile app not working up to 20% of women (and up to 60% of women who get regular migraines) experience a form of migraine tied to their period, known as menstrual migraines. These tend to occur in the two days leading up to a period and the three days after a period starts.

    It’s hard to say whether all period-related headaches are migraines, says Dr. Woods, since the definition of migraines has changed and expanded over the years. “But what we can say is that the vast majority of these headaches are linked to this drop in hormones,” he says.

    RELATED: 10 Things That Mess With Your Period

    Menstrual migraine treatment and prevention

    Since period-related headaches are fueled by hormonal changes, it can help to prevent large fluctuations, explains Dr. Woods. “A birth control pill that levels out those hormones throughout the month . can really help,” he says.

    Some women will still get headaches during the placebo week of a 28-day pill regimen, Dr. Woods adds. If that happens, he says, doctors may recommend that patients skip the placebo week and start right in on a new pack of pills.

    “You can do that for a couple years, and you effectively level the playing field across the whole month,” he says. “If there’s no change in hormones, you’re less likely to get those headaches.”

    RELATED: Is It Really OK to Skip a Period Using Birth Control?

    Women who are going through menopause often experience menstrual migraines as well. Wearing an estrogen patch or taking estrogen can help keep hormone levels stable during this transition and may help reduce headaches. Once a woman has stopped having periods altogether, those migraines are likely to stop as well.

    Over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and prescription pain relievers (like triptans) can also help treat period headaches and may be good solutions for women who choose not to or cannot take hormonal birth control. (Some types of birth control may not be safe for women who get migraines with auras, for example.)

    “Some people benefit from strong coffee, some people take Excedrin, and people increase their doses of their migraine medication,” says Dr. Woods. He recommends talking to your doctor about what type of medication regimen is best for you.

    To get our top stories delivered to your inbox, sign up for the Healthy Living newsletter

    Stress can also contribute to headaches, says Dr. Woods. Finding ways to relax during your period—and all month long—may help relieve symptoms. Alternative therapies, like acupuncture, yoga, or hypnosis, may benefit some people as well.

    “There’s no one simplistic treatment that works for everyone," Dr. Woods adds. "It’s often a trial of different approaches until we find something that fits.”

    Источник: https://www.health.com/condition/headaches-and-migraines/period-headaches
    Office on Women's Health." Office on Women's Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, https://www.womenshealth.gov/menstrual-cycle/your-menstrual-cycle.

  • Linstra KM, Ibrahimi K, van Casteren DS, Wermer MJ, Terwindt GM, MaassenVanDenBrink A. Pain perception in women with menstrually-related migraine. Cephalalgia. 2021;41(3):417-421.

  • Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. "Why light worsens migraine headaches." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 January 2010.

  • Sprouse-Blum AS, Gabriel AK, Brown JP, Home remedies for migraine during periods MH. Randomized controlled trial: targeted neck cooling in the treatment of the migraine patient. Hawaii J Med Public Health. 2013;72(7):237-241.

  • Editorial Team. November 29, 2010. "Heat Therapy for Migraine Headaches." Migraine.com, Health Union LLC, 29 Nov. 2010.

  • Allais G, Rolando S, Castagnoli Gabellari I, et al. Acupressure in the control of migraine-associated nausea. Neurol Sci. 2012;33 Suppl 1(Suppl 1):S207-S210.

  • Mayans L, Walling A. Acute Migraine Headache: Treatment Strategies. Am Fam Physician. 2018;97(4):243-251.

  • Kirkland AE, Sarlo GL, Holton KF. The Role of Magnesium in Neurological Disorders. Nutrients. 2018;10(6):730. Published 2018 Jun 6.

  • Maghbooli M, Golipour F, Moghimi Esfandabadi A, Yousefi M. Comparison between the efficacy of ginger and sumatriptan in the ablative treatment of the common migraine. Phytother Res. 2014;28(3):412-415.

  • Maasumi K, Tepper SJ, Kriegler JS. Menstrual Migraine and Treatment Options: Review. Headache. 2017;57(2):194-208.

  • Chai NC, Peterlin BL, Calhoun AH. Migraine and estrogen. Curr Opin Neurol. 2014;27(3):315-324.

  • Becker WJ. Acute Migraine Treatment. Continuum (Minneap Minn). 2015;21(4 Headache):953-972.

  • Do TP, Guo S, Ashina M. Therapeutic novelties in migraine: new drugs, new hope? [published correction appears in J Headache Pain. 2019 May 17;20(1):55]. J Headache Pain. 2019;20(1):37. Published 2019 Apr 17.

  • "Alternative Migraine Remedies." American Migraine Foundation, American Headache Society, 18 Feb. 2021.

  • Источник: https://blog.thepillclub.com/how-to-get-rid-of-period-headache-menstrual-migraine-treatment/

    How to Get Rid of a Period Headache (Menstrual Migraine)

    If you regularly experience headaches during your period, then that "time of the month" can feel especially intrusive. We'll share science-backed treatment options for how to get rid of your period headaches so you can decide what to do next (because let's face it—that "time of the month" can be hard enough as it is!).

    What is a period headache?

    There are different types of headaches, depending on the cause and symptoms. Let's break down how different types of headaches are categorized.

    Tension headache:

    This is the most common type of headache affecting 80% of Americans. It's often caused by stress, dehydration, or exhaustion. Tension headaches usually cause a pressing or tightening pain on both sides of the head.

    Migraine:

    This is an intense, throbbing headache that affects 29.5 million Americans. Women in particular are affected, as about 75% of people who get migraines are female. Migraines can cause pain on both sides of the head, but one side, usually in the temple or behind the eye.

    Menstrual migraine:

    A menstrual migraine or period headache is a type of migraine. It occurs anywhere from two days before to three days after your period begins and may last until your period is over.

    Need help finding migraine medication that can help you avoid attacks? Get expert-backed migraine care and receive 50% off your first month of medication from Cove.

    Please note that this discount is solely from Cove and not related to The Pill Club or from engaging with The Pill Club website.

    Why do you get menstrual migraines?

