central texas hummingbirds

Notes: Black-chinned Hummingbirds are very common in the western United States, breeding in West Texas and areas west and north up into Canada. The majority of sightings in Dec-Feb are south central Texas (Like San Antonio) and along the coast. They wander a lot in the winter and there. Let's start with some facts about hummingbirds. 10 Hummingbird facts. If you grew up in Austin or Central Texas, you may take hummingbirds for.

Central texas hummingbirds -

Interesting Facts

Georgia is home to 11 hummingbird species during the year: the ruby-throated, black-chinned, rufous, calliope, magnificent, Allen's, Anna's, broad-billed, green violet-ear, green-breasted mango and broad-tailed hummingbird.

The ruby-throated hummingbird is the only species of hummingbird known to nest to Georgia. These birds weigh as little as a first-class letter. The female builds the walnut-sized nest without any help from her mate, a process can take up to 12 days. The female then lays two eggs, each about the size of a black-eyed pea.

In Georgia, female ruby-throated hummers produce up to two broods per year. Nests are typically built on a small branch that is parallel to or dips downward. The birds sometimes rebuild the nest they used the previous year.

A few other interesting facts on hummers that visit Georgia:

  • The calliope hummingbird is the smallest bird found in North America.
  • The rufous hummingbird has the longest migration of North American hummers—more than 3,000 miles!

Feeding Hummingbirds

Hummingbird nectar can easily be prepared at home. The best solution consists of 1 part sugar to 4 parts water (this mirrors the sugar concentration of the nectar found in flowers). Boil the water for 2–3 minutes before adding sugar. Cool and store the mixture in a refrigerator until you are ready to use it.

There is no need to add red food coloring. Hummingbirds are attracted to the red color of the feeder and do not prefer red nectar to clear.

Select a feeder that is easy to clean and does not drip. In warm weather, change nectar every 2–3 days or before it gets cloudy.

Periodically clean feeders, making sure that mold and bacteria are removed. Feeders can be easily cleaned soaking them in a solution of 1 part bleach and 10 parts water. Thoroughly rinse the feeders before using them again.

Keep at least one feeder up throughout the year. You cannot keep hummingbirds from migration by leaving feeders up during the fall and winter seasons. Hummingbirds migrate in response to a decline in day length, not food availability. Most of the rare hummingbird's found in Georgia are seen during the winter.

Ants can be kept away from feeders by installing an "ant moat" between the feeder and the structure on which the feeder is hung. Smearing petroleum jelly or automotive grease on the wire above the feeder can also thwart ants.

Yellow jackets can be trapped using a simple yellow jacket trap made from a 2-liter soft drink bottle. Contact the DNR's Wildlife Conservation Section for details. Bees, wasps and yellow jackets can be deterred by smearing cooking oil on the surface of the artificial flowers surrounding the feeding ports on your feeders.


How to Keep Your Hummingbird Feeders from Freezing

One of the simplest ways to keep hummingbird feeders from freezing in the winter is to place a clip-on shop light equipped with a 150-watt bulb close to the feeder. When there is a chance the temperature will dip below freezing, turn the light on. The heat generated by the light bulb should keep the feeder from freezing.

It is always best to determine how close you can place the bulb next to the feeder without melting plastic feeder parts. Mount the light at varying distances from your feeder and see what works best with your feeder. Use this method to test the set-up before leaving the light on for extended periods of time.


Gardening for Hummingbirds

Homeowners who are the most successful at attracting hummingbirds combine the use of feeders and hummingbird food plants. Plan plantings so that nectar-producing plants are blooming throughout the growing season. Also plant flowers that attract small, soft-bodied insects, which provide a protein source for hummingbirds. Other plants provide wintering hummingbirds with roosting cover on cold winter nights.

Here are some excellent plants to attract hummingbirds:

Signifiers: Exotic (e), Native (n)

Herbaceous Plants

Dalhia (e)

Indian Pink (n)

Pentstemon (n)

Petunia (e)

Hollyhock (e)

Red-Hot Poker (e)

Delphinium

Geranium (n, e)

Gladiolus (e)

Phlox (n, e)

Four-O'clock (e)

Cardinal Flower (n)

Lupine (n)

Salvia (n, e)

Bleeding Heart (e)

Impatiens (n, e)

Snapdragon (n, e)

Century Pant (e)

Foxglove (e)

Mexican Sunflower (e)

Jewelweed (n)

Crocosmia (e)

Blazing Star (Liatris) (n)

Columbine (n)

Butterfly Weed (n)

Red Basil (e)

Canna Lily (n)

Cockscomb (e)

Coreopsis (n)

Beebalm (n)

Shrubs

Buckeye (n)

Powderpuff (n)

Mexican Cigar (e)

Shrimp Plant (e)

Hibiscus (n, e)

Abelia (e)

Weigela (e)

Wild Azalea (n)

Flowering Maple (e)

Flowering Quince (e)

Azaleas (e)

Buttonbush (n)

Turk's Cap Mellow (e)

Trees

Black Locust (n)

Tulip Poplar (n)

Redbud (n)

Crabapple (e)

Orchid Tree (e)

Hawthorne (n)

Red Horse Chesnut (n)

Vines

Cross Vine (n)

Trumpet Creeper (n)

Coral Honeysuckle (n)

Yellow Jasmine (n)

Scarlet Runner-Bean (e)


Hummingbirds of Georgia

The vast majority of hummingbird species that occur in Georgia are only seen in winter. Many are immature birds or females, and many cannot be identified unless captured and closely examined. Little is known about their movements and the habitats they use in Georgia and elsewhere in the Southeast. With this in mind, reporting sightings of wintering hummingbirds can be extremely valuable. Chances are good that new species will be discovered in Georgia.

The following list includes details of hummingbirds that can be seen in Georgia. (Note: The number of sightings of different species may have changed since this information was compiled.) The Hummingbirds of Georgia fact sheet is available.

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: Rare in state past October 31. Most wintering birds are found along the coast

Size: 3¾ inches

Identification Adult male has a bright red throat (gorget) that appears black in poor light, an iridescent green back, white underparts and grayish-green sides. Adult female has a metallic green back, white throat and grayish-brown sides

Breeding range: Only hummingbird known to breed east of the Mississippi River. Breeds throughout the eastern United States as far west as eastern Texas and Oklahoma north to Minnesota

Winter range: South Florida, southern Mexico to Panama

Black-chinned Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: Fewer than five reported in state each winter

Size: 3¾ inches (slightly larger than the ruby-throated hummingbird)

Identification: Adult male appears much like a ruby-throated male. Throat is black with a violet band along the lower edge of the gorget seen only in good light. Adult female appears much like a ruby-throated female

Breeding range: Breeds from southwestern British Columbia southward into western Mexico and as far east as Texas

Winter range: Mexico

Anna's Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: Only three records for Georgia

Size: 4 inches

Identification: Adult male's head is a deep rose-red. Color will actually extend down the side of the neck. Underparts are grayish-green. Adult female often displays tiny red feathers that form a small reddish patch on the throat. Underparts are grayish-green

Breeding range: Washington, Oregon, California, Arizona

Winter range: Pacific coast area from Washington to northwest Mexico and Arizona

Broad-tailed Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: A very rare winter visitor

Size: 4 inches

Identification: Adult male looks much like a ruby-throated male, with a green back, rose-red throat, white underparts and green sides. Adult female has a green back, streaked throat, white underparts and pale brown sides

Breeding range: East-central California and Nevada, north to Montana and Wyoming to very western Texas and Mexico

Winter range: Central Mexico southward

Magnificent Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: Two birds documented in Georgia, one in summer

Size: 5¼ inches (Georgia's largest hummingbird)

Identification: Adult male is metallic bronze-green, with cinnamon rufous color in tail and purple crown. Adult female is duller with no purplish crown

Breeding range: Mountainous regions of southern Arizona and south-western New Mexico to Central America

Winter range: Mexico southward

Broad-billed Hummingbird

Status in Georgia:
One bird has been documented in Georgia. An adult male overwintered in a backyard in Macon during the winter of 2001–2002.

Size: 4 inches

Identification: Adult male displays brilliant emerald green feathers on his breast, sides, belly and back. His gorget is sapphire blue. The bill is reddish-orange and black near the tip. The male's tail is deeply forked, dark blue with a grayish border. Adult female lacks the sapphire gorget and is green to bronze-green on its underside with a pale throat. The female's bill is predominantly blackish with some orange near its base

Breeding range: The broad-billed hummingbird is a Mexican bird that ventures into the United States regularly only in southern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico. It is the most common hummingbird in the lowlands of northwestern Mexico

Winter range: Mexico (several birds have been seen in South Carolina, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama)

Rufous Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: Most common wintering hummingbird

Size: 3¾ inches (slightly larger than ruby-throated hummingbird)

Identification: Adult male has a reddish-brown back, rump, tail and sides with orange-red gorget. Adult female has a green back, light brown sides and reddish flecks in throat that form a central reddish spot. Tail has varying amounts of brownish color

Breeding range: Southern Alaska through Washington, Oregon, western Montana and northern Idaho

Winter range: Throughout much of Mexico

Allen's Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: Less than a dozen records in Georgia

Size: 3¾ inches (slightly larger than a ruby-throated hummingbird)

Identification: Adult male has a green back, orange-red gorget, reddish-brown sides, rump and tail. Adult female cannot be safely separated from the female Rufous Hummingbird in the field. Female has reddish-brown color in the tail, greenish back, streaked throat and reddish-brown flanks

Breeding range: Coastal California

Winter range: Mexico

Calliope Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: At least one or two birds are reported each winter

Size: 3¼ inches (smallest bird in northern North America)

Identification: The male calliope is Georgia's only hummingbird with rosy purple gorget feathers that form streaks against a white background. Adult female has a metallic bronze-green back; its sides and flanks are cinnamon; the throat is dull, brownish-white with dusky streaks and the breast is cinnamon-buff

Breeding range: Mountains of central British Columbia and southwestern Alberta to northern Baha California

Winter range: Mexico

Green Violet-ear Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: The only verified sighting was in Thomasville in July 2001

Size: 4¾ inches

Identification: Both male and female birds are dark in color, have a moderately down-curved bill, and are grass green above and below the body. Males have a violet-green central breast spot and ear patch

Breeding range: No breeding records in the United States. Breeds in Mexico south into Peru and Bolivia

Winter range: Similar to the breeding range


Georgia's Wintering Hummingbirds

Georgia's wintering hummingbirds still need nourishment during the cooler months.

Georgians should keep their hummingbird feeders up during the fall and winter because during these seasons some fast, fly-by friends will be buzzing by ice-covered windows throughout the state! Nine species of hummingbirds can be seen in the state—ruby-throated, black-chinned, Anna's, broad-tailed, broad-billed, rufous, calliope, Allen's and magnificent. The ruby-throated is the only hummingbird that nests in Georgia with very few birds seen over wintering here. Most of the hummingbirds seen in Georgia during the winter months are western visitors. Wintering hummingbirds begin arriving as early as August; however, they appear at feeders anytime throughout fall and winter. In winter, the hummingbird with the longest migration route and North America's smallest hummingbird are among the hummingbirds that migrate here.

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources' Wildlife Resources Division is encouraging people across the state to keep up at least one feeder during the winter months so the DNR can document western hummingbirds that find their way to Georgia. If a wintering hummingbird visits a feeder this year, it may return next year.

Traditionally, Georgians have taken their feeders down in the fall in fear that feeders would keep hummingbirds from migrating. But, hummingbirds migrate in response to day length, not food supply, so leaving a feeder up will not hinder the hummers migrating. Some lucky Georgia homeowners have been known to host six or more wintering hummingbirds!

The rufous hummingbird is the most commonly seen wintering hummer in the southeastern U.S. During one winter, more than 100 rufous hummers were documented in Georgia. The rufous hummingbird has the longest migration of any North American hummingbird, traveling from its breeding ranges that extend from the Pacific Northwest as far north as southern Alaska to its primary wintering grounds in south-central Mexico. However, wintering rufous hummingbirds are spotted throughout Georgia and the rest of the Southeast.

The colorful calliope hummingbird is the smallest bird found in the United States and is one of Georgia's winter residents. The calliope had first been seen in the Peach State during the winter of 1998–1999.

Many of the wintering hummingbirds are extremely difficult to identify, so don't assume that the wintering hummer at your feeder is a rufous. It may take an expert to positively identify them. If a hummingbird shows up at your feeder from October until the end of February, be sure to contact the Wildlife Conservation Section office in Forsyth at the address below. Your information can help WRD document the incidence of wintering hummers and help determine their habitat needs.

Georgians who spot any of the unusual hummingbirds species that migrate through Georgia in winter months are encouraged to report their sightings to the Wildlife Conservation Section. Who knows, you may be the first person to report a buff-bellied or other rare hummingbird in Georgia!


Contact Information

Report sightings of rare hummingbirds as well as all hummingbirds spotted in the winter to:
Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife Resources Division, Wildlife Conservation Section
116 Rum Creek Drive
Forsyth, GA 31029
478-994-1438

Источник: https://georgiawildlife.com/hummingbirds-your-backyard

Hummingbirds of Texas


We love watching hummingbirds, and East Texas is a great place for that pastime!

Ruby-throated hummingbird in Tyler on our Texas-shaped feeder!
Ruby-throated hummingbird in Tyler on our Texas-shaped feeder!

The hummingbird population at the end of last year's Texas migration in September of 2018 was awesome, as the hummers made their southbound migration towards South Texas.

We often have over 40 Ruby Throat hummingbirds on our feeders at one time. At times we are also blessed with several brightly colored Baltimore Orioles on our feeders.

We grow lots of hummingbird and butterfly-friendly plants, annuals and perennials such as Butterfly Bush, Marigolds, Zinnias, Goldflame Honeysuckle, Passion Vine, Cross Vine, Weigla, Mexican Firebush, Batface Cuphea, Lipstick Salvia, Hot Lips, and more.

Some of our feeders we put at eye-level, nestled in the flowers. If you don't have pets, or a problem with racoons, this can enhance your hummingbird viewing, and it puts the feeder more in a natural environment for the birds.

We also have an abundance of trees nearby which provide shelter and protection for the hummingbirds.

For Texas hummingbird species, photos, videos, migration patterns, hummingbird gardening, and more,
visit our new hummingbird website at

www.HummingbirdCentral.com


Hummingbird Central Website

Shown here are a few quick favorites of some recent sightings ... for more photos, visit our new website at www.HummingbirdCentral.com

Ruby Throat Hummingbird near Tyler Texas
Ruby Throat Hummingbird near Tyler Texas

Ruby Throat Hummingbird near Tyler Texas
Ruby Throat Hummingbird near Tyler Texas

Ruby Throat Hummingbirds crowding a feeder!
Ruby Throat Hummingbirds crowding a feeder

Male Ruby Throat Hummingbird in flight in East Texas
Male Ruby Throat Hummingbird in flight in East Texas

Hummingbird in flight ... Tyler Texas
Hummingbird feeding at Tyler Texas

Hummingbird hovering while working a feeder ... Tyler Texas
Hummingbird feeding at Tyler Texas

Hummingbird feeding mania near Tyler Texas during the fall migration
Hummingbird feeding mania near Tyler Texas

 

 

Texas hummingbird garden with low-hanging feeders
A good solution if you have no pets, or racoons! Put the feeders at eye-level
for the enjoyment of the hummingbirds, and you!
Texas hummingbird garden with low-hanging feeder


Источник: https://www.tylertexasonline.com/photos-east-texas-hummingbirds.htm

What types of hummingbirds can you find in Texas?

common hummingbirds in texas

 

Hummingbirds are one of the most popular birds in Texas and have captivated people’s interest and attention for a long time. But because hummingbirds are incredibly fast and small, these birds can be hard to distinguish from each other. Most of the time, they just look like little green, iridescent blurs streaking by your face!

