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What InStyle Editors Are Actually Gifting (or Hoping to Get!) This Season

The holiday season is well under way, but oops — part of you totally forgot that presents were, you know, a thing. Now, you're scrambling to find items that, ideally, check every single box: fun, fashionable, meaningful, useful, and quick. Emphasis on quick — there's really no time to waste brainstorming here. 

With that panicked feeling of procrastination creeping up on us, we put out a call to InStyle editors for their best gift ideas — and whoa, did they come up with some seriously great ones. The combination of professional opinion, personal taste, and an eye for what's cool helped us form a full list of picks that are perfect for anyone you have to buy for, from the difficult-to-please to the always-ahead-of-the-game.

RELATED: 10 Conscious Gift Ideas for the Fashion Lover in Your Life

Shop InStyle editors' best gift ideas for 2021, ahead.

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Источник: https://www.instyle.com/fashion/editor-picks-gift-guide

Bra

Woman's undergarment for supporting breast movement

For other uses, see Bra (disambiguation) and BRA (disambiguation).

"Brassiere" redirects here. For the type of restaurant, see Brasserie.

Full-cup bra

Plunge bra

Balconette bra

A bra, short for brassiere or brassière (, or ; French: [bʁasjɛʁ]), is a form-fittingundergarment typically designed to support or cover a woman's breasts. Bras are designed for a variety of purposes, including general breast support, enhancing or diminishing the appearance of breast size, creating cleavage, or other aesthetic or practical considerations. Swimsuits, camisoles, and backless dresses may have built-in breast support with supportive bra cups. Nursing bras are designed to facilitate breastfeeding. Some people have a medical and surgical need for brassieres, but most wear them for fashion or cultural reasons. There is no evidence that bras prevent breasts from sagging and one study even suggests the opposite (weakening of the breasts' supportive tissue),[1] with the exception of wearing them during sports exercises.

Bras have gained importance beyond their mere functionality as a garment. Women's choices about what kind of bra to wear are consciously and unconsciously affected by social perceptions of the ideal female body shape, which changes over time. Bras have become a fashion item and cultural statement that are sometimes purposely revealed by the wearer or even worn as outerwear.

Etymology[edit]

The term brassiere, from French brassière, was used by the Evening Herald in Syracuse, New York, in 1893.[2] It gained wider acceptance in 1904 when the DeBevoise Company used it in their advertising copy—although the word is actually French for a child's undershirt. In French, it is called a soutien-gorge (literally, "throat-supporter").[3] It and other early versions resembled a camisole stiffened with boning.

Vogue magazine first used the term brassiere in 1907,[5][6] and by 1911 the word had made its way into the Oxford English Dictionary.[7] On 3 November 1914, the newly formed US patent category for "brassieres" was inaugurated with the first patent issued to Mary Phelps Jacob.[8][9] In the 1930s, brassiere/brassière was gradually shortened to bra.[3]

History[edit]

Main article: History of bras

Several lingerie and shapewear manufacturers, among them Wonderbra, Frederick's of Hollywood, Agent Provocateur and Victoria's Secret, produce bras that enhance cleavage.[10] There are as many as 30 different kinds of bras like push-up, strapless, bandeau, demicup, sports bra, the minimiser, padded, a T-shirt bra, multiway, plunge, wireless, maternity, seamless, silicone, and stick-on available.[11] History of the brassière is full of myths in which people like Caresse Crosby, Howard Hughes, Herminie Cadolle and even Otto Titzling command the center stage.[12]

Before the spread of brassières the female bust was encased in corsets and structured garments called "bust improvers" made of boning and lace.[13] The history of corsets indicates they started to go out of fashion by 1917 as when metal was needed to make tanks and munitions for World War I,[14] and the 1920s trend of boyish figures.[15] With a return to more womanly figures in the 1930s corsetry maintained a strong demand even at the height of the Great Depression.[15] Designer Vivienne Westwood re-introduced the corset as a trendy way to enhance cleavage in 1985.[16] It was followed by Jean Paul Gaultier in 1989 when he dressed Madonna in a pink corset. Soon Westwood introduced an elastic-sided variant that works as a balcony to push up the cleavage.[17] According to Rebecca Scritchfield, the resurgent popularity of corsets is driven by "the picture on Instagram of somebody with a tiny waist and giant boobs."[18]

When corsets became unfashionable, brassières and padding helped to project, display and emphasize the breasts. In 1893, New Yorker Marie Tucek was granted a patent for a "breast supporter", described as a modification of the corset, and was very similar to a modern push-up bra designed to support the breasts. It consisted of a plate made of metal, cardboard or other stiff material shaped to fit against the torso under the breasts, following the contour of the breasts. It was covered with silk, canvas or other cloth, which extended above the plate to form a pocket for each breast. The plate curved around the torso and ended near the armpits.[19][20]

Early brassières[edit]

Wearing a garment to support the breasts may date back to ancient Greece.[21] Women wore an apodesmos,[22] later stēthodesmē,[23]mastodesmos[24] and mastodeton,[25] all meaning "breast-band", a band of wool or linen that was wrapped across the breasts and tied or pinned at the back.[27] Roman women wore breast-bands during sport, such as those shown on the Coronation of the Winner mosaic (also known as the "Bikini mosaic").