    Throughout your menstrual cycle, estrogen and progesterone hormone levels fluctuate in order to prepare your body for pregnancy. During your period, your estrogen levels are at their lowest. Estrogen plays a role in how sensitive you are to pain, so when estrogen levels are lower, you may feel more pain in the form of migraines, cramps, and back pain.

    These hormone level fluctuations may help explain why migraines are more common in women than they are in men.

    It can be hard to identify whether a migraine you experience during your period is actually a menstrual migraine, or if it's a migraine happening during your period. However, it was observed in one study that patients with menstrual migraines tend to experience more symptoms associated with migraines for a longer period of time, and have a worse experience online savings rates asked Dr. Sara Crystal, Neurologist and Medical Director at Cove, about why women get migraine attacks around their period.

    Dr. Crystal said,

    "The worsening of migraine is probably related to the drop in estrogen levels that occurs about 2 days before menstruation. Estrogen has a role in the perception of pain."

    What are the symptoms of a menstrual migraine?

    The most common menstrual migraine symptom is a throbbing pain that's most often felt on your temples (on each side of your forehead) or behind your eyes. The pain can vary in how intense it feels. It's most on either the left or right home remedies for migraine during periods of your head, but can be on both sides.

    Unlike a tension headache, migraines can have other symptoms such as

    • Nausea

    • Vomiting

    • Vision changes

    • Pain with a lot of noise, known as sonophobia

    • Sensitivity to light, known as photophobia

    One study involving 181 women between the ages of 12 and 55 compared menstrual migraines with migraines not related to menstruation. The menstrual migraine group had can you open a savings account online us bank headaches, and more nausea and light and sound sensitivity compared to the migraine group.

    At-home treatment and natural remedies for menstrual migraines

    Your environment can also help decrease migraine symptoms. Here are some things that can help:

    • A quiet, dark room: Avoid harsh noise and light when you have a migraine. Rest in a quiet, dark room if possible. The retinas in your eyes send light to your brain through your optic nerve, and light can be involved in worsening your pain during migraines.

    • Ice packs: One small study showed that ice wraps applied to the carotid arteries of the neck at the start of a migraine and left on for 30 minutes reduced pain by about 32%. Ideally this would be a pack that can be secured around your neck for consistent cold. Hot packs or heating pads might not give you much relief from a migraine, but may help with tension headaches.

    • Acupressure: If nausea is a particularly troubling part of your migraines, acupressure may be worth a try. In one study, 32 women participated and experienced significant nausea relief by using SeaBands, which put pressure on a certain area of the wrist. Pressing on these points can help relieve nausea and vomiting.

    For some people, a migraine can be treated at home by taking over-the-counter (OTC) medications. Medications or supplements that have been shown to improve migraines include:

    • NSAIDs and acetaminophen: Acetaminophen (Tylenol) and NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) are recommended for mild to moderate migraines. Some examples of NSAIDs are ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve). These medications work by blocking a certain enzyme in your body responsible for making chemicals that play a role in pain. If you have kidney disease or heart disease (like high blood pressure or heart failure), you'll want to talk to your doctor before taking NSAID medications.

    • Magnesium: Research shows that magnesium levels are lower in migraine sufferers, and that taking magnesium supplements long term may lessen migraine frequency.

    • Ginger powder: You may have heard of ginger helping with digestion issues, but there is also some evidence of its usefulness in treating migraines. One study gave either ginger powder or sumatriptan (a common migraine drug discussed in the next section) to 100 migraine patients. The patients that took ginger powder had similar relief to those taking sumatriptan.

    Prescription treatment for menstrual migraines

    If OTC medicines and natural remedies are not enough to control your menstrual migraines, a prescription treatment may be the best option for you. Furthermore, menstrual migraines can be more difficult to treat due to the effect of estrogen in your body. You may need a prescription on hand for when you get headaches around your period. Here are some commonly used prescription treatments.

    • Estrogen cream or patches: Remember how we said that a major cause of menstrual migraines is thought to be the drop in estrogen levels that happens during your period? Preventing such a quick and major drop in these hormones can help keep menstrual migraines away. For this, estrogen cream or patches can be used, starting a few days before your period.

    While birth control pills can help prevent menstrual migraines, it can take some time for them to work. For more information on starting regular birth control, read our birth control pill guide.

    • Triptans: This is a group of medications recommended for moderate to severe migraines. Sumatriptan (Imitrex), rizatriptan (Maxalt), and zolmitriptan (Zomig) are examples of triptan drugs. These medications are available as pills, injections, or nasal sprays. They work best if taken immediately when you feel a migraine coming on.

    • Dihydroergotamine (DHE): This drug is most commonly used as a nasal spray for migraine treatment. Doctors think this medication works by shrinking the blood vessels in your brain which often become enlarged and cause pain during migraines. The use of DHE has gone down because of side effects such as nausea, chest tightness, and tingling in the legs or arms, but it does show effectiveness in migraines that don't get better with other medications. DHE, however, isn't safe to take if you're pregnant.

    • Newly developing therapies: Some new medications have been developed as doctors learn more about migraines. One group of medications, CGRP receptor antagonists, or gepants, shows promise for short-term treatment of migraines and are currently being studied for the prevention of migraine. Nurtec (rimegepant), Ubrelvy (ubrogepant), and Qulipta (atogepant) are some examples.

    Need help finding migraine medication that can help you avoid attacks? Get expert-backed migraine care and receive 50% off your first month of medication from Cove.

    Please note that this discount is solely from Cove and not related to The Pill Club or from engaging with The Pill Club website.

    How to prevent menstrual migraines

    If you get migraines often, you may want something that is taken on a regular schedule to prevent your migraines before they begin. The following are some options mentioned by the American Migraine Foundation as well as some new medications.

    • Birthcontrol: It's worth mentioning again that hormonal birth control is a preventive measure for migraines. Taken regularly, birth control can maintain an even estrogen level, preventing dips that can trigger headaches. Deciding to take birth control pills or other hormonal contraceptives is a decision that extends beyond treating your migraines. Other factors should be taken into account, such as safety considerations, potential side effects, and whether you want to use a daily pill, an injection every few months, or an IUD to prevent pregnancy. See our birth control pill guide for more information.