 

But don’t worry.

 

Today, you will learn 5 hummingbirds found in Texas (and how to identify them).

 

Each description includes identification tips, pictures, *range maps, fun facts, AND how to attract these beautiful birds to your yard!

  • The range maps below were generously shared with permission from The Birds of The World, published by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. I use their site OFTEN to learn new information about birds!

 

To learn more about birds that live near you, check out these other guides!

 

Here are the 5 types of hummingbirds that live in Texas!

 

Please let me know which hummingbird species you have spotted before in the “Comments” section at the end!

 


#1: Ruby-throated Hummingbird

ruby throated hummingbird - types of hummingbirds in texas

 

How To Identify:

  • Males: Medium-sized hummingbird with a bright red throat and a black chin and mask that extends behind the eyes. The top of their head and back is iridescent green. Underparts are pale grey with a green wash on the sides of their belly.

 

  • Females: Duller than males. The chin and throat are white with pale green streaks. Their face lacks the black chin and red throat of the male. Their belly is mostly white with buffy flanks, and the back is green.

 

  • *Similar Species: Broad-tailed Hummingbirds, which have a duller red throat and lack a black chin. These two species have ranges that do not overlap.

 

Ruby-throated Hummingbird Range Map

ruby throated hummingbird range map

 

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are common in eastern Texas during warm summer months. Once cooler temperatures start to arrive, these birds migrate to Mexico. Amazingly, most individuals travel ACROSS the Gulf of Mexico to reach their wintering grounds.  Remember, they must make this incredibly long journey in a single flight, as there is nowhere to stop and rest. 🙂

 

How do you attract Ruby-throated Hummingbirds in Texas?

 

While there are many ways to draw these winged beauties to your yard, here are the two BEST strategies:

 

#1. Put out nectar feeders.

species of hummingbirds in texas

The most common way to get hummers to visit your backyard is to hang a quality hummingbird feeder filled with homemade nectar (sugar water).

 

The reason this strategy works is that nectar is a primary food source for hummingbirds. To fuel their active lifestyle, hummingbirds need to feed on it almost continuously throughout the day.

 

Supplying a FRESH and RELIABLE nectar source will be sought after by hummingbirds.

 

#2. Plant native plants that have long, tubular flowers.

 

As we just discussed, hummingbirds need nectar continuously, which is naturally obtained from flowers. Did you know that a hummingbird can visit up to 2,000 flowers each day looking for nectar?

 

With that being said, I hope it’s easy to see why you should plant shrubs, trees, and flowers in your yard that hummingbirds can’t resist! Establishing a hummingbird garden provides birds with a safe place to reliably find food.

 

Look for red flowers, because hummingbirds are naturally attracted to this color. Also, long, tubular flowers are great for hummingbirds because they can access the nectar with their long beaks and tongues, but bees and other insects can’t!

 

What sounds do Ruby-throated Hummingbirds make?

Press PLAY above to hear the sound these birds make!

 

Believe it or not, these hummingbirds do make distinctive noises. The sounds that I most often hear are a series of calls seem to be given as individuals are chasing each other around. It resembles a chattering “chee-dit.”

 

Fun Facts:

  • Their legs are so short they are unable to walk or hop! If needed, they can sort of shuffle and scoot down a branch.

 

  • These hummingbirds can beat their wings up to 53 times per SECOND!

 

  • Ruby-throated Hummingbirds drink nectar for energy, but they obtain nutrition by eating a wide variety of small bugs. The list includes spiders, mosquitoes, gnats, fruit flies, and small bees.

 

 


#2: Rufous Hummingbird

 

Rufous Hummingbirds are the most aggressive type of hummingbird in Texas!

 

Be careful if one finds your hummingbird feeders or garden, as they will relentlessly attack and drive away other hummingbirds (including much larger species) away.

 

rufous hummingbird

 

How To Identify:

  • Males: Bright copper-orange on their back (although some males have a green back) and sides of their belly. Beautiful reddish-orange iridescent throat. White breast and ear patch behind eye. Compared to other hummingbird species, they are small.

 

  • Females: They have a green crown, neck, and back. Rufous (copper) colored sides with a white breast and belly. Some females have a spot of red or orange on their throat.

 

  • *Similar Species: Allen’s Hummingbird, which has slightly more green on their crown and back. Allen’s also has narrower outer tail feathers and a slightly downward-curved bill. Females of these two species are incredibly hard to tell apart.

 

Rufous Hummingbird Range Map

rufous hummingbird

 

Rufous Hummingbirds have an interesting migration pattern. In the spring, they fly north up the Pacific Coast to their summer breeding grounds. They return to their winter homes in Mexico and parts of the southern United States by flying a completely different route along the Rocky Mountains!

 

How To Attract:

Just put out a hummingbird feeder full of homemade sugar water or plant native nectar-filled flowers in your backyard!

 

 

But please be aware that Rufous Hummingbirds may drive away any other hummers that visit your yard. These aggressive birds are incredibly territorial and will relentlessly scare away all other hummingbird species. They have even been seen chasing chipmunks!

 

If an aggressive Rufous Hummingbird has taken over your hummingbird feeder, you have a few options to help alleviate the pressure. My favorite strategy is setting up multiple feeders around your entire yard. The farther you can place them apart, the better! There is no way your problem bird can defend all the feeding stations at once, ensuring that other individuals get a chance to eat. 🙂

 

What sounds do Rufous Hummingbirds make?

The most common sound you will hear these birds make is a series of chipping notes, which are given as a warning to intruding birds. Males also make a “chu-chu-chu” call at the bottom of a dive while trying to impress females.

 

Fun Facts:

  • They have one of the longest migrations of any bird in the world, which is incredible given their small size (roughly 3 inches)! A one-way journey from Mexico to Alaska is about 3,900 miles (6,275 km), and remember they make this trip twice a year.

 

  • They build their nests with soft plant down held together with spider webs. Like other hummingbird species, females prefer lichen, bark, and moss as camouflage.

 

  • In addition to drinking nectar from plants, these birds enjoy hunting gnats, midges, and flies in the air, while plucking aphids from leaves.

 


#3: Black-chinned Hummingbird

 

I will never forget the first time I saw this hummingbird species. While on a camping trip in Zion National Park, I took an early morning walk when a male Black-chinned Hummingbird started feeding on the wildflowers in front of me! I still remember the purple, vibrant throat shining in the early morning sun. 🙂

black chinned hummingbird

 

How To Identify:

  • Males: A medium-sized hummingbird with a metallic green body with a white breast and greenish flanks. Their head appears black overall, but their crown is actually very dark green, and their lower throat is iridescent violet. You typically can’t see the strip of purple unless the light hits it just right. Look for a white spot behind their eyes.

 

  • Females: Have a greenish-grey cap on their heads and a green back. There is a white spot behind their eyes, similar to the males. Females have a dark-spotted grey throat and a white breast.

 

  • *Similar Species: Ruby-throated Hummingbird, which has a greener crown, shorter bill, and red throat. But these two hummingbirds have ranges that are incredibly different, so you shouldn’t mix them up.

 

Black-chinned Hummingbird Range Map

black chinned hummingbird range map

 

Black-chinned Hummingbirds breed in Texas during the summer months. In winter, they migrate to the west coasts of Mexico. This species is one of the most adaptable of all hummingbird species and is found in various habitats. Look for them in places such as mountain and alpine meadows, canyons with thickets, orchards, urban areas, and recently disturbed areas.

 

You will probably hear a Black-chinned Hummingbird flying if they are around. This is because their wings make a distinctive hum, which sounds similar to a bee. These birds also commonly make different high-pitched ticks and chips.

 

Fun Facts:

 

  • Their eggs are only about the size of a coffee bean!

 

  • When the weather is cold, and lots of energy is needed to stay warm, these birds can drink up to THREE times their body weight in nectar. On the flip side, when insects are plentiful, they can survive without any nectar for stretches of time.

 


#4: Calliope Hummingbird

 

The Calliope Hummingbird is the smallest bird in Texas! It’s under four inches in length and weighs between 2 – 3 grams (0.071 to 0.106 oz), which is about the same weight as a ping-pong ball!

calliope hummingbird

 

How To Identify:

  • Males: These small birds are easy to identify because of their long, magenta throat feathers that appear as streaks going down their neck. Their head, upperparts, and flanks are metallic green. The breast is white. Males can be observed performing a unique U-shaped dive that is used to impress females.

 

  • Females: They have small dark spots on their white throat instead of the vibrant magenta throat feathers like the male. Their head and back are covered in a metallic green with a white, buffy breast.

 

  • *Similar Species: It’s hard to distinguish between female Calliope and female Rufous Hummingbirds. The biggest difference is that Rufous Hummingbirds are larger with a longer bill and have more copper coloring at the base of the tail.

 

Calliope Hummingbird Range Map

calliope hummingbird range map

 

This hummingbird species has an incredibly long migration route, especially when you consider their tiny size. The Calliope spends its winters in Mexico. But each spring, they make the long migration up the Pacific coast to their summer breeding grounds.  During fall migration, they return to Mexico by following the Rocky Mountains instead of heading back down the coast.

 

Male Calliope Hummingbirds are known for their impressive U-shaped dives, which are used to attract females. During the display, they will fly as high as 100 feet in the air and then dive until they almost hit the ground, and then rise back up to repeat the process.

 

While they are plummeting towards the Earth, you should be able to hear buzzing, which is emitted from their tail feathers, along with a high-pitched “zing” call that the bird makes.

 

Fun Facts:

  • Even though they are tiny, Calliope Hummingbirds are known to be feisty during the breeding season. They have been observed chasing away birds as large as Red-tailed Hawks!

 

  • These small hummers are known to hunt small insects by “hawking.” This means they sit on a perch waiting for their victim to pass by, and then fly out to catch it in mid-air.

 

  • Calliopes like using conifer trees for nest construction. They try to choose a limb with a substantial sheltering branch overhead, which protects them from precipitation and makes the nest more difficult to spot from above. Organic materials such as lichen, bark, and moss comprise the camouflage.

 


#5: Broad-tailed Hummingbird

 

These hummingbirds are a bird of mountain meadows and open woodlands. They typically breed at elevations between 5,000 and 10,500 feet.

broad tailed hummingbirds

 

How To Identify:

  • Males: Adults have a white breast, buffy flanks, and green covering their head, back, and tail. Look for their iridescent red throat.

 

  • Females: Similar to other types of hummingbirds, females are larger than males. They have a lightly speckled throat, white upper breast, and a brownish belly. Head and back are green.

 

  • *Similar Species: Ruby-throated Hummingbird, but their ranges do not overlap. These two species should be easy to tell apart depending on your location since Ruby-throats only live in eastern North America.

 

Broad-tailed Hummingbird Range Map

 

Broad-tailed Hummingbirds only stay in western Texas for a few months, from late May to early August.

 

Males put on impressive aerial displays to attract females. The show begins with the male climbing high into the sky and then diving towards the ground, pulling up right in front of the bird he is trying to attract. Broad-tailed Hummingbirds are promiscuous, and they may mate with many individuals during a breeding season.

 

There are two sounds you may hear these hummingbirds make!

 

#1. Both males and females make chittering and chattering noises. These sounds are most often heard while they are feeding and foraging. (Listen below!)

 

#2. Their wings sound like crickets! While they fly, you can distinctly hear a trill that is both insect-like and metallic. (Listen below!)

 

Fun Facts:

  • These birds live up to 10,500 feet high in the mountains, where temperatures regularly drop below freezing, even in summer. To survive these cold nights, Broad-tailed Hummingbirds enter what is called a state of torpor, where they slow their heart rate down and drop their body temperature until the sun comes up!

 

  • To obtain protein, Broad-tailed’s will eat insects wherever they can find them! That could be catching bugs in mid-air, gleaning off leaves, or even stealing them off a spider web!

 

  • When available, they will sometimes drink sap that is leaking from trees that have been drilled by Red-naped Sapsuckers.

 


Do you want to learn more about hummingbirds?

If so, here are a few books you should consider purchasing. 🙂

 


What’s your favorite strategy for attracting hummingbirds in Texas?

 

Leave a comment below!

Источник: https://birdwatchinghq.com/hummingbirds-in-texas/

Hummingbird Migration


Rain makes Ruby-throats thirsty! Scene at our yard, September 8, 2020, approaching peak fall migration
Rain makes Ruby-throats thirsty! Scene at our yard, September 8, 2020, approaching peak fall migration

Many hummingbirds spend the winter in Central America or Mexico, and migrate north to their breeding grounds in the southern U.S. and western states as early as February, and to areas further north later in the spring. The first arrivals in spring are usually males.

Some, however, do not migrate, in areas like California and the upper Pacific coast.

The Migration Triggers

Although there are differing views in the birding community as to what triggers the start of migration, it is generally thought that hummingbirds sense changes in daylight duration, and changes in the abundance of flowers, nectar and insects. Instinct also plays a role in making the decision to migrate.

Making the Trip

During migration, a hummingbird's heart beats up to 1,260 times a minute, and its wings flap 15 to 80 times a second.

To support this high energy level, a hummingbird will typically gain 25-40% of their body weight before they start migration in order to make the long trek over land, and water.

They fly alone, often on the same path they have flown earlier in their life, and fly low, just above tree tops or water. Young hummingbirds must navigate without parental guidance.

Hummingbirds fly by day when nectar sources such as flowers are more abundant. Flying low allows the birds to see, and stop at, food supplies along the way. They are also experts at using tail winds to help reach their destination faster and by consuming less energy and body fat. Research indicates a hummingbird can travel as much as 23 miles in one day. However those that make the 500 mile flight from Florida to the Yucatan do it in 18-22 hours non-stop, depending on wind conditions.

Map of Breeding Ranges of Dominant Hummingbird Species in North America

The map below shows the approximate breeding ranges of four major hummingbird species in North America: Rufous, Anna's, Black-chinned and Ruby-throated.

Of course actual breeding areas vary by year depending on weather-related conditions and other environmental factors.

Also, there is overlap in some areas, such as in Central Texas where Ruby-throats and Black-chinned can be found frequenting the same area.

Map showing the approximate breeding ranges of four major hummingbird species in North America: Rufous, Anna's, Black-chinned and Ruby-throated

 


The spring migration can be hard on the hummingbird population as they move north from their winter homes in southern Mexico and Central America.

Stops along the way may be for a few minutes, or a few days at more favorable locations with abundant food supplies.

Strong cold fronts moving south over the Gulf of Mexico make flying difficult as the birds deal with headwinds and heavy rain, over long distances with no shelter. Food is non-existent over the open waters.

First arrivals in the spring, usually males, can be seen in Texas, Louisiana and other sites along the Gulf Coast in late January to mid-March.

As the spring progresses, sightings are reported further north, even into Canada.

The Final 2021 Migration Map

We monitor the spring hummingbird migration from early January to mid-May of each year, with the help of our viewers as they submit their first hummingbird sightings in their areas.

Now that hummingbirds have reached their northernmost breeding grounds in the Canadian provinces, we have ended our mapping project for the year.

Shown below is our final map of hummingbird sightings in 2021 across the U.S. and Canada, as reported by our website viewers. In 2021 we received over 12,000 "first sighting reports". The map has been viewed over 5,000,000 times !

With the spring migration complete, we are no longer posting sightings to our 2021 map. 

 

Creatures of Habit?

Hummingbirds are known to return to the same location from one year to the next, even to the same feeder!

March 13, 2021
March 14, 2020
March 17, 2019
March 12, 2018
March 18, 2017
March 26, 2016
March 22, 2015
March 21, 2014
March 18, 2013
March 18, 2012
March 19, 2011
March 23, 2010
March 27, 2009
March 22, 2008

 


Ruby-throated Hummingbird Spring Migration

First arrivals in the spring, usually males, are back in Texas and Louisiana in late February to mid-March. In more northern states, first arrivals are not until April or May.

The map below shows the approximate spring migration arrival dates for Ruby-throated Hummingbirds in North America.

Arrival dates vary from year to year and from location to location, depending on a number of weather-related conditions and other environmental factors.

Map showing the approximate spring migration arrival dates for Ruby-Throated Hummingbirds in North America

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds feeding during the fall southerly migration in early September, 2017 ... Watch our video on YouTube
And turn up your volume to enjoy their humming and chirping!

The Fall Hummingbird Migration

Hummingbird feeding mania near Tyler Texas

By August and September, hummingbirds are moving south, refueling their bodies in the early morning, traveling midday, and foraging again in the late afternoon to maintain their body weight.

August brings lots of activity, when we have 10-20 Ruby-throated hummingbirds at a time, with peak numbers in early September when we typically spot as many as 25-40 hummingbirds at a time as part of the fall migration. Most are Ruby Throats, with an occasional Rufous in the mix at the feeders.

Ruby-throats gather in Florida, Louisiana and along the South Texas coast in September in preparation for the final push to the south, either over the Gulf of Mexico or via an overland route through Mexico.

Other species travel south down the Rocky Mountain chain into Mexico and Central America.

Winter Hummingbird Residents in the U.S.

Hummingbirds are overwintering on the Gulf Coast in greater numbers than in the past, and many can be found at feeders in South Texas and South Louisiana during mild winters.

For example, in South Louisiana, several species are often spotted during the winter months, including the Ruby-throated, Rufous, Black-chinned, Buff-bellied, Calliope, Allen's, Broad-tailed, Anna's and Broad-billed.

A few hummingbird species are year-round residents in the warmer Pacific coastal and southern desert regions of the United States. Among these are Anna's hummingbird, a common resident from California inland to Arizona and north to British Columbia.

Migration Patterns of Other Hummingbird Species

Of the four Pacific Northwest hummingbirds, Anna’s is the only one that doesn’t always migrate south to warmer areas in winter.

The Continental Divide is host to the greatest number and diversity of migrating hummingbirds. A nearly constant high pressure dome called the “Great Basin High” features winds that rotate clockwise and that are followed by the hummingbirds. This provides consistent tail winds to support migration.

Rufous, Calliope, and Black-chinned Hummingbirds migrate north up the valleys and along the foothills of the Pacific slopes of the western United States, sipping nectar from spring flowers. This route is often called the ”Pacific Flyway” or “floral highway.” They reach the Northwest in early summer.

As the lowland flowers begin to die off, the birds move up in elevation to the alpine meadows of the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada where the flowers are at full bloom. Then they follow the mountains of the Continental Divide south to Mexico in late summer and fall.

Rufous Hummingbirds

Rufous Hummingbird

Rufous Hummingbird (Selasphorus rufus)
Source: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Rufous Hummingbirds are wide-ranging, and breed farther north than any other hummingbird, even into southeastern Alaska. They are often seen in the spring in California, summer in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska, and fall in the Rocky Mountains.

They spend their winter non-breeding months in southern Mexico especially in wooded areas in the state of Guerrero.

During their long migrations, Rufous Hummingbirds make a clockwise circuit of western North America each year.

They move up the Pacific Coast in late winter and spring, reaching Washington and British Columbia by May. As early as July they may start south again, traveling down the chain of the Rocky Mountains.


The map below shows the approximate migration and breeding ranges  of the Rufous Hummingbird in North America.

Actual ranges vary from year to year and can depend on a number of weather-related conditions and other environmental factors.

Map showing the approximate migration and breeding ranges of the Rufous Hummingbird in North America

 

Anna's Hummingbird

Anna’s Hummingbird is one of the most common hummingbirds in its range. The species breeds from Vancouver, Canada south to northern Baja California and east through southern Arizona.

This hardy bird is a permanent resident along the Pacific Coast, staying through the winter in many areas where no other hummingbirds are present.

Anna's hummingbirds are found along the western coast of North America, from southern Canada to northern Baja California, and inland to southern and central Arizona, extreme southern Nevada and southeastern Utah, and western Texas.

They tend to be permanent residents within their range, and are very territorial. However, birds have been spotted far outside their range in such places as southern Alaska, Saskatchewan, New York, Florida, Louisiana and Newfoundland.

Anna's hummingbirds have the northernmost year-round range of any hummingbird. During cold temperatures, Anna's hummingbirds gradually gain weight during the day as they convert sugar to fat. In addition, hummingbirds with inadequate stores of body fat or insufficient plumage are able to survive periods of sub-freezing weather by lowering their metabolic rate and entering a state of torpor.


Costa's Hummingbirds

Costa's Hummingbirds are small North American desert birds that inhabit the western United States and Mexico, but are known to wander eastward and as far north as Alaska and Canada.

They are closely related to the Anna's Hummingbirds.

Their most common breeding areas are the Mojave Desert, Sonoran Desert and the San Joaquin Valley of California. Their wintering areas include southern California south into Mexico.

Allen’s Hummingbirds

Allen's Hummingbirds winter as far south as southern Mexico. They move north up the Pacific Coast in late winter, and south through the mountains in late summer.

A close relative of the Rufous Hummingbird, Allen's has a more limited range, nesting mostly in California.

Black-chinned Hummingbirds

The Black-chinned Hummingbird's breeding range stretches from southern British Columbia in Canada through Idaho and Nevada, south to northern Mexico, and from coastal California, Arizona through Texas, where they are relatively common spring and summer residents. They have also been reported in a number of other states.

They migrate to southern California, southern Arizona, and southern Texas or Mexico for the winter.

Calliope Hummingbirds

Calliope Hummingbirds primarily breed at high elevations in the mountains of northwestern United States and Canada into Alaska. In Canada, they occur from southern British Columbia and Alberta, and also south to Colorado, Nevada and southern California and Arizona.

During spring and summer they travel through Arizona and New Mexico and northern Mexico, to winter in southwestern Mexico as well as in Guatemala and Belize.


Broad-tailed Hummingbird

Broad-tailed hummingbirds migrate north in the spring leaving behind the non-migrant populations in central Mexico.

During spring migration, males reach southern Arizona in late February or early March, northern Arizona in early April, Colorado in late April to late May, Wyoming in mid-May, and Idaho/Southern Montana by late May.

After breeding, Broad-tailed Hummingbirds start their south-bound migration into their winter range in the highlands of Mexico south to Guatemala.

 

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Источник: https://www.hummingbirdcentral.com/hummingbird-migration.htm

Identifying Central Texas Birds in Your Travisso Backyard

Whether you are an avid birder or an ambitious amateur, Travisso’s landscape overlooking the Texas Hill Country is a bird lover’s haven. From sunrise to sunset Central Texas birds provide a free show of vibrant colors and delightful songs. And their array of unusual habits makes this backyard sport a rewarding experience. Birding is a combination of a bit of luck and having the right feeder to attract them. It’s also a lot of knowing what you are looking at.

Even if you are new to the Lone Star State we’re sure you already know that everything is bigger here. Same goes for the 600 species of birds that make Texas their home. It’s more than in any other state. That’s an impressive number and something to keep in mind when you travel through the state’s large land mass. To identify the birds that frequent your backyard we put together a list of some common species in the area. Remember to equip yourself with a good pair of binoculars. Let’s go!

Black-capped Vireo and the Golden-cheeked Warbler

While it may not be possible to see these two birds from your backyard, you can view their breeding habitats at Balcones Canyonlands National Wildlife Refuge, a short 10 minute drive from Travisso. Over 32,000 acres protects the area’s wildlife including the nesting habitats of the black-capped vireo and the golden-cheeked warbler, two migratory birds. Relatively small in size, the vulnerable black-capped vireo can be seen from the refuge’s Shin Oak Observation Deck from approximately April through September.

With its bright golden head and strong vocals the endangered golden-cheeked warbler’s Texas appearance from March to July is not to be missed. They are here just a short time to nest in the oak-juniper woodlands found only in Central Texas. While at Balcones don’t miss the opportunity to spot a few more of the 270 bird species that visit the refuge.

Black-chinned Hummingbird

Hummingbirds are tiny, interesting creatures that we love to attract to our yards. They have long beaks, nonstop fluttering wings and unique flight patterns. And they’re frequently seen noshing at backyard nectar feeders and on flowers across Central Texas. As one of the most numerous breeders in Texas, the black-chinned hummingbird is both beautiful and adaptable. When not at your feeder you can find it by listening for its distinctive low-pitched humming wings. It can also be found perched on bare branches at the tops of dead or live trees.

Carolina Chickadee

This small, gray, large-headed bird with white cheeks and a plump body is an indication of its frequent habit of visiting backyard bird feeders. They love to snack and can be seen in urban areas and suburban backyards primarily in east and Central Texas. As a year-round Texas resident, the Carolina Chickadee breeds from February to July. And although it closely resembles the black-capped chickadee, it has its own distinct identity and voice. Its unique song is made up of a long four-note whistle unlike those of other chickadees.

Lesser Goldfinch

With its bright yellow belly and black head and wings the male lesser goldfinch is an easy bird to recognize. While the female lesser goldfinch’s appearance is slight different. Females sports an olive back, dull yellow underparts, black wings and two whitish wingbars. Both males and females have long, pointy wings and short, notched tails. Small in size and social by nature, the lesser goldfinch is a flock bird that feeds on seeds and grains in weedy fields and at feeders. They can be commonly seen in suburban areas where their songs can be easily heard. While in a flock its song is characterized by a wheezy and descending call with one to two notes at a time.

Northern Mockingbird

From Brownsville to El Paso to Dallas and Austin too, the Northern Mockingbird can be seen all over the state. As a species that lives here year-round it is the ideal symbol as the state bird of Texas. With a fighter’s instinct and the ability to protect their home it is the primary reason it represents the state today. But it’s their special talent singing a diverse playlist of over 200 songs from the sounds of other birds, inspects and amphibians is what they are most known for. These cherished songbirds never stop giving us a cheery morning song or two.

Red-tailed Hawk

This large raptor is often seen looming on light posts overlooking grassy median strips looking for its next feast. Red-tailed hawks can easily be viewed in any open habitat. When other parts of the country gets cold, you’ll see this bird’s population in Central Texas swell. Though its name implies that the tail is red, in fact, it is more of a terra-cotta orange color. The dull-orange color makes this bird standout among its friends and foes. 

To expand your knowledge of birds in Central Texas and throughout the state, download a free copy of Texas Birds: Introducing Texans to Common Birds. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department publishes this informative and comprehensive guide.

Move-in Ready Homes Now Available at Travisso

Are you looking for your dream home? Check out Travisso’s current list of move-in ready available homes today. Specifically built for today’s busy lifestyles they offer open concept floor plans, media and game rooms, and large gourmet kitchens and gathering areas that make entertaining super easy. In addition, Travisso offers gorgeous views, a family-friendly neighborhood and endless recreational possibilities for the entire family. For additional information call 512-243-8583.

Источник: https://blog.travisso.com/central-texas-backyard-birds/

Hummingbird Migration

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If you ever wanted to spot a hummer, Texas is among the best destinations to make your wish come true. The state hosts around 18 different species, with the dominant ruby-throated (Archilochus colubris), black-chinned (Archilochus alexandri), Anna's (Calypte anna), and rufous (Selasphorus rufus) hummingbirds. Some species breed here, whereas others winter or stay all year round. Anyway, the chances of encountering one of these entertaining little creatures is enhanced during spring and fall hummingbird migrations, which roughly peak in March to May and August to October.

Some of the most promising spots to check out include Highland Lakes west of Austin and Hill Country in Central Texas, north-west of San Antonio. The most avid birdwatchers are welcome to Big Bend National Park and Padre Island National Seashore to chase all-year residents. However, you can also catch a glimpse of a hummer elsewhere across the state, including large metropolises such as Houston.

Ruby-throated hummingbirds are the most remarkable in Texas. A wee bird weighing some 0.1 oz (3 g) can travel for 1,500 mi (2,400 km) from its breeding grounds reaching southern areas of Canada to winter homes in Mexico and Central America. You could search for a long time and finally see (or not) a single hummer. But knowing the right time and place, you can observe swarms of 25–40 ruby-throats at a time!

Rockport-Fulton HummerBird Celebration (September 16–19, 2021)

The secret is Rockport-Fulton HummerBird Celebration held annually in mid-September near Corpus Christi. On their southern migration, ruby-throated hummingbirds stop by coastal Texas to fatten up at human-made feeders before the non-stop flight across the Gulf of Mexico. During the celebration, locals open their gardens to both birds and the public, so mesmerizing sightings are guaranteed. Stand still and quiet, and they will come right up to your side.

Some Texans used to take the feeders down after Labor Day for the fear the birds would postpone their migration while food is aplenty, but lately, things have changed. Ornithologists claim that the trigger setting hummers on the move is the day's length rather than the lack of food, so feeders are relevant all year round.

Just in case you'd like to buy a feeder and prepare your artificial nectar, the recipe is one part sugar to four parts water. No food coloring allowed—the red vessel itself is attractive enough for a hummingbird. Note that in summer, the mixture will soon turn into toxic alcohol. So clean your feeder up on time.

Источник: https://rove.me/to/texas/hummingbird-migration

Central texas hummingbirds -

Help or hinderance? The best time to take in your hummingbird feeders

Male rufous hummingbird. Photo courtesy of Alan Schmierer.
Male rufous hummingbird. Photo courtesy of Alan Schmierer.

As we look out to our once active hummingbird feeders, we’re instantly reminded that the move is on. The return of fall brings the departure of many migratory birds in the midwest. While the result is a noticeable decrease at hummingbird feeders, rare hummingbirds can sometimes use a helping hand in heading on their way to warmer skies. We at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service want to provide some food for thought when it comes to taking in your hummingbird feeders.

Hummingbird feeders are popular and usually busy with activity from early spring through late summer. Here in the midwest, they are most commonly visited by ruby-throated hummingbirds, but fall migration can bring some unusual birds, including the rufous hummingbird. In fact, the rufous hummingbird has been appearing in increasing numbers in the midwest in recent years, which is well outside of its normal range.

“Occasionally, stray migrant rufous hummingbirds will linger into late fall here,” said Wildlife Biologist Andy Forbes. “Our resident ruby-throated hummingbirds are not adapted to cold weather and rarely stay long as fall’s chill sets in, but rufous hummingbirds are more adapted to cold because their normal distribution is well to the north and/or at higher elevations.”

Rufous hummingbirds are able to survive the cold for short periods by lowering their metabolism. The key words here being ‘short periods.' Midwest winters are not an environment they could survive in at length, which is why we must make sure we do not encourage them to stay too long by keeping feeders up late into the fall. This includes the use of heat lamps to keep feeders open.

When to take your feeders down

Male ruby-throated hummingbird at a feeder. Photo courtesy of Mark Moschell/Creative Commons.
Male ruby-throated hummingbird at a feeder. Photo courtesy of Mark Moschell/Creative Commons.

What can you do to help hummingbirds on their fall migration? Keep your feeders stocked through the early fall to provide helpful energy to migrating birds, but take your feeder down at the first sign of frost or when your feeder freezes for the first time. This will ensure that stray migrants like the rufous hummingbird don’t stay too long and cause concern.

If you do spot a late-season rufous hummingbird or any other species of unusual hummingbird, please don’t try to capture it. It will likely follow its normal course and migrate. In all situations, if you come upon a bird, or other wildlife, that you believe to be injured, the best thing to do is to leave it alone. If you feel the need to help, contact a licensed wildlife rehabilitator for assistance. Licensed professional wildlife rehabilitators have the permits, tools and training to safely handle injured animals.