    • Magnesium: As discussed above, taking magnesium once a migraine sets in won't do much to treat it, but taking it long term as a supplement has been shown to reduce the number of migraines patients experience.

    • Newly developing therapies: Another newer class of drugs called anti-CGRP monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can help with migraine prevention. The goal is to lower the number of migraines every month. Some examples are Aimovig (erenumab), Ajovy (fremanezumab), and Emgality (galcanezumab). These drugs are given intravenously, or in a vein in your arm, every 4 to 12 weeks in a clinic or at home.

    When to see a doctor

    If your menstrual migraines, or any migraines for that matter, are causing you to miss days of work or interrupting your daily activities, it is likely time to see a doctor to talk about some higher level treatment options. Prescription medications may be necessary to quickly and effectively treat your migraines.

    It's also a good idea to keep a diary or some kind of documentation about when you experience your migraines and whether you can identify any triggers or things that make your migraine attacks better or worse. For example, some people find light, loud sounds, and dehydration to be triggers. This will help both you and your doctor pick out the best solution for you.

    Conclusion

    While periods can be a hassle to deal with, you don't have to accept severe pain as part of that hassle. Always remember you have different options to choose from when it comes to your reproductive health.

    If you experience migraines around your time of the month, and OTC medications with an ice pack aren't cutting it, talk to your doctor about other treatments available to you.


    This article was created in partnership with Cove.

    Need help finding migraine medication that can help you avoid attacks? Get expert-backed migraine care and receive 50% off your first month of medication from Cove.

    Please note that this discount is solely from Cove and not related to The Pill Club or from engaging with The Pill Club website.

    You can learn more about Cove at our upcoming webinar Migraines & Periods: A Love Affair, featuring essential advice on menstrual migraine attacks from the medical experts at Cove and The Pill Club and moderated by the health and beauty writer Victoria Moorhouse. This virtual event will take place on Thursday, October 28 at 5 PM EST. Interested? Register here!

    Sources

    • Ertsey C, Magyar M, Gyüre T, Balogh E, Bozsik G. A tenziós fejfájás és kezelése [Tension type headache and its treatment possibilities]. Ideggyogy Sz. 2019;72(1-2):13-21.

    • "Migraine

      Tension Headaches

      Topic Overview

      Is this topic first premier bank near me you?

      This topic is about tension headaches in adults. If you are looking for information about migraine headaches, see Migraine Headaches.

      What is a tension headache?

      Most headaches are tension headaches. These headaches tend link your google my business account to adwords happen again and again, especially if you are under stress. They are not home remedies for migraine during periods a sign of something serious. But they can be very painful and hard to live with.

      Tension headaches can last from 30 minutes to 7 days.

      If you have a headache on 15 or more days each month over a 3-month period, you may have chronic tension headaches. This type amazon music logo png headache can lead to stress and depression, which in turn can lead to more headaches.

      Tension headaches are very common. Symptoms can start in childhood, but they are more likely to occur during middle age.

      Some people have both tension headaches and migraine headaches.

      What causes tension headaches?

      Doctors don't know for sure what causes tension headaches. Experts once thought that tension or spasms in the muscles of the neck, face, and head played a role. Now they think that a change in brain chemicals also may be a cause.

      Tension headaches are one of the most common types of headaches. They can be brought on—or triggered—by things such as stress, depression, hunger, and muscle strain. Tension headaches may come on suddenly or slowly.

      What are the symptoms?

      Symptoms of tension headaches include:

      • A headache that is constant, not throbbing. You usually feel the pain or pressure on both sides of your head.
      • Pressure that makes you feel like your head is in a vise.
      • Aching pain at your temples or the back of your head and neck.

      This is different than migraine headaches, which usually cause throbbing pain and start on one side of your head.

      Tension headaches tend to come back, especially when you are under stress.

      Pain from a tension headache is usually not severe and does not get in the way of your work or social life. But for some people, the pain is very bad or lasts a long time.

      How are tension headaches diagnosed?

      A doctor can usually diagnose tension headaches by asking you questions about your health and lifestyle and by examining you.

      How are they treated?

      Most people can treat their tension headaches with over-the-counter pain relievers like acetaminophen (such as Tylenol) or aspirin (such as Bayer).

      But if you take these pain relievers more than 3 times a week, you may get rebound headaches. These are different from tension headaches. Rebound headaches usually start after pain medicine has worn off, which leads you to take another dose. After a while, you get a headache whenever you stop taking the medicine.

      Your doctor may prescribe medicine if you get chronic tension headaches.

      Can you prevent tension headaches?

      Even with treatment, most people still have some headaches. But with treatment, you will probably have them less often. And when you do get them, they probably won't be as bad.

      Home treatment may help you avoid headaches. You can:

      • Try to reduce stress.
      • Make sure you sleep, exercise, and eat on a regular schedule.
      • Make sure you practice good posture. Stand and sit up straight.
      • Try not to strain your eyes when you use your computer.
      • Get treatment for depression or anxiety if you have those health problems.
      • Try using a headache diary. Every time you get a headache, write down the date, the time, and what you were doing and feeling before your headache started. This may help you and your doctor find out what is causing your headaches. Then your doctor can use the diary to plan your treatment.

      Cause

      The cause of tension headaches is not clear. In the past, doctors home remedies for migraine during periods that tension or spasms of the muscles of the neck, face, jaw, head, or scalp played a role in causing these headaches. Now they think a change in brain chemistry may also help cause a tension headache.

      Tension headaches are the most common type of headache. They can be brought on—or triggered—by things such as stress, depression, hunger, and muscle strain. Tension headaches may come on suddenly or slowly.

      Chronic tension headaches often occur along with other health problems such as anxiety or depression.

      Symptoms

      Symptoms of tension headaches include:

      • A constant headache that does not throb or pulse. You usually feel the pain or pressure on both sides of your head.
      • Tightness around your forehead that may feel like a "vise grip."
      • Aching pain at your temples or the back of your head and neck.

      Unlike migraines, tension headaches usually don't occur with nausea, vomiting, or feeling sensitive to both light and noise. But light or noise could make your headache worse. Tension headaches usually aren't bad enough to keep you from doing your daily activities.

      Tension headaches can last from 30 minutes to 7 days.

      If you have a headache on 15 or more days each month over a 3-month period, you may have chronic tension headaches.

      When to Call a Doctor

      Call 911 or other emergency services if:

      • You have symptoms of a stroke, such as:
        • Sudden numbness, tingling, weakness, or loss of movement in your face, arm, or leg, especially on only one side of your body.
        • Sudden vision changes.
        • Sudden trouble speaking.
        • Sudden confusion or trouble understanding simple statements.
        • Sudden problems with walking or balance.
        • A sudden, severe headache that is different from past headaches.

      Call your doctor now or go to the emergency room if:

      • You have a fever and a stiff neck.
      • You have new nausea and vomiting, or you cannot keep food or liquids down.

      Watch closely for changes in your health, and be sure to contact your doctor if:

      • Your headache wakes you up at night.
      • Your headaches get worse or happen more often.
      • You start to have new symptoms.
      • You have any problems with your medicine.
      • Your headaches occur after physical exercise, sexual activity, coughing, or sneezing.
      • Your life is disrupted by your headaches (for example, you miss work or school regularly).

      Watchful waiting

      Watchful waiting is a wait-and-see approach. If your headache gets better on its own, you won't need treatment. If buy buy baby store credit card gets worse or you get headaches often, you and your doctor will decide what to do next.

      Watchful waiting and using over-the-counter pain medicines work well if your tension headaches don't keep you from doing the things you want to do. But if your headaches are disrupting your life, talk to your doctor about other treatments that you is extra olive oil good for you try.

      Who to see

      Most health professionals can recognize and treat tension headaches. You may seek treatment from any of the following:

      If you think that your headaches are caused by depression or anxiety, talk to your doctor. Treating these problems may help reduce how bad your headaches are and how often you get them.

      Exams and Tests

      Finding out the type of headache you have

      A doctor can usually diagnose tension headaches by asking you questions about your health and lifestyle and by examining you.

      It can be hard to know which type of headache you have, because different types can have the same symptoms. But the treatments may be different, so it's important to find out which type you have.

      Finding other possible causes

      In very rare cases, headaches can be caused by more serious health problems (such as brain tumors or aneurysms). But most headaches aren't caused by anything serious, so you probably won't need to have tests.

      Treatment Overview

      You can treat most tension headaches with:

      • Over-the-counter pain medicines.
      • Prescription drugs if you have chronic or very bad headaches.
      • Avoiding things that trigger your headaches.
      • Meditation and other ways to lower your stress.

      Over-the-counter medicines to stop headaches

      Medicines can help you feel better. But they can also be dangerous, especially if you don't take them the right way. Be safe with medicines. Read and follow all instructions on the label.

      • Try these drugs first. Most doctors recommend that you try over-the-counter drugs first if you have mild to moderate headaches. They may have fewer side effects than prescription drugs. These medicines include:
        • Acetaminophen, such as Tylenol.
        • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin (for example, Bayer) and ibuprofen (for example, Motrin).
        • Medicine that combines aspirin, acetaminophen, and caffeine, such as Excedrin.
      • Don't take this medicine too often. Try not to take over-the-counter drugs more than 3 times a week, because you may home remedies for migraine during periods rebound headaches. These are different from tension headaches. They are usually triggered after pain medicine has worn off, prompting you to take another dose. After a while, you get a headache whenever you stop taking the medicine.

      Prescription medicines to prevent headaches

      Your doctor may recommend that you take a prescription medicine every day to prevent headaches. You may want to try a prescription medicine to prevent a headache if:

      • You are using over-the-counter medicines to stop headaches more than 3 times a week.
      • Over-the-counter medicines to stop headaches aren't working well for you.

      Your doctor may have you try one or more medicines, such as an antidepressant or a medicine that prevents seizures. These medicines can help prevent headaches even if you don't have depression or seizures.

      Avoiding triggers

      You may be able to prevent or reduce tension headaches by learning what causes your headaches and trying to avoid those triggers. For more information, see Living With Tension Headaches.

      Reducing stress

      How you think can affect how you feel. So finding ways home remedies for migraine during periods relax and stop negative thoughts may help prevent headaches.

      You may want to try:

      • Techniques to stop negative thoughts.
      • Progressive muscle relaxation.
      • Ways to manage your time.
      • Breathing exercises.
      • Guided imagery.
      • Meditation.
      • Yoga.

      For more information, see Living With Tension Headaches.

      Treatment if headaches get worse

      If edd prepaid login continue to have tension headaches while you are getting treatment, you and your doctor may want to try another treatment.

      You may have to try different drugs or doses. If you have already tried several medicines, your doctor may order tests (such as an MRI or CT scan) to find out if a health problem is causing your headaches.

      Other things to think about

      • Even with treatment, you will most likely still get some tension headaches. But you probably will get them less often. And they may hurt less when you do get them.
      • If you also have depression or anxiety, talk to your doctor. Treatment for these health problems also may help you have fewer headaches.

      Prevention

      Finding and avoiding the things—or triggers—that lead to tension headaches can reduce how often you get headaches and how bad they are when you do get them.

      Headache triggers first republic bank ceo include:

      • Stress.
      • Anxiety.
      • Fatigue.
      • Hunger.

      Using a windstream bill pay sign in diary can help you find your triggers. You write down when you have a headache and how bad it is, along with details such as what you ate and what you were doing before the headache started. This information can help you avoid things that bring on your headaches. And the diary also can help your doctor plan your treatment.

      If you have headaches caused by muscle tension in your neck, shoulders, and upper back, pay attention to your posture during your daily activities. You also can try muscle relaxation and other ways to reduce muscle home remedies for migraine during periods doctor also may prescribe medicine to help prevent tension headaches.

      Living With Tension Headaches

      You may have fewer headaches—and less pain when you do get them—if you:

      • Find and avoid triggers for your headaches.
      • Keep a headache diary to find out what triggers your headaches.
      • Take over-the-counter drugs to stop a headache.
      • Take medicine as your doctor advises to stop or prevent a headache.
      • Reduce stress with relaxation and positive-thinking methods.