Wildlife Biologist Deanne Endrizzi noted, “it’s a treat seeing out-of-range species like rufous hummingbirds who sometimes choose to route themselves through the midwest, for reasons we don’t entirely understand. We ask people not to prolong their migration by providing food sources too late into the fall. We do however, encourage you to report sightings of these and other rare species you spot passing through your community via eBird. Your assistance in tracking sightings provides important data which helps bird conservation.”

As with any wildlife, it's survival of the fittest and, under normal circumstances, migratory birds will follow their biological clock to migrate when the timing is best for a well-fed journey to their favorite wintering grounds. We can all help this happen naturally by following these recommendations.

Источник: https://www.fws.gov/midwest/news/HummingbirdFeeders.html

Interesting Facts

Georgia is home to 11 hummingbird species during the year: the ruby-throated, black-chinned, rufous, calliope, magnificent, Allen's, Anna's, broad-billed, green violet-ear, green-breasted mango and broad-tailed hummingbird.

The ruby-throated hummingbird is the only species of hummingbird known to nest to Georgia. These birds weigh as little as a first-class letter. The female builds the walnut-sized nest without any help from her mate, a process can take up to 12 days. The female then lays two eggs, each about the size of a black-eyed pea.

In Georgia, female ruby-throated hummers produce up to two broods per year. Nests are typically built on a small branch that is parallel to or dips downward. The birds sometimes rebuild the nest they used the previous year.

A few other interesting facts on hummers that visit Georgia:

  • The calliope hummingbird is the smallest bird found in North America.
  • The rufous hummingbird has the longest migration of North American hummers—more than 3,000 miles!

Feeding Hummingbirds

Hummingbird nectar can easily be prepared at home. The best solution consists of 1 part sugar to 4 parts water (this mirrors the sugar concentration of the nectar found in flowers). Boil the water for 2–3 minutes before adding sugar. Cool and store the mixture in a refrigerator until you are ready to use it.

There is no need to add red food coloring. Hummingbirds are attracted to the red color of the feeder and do not prefer red nectar to clear.

Select a feeder that is easy to clean and does not drip. In warm weather, change nectar every 2–3 days or before it gets cloudy.

Periodically clean feeders, making sure that mold and bacteria are removed. Feeders can be easily cleaned soaking them in a solution of 1 part bleach and 10 parts water. Thoroughly rinse the feeders before using them again.

Keep at least one feeder up throughout the year. You cannot keep hummingbirds from migration by leaving feeders up during the fall and winter seasons. Hummingbirds migrate in response to a decline in day length, not food availability. Most of the rare hummingbird's found in Georgia are seen during the winter.

Ants can be kept away from feeders by installing an "ant moat" between the feeder and the structure on which the feeder is hung. Smearing petroleum jelly or automotive grease on the wire above the feeder can also thwart ants.

Yellow jackets can be trapped using a simple yellow jacket trap made from a 2-liter soft drink bottle. Contact the DNR's Wildlife Conservation Section for details. Bees, wasps and yellow jackets can be deterred by smearing cooking oil on the surface of the artificial flowers surrounding the feeding ports on your feeders.


How to Keep Your Hummingbird Feeders from Freezing

One of the simplest ways to keep hummingbird feeders from freezing in the winter is to place a clip-on shop light equipped with a 150-watt bulb close to the feeder. When there is a chance the temperature will dip below freezing, turn the light on. The heat generated by the light bulb should keep the feeder from freezing.

It is always best to determine how close you can place the bulb next to the feeder without melting plastic feeder parts. Mount the light at varying distances from your feeder and see what works best with your feeder. Use this method to test the set-up before leaving the light on for extended periods of time.


Gardening for Hummingbirds

Homeowners who are the most successful at attracting hummingbirds combine the use of feeders and hummingbird food plants. Plan plantings so that nectar-producing plants are blooming throughout the growing season. Also plant flowers that attract small, soft-bodied insects, which provide a protein source for hummingbirds. Other plants provide wintering hummingbirds with roosting cover on cold winter nights.

Here are some excellent plants to attract hummingbirds:

Signifiers: Exotic (e), Native (n)

Herbaceous Plants

Dalhia (e)

Indian Pink (n)

Pentstemon (n)

Petunia (e)

Hollyhock (e)

Red-Hot Poker (e)

Delphinium

Geranium (n, e)

Gladiolus (e)

Phlox (n, e)

Four-O'clock (e)

Cardinal Flower (n)

Lupine (n)

Salvia (n, e)

Bleeding Heart (e)

Impatiens (n, e)

Snapdragon (n, e)

Century Pant (e)

Foxglove (e)

Mexican Sunflower (e)

Jewelweed (n)

Crocosmia (e)

Blazing Star (Liatris) (n)

Columbine (n)

Butterfly Weed (n)

Red Basil (e)

Canna Lily (n)

Cockscomb (e)

Coreopsis (n)

Beebalm (n)

Shrubs

Buckeye (n)

Powderpuff (n)

Mexican Cigar (e)

Shrimp Plant (e)

Hibiscus (n, e)

Abelia (e)

Weigela (e)

Wild Azalea (n)

Flowering Maple (e)

Flowering Quince (e)

Azaleas (e)

Buttonbush (n)

Turk's Cap Mellow (e)

Trees

Black Locust (n)

Tulip Poplar (n)

Redbud (n)

Crabapple (e)

Orchid Tree (e)

Hawthorne (n)

Red Horse Chesnut (n)

Vines

Cross Vine (n)

Trumpet Creeper (n)

Coral Honeysuckle (n)

Yellow Jasmine (n)

Scarlet Runner-Bean (e)


Hummingbirds of Georgia

The vast majority of hummingbird species that occur in Georgia are only seen in winter. Many are immature birds or females, and many cannot be identified unless captured and closely examined. Little is known about their movements and the habitats they use in Georgia and elsewhere in the Southeast. With this in mind, reporting sightings of wintering hummingbirds can be extremely valuable. Chances are good that new species will be discovered in Georgia.

The following list includes details of hummingbirds that can be seen in Georgia. (Note: The number of sightings of different species may have changed since this information was compiled.) The Hummingbirds of Georgia fact sheet is available.

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: Rare in state past October 31. Most wintering birds are found along the coast

Size: 3¾ inches

Identification Adult male has a bright red throat (gorget) that appears black in poor light, an iridescent green back, white underparts and grayish-green sides. Adult female has a metallic green back, white throat and grayish-brown sides

Breeding range: Only hummingbird known to breed east of the Mississippi River. Breeds throughout the eastern United States as far west as eastern Texas and Oklahoma north to Minnesota

Winter range: South Florida, southern Mexico to Panama

Black-chinned Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: Fewer than five reported in state each winter

Size: 3¾ inches (slightly larger than the ruby-throated hummingbird)

Identification: Adult male appears much like a ruby-throated male. Throat is black with a violet band along the lower edge of the gorget seen only in good light. Adult female appears much like a ruby-throated female

Breeding range: Breeds from southwestern British Columbia southward into western Mexico and as far east as Texas

Winter range: Mexico

Anna's Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: Only three records for Georgia

Size: 4 inches

Identification: Adult male's head is a deep rose-red. Color will actually extend down the side of the neck. Underparts are grayish-green. Adult female often displays tiny red feathers that form a small reddish patch on the throat. Underparts are grayish-green

Breeding range: Washington, Oregon, California, Arizona

Winter range: Pacific coast area from Washington to northwest Mexico and Arizona

Broad-tailed Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: A very rare winter visitor

Size: 4 inches

Identification: Adult male looks much like a ruby-throated male, with a green back, rose-red throat, white underparts and green sides. Adult female has a green back, streaked throat, white underparts and pale brown sides

Breeding range: East-central California and Nevada, north to Montana and Wyoming to very western Texas and Mexico

Winter range: Central Mexico southward

Magnificent Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: Two birds documented in Georgia, one in summer

Size: 5¼ inches (Georgia's largest hummingbird)

Identification: Adult male is metallic bronze-green, with cinnamon rufous color in tail and purple crown. Adult female is duller with no purplish crown

Breeding range: Mountainous regions of southern Arizona and south-western New Mexico to Central America

Winter range: Mexico southward

Broad-billed Hummingbird

Status in Georgia:
One bird has been documented in Georgia. An adult male overwintered in a backyard in Macon during the winter of 2001–2002.

Size: 4 inches

Identification: Adult male displays brilliant emerald green feathers on his breast, sides, belly and back. His gorget is sapphire blue. The bill is reddish-orange and black near the tip. The male's tail is deeply forked, dark blue with a grayish border. Adult female lacks the sapphire gorget and is green to bronze-green on its underside with a pale throat. The female's bill is predominantly blackish with some orange near its base

Breeding range: The broad-billed hummingbird is a Mexican bird that ventures into the United States regularly only in southern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico. It is the most common hummingbird in the lowlands of northwestern Mexico

Winter range: Mexico (several birds have been seen in South Carolina, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama)

Rufous Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: Most common wintering hummingbird

Size: 3¾ inches (slightly larger than ruby-throated hummingbird)

Identification: Adult male has a reddish-brown back, rump, tail and sides with orange-red gorget. Adult female has a green back, light brown sides and reddish flecks in throat that form a central reddish spot. Tail has varying amounts of brownish color

Breeding range: Southern Alaska through Washington, Oregon, western Montana and northern Idaho

Winter range: Throughout much of Mexico

Allen's Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: Less than a dozen records in Georgia

Size: 3¾ inches (slightly larger than a ruby-throated hummingbird)

Identification: Adult male has a green back, orange-red gorget, reddish-brown sides, rump and tail. Adult female cannot be safely separated from the female Rufous Hummingbird in the field. Female has reddish-brown color in the tail, greenish back, streaked throat and reddish-brown flanks

Breeding range: Coastal California

Winter range: Mexico

Calliope Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: At least one or two birds are reported each winter

Size: 3¼ inches (smallest bird in northern North America)

Identification: The male calliope is Georgia's only hummingbird with rosy purple gorget feathers that form streaks against a white background. Adult female has a metallic bronze-green back; its sides and flanks are cinnamon; the throat is dull, brownish-white with dusky streaks and the breast is cinnamon-buff

Breeding range: Mountains of central British Columbia and southwestern Alberta to northern Baha California

Winter range: Mexico

Green Violet-ear Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: The only verified sighting was in Thomasville in July 2001

Size: 4¾ inches

Identification: Both male and female birds are dark in color, have a moderately down-curved bill, and are grass green above and below the body. Males have a violet-green central breast spot and ear patch

Breeding range: No breeding records in the United States. Breeds in Mexico south into Peru and Bolivia

Winter range: Similar to the breeding range


Georgia's Wintering Hummingbirds

Georgia's wintering hummingbirds still need nourishment during the cooler months.

Georgians should keep their hummingbird feeders up during the fall and winter because during these seasons some fast, fly-by friends will be buzzing by ice-covered windows throughout the state! Nine species of hummingbirds can be seen in the state—ruby-throated, black-chinned, Anna's, broad-tailed, broad-billed, rufous, calliope, Allen's and magnificent. The ruby-throated is the only hummingbird that nests in Georgia with very few birds seen over wintering here. Most of the hummingbirds seen in Georgia during the winter months are western visitors. Wintering hummingbirds begin arriving as early as August; however, they appear at feeders anytime throughout fall and winter. In winter, the hummingbird with the longest migration route and North America's smallest hummingbird are among the hummingbirds that migrate here.

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources' Wildlife Resources Division is encouraging people across the state to keep up at least one feeder during the winter months so the DNR can document western hummingbirds that find their way to Georgia. If a wintering hummingbird visits a feeder this year, it may return next year.

Traditionally, Georgians have taken their feeders down in the fall in fear that feeders would keep hummingbirds from migrating. But, hummingbirds migrate in response to day length, not food supply, so leaving a feeder up will not hinder the hummers migrating. Some lucky Georgia homeowners have been known to host six or more wintering hummingbirds!

The rufous hummingbird is the most commonly seen wintering hummer in the southeastern U.S. During one winter, more than 100 rufous hummers were documented in Georgia. The rufous hummingbird has the longest migration of any North American hummingbird, traveling from its breeding ranges that extend from the Pacific Northwest as far north as southern Alaska to its primary wintering grounds in south-central Mexico. However, wintering rufous hummingbirds are spotted throughout Georgia and the rest of the Southeast.

The colorful calliope hummingbird is the smallest bird found in the United States and is one of Georgia's winter residents. The calliope had first been seen in the Peach State during the winter of 1998–1999.

Many of the wintering hummingbirds are extremely difficult to identify, so don't assume that the wintering hummer at your feeder is a rufous. It may take an expert to positively identify them. If a hummingbird shows up at your feeder from October until the end of February, be sure to contact the Wildlife Conservation Section office in Forsyth at the address below. Your information can help WRD document the incidence of wintering hummers and help determine their habitat needs.

Georgians who spot any of the unusual hummingbirds species that migrate through Georgia in winter months are encouraged to report their sightings to the Wildlife Conservation Section. Who knows, you may be the first person to report a buff-bellied or other rare hummingbird in Georgia!


Contact Information

Report sightings of rare hummingbirds as well as all hummingbirds spotted in the winter to:
Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife Resources Division, Wildlife Conservation Section
116 Rum Creek Drive
Forsyth, GA 31029
478-994-1438

Источник: https://georgiawildlife.com/hummingbirds-your-backyard

Identifying Central Texas Birds in Your Travisso Backyard

Whether you are an avid birder or an ambitious amateur, Travisso’s landscape overlooking the Texas Hill Country is a bird lover’s haven. From sunrise to sunset Central Texas birds provide a free show of vibrant colors and delightful songs. And their array of unusual habits makes this backyard sport a rewarding experience. Birding is a combination of a bit of luck and having the right feeder to attract them. It’s also a lot of knowing what you are looking at.

Even if you are new to the Lone Star State we’re sure you already know that everything is bigger here. Same goes for the 600 species of birds that make Texas their home. It’s more than in any other state. That’s an impressive number and something to keep in mind when you travel through the state’s large land mass. To identify the birds that frequent your backyard we put together a list of some common species in the area. Remember to equip yourself with a good pair of binoculars. Let’s go!

Black-capped Vireo and the Golden-cheeked Warbler

While it may not be possible to see these two birds from your backyard, you can view their breeding habitats at Balcones Canyonlands National Wildlife Refuge, a short 10 minute drive from Travisso. Over 32,000 acres protects the area’s wildlife including the nesting habitats of the black-capped vireo and the golden-cheeked warbler, two migratory birds. Relatively small in size, the vulnerable black-capped vireo can be seen from the refuge’s Shin Oak Observation Deck from approximately April through September.

With its bright golden head and strong vocals the endangered golden-cheeked warbler’s Texas appearance from March to July is not to be missed. They are here just a short time to nest in the oak-juniper woodlands found only in Central Texas. While at Balcones don’t miss the opportunity to spot a few more of the 270 bird species that visit the refuge.

Black-chinned Hummingbird

Hummingbirds are tiny, interesting creatures that we love to attract to our yards. They have long beaks, nonstop fluttering wings and unique flight patterns. And they’re frequently seen noshing at backyard nectar feeders and on flowers across Central Texas. As one of the most numerous breeders in Texas, the black-chinned hummingbird is both beautiful and adaptable. When not at your feeder you can find it by listening for its distinctive low-pitched humming wings. It can also be found perched on bare branches at the tops of dead or live trees.

Carolina Chickadee

This small, gray, large-headed bird with white cheeks and a plump body is an indication of its frequent habit of visiting backyard bird feeders. They love to snack and can be seen in urban areas and suburban backyards primarily in east and Central Texas. As a year-round Texas resident, the Carolina Chickadee breeds from February to July. And although it closely resembles the black-capped chickadee, it has its own distinct identity and voice. Its unique song is made up of a long four-note whistle unlike those of other chickadees.