      Find and avoid triggers

      You can reduce how many headaches you have by finding out what triggers them and avoiding those things. Triggers may include stress, hunger, and lack of sleep.

      Use a headache diary

      Use a headache diary to find your triggers. You write down when you have a headache and how bad it is, along with details such as what you ate and what you were doing when the headache started. This information can help you avoid things that bring on your headaches. A diary also may help your doctor plan your treatment.

      Take medicines as your doctor advises

      If you have mild to moderate headaches, your doctor probably will want you to take over-the-counter medicines to stop your headaches. These include medicines like acetaminophen (such as Tylenol) and ibuprofen (such as Advil). Be safe with medicines. Read ipad 1st generation charger amazon follow all instructions on the label.

      If over-the-counter medicines don't stop your headaches well enough—or you get a lot of headaches—your doctor may prescribe medicine to prevent headaches.

      Don't take medicine too often. Talk to your doctor if you're taking medicine more than 3 days a week to stop a headache, or if you have a headache on more than 15 days a month. Taking too much over-the-counter pain medicine can lead to more headaches. These are called rebound headaches.

      Reduce stress


      A man

      One Man's Story:

      Jerry, 32

      "I hold my stress in my shoulders and neck. My shoulders are always up around my ears. A lot of times, I leave at the end of the day with a big headache."—Jerry

      Read more about how Jerry reduced his stress.

      Stress can cause tension headaches.

      You can lower your stress with positive thinking and relaxation methods. Research shows that you can change how you think. And how you think affects how you feel. Try these techniques on your own or with help from a therapist or counselor trained in muscle relaxation, meditation, biofeedback, or cognitive-behavioral therapy.

      Learn how to lower your stress with these topics:

      You also can learn to stop thinking all the time about things that bother you.

      Seek help if you think that your tension headaches may be linked to depression or anxiety. Treating these health problems can reduce how often you get headaches.

      Medications

      Your doctor may recommend medicine to treat or prevent tension headaches.

      You might only need to take an over-the-counter medicine for pain. These medicines usually have fewer side effects than prescription drugs. Always be safe with medicines. Read and follow all instructions on the label.

      Over-the-counter drugs to stop headaches

      Over-the-counter medicines that you can use to stop a headache include:

      • Acetaminophen (such as Tylenol).
      • Aspirin (such as Bayer).
      • Ibuprofen (such as Advil).
      • Naproxen (such as Aleve).
      • Medicine that combines aspirin, acetaminophen, and caffeine (such as Excedrin).

      Try to avoid taking over-the-counter drugs more than 3 times a week, because you may get rebound headaches. These are different from tension headaches. They usually occur after headache medicine has worn off. This leads you to take another dose. After a while, you get a headache whenever you stop taking the medicine.

      Prescription drugs to prevent headaches

      Your doctor may recommend that you take a prescription medicine every day to prevent headaches. You may want to take this medicine if:

      • Over-the-counter medicines don't work to stop your headaches.
      • You're taking over-the-counter medicines to stop headaches more than 3 times a week.
      • You get a headache more than 15 days a month.

      Medicines used to prevent tension headaches include:

      • Antidepressants, such as amitriptyline.
      • Seizure medicines, such as topiramate.
      • Medicines that relax muscles, such as tizanidine.
      • Antianxiety medicines, such as buspirone.

      Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) is sometimes injected into the muscles in the face and head to treat headaches. In the past, doctors thought that spasms caused tension headaches. But BTX-A injections do not seem to help with symptoms of tension headaches.footnote 1 And BTX-A may cause weakness of the facial muscles and may make it hard for you to swallow.

      What to think about

      • The type of tension headache you have may help your doctor decide which drug to prescribe.
      • There are other things you can try besides daily medicine. For example, you could use cognitive-behavioral therapy or biofeedback.
      • The medicine that you take may cause side effects. Some side effects may last for a few weeks or for as long as you take the medicine.
      • You may have to try several different drugs or types of drugs before you find the one that is right for you. Make sure to tell your doctor how well a drug stops your headaches.
      • Certain pain medicines can cause a bad reaction if you take them with other medicines. Before you begin taking pain medicines, be sure to let your doctor know about all of the drugs you take. This includes over-the-counter medicines and complementary treatments (such as herbs).

      Other Treatment

      Using other treatments along with medicines may help you stop a tension headache or prevent one.

      If you decide to try one or more of these treatments, make sure your doctor knows. He or she may have advice on how to use other treatments safely. Other treatments for headaches include:

      References

      Citations

      1. Jackson JL, et al. (2012). Botulinum toxin A for prophylactic treatment of migraine and tension headaches in adults: A meta-analysis. JAMA, 307(6): 1736–1745. DOI: 10.1001/jama.2012.505. Accessed February 1, 2016.

      Other Works Consulted

      • Digre KB (2016). Headaches and other head pain. In L Goldman, A Shafer, eds., Goldman-Cecil Medicine, 24th ed., vol. 2, pp. 2356–2364. Philadelphia: Saunders.
      • Haghighi AB, et al. (2010). Cutaneous application of menthol 10% solution as an abortive treatment of migraine without aura: A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossed-over study. International Journal of Clinical Practice, 64(4): 451–456.
      • Headache Classification Committee of the International Headache Society (2013). The international classification of headache disorders, 3rd how to deposit cheque online in icici bank. (beta version). Cephalalgia, 33(9): 629–808. DOI: 10.1177/0333102413485658. Accessed February 1, 2016.
      • Holland S, et al. (2012). Evidence-based guideline update: NSAIDs and other complementary treatments for episodic migraine prevention in adults: Report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the American Headache Society. Neurology, 78(17): 1346–1353.
      • Kedia S, et al. (2014). Neurologic and muscular disorders. In WW Hay Jr et al., eds., Current Diagnosis and Treatment: Pediatrics, 21st ed., pp. 776–861. New York: McGraw-Hill.
      • Ropper AH, et al. (2014). Headache and other craniofacial pains. In Adams and Victor's Principles of Neurology, 10th ed., pp. 1310–1390. York: McGraw-Hill Education.