Lesser Goldfinch

With its bright yellow belly and black head and wings the male lesser goldfinch is an easy bird to recognize. While the female lesser goldfinch’s appearance is slight different. Females sports an olive back, dull yellow underparts, black wings and two whitish wingbars. Both males and females have long, pointy wings and short, notched tails. Small in size and social by nature, the lesser goldfinch is a flock bird that feeds on seeds and grains in weedy fields and at feeders. They can be commonly seen in suburban areas where their songs can be easily heard. While in a flock its song is characterized by a wheezy and descending call with one to two notes at a time.

Northern Mockingbird

From Brownsville to El Paso to Dallas and Austin too, the Northern Mockingbird can be seen all over the state. As a species that lives here year-round it is the ideal symbol as the state bird of Texas. With a fighter’s instinct and the ability to protect their home it is the primary reason it represents the state today. But it’s their special talent singing a diverse playlist of over 200 songs from the sounds of other birds, inspects and amphibians is what they are most known for. These cherished songbirds never stop giving us a cheery morning song or two.

Red-tailed Hawk

This large raptor is often seen looming on light posts overlooking grassy median strips looking for its next feast. Red-tailed hawks can easily be viewed in any open habitat. When other parts of the country gets cold, you’ll see this bird’s population in Central Texas swell. Though its name implies that the tail is red, in fact, it is more of a terra-cotta orange color. The dull-orange color makes this bird standout among its friends and foes. 

To expand your knowledge of birds in Central Texas and throughout the state, download a free copy of Texas Birds: Introducing Texans to Common Birds. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department publishes this informative and comprehensive guide.

Move-in Ready Homes Now Available at Travisso

Are you looking for your dream home? Check out Travisso’s current list of move-in ready available homes today. Specifically built for today’s busy lifestyles they offer open concept floor plans, media and game rooms, and large gourmet kitchens and gathering areas that make entertaining super easy. In addition, Travisso offers gorgeous views, a family-friendly neighborhood and endless recreational possibilities for the entire family. For additional information call 512-243-8583.

Источник: https://blog.travisso.com/central-texas-backyard-birds/

What types of hummingbirds can you find in Texas?

common hummingbirds in texas

 

Hummingbirds are one of the most popular birds in Texas and have captivated people’s interest and attention for a long time. But because hummingbirds are incredibly fast and small, these birds can be hard to distinguish from each other. Most of the time, they just look like little green, iridescent blurs streaking by your face!

 

But don’t worry.

 

Today, you will learn 5 hummingbirds found in Texas (and how to identify them).

 

Each description includes identification tips, pictures, *range maps, fun facts, AND how to attract these beautiful birds to your yard!

  • The range maps below were generously shared with permission from The Birds of The World, published by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. I use their site OFTEN to learn new information about birds!

 

To learn more about birds that live near you, check out these other guides!

 

Here are the 5 types of hummingbirds that live in Texas!

 

Please let me know which hummingbird species you have spotted before in the “Comments” section at the end!

 


#1: Ruby-throated Hummingbird

ruby throated hummingbird - types of hummingbirds in texas

 

How To Identify:

  • Males: Medium-sized hummingbird with a bright red throat and a black chin and mask that extends behind the eyes. The top of their head and back is iridescent green. Underparts are pale grey with a green wash on the sides of their belly.

 

  • Females: Duller than males. The chin and throat are white with pale green streaks. Their face lacks the black chin and red throat of the male. Their belly is mostly white with buffy flanks, and the back is green.

 

  • *Similar Species: Broad-tailed Hummingbirds, which have a duller red throat and lack a black chin. These two species have ranges that do not overlap.

 

Ruby-throated Hummingbird Range Map

ruby throated hummingbird range map

 

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are common in eastern Texas during warm summer months. Once cooler temperatures start to arrive, these birds migrate to Mexico. Amazingly, most individuals travel ACROSS the Gulf of Mexico to reach their wintering grounds.  Remember, they must make this incredibly long journey in a single flight, as there is nowhere to stop and rest. 🙂

 

How do you attract Ruby-throated Hummingbirds in Texas?

 

While there are many ways to draw these winged beauties to your yard, here are the two BEST strategies:

 

#1. Put out nectar feeders.

species of hummingbirds in texas

The most common way to get hummers to visit your backyard is to hang a quality hummingbird feeder filled with homemade nectar (sugar water).

 

The reason this strategy works is that nectar is a primary food source for hummingbirds. To fuel their active lifestyle, hummingbirds need to feed on it almost continuously throughout the day.

 

Supplying a FRESH and RELIABLE nectar source will be sought after by hummingbirds.

 

#2. Plant native plants that have long, tubular flowers.

 

As we just discussed, hummingbirds need nectar continuously, which is naturally obtained from flowers. Did you know that a hummingbird can visit up to 2,000 flowers each day looking for nectar?

 

With that being said, I hope it’s easy to see why you should plant shrubs, trees, and flowers in your yard that hummingbirds can’t resist! Establishing a hummingbird garden provides birds with a safe place to reliably find food.

 

Look for red flowers, because hummingbirds are naturally attracted to this color. Also, long, tubular flowers are great for hummingbirds because they can access the nectar with their long beaks and tongues, but bees and other insects can’t!

 

What sounds do Ruby-throated Hummingbirds make?

Press PLAY above to hear the sound these birds make!

 

Believe it or not, these hummingbirds do make distinctive noises. The sounds that I most often hear are a series of calls seem to be given as individuals are chasing each other around. It resembles a chattering “chee-dit.”

 

Fun Facts:

  • Their legs are so short they are unable to walk or hop! If needed, they can sort of shuffle and scoot down a branch.

 

  • These hummingbirds can beat their wings up to 53 times per SECOND!

 

  • Ruby-throated Hummingbirds drink nectar for energy, but they obtain nutrition by eating a wide variety of small bugs. The list includes spiders, mosquitoes, gnats, fruit flies, and small bees.

 

 


#2: Rufous Hummingbird

 

Rufous Hummingbirds are the most aggressive type of hummingbird in Texas!

 

Be careful if one finds your hummingbird feeders or garden, as they will relentlessly attack and drive away other hummingbirds (including much larger species) away.

 

rufous hummingbird

 

How To Identify:

  • Males: Bright copper-orange on their back (although some males have a green back) and sides of their belly. Beautiful reddish-orange iridescent throat. White breast and ear patch behind eye. Compared to other hummingbird species, they are small.

 

  • Females: They have a green crown, neck, and back. Rufous (copper) colored sides with a white breast and belly. Some females have a spot of red or orange on their throat.

 

  • *Similar Species: Allen’s Hummingbird, which has slightly more green on their crown and back. Allen’s also has narrower outer tail feathers and a slightly downward-curved bill. Females of these two species are incredibly hard to tell apart.

 

Rufous Hummingbird Range Map

rufous hummingbird

 

Rufous Hummingbirds have an interesting migration pattern. In the spring, they fly north up the Pacific Coast to their summer breeding grounds. They return to their winter homes in Mexico and parts of the southern United States by flying a completely different route along the Rocky Mountains!

 

How To Attract:

Just put out a hummingbird feeder full of homemade sugar water or plant native nectar-filled flowers in your backyard!

 

 

But please be aware that Rufous Hummingbirds may drive away any other hummers that visit your yard. These aggressive birds are incredibly territorial and will relentlessly scare away all other hummingbird species. They have even been seen chasing chipmunks!

 

If an aggressive Rufous Hummingbird has taken over your hummingbird feeder, you have a few options to help alleviate the pressure. My favorite strategy is setting up multiple feeders around your entire yard. The farther you can place them apart, the better! There is no way your problem bird can defend all the feeding stations at once, ensuring that other individuals get a chance to eat. 🙂

 

What sounds do Rufous Hummingbirds make?

The most common sound you will hear these birds make is a series of chipping notes, which are given as a warning to intruding birds. Males also make a “chu-chu-chu” call at the bottom of a dive while trying to impress females.

 

Fun Facts:

  • They have one of the longest migrations of any bird in the world, which is incredible given their small size (roughly 3 inches)! A one-way journey from Mexico to Alaska is about 3,900 miles (6,275 km), and remember they make this trip twice a year.

 

  • They build their nests with soft plant down held together with spider webs. Like other hummingbird species, females prefer lichen, bark, and moss as camouflage.

 

  • In addition to drinking nectar from plants, these birds enjoy hunting gnats, midges, and flies in the air, while plucking aphids from leaves.

 


#3: Black-chinned Hummingbird

 

I will never forget the first time I saw this hummingbird species. While on a camping trip in Zion National Park, I took an early morning walk when a male Black-chinned Hummingbird started feeding on the wildflowers in front of me! I still remember the purple, vibrant throat shining in the early morning sun. 🙂

black chinned hummingbird

 

How To Identify:

  • Males: A medium-sized hummingbird with a metallic green body with a white breast and greenish flanks. Their head appears black overall, but their crown is actually very dark green, and their lower throat is iridescent violet. You typically can’t see the strip of purple unless the light hits it just right. Look for a white spot behind their eyes.

 

  • Females: Have a greenish-grey cap on their heads and a green back. There is a white spot behind their eyes, similar to the males. Females have a dark-spotted grey throat and a white breast.

 

  • *Similar Species: Ruby-throated Hummingbird, which has a greener crown, shorter bill, and red throat. But these two hummingbirds have ranges that are incredibly different, so you shouldn’t mix them up.

 

Black-chinned Hummingbird Range Map

black chinned hummingbird range map

 

Black-chinned Hummingbirds breed in Texas during the summer months. In winter, they migrate to the west coasts of Mexico. This species is one of the most adaptable of all hummingbird species and is found in various habitats. Look for them in places such as mountain and alpine meadows, canyons with thickets, orchards, urban areas, and recently disturbed areas.

 

You will probably hear a Black-chinned Hummingbird flying if they are around. This is because their wings make a distinctive hum, which sounds similar to a bee. These birds also commonly make different high-pitched ticks and chips.

 

Fun Facts:

 

  • Their eggs are only about the size of a coffee bean!

 

  • When the weather is cold, and lots of energy is needed to stay warm, these birds can drink up to THREE times their body weight in nectar. On the flip side, when insects are plentiful, they can survive without any nectar for stretches of time.

 


#4: Calliope Hummingbird

 

The Calliope Hummingbird is the smallest bird in Texas! It’s under four inches in length and weighs between 2 – 3 grams (0.071 to 0.106 oz), which is about the same weight as a ping-pong ball!

calliope hummingbird

 

How To Identify:

  • Males: These small birds are easy to identify because of their long, magenta throat feathers that appear as streaks going down their neck. Their head, upperparts, and flanks are metallic green. The breast is white. Males can be observed performing a unique U-shaped dive that is used to impress females.

 

  • Females: They have small dark spots on their white throat instead of the vibrant magenta throat feathers like the male. Their head and back are covered in a metallic green with a white, buffy breast.

 

  • *Similar Species: It’s hard to distinguish between female Calliope and female Rufous Hummingbirds. The biggest difference is that Rufous Hummingbirds are larger with a longer bill and have more copper coloring at the base of the tail.

 

Calliope Hummingbird Range Map

calliope hummingbird range map

 

This hummingbird species has an incredibly long migration route, especially when you consider their tiny size. The Calliope spends its winters in Mexico. But each spring, they make the long migration up the Pacific coast to their summer breeding grounds.  During fall migration, they return to Mexico by following the Rocky Mountains instead of heading back down the coast.

 

Male Calliope Hummingbirds are known for their impressive U-shaped dives, which are used to attract females. During the display, they will fly as high as 100 feet in the air and then dive until they almost hit the ground, and then rise back up to repeat the process.

 

While they are plummeting towards the Earth, you should be able to hear buzzing, which is emitted from their tail feathers, along with a high-pitched “zing” call that the bird makes.

 

Fun Facts:

  • Even though they are tiny, Calliope Hummingbirds are known to be feisty during the breeding season. They have been observed chasing away birds as large as Red-tailed Hawks!

 

  • These small hummers are known to hunt small insects by “hawking.” This means they sit on a perch waiting for their victim to pass by, and then fly out to catch it in mid-air.

 

  • Calliopes like using conifer trees for nest construction. They try to choose a limb with a substantial sheltering branch overhead, which protects them from precipitation and makes the nest more difficult to spot from above. Organic materials such as lichen, bark, and moss comprise the camouflage.

 


#5: Broad-tailed Hummingbird

 

These hummingbirds are a bird of mountain meadows and open woodlands. They typically breed at elevations between 5,000 and 10,500 feet.

broad tailed hummingbirds

 

How To Identify:

  • Males: Adults have a white breast, buffy flanks, and green covering their head, back, and tail. Look for their iridescent red throat.

 

  • Females: Similar to other types of hummingbirds, females are larger than males. They have a lightly speckled throat, white upper breast, and a brownish belly. Head and back are green.

 

  • *Similar Species: Ruby-throated Hummingbird, but their ranges do not overlap. These two species should be easy to tell apart depending on your location since Ruby-throats only live in eastern North America.

 

Broad-tailed Hummingbird Range Map

 

Broad-tailed Hummingbirds only stay in western Texas for a few months, from late May to early August.

 

Males put on impressive aerial displays to attract females. The show begins with the male climbing high into the sky and then diving towards the ground, pulling up right in front of the bird he is trying to attract. Broad-tailed Hummingbirds are promiscuous, and they may mate with many individuals during a breeding season.

 

There are two sounds you may hear these hummingbirds make!

 

#1. Both males and females make chittering and chattering noises. These sounds are most often heard while they are feeding and foraging. (Listen below!)

 

#2. Their wings sound like crickets! While they fly, you can distinctly hear a trill that is both insect-like and metallic. (Listen below!)

 

Fun Facts:

  • These birds live up to 10,500 feet high in the mountains, where temperatures regularly drop below freezing, even in summer. To survive these cold nights, Broad-tailed Hummingbirds enter what is called a state of torpor, where they slow their heart rate down and drop their body temperature until the sun comes up!

 

  • To obtain protein, Broad-tailed’s will eat insects wherever they can find them! That could be catching bugs in mid-air, gleaning off leaves, or even stealing them off a spider web!

 

  • When available, they will sometimes drink sap that is leaking from trees that have been drilled by Red-naped Sapsuckers.

 


Do you want to learn more about hummingbirds?

If so, here are a few books you should consider purchasing. 🙂

 


What’s your favorite strategy for attracting hummingbirds in Texas?

 

Leave a comment below!

Источник: https://birdwatchinghq.com/hummingbirds-in-texas/

Hummingbird Migration

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If you ever wanted to spot a hummer, Texas is among the best destinations to make your wish come true. The state hosts around 18 different species, with the dominant ruby-throated (Archilochus colubris), black-chinned (Archilochus alexandri), Anna's (Calypte anna), and rufous (Selasphorus rufus) hummingbirds. Some species breed here, whereas others winter or stay all year round. Anyway, the chances of encountering one of these entertaining little creatures is enhanced during spring and fall hummingbird migrations, which roughly peak in March to May and August to October.

Some of the most promising spots to check out include Highland Lakes west of Austin and Hill Country in Central Texas, north-west of San Antonio. The most avid birdwatchers are welcome to Big Bend National Park and Padre Island National Seashore to chase all-year residents. However, you can also catch a glimpse of a hummer elsewhere across the state, including large metropolises such as Houston.

Ruby-throated hummingbirds are the most remarkable in Texas. A wee bird weighing some 0.1 oz (3 g) can travel for 1,500 mi (2,400 km) from its breeding grounds reaching southern areas of Canada to winter homes in Mexico and Central America. You could search for a long time and finally see (or not) a single hummer. But knowing the right time and place, you can observe swarms of 25–40 ruby-throats at a time!

Rockport-Fulton HummerBird Celebration (September 16–19, 2021)

The secret is Rockport-Fulton HummerBird Celebration held annually in mid-September near Corpus Christi. On their southern migration, ruby-throated hummingbirds stop by coastal Texas to fatten up at human-made feeders before the non-stop flight across the Gulf of Mexico. During the celebration, locals open their gardens to both birds and the public, so mesmerizing sightings are guaranteed. Stand still and quiet, and they will come right up to your side.

Some Texans used to take the feeders down after Labor Day for the fear the birds would postpone their migration while food is aplenty, but lately, things have changed. Ornithologists claim that the trigger setting hummers on the move is the day's length rather than the lack of food, so feeders are relevant all year round.

Just in case you'd like to buy a feeder and prepare your artificial nectar, the recipe is one part sugar to four parts water. No food coloring allowed—the red vessel itself is attractive enough for a hummingbird. Note that in summer, the mixture will soon turn into toxic alcohol. So clean your feeder up on time.

Источник: https://rove.me/to/texas/hummingbird-migration

Hummingbird Season in Texas

(Photo: )

They arrive every year in areas all over the state of Texas. Hummingbirds, on their way from winter haunts in Mexico to breeding grounds across the United States, pass through the Lone Star State every spring and return south again in the fall. Texas offers a chance to spot more than a dozen hummingbird species, but you have to know where – and when – to look.

Texas Hummingbird Migration

Most hummingbirds arrive in Texas between mid-March and early May, and these spring months offer great opportunities to spot hummingbirds in parks and gardens across the state. Parts of South Texas and the Gulf Coast see the first arrivals, occasionally as early as February. Some hummingbirds stay in Texas to nest during summer, while others continue to areas farther north. The southward migration that takes place in August to September offers arguably the best opportunities of the year to see these birds as they return to their winter homes in great numbers. Only a handful of hummingbirds stay in Texas year-round, but winter sightings are fairly common in some areas.

Hummingbird Species in Texas

Ruby-throated hummingbirds are the most commonly-seen hummingbirds in Texas, according to a study by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. This species, along with the black-chinned hummingbird, nests in Texas before returning to Mexico. Lucifer, broad-tailed and magnificent hummingbirds do the same, but follow a more westerly migration route. These species can be seen in parts of west Texas, but are much more common in Arizona and New Mexico. The Rufous hummingbird, another common species, follows a different schedule, breeding in Canada and passing through Texas in summer on its way back to Mexico. A handful of Rufous hummingbirds have been known to overwinter in parts of Texas along the Gulf Coast. A few other species, including Anna's, buff-bellied, calliope and Costa's hummingbirds are also seen sporadically in Texas.

Where to See Hummingbirds

Hummingbirds stop to nest and feed in parks and gardens all over Texas, though they are more often seen in the mountains of West Texas and in the forested areas of South and East Texas than they are in the high plains of North Texas and the Panhandle. Big Bend National Park in West Texas is a particularly good destination for hummingbird-watching, harboring year-round resident blue-throated and broad-billed hummingbirds – species that are rare elsewhere in the state – along with most of the regular migratory species that can be seen throughout Texas. Coastal areas like Padre Island National Seashore also offer year-round hummingbird sightings.

Texas Hummingbird Events

In many areas, the southward migration that takes place in late summer and early fall is a major event, marked by hummingbird festivals and celebrations. In West Texas, the mountain community of Fort Davis throws a Davis Mountains Hummingbird Celebration every August. Nearby Davis Mountains State Park, known for its excellent bird-watching opportunities, is home to an enclosed bird blind as well as nature trails and campsites. Down on the Gulf Coast, the city of Rockport, Texas, hosts the annual HummerBird Celebration every September. Rockport is about an hour from Padre Island National Seashore, where you can camp on the beach and hang a hummingbird feeder outside your RV to bring the hummingbirds to you.

References

Resources

Writer Bio

Richard Corrigan has been a full-time freelance writer since 2009, and has always considered himself lucky to be able to combine his passion for travel with his love of writing. His work has appeared online on USA TODAY Travel, LIVESTRONG.com, AZCentral and 10Best.com.

Источник: https://traveltips.usatoday.com/hummingbird-season-texas-107545.html

Hummingbirds of Texas


We love watching hummingbirds, and East Texas is a great place for that pastime!

Ruby-throated hummingbird in Tyler on our Texas-shaped feeder!
Ruby-throated hummingbird in Tyler on our Texas-shaped feeder!

The hummingbird population at the end of last year's Texas migration in September of 2018 was awesome, as the hummers made their southbound migration towards South Texas.

We often have over 40 Ruby Throat hummingbirds on our feeders at one time. At times we are also blessed with several brightly colored Baltimore Orioles on our feeders.

We grow lots of hummingbird and butterfly-friendly plants, annuals and perennials such as Butterfly Bush, Marigolds, Zinnias, Goldflame Honeysuckle, Passion Vine, Cross Vine, Weigla, Mexican Firebush, Batface Cuphea, Lipstick Salvia, Hot Lips, and more.

Some of our feeders we put at eye-level, nestled in the flowers. If you don't have pets, or a problem with racoons, this can enhance your hummingbird viewing, and it puts the feeder more in a natural environment for the birds.

We also have an abundance of trees nearby which provide shelter and protection for the hummingbirds.

For Texas hummingbird species, photos, videos, migration patterns, hummingbird gardening, and more,
visit our new hummingbird website at

www.HummingbirdCentral.com


Hummingbird Central Website

Shown here are a few quick favorites of some recent sightings ... for more photos, visit our new website at www.HummingbirdCentral.com

Ruby Throat Hummingbird near Tyler Texas
Ruby Throat Hummingbird near Tyler Texas

Ruby Throat Hummingbird near Tyler Texas
Ruby Throat Hummingbird near Tyler Texas

Ruby Throat Hummingbirds crowding a feeder!
Ruby Throat Hummingbirds crowding a feeder

Male Ruby Throat Hummingbird in flight in East Texas
Male Ruby Throat Hummingbird in flight in East Texas

Hummingbird in flight ... Tyler Texas
Hummingbird feeding at Tyler Texas

Hummingbird hovering while working a feeder ... Tyler Texas
Hummingbird feeding at Tyler Texas

Hummingbird feeding mania near Tyler Texas during the fall migration
Hummingbird feeding mania near Tyler Texas

 

 

Texas hummingbird garden with low-hanging feeders
A good solution if you have no pets, or racoons! Put the feeders at eye-level
for the enjoyment of the hummingbirds, and you!
Texas hummingbird garden with low-hanging feeder


Источник: https://www.tylertexasonline.com/photos-east-texas-hummingbirds.htm
central texas hummingbirds

Providing a haven for hummingbirds

With so much hummingbird traffic, a garden offering shelter, favorite flowers and feeders can become a busy destination for the little birds.

Shelter and safety

Hummingbirds seek trees and bushes as protection from storms. Dense foliage also shields the birds from raptors, cats and other predators. Evergreens such as live oak, hollies, cedars and pines are good choices for year-round cover.

PLANTS TO ATTRACT HUMMINGBIRDS

The plants are perennials unless otherwise noted. Several are native species, available from native plant nurseries or as seed from Native American Seed at seedsource.com, the source recommended by Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

For sun and part sun

• Autumn sage (Salvia greggii): evergreen small shrub, dry to moderate water, deer resistant

• Coral honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens): semi-evergreen vine, part sun, moderate water to moist

• Desert willow (Chilopsis linearis): deciduous small tree, well-drained soil, dry to moderate water

• Esperanza (Tecoma stans var. angustata): deciduous shrub, well-drained, part sun, dry to moderate water

• Firebush (Hamelia patens): deciduous shrub, part sun, moderate water

• Firecracker bush (Russelia rotundifolia): cold-tender shrub, part sun, moderate water, deer resistant

• Flame acanthus (Anisacanthus quadrifidus): deciduous shrub, part sun, moderate water to dry, deer resistant

• Mexican oregano (Poliomintha bustamanta): evergreen low shrub, moderate water to dry, deer resistant

• Pink Texas skullcap (Scutellaria suffrutescens): evergreen small shrub, part sun, dry, deer resistant

• Pride of Barbados (Caesalpinia pulcherrima): deciduous shrub, moderate water to dry, deer resistant

• Trumpet vine (Campsis radicans): deciduous vine, moderate water to dry

• Zinnias (Zinnia var. sp.): annual, moderate water to dry, deer resistant

For shade

Dappled shade

• Cedar sage (Salvia roemeriana): small evergreen shrub, dry, requires alkaline soil, deer resistant

• Eastern red columbine (Aquilegia Canadensis): small semi-evergreen, moderate water to dry, requires alkaline soil

• Turk's cap (Malvaviscus arboreus): also part-shade, deciduous shrub, moderate water to dry, deer resistant

Part shade

• Big red sage (Salvia penstemonoides): evergreen, well-drained, requires alkaline soil

• Cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis): annual, moderate water

• Crossvine (Bignonia capreolata): evergreen, moderate water to dry

• Dwarf blue Lily of the Nile (Agapanthus var. 'Peter Pan Blue'): semi-evergreen, moderate water

• Pentas (hummers prefer red flowers) (Pentas lanceolata): cold-tender, moderate water

• Pineapple sage (Salvia elegans): semi-evergreen, moderate water

• Standing cypress (Ipomopsis rubra): are blueberry cheerios good for you, moderate water to dry

• Texas betony (Stachys coccinea): small evergreen, moderate water, deer resistant

• Tropical sage (Salvia coccinea): sun to shade, moderate water, deer resistant

Kathleen Scott

Trees near a hummingbird garden provide the birds a safe lookout point for flights to flowers and feeders. Moderate-size trees such as redbuds and crape myrtles will fit into most landscapes.

Even though hummingbirds are fast and agile fliers, when a bird hovers over a flower it becomes an easy target for a waiting cat. Keep felines indoors.

Pesticides also pose danger. Chemical residue in flower nectar can sicken hummingbirds. Pesticides may also poison or eliminate gnats, mosquitoes, spiders, caterpillars and aphids that provide protein in the hummingbird diet.

But how does a gardener cope with unwanted insects? Dorothy Borders, a Houston-area gardener and blogger (gardening withnature.blogspot.com), uses organic techniques, saying "the good bugs eat the bad bugs." She strengthens her plants against pests by enriching the soil with compost and providing regular watering with drip irrigation. Her garden survived last summer's drought, and she enjoyed watching a mother hummingbird bring fledglings to her flowers and feeders.

Feeders

Feeders supplement the diets of hummingbirds, especially when flowers and insects are less available. Place feeders where you can see them from the house. Hanging them in a shady spot will help reduce mold and spoilage. Clean the feeders and replace food at least twice a week, more often if the food becomes cloudy how to order online from walmart moldy.

Hummingbird food is easy to make: one part sugar to four parts water. Bring the water to a rolling boil and add sugar, stirring until the sugar is dissolved and the solution is clear. Cool before using and store in the refrigerator.

Do not add red coloring. It's not necessary and may be harmful.

Favorite flowers

A hummingbird hot spot can be a single bed or an entire yard. Start by selecting an area, then choose plants to suit the site, aiming for mass and variety.

The best location for a hummingbird garden is wherever a gardener has space. More species of plants bloom in sunny locations, but a number of shade-loving plants also attract hummingbirds.

Understand your site. What is the soil type - sand, loam, clay, caliche? Is it acidic or alkaline? What kind of light - full sun, part-sun, shade? Is the area moist, moderate or dry, and how much watering are you willing to do?

Hummingbird-attracting plants are available for every condition, including deer resistance. Matching plants to the site is key to a thriving garden.

A mass of flowers will help birds spot your yard from the air, bringing them down to explore. Hummingbirds also remember food sites and return to those places.

For small gardens, use a few plants that bloom profusely for extended periods, such as Turk's cap (Malvaviscus arboreus) for shade or flame acanthus (Anisacanthus quadrifidus) for sun.

No space for a hummingbird garden? Try tucking smaller plants into the border of existing beds. Pink Texas skullcap (Scutellaria suffretescens) and Texas betony (Stachys coccinea) are small evergreen perennials blooming from spring through fall if watered during dry times.

Use a variety of plants for flexibility in shaping the garden and having blooms from spring through fall. Hummingbirds are attracted to a number of flowering trees and bushes, vines, small perennials and annuals. Look for native or well-adapted plants producing tubular blooms. Hummingbirds have good color vision and are drawn to red but feed at flowers of other colors, too.

Native coral honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens) blooms early, a beacon to spring migrants. Autumn sage (Salvia greggii) blooms early and repeatedly throughout the period, if pruned and watered. Firebush (Hamelia patens) anchors gardens with blooms in the heat of summer into October. Pineapple sage (Salvia elegans) brackets the hot months by blooming in midspring and again in fall until frost.

A safe garden with feeders and flowers is a good bet to lure hummingbirds. Then you can sit in the shade, enjoy the beauty and marvel at the tiny iridescent fliers as they frequent your hot spot.

Kathleen Scott writes about gardening and life in the Hill Country in her blog, hillcountry mysteries.blog spot.com.

Источник: https://www.mysanantonio.com/life/article/Providing-a-haven-for-hummingbirds-3688563.php

Hummingbirds of Texas


We love watching hummingbirds, and East Texas is a great place for that pastime!

Ruby-throated hummingbird in Tyler on our Texas-shaped feeder!
Ruby-throated hummingbird in Tyler on our Texas-shaped feeder!

The hummingbird population at the end of last year's Texas migration in September of 2018 was awesome, as the hummers made their southbound migration towards South Texas.

We often have over 40 Ruby Throat hummingbirds on our feeders at one time. At times we are also blessed with several brightly colored Baltimore Orioles on our feeders.

We grow lots of hummingbird and butterfly-friendly plants, annuals and perennials such as Butterfly Bush, Marigolds, Zinnias, Goldflame Honeysuckle, Passion Vine, Cross Vine, Weigla, Mexican Firebush, Batface First financial bank texas customer service number, Lipstick Salvia, Hot Lips, and more.

Some of our feeders we put at eye-level, nestled in the flowers. If you don't have pets, or a problem with racoons, this can enhance your hummingbird viewing, and it puts the feeder bmo of montreal online banking in a natural environment for the birds.

We also have an abundance of trees nearby which provide shelter and protection for the hummingbirds.

For Texas hummingbird species, photos, videos, migration patterns, hummingbird gardening, and more,
visit our new hummingbird website at

www.HummingbirdCentral.com


Hummingbird Central Website

Shown here are a few quick favorites of some recent sightings . for more photos, visit our new website at www.HummingbirdCentral.com

Ruby Throat Hummingbird near Tyler Texas
Ruby Throat Hummingbird near Tyler Texas

Ruby Throat Hummingbird near Tyler Texas
Ruby Throat Hummingbird near Tyler Texas

Ruby Throat Hummingbirds crowding a feeder!
Ruby Throat Hummingbirds crowding a feeder

Male Ruby Throat Hummingbird in flight in East Texas
Male Ruby Throat Hummingbird in flight in East Texas

Hummingbird in flight . Tyler Texas
Hummingbird feeding at Tyler Texas

Hummingbird hovering while working a feeder . Tyler Texas
Hummingbird feeding at Tyler Texas

Hummingbird feeding mania near Tyler Texas during the fall migration
Hummingbird feeding mania near Tyler Texas

 

 

Texas hummingbird garden with low-hanging feeders
first citizens national bank bartlett tn A good solution if you have no pets, or racoons! Put the feeders at eye-level
for the enjoyment of the hummingbirds, and you!
Texas hummingbird garden with low-hanging feeder


Источник: https://www.tylertexasonline.com/photos-east-texas-hummingbirds.htm

Help or hinderance? The best time to take in your hummingbird feeders

Male rufous hummingbird. Photo courtesy of Alan Schmierer.
Male rufous hummingbird. Photo courtesy of Alan Schmierer.