      Credits

      Current as of: August 4, 2020

      Author: Healthwise Staff
      Medical Review:
      Kathleen Romito MD - Family Medicine
      E. Gregory Thompson MD - Internal Medicine
      Martin J. Gabica MD - Family Medicine

      Current as of: August 4, 2020

      Author: Healthwise Staff

      Medical Review:Kathleen Romito MD - Family Medicine & E. Gregory Thompson MD - Internal Medicine & Martin J. Gabica MD - Family Medicine

      Jackson JL, et al. (2012). Botulinum toxin A for prophylactic treatment of migraine and tension headaches in adults: A meta-analysis. JAMA, 307(6): 1736-1745. DOI: 10.1001/jama.2012.505. Accessed February 1, 2016.

      Источник: https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/rt1023

      Headaches, migraines, and the menstrual cycle

      This article is also available in: português, español

      Top things to know:

      • The menstrual cycle has been linked to some types of headaches, specifically tension-type headaches and migraines

      • Women are more likely than men to get migraine headaches, which researchers think is due to the influence of the hormones related to the menstrual cycle

      • Treatment for menstrually-related headaches includes pain relief medication and hormonal therapy

      How headaches are related to the menstrual cycle

      There are many different types and causes of headaches, but only two that can be linked to the menstrual cycle.

      Tension-type headaches

      This is a very common type of headache. These headaches are often felt on both sides of the head and have a mild or moderate pressing or tightening quality (1). Some people experience headaches similar to these around the time of their period (2). More research is needed about this type of headache and how it may be linked to the cycle.

      Migraine

      Migraine is a disorder with characteristic headaches that can be debilitating. In the US, 17.6% of women and 5.7% of men report experiencing at least one migraine headache within the past year (3).

      Migraine headaches are usually quite severe, often have a throbbing type quality, and are usually felt on one side of the head. Migraines can have additional side effects, including feelings of nausea, vomiting, aggravated by normal activity, and a sensitivity to light or sound (1). Some people who have migraine disorder may experience aura symptoms, such as visual or sensory symptoms, which occur before or during an attack, which can signal that a migraine headache is coming (1). Migraines can last up to three days (1).

      Women are three times more likely to experience at least one migraine over a year than men union savings bank com, which researchers think is due to the influence of the hormones related to the menstrual cycle, specifically estrogen (4,5). Menstrual migraines are thought to be caused by a drop in hormones before the start of the period (4,5).

      A small percentage of women get migraine headaches at the start of their period. These migraines often last longer and involve more nausea than migraines that happen at other timesand they usually do not have an aura (1). Migraines that occur only with the start of the period are called Pure menstrual migraines.

      In Clue, you can also use custom tags to track migraine headaches or other symptoms.

      Menstrually-related migraines and headaches

      illustration of hormones

      The menstrual cycle and related hormonal changes can affect people with migraine disorder. In a study of women referred to headache specialists, about 1 in 10 high yield cd account the participants stated that their migraines started at the time of menarche (the first menstrual period) (6). This may not be true for all women or people with cycles, since this study was among women seeking care, but it does suggest that menstrual hormones can have an impact.

      Other reproductive stages in life can also impact when migraines show up. In the same study as above, two thirds of people reported a decrease or disappearance of their migraines during pregnancy (6).

      Some people also get mid-cycle headaches as well, which could be in relation to ovulation. In one study, about 16% of participants experienced primarily mid-cycle headaches, while half experienced headaches that followed their menstrual cycle (7).

      Headaches can also sometimes be part of PMS (8).

      3 colorful lightning bolts on a red background

      Treatment

      This is only a small collection of medications available to treat headaches and migraines, and there are other therapeutic and preventative medications available. Speak to your healthcare provider about which option would be best for you.

      Science-backed remedies for tension-headaches

      NSAIDs and over the counter painkillers: NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) are a class of painkillers and anti-inflammatory medications, many of which are available without a prescription in many countries. Ibuprofen and ketoprofen are more effective than placebo at providing a person with tension headaches (9). Acetaminophen (paracetamol), which often gets grouped together with NSAIDs, also has been demonstrated to provide similar pain relief (9).

      Although the above medications are helpful, they might not be as helpful as people think. A meta-analysis of 3,094 people with tension home remedies for migraine during periods showed that taking a dose of ibuprofen only provides a small number of people with pain relief (23 out of 100 people) compared to taking a placebo (16 out of 100) (10).

      Acupuncture: Acupuncture may offer some help in decreasing the frequency of tension headache occurrences when treated at the start of symptoms (11). More research is needed. Treatment with acupuncture for frequent migraines may offer some relief in decreasing the frequency of migraine attacks (12).

      Science-backed remedies for menstrual migraine

      Pain relief therapies

      Triptans (including sumatripin): This is a type of medication used to treat both acute menstrual migraines, as well as migraines unrelated to the menstrual cycle (4,13). In order for the medication to work best, sumatripin should be taken promptly while pain levels are still mild. Don’t hold off on the medication and try to be a hero. This will only make the medication less likely to provide effective pain relief (13). You may need a prescription for this medication, so be sure to talk to your healthcare provider first.

      Over the counter pain medication like naproxen (NSAID) and acetaminophen (paracetamol): While these therapies offer more pain relief than doing nothing, neither of these are reliable in terms of eliminating migraine pain (14,15). Consider asking your healthcare provider about triptans instead.

      Preventative menstrual migraine treatments

      Triptans: This medication can also be taken to prevent future migraines from happening. In one study, using triptans for a few days before the start of the period helped reduce both severity and frequency of menstrual migraine headaches (16).

      Hormone stabilization techniques: Preventative treatment using hormone therapy may help to decrease the frequency of severe menstrual migraines. In one study, researchers looked at how two treatments with hormonal contraception affected migraines. The majority of participants (95%) were prescribed combined oral contraceptives (the pill) and additionally took estrogen during the week of their withdrawal bleed (“period”), which helped to make the drop in estrogen less severe. Fewer participants (5%) used the estrogen patch during their normal menstrual period to prevent the drop in hormones. Among all participants, eight out of 10 people reported a decrease in their menstrual migraines and were able to reduce their pain-medication use by half (17).

      Continuous birth control: Using a form of continuous/extended-use birth control may be an option to decrease menstrually related migraine attacks or headaches. People who took extended use combined oral contraceptives had fewer headache symptoms, and were more productive (18). Talk to your healthcare provider about extended use hormonal birth control, though this may not be the right therapy for everyone, especially those with migraine with aura—see the section below on hormonal birth control for more info.

      Natural treatments and lifestyle adjustments for menstrual migraines

      Lifestyle treatments are always tricky to study, since they are hard to control and not as well-funded as pharmaceutical medicine.

      Magnesium: There’s some evidence that magnesium can relieve migraine pain (19). In a small preliminary trial, participants took magnesium supplements three times per day starting from Day 15 of their cycle until the start of their next period (20). This treatment helped decrease the participants’ total pain and also improved their PMS symptoms (20). In a randomized control trial where participants received either a placebo or a drug containing magnesium, vitamin B2, and coenzyme Q10, the severity of migraines was lower among those taking the drug, though the number of days in which migraines were experienced was not statistically different from the placebo (21).

      Recommended lifestyle adjustments for migraines and headaches

      Not all lifestyle changes are studied, but these recommendations are fairly standard for how to help you cope with your headaches. Give them a try, see what works best for you.

      Get enough sleep: Since fatigue and sleep disturbances are linked to being migraine/headache triggers (1,22-24), be sure to adjust your bedtime accordingly so that you wake up relaxed and well rested. If you commonly have headaches in the morning after waking up, it may be a good idea to get checked for sleep apnea (1).

      Reduce your stress levels: Stress, whether it’s particular events, feelings, or time periods, are linked to triggering migraines and headache (22-25). For this reason, stress management techniques like relaxation therapy, cognitive behavioural therapy, and biofeedback could help (25). It’s easier said than done, but prioritize de-stressing as best you can.

      Avoid extreme weather: Weather changes, both hot and cold, can trigger migraines and headaches (22-24). Check the weather forecast and plan ahead. Be extra cautious about extreme heat and sun exposure, as exhaustion and dehydration can also cause headaches (26).

      Find a dark and quiet space: For people experiencing a migraine headache, light and sound can aggravate migraine symptoms (1). Some people find relief by lying in dark, quiet rooms.

      Download Clue to track your headaches.

      • Download the Clue app on the App Store
      • Download the Clue app on the Play Store

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      Migraine and hormonal birth control

      Is your birth control causing headaches?

      Headaches are sometimes a side effect of hormonal birth control (4). In one study, taking oral contraceptives affected migraines, with 24% of people experiencing increased frequency of migraines (6).

      Estrogen-withdrawal headaches are a type of headache that people get during their “pill-free” or “sugar-pill week” when they are taking oral contraceptives. This type of headache usually goes away within 3 days, but then will return during the estrogen-free week of the next cycle  (1).

      Hormonal contraception for people with migraine

      People with migraine with aura are not recommended to use combined hormonal contraceptives (like the pill, the ring, or the patch) (27). Having migraines with aura is a risk factor for experiencing a stroke (28-30), plus taking combined hormonal contraceptives up to doubles that risk (31,32). The combination of these risk factors is associated with a 3x increased risk of stroke, compared to people with migraine who don’t use combined hormonal contraceptives (27).

      The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says people with chronic migraine are safe to use certain forms of contraception:

      Most people who experience migraine without aura can use combined hormonal contraceptives, too, as the risk of increased stroke is outweighed by the benefits that the pill offers (27); however, people with other risk factors for stroke, such as older age and cigarette smoking, may be advised not to use combined hormonal birth control home remedies for migraine during periods with non-migraine headaches do not have any restrictions on hormonal birth control (27).

      Some birth control options may be safer than others, depending on your age and other risk factors (27). Speak to your healthcare provider to figure out what is the best contraceptive method for you. home remedies for migraine during periods you have migraine disorder or headaches, but are not sure if they are if are related to your cycle? Get tracking. You can use Clue to track your headaches, and even add custom tags. Do this consistently for a couple of cycles so that you and your healthcare provider can see if there is a pattern.

      Download Clue to track your headaches and see how they appear in relation to your cycle.