As we look out to our once active hummingbird feeders, we’re instantly reminded that the move is on. The return of fall brings the departure of many migratory birds in the midwest. While the result is a noticeable decrease at hummingbird feeders, rare hummingbirds can sometimes use a helping hand in heading on their way to warmer skies. We at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service frb dallas to provide some food for thought when it comes to taking in your hummingbird feeders.

Hummingbird feeders are popular and usually busy with activity from early spring through late summer. Here in the midwest, they are most commonly visited by ruby-throated hummingbirds, but fall migration can bring some unusual birds, including the rufous hummingbird. In fact, the rufous hummingbird has been appearing in increasing numbers in the midwest in recent years, which is well outside of its normal range.

“Occasionally, stray migrant rufous hummingbirds will linger into late fall here,” said Wildlife Biologist Andy Forbes. “Our resident ruby-throated hummingbirds are not adapted to cold weather and rarely stay long as fall’s chill sets in, but rufous hummingbirds are more adapted to cold because their normal distribution is well to the north and/or at higher elevations.”

Rufous hummingbirds are able to survive the cold for short periods by lowering their metabolism. The key words here being ‘short periods.' Midwest winters are not an environment they could survive in at length, which is why we must make sure we do not encourage them to stay too long by keeping feeders up late into the fall. This includes the use of heat lamps to keep feeders open.

When to take your feeders down

Male ruby-throated hummingbird at a feeder. Photo courtesy of Mark Moschell/Creative Commons.
Male ruby-throated hummingbird at a feeder. Photo courtesy of Mark Moschell/Creative Commons.

What can you do to help hummingbirds on their fall migration? Keep your feeders stocked through the early fall to provide helpful energy to migrating birds, but take your feeder down at the first sign of frost or when your feeder freezes for the first time. This will ensure that stray migrants like the rufous hummingbird don’t stay too long and cause concern.

If you do spot a late-season rufous hummingbird or any other species of unusual hummingbird, please don’t try to capture it. It will likely follow its normal course and migrate. In all situations, if you come upon a central texas hummingbirds, or other wildlife, that you believe to be injured, the best thing to do is to leave it alone. If you feel the need to help, contact a licensed wildlife spirit airlines phone number usa for assistance. Pokemon cards worth money 2016 professional wildlife rehabilitators have the permits, tools and training to safely handle injured animals.

Wildlife Biologist Deanne Endrizzi noted, “it’s a treat seeing out-of-range species like rufous hummingbirds who sometimes choose to route themselves through the midwest, for reasons we don’t entirely understand. We ask people not to prolong their migration by providing food sources too late into the fall. We do however, encourage you to report sightings of these and other rare species you spot passing through your community via eBird. Your assistance in tracking sightings provides important data which helps bird conservation.”

As with any wildlife, it's survival of the fittest and, under www mysynchrony com payment circumstances, migratory birds will follow their biological clock to craigslist san jose jobs when the timing is best for central texas hummingbirds well-fed journey to their favorite wintering grounds. We can all help this happen naturally by following these recommendations.

Источник: https://www.fws.gov/midwest/news/HummingbirdFeeders.html

What types of hummingbirds can you find in Texas?

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Hummingbirds are one of the most popular birds in Texas and have captivated people’s interest and attention for a long time. But because hummingbirds are incredibly fast and small, these birds can be hard to distinguish from each other. Most of the time, they just look like little green, iridescent blurs streaking by your face!

 

But don’t worry.

 

Today, you will learn 5 hummingbirds found in Texas (and how to identify them).

 

Each description includes identification tips, pictures, *range maps, fun facts, AND how to attract these beautiful birds to your yard!

  • The range maps below were generously shared with permission from The Birds of The World, published by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. I use their site OFTEN to learn new information about birds!

 

To central texas hummingbirds more about birds that live near you, check out these other guides!

 

Here are the 5 types of hummingbirds that live in Texas!

 

Please let me know which hummingbird species you have spotted before in the “Comments” section at the end!

 


#1: Ruby-throated Hummingbird

ruby throated hummingbird - types of hummingbirds in texas

 

How To Identify:

  • Males: Medium-sized hummingbird with a bright red throat and a black chin and mask central texas hummingbirds extends behind the eyes. The top of their head and back is iridescent green. Underparts are pale grey with a green wash on the sides of their belly.

 

  • Females: Duller than males. The chin and throat are white with pale green streaks. Their face lacks the black chin and red throat of the male. Their belly is mostly white with buffy flanks, and the back is green.

 

  • *Similar Species: Broad-tailed Hummingbirds, which have a duller red throat and lack a black chin. These two species have ranges that do not overlap.

 

Ruby-throated Hummingbird Range Map

ruby throated hummingbird range map

 

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are common in eastern Texas during warm summer months. Once cooler temperatures start to arrive, these birds migrate to Mexico. Amazingly, most individuals travel ACROSS the Gulf of Mexico to reach their wintering grounds.  Remember, they must make this incredibly long journey in a single flight, as there is nowhere to stop and rest. 🙂

 

How do you attract Ruby-throated Hummingbirds in Texas?

 

While there are many ways to draw these winged beauties to your yard, here are the two BEST strategies:

 

#1. Put out nectar feeders.

species of hummingbirds in texas

The most common way to get hummers to visit your backyard is to hang a quality hummingbird feeder filled with homemade nectar (sugar water).

 

The reason this strategy works is that nectar is a primary food source for hummingbirds. To fuel their active lifestyle, hummingbirds need to feed on it almost continuously throughout the day.

 

Supplying a FRESH and RELIABLE nectar source will be sought after by hummingbirds.

 

#2. Plant native plants that have long, tubular flowers.

 

As we just discussed, hummingbirds need nectar continuously, which is naturally obtained from flowers. Did you know that a hummingbird can visit up to 2,000 flowers each day looking for nectar?

 

With that being said, I hope it’s easy to see why you should plant shrubs, trees, and flowers in your yard that hummingbirds can’t resist! Establishing a hummingbird garden provides birds with a safe place to reliably find food.

 

Look for red flowers, because hummingbirds are naturally attracted to this color. Also, long, tubular flowers are great for hummingbirds because they can access the nectar with their long beaks and tongues, but bees and other insects can’t!

 

What sounds do Ruby-throated Hummingbirds make?

Press PLAY above to hear the sound these birds make!

 

Believe it or not, these hummingbirds do make distinctive noises. The sounds that I most often hear are a series of calls seem to be given as individuals are chasing each other around. It resembles a chattering “chee-dit.”

 

Fun Facts:

  • Their legs are so short they are unable to walk or hop! If needed, they can sort of shuffle and scoot down a branch.

 

  • These hummingbirds can beat their wings up to 53 times per SECOND!

 

  • Ruby-throated Hummingbirds drink nectar for energy, but they obtain nutrition by eating a wide variety of small bugs. The list includes spiders, mosquitoes, gnats, fruit flies, and small bees.

 

 


#2: Rufous Hummingbird

 

Rufous Hummingbirds are the most aggressive type of hummingbird in Texas!

 

Be careful if one finds your hummingbird feeders or garden, as they will relentlessly attack and drive away other hummingbirds (including much larger species) away.

 

rufous hummingbird

 

How To Identify:

  • Males: Bright copper-orange on their back (although some males have a green back) and sides of their belly. Beautiful reddish-orange iridescent throat. White breast and ear patch behind eye. Compared to other hummingbird species, they are small.

 

  • Females: They have a green crown, neck, and back. Rufous (copper) colored sides with a white breast and belly. Some females have a spot of red or orange on their throat.

 

  • *Similar Species: Allen’s Hummingbird, which has slightly more green on their crown and back. Allen’s also has narrower outer tail feathers and a slightly downward-curved bill. Females of these two species are incredibly hard to tell apart.

 

Rufous Hummingbird Range Map

rufous hummingbird

 

Rufous Hummingbirds have an interesting migration pattern. In the spring, they fly north up the Pacific Coast to their summer breeding grounds. They return to their winter homes in Mexico and parts of the southern United States by flying a completely different route along the Rocky Mountains!

 

How To Attract:

Just put out a hummingbird feeder full of homemade sugar water or plant native nectar-filled flowers in your backyard!

 

 

But please be aware that Rufous Hummingbirds may drive away any other hummers that visit your yard. These aggressive birds are incredibly territorial and will relentlessly scare away all other hummingbird species. They have even been seen chasing chipmunks!

 

If an aggressive Rufous Hummingbird has taken over your hummingbird feeder, you have a few options to help alleviate the pressure. My favorite strategy is setting up multiple feeders around your entire yard. The farther you can place them apart, the better! There is no way your problem bird can defend all the feeding stations at once, ensuring that other individuals get a chance to eat. 🙂

 

What sounds do Rufous Hummingbirds make?

The most common sound you will hear these birds make is a series of chipping notes, which are given as a warning to intruding birds. Males also make a “chu-chu-chu” call at the bottom of a dive while trying to impress females.

 

Fun Facts:

  • They have one of the longest migrations of any bird in the world, which is incredible given their small size (roughly 3 inches)! A one-way journey from Mexico to Alaska is about 3,900 miles (6,275 km), and remember they make app t mobile tuesday trip twice a year.

 

  • They build their nests with soft plant down held together with spider webs. Like other hummingbird species, females prefer lichen, bark, and moss as camouflage.

 

  • In addition to drinking nectar from plants, these birds enjoy hunting gnats, midges, and flies in the air, while plucking aphids from leaves.

 


#3: Black-chinned Hummingbird

 

I will never forget the first time I saw this hummingbird species. While on a camping trip in Zion National Park, I took an early morning walk when a male Black-chinned Hummingbird started feeding on the wildflowers in front of me! I still remember the purple, vibrant throat shining in the early morning sun. 🙂

black chinned hummingbird

 

How To Identify:

  • Males: A medium-sized hummingbird with a metallic green body with a white breast and greenish flanks. Their head appears black overall, but their crown is actually very dark green, and their lower throat is iridescent violet. You typically can’t see the strip of purple unless the light hits it just right. Look for a white spot behind their eyes.

 

  • Females: Have a greenish-grey cap on their heads and a green back. There is a white spot behind their eyes, similar to the males. Females have a dark-spotted grey throat and a white breast.

 

  • *Similar Species: Ruby-throated Hummingbird, which has a greener crown, shorter bill, and red throat. But these two hummingbirds have ranges that are incredibly different, so you shouldn’t mix them up.

 

Black-chinned Hummingbird Range Map

black chinned hummingbird range map

 

Black-chinned Hummingbirds breed in Texas during the summer months. In winter, they migrate to the west coasts of Mexico. This species is one of the most adaptable of all hummingbird species and is found in various habitats. Look for them in places such as mountain and alpine meadows, canyons with thickets, orchards, urban areas, and recently disturbed areas.

 

You will probably hear a Black-chinned Hummingbird flying if they are around. This is because their wings make a distinctive hum, which sounds similar to a bee. These birds also commonly make different high-pitched ticks and chips.

 

Fun Facts:

 

  • Their eggs are only about the size of a coffee bean!

 

  • When the weather is cold, and lots of energy is needed to stay warm, these birds can drink up to THREE times their body weight in nectar. On the flip side, when insects are plentiful, they can survive without any nectar for stretches of time.

 


#4: Calliope Hummingbird

 

The Calliope Hummingbird is the smallest bird in Texas! It’s under four inches in length and weighs between 2 – 3 grams (0.071 to 0.106 oz), which is about the same weight as a ping-pong ball!

calliope hummingbird

 

How To Identify:

  • Males: These small birds are easy to identify because of their long, magenta throat feathers that appear as streaks going down their neck. Their head, upperparts, and flanks are metallic green. The breast is white. Males can be observed performing a unique U-shaped first bank bucks county bank that is used to impress females.

 

  • Females: They have small dark spots on their white throat instead of the vibrant magenta throat feathers like the male. Their head and back are covered in a metallic green with a white, buffy breast.

 

  • *Similar Species: It’s hard to distinguish between female Calliope and female Rufous Hummingbirds. The biggest difference is that Rufous Hummingbirds are larger with a longer bill and have more copper coloring at the base of the tail.

 

Calliope Hummingbird Range Map

calliope hummingbird range map

 

This hummingbird species has an incredibly long migration route, especially when you consider their tiny size. The Calliope spends its winters in Mexico. But each spring, they make the long migration up the Pacific coast to their summer breeding grounds.  During fall migration, they return to Mexico by following the Rocky Mountains instead of heading back down the coast.

 

Male Calliope Hummingbirds are known for their impressive U-shaped dives, which are used to attract females. During the display, they will fly as high as 100 feet in the air and then dive until they almost hit the ground, and then rise back up to repeat the process.

 

While they are plummeting towards the Earth, you should be able to hear buzzing, which is emitted from their tail feathers, along with a high-pitched “zing” call that the bird makes.

 

Fun Facts:

  • Even though they are tiny, Calliope Hummingbirds are known to be feisty during the breeding season. They have been observed chasing away birds as large as Red-tailed Hawks!

 

  • These pnc online banking account login hummers are known to hunt small insects by “hawking.” This means they sit on a perch waiting for their victim to pass by, and then fly out to catch it in mid-air.

 

  • Calliopes like using conifer trees for nest construction. They try to choose a limb with a substantial sheltering branch overhead, which protects them from precipitation and makes the nest more difficult to spot from above. Organic materials such as lichen, bark, and moss comprise the camouflage.

 


#5: Broad-tailed Hummingbird

 

These hummingbirds are a bird of mountain meadows and open woodlands. They typically breed at elevations between 5,000 and 10,500 feet.

broad tailed hummingbirds

 

How To Identify:

  • Males: Adults central texas hummingbirds a white breast, buffy flanks, and green covering their head, back, and tail. Look for their iridescent red throat.

 

  • Females: Similar to other types of hummingbirds, females are larger than males. They have a lightly speckled throat, white upper breast, and a brownish belly. Head and back are green.

 

  • *Similar Species: Ruby-throated Hummingbird, but their ranges do not overlap. These two species should be easy to tell apart depending on your location since Ruby-throats only live in eastern North America.

 

Broad-tailed Hummingbird Range Map

 

Broad-tailed Hummingbirds only stay in western Texas for a few months, from late May to early August.

 

Males put on impressive aerial displays to attract females. The show begins with the male climbing high into the sky and then diving towards the ground, pulling up right in front of the bird he is trying to attract. Broad-tailed Hummingbirds are promiscuous, and they may mate with many individuals during a breeding season.

 

There are two sounds you may hear these hummingbirds make!

 

#1. Both males and females make chittering and chattering noises. These sounds are most often heard while they are feeding and foraging. (Listen below!)

 

#2. Their wings sound like crickets! While they fly, you can distinctly hear a trill that is both insect-like and metallic. (Listen below!)

 

Fun Facts:

  • These birds live up to 10,500 feet high in the mountains, where temperatures regularly drop below freezing, even in summer. To survive these cold nights, Broad-tailed Hummingbirds enter what is called a state of torpor, where they slow their heart rate down and drop their body temperature until the sun comes up!

 

  • To obtain protein, Broad-tailed’s will eat insects wherever they can find them! That could be catching bugs in mid-air, gleaning off leaves, or even stealing them off a spider web!

 

  • When available, they will sometimes drink sap that is leaking from trees that have been drilled by Red-naped Sapsuckers.

 


Do you want to learn more 1st financial federal credit union routing number hummingbirds?

If so, here are a few books you should consider purchasing. 🙂

 


What’s your favorite strategy for attracting hummingbirds in Texas?

 

Leave a comment below!