      References

      1. Headache Classification Committee of the International Headache Society (IHS). The international classification of headache disorders, 3rd edition. Cephalalgia. 2018 Jan;38(1):1-211. Available from: https://www.ihs-headache.org/binary_data/3245_ichd-3-cephalalgia-2018-issue-1.pdf
      2. Arjona A, Rubi-Callejon J, Guardado-Santervas P, Serrano-Castro P, Olivares J. Menstrual tension-type headache: evidence for its existence. Headache. 2007 Jan;47(1):100-3.
      3. Stewart WF, Lipton RB, Celentano DD, Reed ML. Prevalence of migraine headache in the United States. Relation to age, income, race, and other sociodemographic factors. JAMA. 1992 Jan 1;267(1):64-9.
      4. Ashkenazi A, Silberstein SD. Hormone-related headache: pathophysiology and treatment. CNS Drugs. 2006;20(2):125-141.
      5. Allais G, Chiarle G, Sinigaglia S, Benedetto C. Menstrual migraine: a review of current and developing pharmacotherapies for women. Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2018 Feb;19(2):123-136.
      6. Granella F, Sances G, Zanferrari C, Costa A, Martignoni E, Manzoni GC. Migraine without aura and reproductive life events: a clinical epidemiological study in 1300 women. Headache. 1993 Jul-Aug;33(7):385-9.
      7. Kiesner J, Martin VT. Mid-cycle headaches and their relationship to different patterns of premenstrual stress symptoms. Headache. 2013 Jun;53(6):935-46.
      8. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. FAQ057 - Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS). 2015. Available from: https://www.acog.org/Patients/FAQs/Premenstrual-Syndrome-PMS
      9. Moore RA, Derry S, Wiffen PJ, Straube S, Bendtsen L. Evidence for efficacy of acute treatment of episodic tension-type headache: methodological critique of randomised trials for oral treatments. Pain. 2014 Nov;155(11):2220-8.
      10. Derry S, Wiffen PJ, Moore RA, Bendtsen L. Ibuprofen for acute treatment of episodic tension-type headache in adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 Jul 31;(7):CD011474.
      11. Linde K, Allais G, Brinkhaus B, Fei Y, Mehring M, Shin BC, Vickers A, White AR. Acupuncture for the prevention of tension-type headache. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2016 Apr 19;4:CD007587.
      12. Linde K, Allais G, Brinkhaus B, Fei Y, Mehring M, Vertosick EA, Vickers A, White AR. Acupuncture for the prevention of episodic migraine. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2016 Jun 28;(6):CD001218.
      13. Derry CJ, Derry S, Moore RA. Sumatriptan (all routes of administration) for acute migraine attacks in adults - overview of Cochrane reviews. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014 May 28;(5):CD009108.
      14. Law S, Derry S, Moore RA. Naproxen with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 Oct 20;(10):CD009455.
      15. Derry S, Moore RA. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 Apr 30;(4):CD008040.
      16. Brandes JL, Poole Ac, Kallela M, Schreiber CP, MacGregor EA, Silberstein SD, Tobin J, Shaw R. Short-term frovatriptan for the prevention of difficult-to-treat menstrual migraine attacks. Cephalalgia. 2009 Nov;29(11):1133-48.
      17. Calhoun A, Ford S. Elimination of menstrual-related migraine beneficially impacts chronification and medication overuse. Headache. 2008 Sep;48(8):1186-93.
      18. Sulak P, Willis S, Kuehl T, Coffee A, Clark J. Headaches and oral contraceptives: impact of eliminating the standard 7-day placebo interval. Headache. 2007 Jan;47(1):27-37.
      19. Gröber U, Schmidt J, Kisters K. Magnesium in prevention and therapy. Nutrients. 2015;7(9):8199-226.
      20. Facchinetti F, Sances G, Borella P, Genazzani AR, Nappi G. Magnesium prophylaxis of menstrual migraine: effects on intracellular magnesium. Headache. 1991 May;31(5):298-301.
      21. Gaul C, Diener HC, Danesch U. Improvement of migraine symptoms with a proprietary supplement containing riboflavin, magnesium and Q10: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter trial. The journal of headache and pain. 2015 Dec;16(1):32.
      22. Chabriat H, Danchot J, Michel P, Joire JE, Henry P. Precipitating factors of headache. A prospective study in a national control-matched survey in migraineurs and nonmigraineurs. Headache. 1999 May;39(5):335-8.
      23. Martin VT, Behbehani MM. Toward a rational understanding of migraine trigger factors. Med Clin North Am. 2001 Jul;85(4):911-41.
      24. Kelman L. The triggers or precipitants of the acute migraine attack. Cephalalgia. 2007 May;27(5):394-402.
      25. Sauro KM, Becker WJ. The stress and migraine interaction. Headache. 2009 Oct;49(9):1378-86.
      26. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Heat stress - heat related illness. 2018. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/heatstress/heatrelillness.html
      27. Curtis KM, Tepper NK, Jatlaoui TC, Berry-Bibee E, Horton LG, Zapata LB, Simmons KB, et al. U.S. Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use, 2016. MMWR Recomm Rep. 2016 Jul 29;65(3):1-103.
      28. Etminan M, Takkouche B, Isorna FC, Samii A. Risk of ischaemic stroke in people with migraine: systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. BMJ. 2005 Jan 8;330(7482):63.
      29. Schürks M, Rist PM, Bigal ME, Buring JE, Lipton RB, Kurth T. Migraine and cardiovascular disease: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ. 2009 Oct 27;339:b3914.
      30. Spector JT, Kahn SR, Jones MR, Jayakumar M, Dalal D, Nazarian S. Migraine headache and ischemic stroke risk: an updated meta-analysis. Am J Med. 2010 Jul;123(7):612-24.
      31. Gillum LA, Mamidipudi SK, Johnston SC. Ischemic stroke risk with oral contraceptives: A meta-analysis. JAMA. 2000 Jul 5;284(1):72-8.
      32. Xu Z, Li Y, Tang S, Huang X, Chen T. Current use of oral contraceptives and the risk of first-ever ischemic stroke: A meta-analysis of observational studies. Thromb Res. 2015 Jul;136(1):52-60.
      Источник: https://helloclue.com/articles/cycle-a-z/headaches-migraines-and-the-menstrual-cycle

      Cure for migraine headache and nausea, include fruits and veggies in diet

      Migraine headaches can eat away your peace of mind. After all, you need to have a steady head to perform to the best of your ability. If you’ve been suffering from persistent headache for more than two days, it is advisable to get it checked from a physician at the earliest.

      Surprisingly, a few diet hacks can also help you relieve that pain. According to a 2016 study, eliminating coffee and processed foods high in nitrites or monosodium glutamate (MSG) can help fight headaches and migraine.

      Apart from coffee, alcohol and processed food, nutritionist Janvi Chitalia suggests eating more of water and potassium rich foods such as watermelon. “Sometimes a headache is caused by dehydration. Loading up on fruits and vegetables that are high in water content such as berries, cucumber, melon, soups, tomatoes can help,” she adds.

      A healthy dose of carbs may also help. “A diet that has less of carbohydrates tends to deplete glycogen stores that lead to fluid losses and can trigger dehydration related headaches. A healthy boost of carbs may also improve your mood, as they help your body to release serotonin, the feel-good hormone,” she adds.

      Here are some other foods that you can include to relieve migraine or a headache. Dried apricots, avocados, almonds, cashews and brown rice are full of magnesium. These help prevent headaches by relaxing the blood vessels.

      Similarly, green leafy vegetables, home remedies for migraine during periods fat dairy products and other calcium rich sources of food can also help relieve chronic headache. “If you regularly suffer from headaches during your periods, you can add some sesame seeds to your diet. Sesame seeds are a rich source of vitamin E, which helps stabilise estrogen levels and prevents headaches,” adds Chitalia.

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