Источник: https://birdwatchinghq.com/hummingbirds-in-texas/

Interesting Facts

Georgia is home to 11 hummingbird species during the year: the ruby-throated, black-chinned, rufous, calliope, magnificent, Allen's, Anna's, broad-billed, green violet-ear, green-breasted mango and broad-tailed hummingbird.

The ruby-throated hummingbird is the only species of hummingbird known to nest to Georgia. These birds weigh as little as a first-class letter. The female builds the walnut-sized nest without any help from her mate, a process can take up to 12 days. The female then lays two eggs, each about the size of a black-eyed pea.

In Georgia, female ruby-throated hummers produce up to two broods per year. Nests are typically built on a small branch that is parallel to or dips downward. The birds sometimes rebuild the nest they used the previous year.

A few other interesting facts on hummers that visit Georgia:

  • The calliope hummingbird is the smallest bird found in North America.
  • The rufous hummingbird has the longest migration of North American hummers—more than 3,000 miles!

Feeding Hummingbirds

Hummingbird nectar can easily be prepared at home. The best solution consists of 1 part sugar to 4 parts water (this mirrors the sugar concentration of the nectar found in flowers). Boil the water for 2–3 minutes before adding sugar. Cool and store the mixture in a first financial credit union open account until you are ready to use it.

There is no need to add red food coloring. Hummingbirds are attracted to the red color of the feeder and do not prefer red nectar to clear.

Select a feeder that is easy to clean and does not drip. In warm weather, change nectar every 2–3 days or before it gets cloudy.

Periodically clean feeders, making sure that mold and bacteria are removed. Feeders can be easily cleaned soaking them in a solution of 1 central texas hummingbirds bleach and 10 parts water. Thoroughly rinse the feeders before using them again.

Keep at least one feeder up throughout the year. You cannot keep hummingbirds from migration by leaving feeders up during the fall and winter seasons. Citi premier card credit limit migrate in response to a decline in day length, not food availability. Most of the rare hummingbird's found in Georgia are seen during the winter.

Ants can be kept away from feeders by installing an "ant moat" between the feeder and the structure on which the feeder is hung. Smearing petroleum jelly or automotive grease on the wire above the feeder can also thwart ants.

Yellow jackets can be trapped using a simple yellow jacket trap made from a 2-liter soft drink bottle. Contact the DNR's Wildlife Conservation Section for details. Bees, wasps and yellow jackets can be deterred by smearing cooking oil on the surface of the artificial flowers surrounding the feeding central texas hummingbirds on your feeders.


How to Keep Your Hummingbird Feeders from Freezing

One of the simplest ways to keep hummingbird feeders from freezing in the winter is to place a clip-on shop light equipped with a 150-watt bulb close to the feeder. When there is a chance the temperature will dip below freezing, turn the light on. The heat generated by the light bulb should keep the feeder from freezing.

It is always best to determine how close you can place the bulb next to the feeder without melting plastic feeder parts. Mount the light at varying distances from your feeder and see what works best with your feeder. Use this method to test the set-up before leaving the light on for extended periods of time.


Gardening for Hummingbirds

Homeowners who are the most successful at attracting hummingbirds combine the use of feeders and hummingbird food plants. Plan plantings so that nectar-producing plants are blooming throughout the growing season. Also plant flowers that attract small, soft-bodied insects, which provide a protein source for hummingbirds. Other plants provide wintering hummingbirds with roosting cover on cold winter nights.

Here are some excellent plants to attract hummingbirds:

Signifiers: Exotic (e), Native (n)

Herbaceous Plants

Dalhia (e)

Indian Pink (n)

Pentstemon (n)

Petunia (e)

Hollyhock (e)

Red-Hot Poker (e)

Delphinium

Geranium (n, e)

Gladiolus (e)

Phlox (n, e)

Four-O'clock (e)

Cardinal Flower (n)

Lupine (n)

Salvia (n, e)

Bleeding Heart (e)

Impatiens (n, e)

Snapdragon (n, e)

Century Pant (e)

Foxglove (e)

Mexican Sunflower (e)

Jewelweed (n)

Crocosmia (e)

Blazing Star (Liatris) (n)

Columbine (n)

Butterfly Weed (n)

Red Basil (e)

Canna Lily (n)

Cockscomb (e)

Coreopsis (n)

Beebalm (n)

Shrubs

Buckeye (n)

Powderpuff (n)

Mexican Cigar (e)

Shrimp Plant (e)

Hibiscus (n, e)

Abelia (e)

Weigela (e)

Wild Azalea (n)

Flowering Maple (e)

Flowering Quince (e)

Azaleas (e)

Buttonbush (n)

Turk's Cap Mellow (e)

Trees

Black Locust (n)

Tulip Poplar (n)

Redbud (n)

Crabapple (e)

Orchid Tree (e)

Hawthorne (n)

Red Horse Chesnut (n)

Vines

Cross Vine (n)

Trumpet Creeper (n)

Coral Honeysuckle (n)

Yellow Jasmine (n)

Scarlet Runner-Bean (e)


Hummingbirds of Georgia

The vast majority of hummingbird species that occur in Georgia are only seen in winter. Many are immature birds or females, and many cannot be identified unless captured and closely examined. Little is known about their movements and the habitats they use in Georgia and elsewhere in the Southeast. With this in mind, reporting sightings of wintering hummingbirds can be extremely valuable. Chances are good that new species will be discovered in Georgia.

The following list includes details of hummingbirds that can be seen in Georgia. (Note: The number of sightings of different species may have changed since this information was compiled.) The Hummingbirds of Georgia fact sheet is available.

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: Rare in state past October 31. Most wintering birds are found along the coast

Size: 3¾ inches

Identification Adult male has a bright red throat (gorget) that appears black in poor light, an iridescent green back, white underparts and grayish-green sides. Adult female has a metallic green back, white throat and grayish-brown sides

Breeding range: Only hummingbird known to breed east of the Mississippi River. Breeds throughout the eastern United States as far west as eastern Texas and Oklahoma north to Minnesota

Winter range: South Florida, southern Mexico to Panama

Black-chinned Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: Fewer than five reported in state each winter

Size: 3¾ inches (slightly larger than the ruby-throated hummingbird)

Identification: Adult male appears much like a ruby-throated male. Throat is black with a violet band along the lower edge of the gorget seen only in good light. Adult female appears much like a ruby-throated female

Breeding range: Breeds from southwestern British Columbia southward into western Mexico and as far east as Texas

Winter range: Mexico

Anna's Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: Only three records for Georgia

Size: 4 inches

Identification: Adult male's head is a deep rose-red. Color will actually extend down the side of the neck. Underparts are grayish-green. Adult female often displays tiny red feathers that form a small reddish patch on the throat. Underparts are grayish-green

Breeding range: Washington, Oregon, California, Arizona

Winter range: Pacific coast area from Washington to northwest Mexico and Arizona

Broad-tailed Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: A very rare winter visitor

Size: 4 inches

Identification: Adult male looks much like a ruby-throated male, with a green back, rose-red throat, white underparts and green sides. Adult female has a green back, streaked throat, white underparts and pale brown sides

Breeding range: East-central California and Nevada, north to Montana and Wyoming to very western Texas and Mexico

Winter range: Central Mexico southward

Magnificent Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: Two birds documented in Georgia, one in summer

Size: 5¼ inches (Georgia's largest hummingbird)

Identification: Adult male is metallic bronze-green, with cinnamon rufous color in tail and purple crown. Adult female is duller with no purplish crown

Breeding range: Mountainous regions of southern Arizona and south-western New Mexico to Central America

Winter range: Mexico southward

Broad-billed Hummingbird

Status in Georgia:
One bird has been documented in Georgia. An adult male overwintered in a backyard in Macon during the winter of 2001–2002.

Size: 4 inches

Identification: Adult male displays brilliant emerald green feathers on his breast, sides, belly and back. His gorget is sapphire blue. The bill is reddish-orange and black near the tip. The male's tail is deeply forked, dark blue with a grayish border. Adult female lacks the sapphire gorget and is green to bronze-green on its underside with a pale throat. The female's bill is predominantly blackish with some orange near its base

Breeding range: The broad-billed hummingbird is a Mexican bird that ventures into the United States regularly only in southern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico. It is the most common hummingbird in the lowlands of northwestern Mexico

Winter range: Mexico (several birds have been seen in South Carolina, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama)

Rufous Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: Most common wintering hummingbird

Size: 3¾ inches (slightly larger than ruby-throated central texas hummingbirds Adult male has a reddish-brown back, rump, tail and sides with orange-red gorget. Adult female has a green back, light brown sides and reddish flecks in throat that form a central reddish spot. Tail has varying amounts of brownish color

Breeding range: Southern Alaska through Washington, Oregon, western Montana and northern Idaho

Winter range: Throughout much of Mexico

Allen's Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: Less than a dozen records in Georgia

Size: 3¾ inches (slightly larger than a ruby-throated hummingbird)

Identification: Adult male has a green back, orange-red gorget, reddish-brown sides, rump and tail. Adult female cannot be safely separated from the female Rufous Hummingbird in the field. Female has reddish-brown color in the tail, greenish back, streaked throat and reddish-brown flanks

Breeding range: Coastal California

Winter range: Mexico

Calliope Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: At least one or two birds are reported each winter

Size: 3¼ inches (smallest bird in northern North America)

Identification: The male calliope is Georgia's only hummingbird with rosy purple gorget feathers that form streaks against a white background. Adult female has a metallic bronze-green back; its sides and flanks are cinnamon; the throat is dull, brownish-white with dusky streaks and the breast is cinnamon-buff

Breeding range: Mountains of central British Columbia and southwestern Alberta to northern Baha California

Winter range: Mexico

Green Violet-ear Hummingbird

Status in Georgia: The only verified sighting was in Thomasville in July 2001

Size: 4¾ inches

Identification: Both male and female birds are dark in color, have a moderately down-curved bill, and are grass green above and below the body. Males have a violet-green central breast spot and ear patch

Breeding range: No breeding records in the United States. Breeds in Mexico south into Peru and Bolivia

Winter range: Similar to the breeding range


Georgia's Wintering Hummingbirds

Georgia's wintering hummingbirds still need nourishment during the cooler months.

Georgians should keep their hummingbird feeders up during the fall and winter because during these seasons some fast, fly-by friends will be buzzing by ice-covered windows throughout the state! Nine species of hummingbirds can be seen in the state—ruby-throated, black-chinned, Anna's, broad-tailed, broad-billed, rufous, calliope, Allen's and magnificent. The ruby-throated is the only hummingbird that nests in Georgia with very few birds seen over wintering here. Most of the hummingbirds seen in Georgia during the winter months are western visitors. Wintering hummingbirds begin arriving as early as August; however, they appear at feeders anytime throughout fall and winter. In winter, the hummingbird with the longest migration route and North America's smallest hummingbird are among the hummingbirds that migrate here.

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources' Wildlife Resources Division is encouraging people across the state to keep up at least one feeder during the winter months so the DNR can document western hummingbirds that find their way to Georgia. If a wintering hummingbird visits a feeder this year, it may return next year.

Traditionally, Georgians have taken their feeders down in the fall in fear that feeders would keep hummingbirds from migrating. But, hummingbirds migrate in response to day length, not food supply, so leaving a feeder up will not hinder the hummers migrating. Some lucky Georgia homeowners have been known to host six or more wintering hummingbirds!

The rufous hummingbird is the most commonly seen wintering hummer in the southeastern U.S. During one winter, more than 100 rufous hummers were documented in Georgia. The rufous hummingbird has the longest migration of any North American hummingbird, traveling from its breeding ranges that extend from the Pacific Northwest as far north as southern Alaska to its primary wintering grounds in south-central Mexico. However, wintering rufous hummingbirds are spotted throughout Georgia and the rest of the Southeast.

The colorful calliope hummingbird is the smallest bird found in the United States and is one of Georgia's winter residents. The calliope had first been seen in the Peach State during the winter of 1998–1999.

Many of the wintering hummingbirds are extremely difficult to identify, so don't assume that the wintering hummer at your feeder is a rufous. It may take an expert to positively identify them. If a hummingbird shows up at your feeder from October until the end of February, be sure to contact the Wildlife Conservation Section office in Forsyth at the address below. Your information can help WRD document the incidence of wintering hummers and help determine their habitat needs.

Georgians who spot any of the unusual hummingbirds species that migrate through Georgia in winter months are encouraged to report their sightings to the Wildlife Conservation Section. Who knows, you may be the first person to report a buff-bellied or other rare hummingbird in Georgia!


Contact Information

Report sightings of rare hummingbirds as well as all hummingbirds spotted in the winter to:
Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife Resources Division, Wildlife Conservation Section
116 Rum Creek Drive
Forsyth, GA 31029
478-994-1438

Источник: https://georgiawildlife.com/hummingbirds-your-backyard

Hummingbird Season in Texas

(Photo: )

They arrive every year in areas all over the state of Texas. Hummingbirds, on their way from winter haunts in Mexico to breeding grounds across the United States, pass through the Lone Star State every spring and return south again in the fall. Texas offers a chance to spot more than a dozen hummingbird species, but you have to know where – and when – to look.

Texas Hummingbird Migration

Most hummingbirds arrive in Texas between mid-March and early May, and these spring months offer great opportunities to spot hummingbirds in parks and gardens across the state. Parts of South Texas and the Gulf Coast see the first arrivals, occasionally as early as February. Some hummingbirds stay in Texas to nest during summer, while others continue to areas farther north. The southward migration that takes place in August to September offers arguably the best opportunities of the year to see these birds as they return to their winter homes in great numbers. Only a handful of hummingbirds stay in Texas year-round, but winter sightings are fairly common in some areas.

Hummingbird Species in Texas

Ruby-throated hummingbirds are the most commonly-seen hummingbirds in Texas, according to a study by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. This species, along with the black-chinned hummingbird, nests in Texas before returning to Mexico. Lucifer, broad-tailed and magnificent hummingbirds do the same, but follow a more westerly migration route. These species can be seen in parts of west Texas, but are much more common in Arizona and New Mexico. The Rufous hummingbird, another common species, follows a different schedule, breeding in Canada and passing through Texas in summer on its way back to Mexico. A handful of Rufous hummingbirds have been known to overwinter in parts of Texas along the Gulf Coast. A few other species, including Anna's, buff-bellied, calliope and Costa's hummingbirds are also seen sporadically in Texas.

Where to See Hummingbirds

Hummingbirds stop to nest and feed in parks and gardens all over Texas, though they are more often seen in the mountains of West Texas and in the forested areas of South and East Texas than they are in the high plains of North Texas and the Panhandle. Big Bend National Park in West Texas is a particularly good destination for hummingbird-watching, harboring year-round resident blue-throated and broad-billed hummingbirds – species that are rare elsewhere in the state – along with most of the regular migratory species that can be seen throughout Texas. Coastal areas central texas hummingbirds Padre Island National Seashore also offer year-round hummingbird sightings.

Texas Hummingbird Events

In many areas, the southward migration that takes place in late summer and early fall is a major event, marked by hummingbird festivals and celebrations. In West Texas, the mountain community of Fort Davis central texas hummingbirds a Davis Mountains Hummingbird Celebration every August. Nearby Davis Mountains State Park, known for its excellent bird-watching opportunities, is home to an enclosed bird blind as well as nature trails and campsites. Down on the Gulf Coast, the city of Rockport, Texas, hosts the annual HummerBird Celebration every September. Rockport is about an hour from Padre Island National Seashore, where you can camp on the beach and hang a hummingbird feeder outside your RV to bring the hummingbirds to you.

References

Resources

Writer Bio

Richard Corrigan has been a full-time freelance writer since 2009, and has always considered himself lucky to be able to combine his passion for travel with his love of writing. His work has appeared online on USA TODAY Travel, LIVESTRONG.com, AZCentral and 10Best.com.

Источник: https://traveltips.usatoday.com/hummingbird-season-texas-107545.html

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