Fragments of linen textiles found at Lengberg Castle in East Tyrol in Austria dated to between 1440 and 1485 are believed to have been bras. Two of them had cups made from two pieces of linen sewn with fabric that extended to the bottom of the torso with a row of six eyelets for fastening with a lace or string. One had two shoulder straps and was decorated with lace in the cleavage.[28][29]

From the 16th century, the undergarments of wealthier women in the Western world were dominated by the corset, which pushed the breasts upwards. In the later 19th century, clothing designers began experimenting with alternatives, splitting the corset into multiple parts: a girdle-like restraining device for the lower torso, and devices that suspended the breasts from the shoulder to the upper torso.[21]

Modern bra[edit]

"Breast Supporter" c. 1893

Though the first bra, a linen and lace garment that looks almost exactly like a modern bra, was discovered in an early 15th century collection from Lengberg Castle in Tyrol, Austria, there is no other evidence of any use of bras in the 1400s, and the first bra is attributed to Mary Phelps Jacob (better known as Caresse Crosby), a New York socialite.[30][14] Frustrated with a whale bone corset that kept popping through a new party dress,[31] she created the bra from two handkerchiefs and some ribbon to show off her cleavage.[32][33]

Since it made her look better, Phelps Jacob a.k.a. Polly started selling bras to her friends for one dollar. Soon she founded the Fashion Form Brassière Company, a two-woman factory in Boston, and patented the first bra as "the backless brassière" in 1914. After making a few hundred bras and some orders from department stores, she was persuaded by her husband to close the company. She sold the patent to The Warner Brothers Corset Company for US$1,500. In the next 30 years, Warner Brothers made more than US$15 million from the design.[32][33]

Corset from 1898

Bodice from 1900

According to Cadolle Lingerie House, Herminie Cadolle, a French inventor, was the first inventor to patent the modern 'brassiere', called the "corselet-gorge", lingerie which separated the upper bra portion from the lower corset, the first step toward the modern bra.[34] An urban legend that the brassière was invented by a man named Otto Titzling ("tit sling") who lost a lawsuit with Phillip de Brassière ("fill up the brassière") originated with the 1971 book Bust-Up: The Uplifting Tale of Otto Titzling and the Development of the Bra and was propagated in a comedic song from the movie Beaches.[35]

Women have played a large part in the design and manufacture of the bra, accounting for half the patents filed. The Dresden-based German, Christine Hardt, patented the first modern brassière in 1899.[37] Sigmund Lindauer from Stuttgart-Bad Cannstatt, Germany, developed a brassière for mass production and patented it in 1912. It was mass-produced by Mechanische Trikotweberei Ludwig Maier und Cie. in Böblingen, Germany.[38][39] In the United States, Mary Phelps Jacob received a patent in 1914 for the first brassière design that is recognized as the basis for modern bras.[40] Mass production in the early 20th century made the garment widely available to women in the United States, England, Western Europe, and other countries influenced by western fashion.[3] Metal shortages in World War I encouraged the end of the corset.

Development of the underwire bra started in the 1930s,[42] though it did not gain widespread popularity until the 1950s, when the end of World War II freed metal for domestic use.[43][44] Aviator and filmmaker Howard Hughes designed a prototype for an aerodynamic underwire bra for Jane Russell when filming The Outlaw in 1941. According to Hughes, the resultant amount was "the length of the actual cleavage is five and one-quarter inches."[45] Bras in 1940s left a substantial amount of fabric in the center, thus creating a separation of breasts instead of the pushed-together cleavage of today.[46]Frederick Mellinger of Frederick's of Hollywood created the first padded bra in 1947, followed by an early push-up bra a year later (dubbed "The Rising Star"[14]).[31]

A padded bra adds material (foam, silicone, gel, air, fluid etc.[47]) to the cups to help the breasts look fuller.[48] There are different designs, from a slight lift to a highly pushed-up effect,[49] that provide coverage and support, hides nipples, add shape to breasts that are far apart and adds comfort.[48] Graduated padding uses more padding at the bottom of the cups that gradually tapers off towards the top.[50] There also are semi-padded bras that suits deep neck dresses.[51] With the advent of padded bras, sales of removable pads took a plunge,[52] though some padded bras also have removable inserts.[49] Actress Julia Roberts was required to wear a custom made silcone gel filled bra for the movie Erin Brockovich in order to increase her cleavage.[53][54]

Brassières were initially manufactured by small production companies and supplied to retailers. The term "cup" was not used until 1916, and manufacturers relied on stretchable cups to accommodate different sized breasts. Women with larger or sagging breasts had the choice of long-line bras, built-up backs, wedge-shaped inserts between the cups, wider straps, Lastex, firm bands under the cup, and light boning.

In October 1932, the S.H. Camp and Company correlated the size and pendulousness of breasts to letters A through D. Camp's advertising featured letter-labeled profiles of breasts in the February 1933 issue of Corset and Underwear Review. In 1937, Warner began to feature cup sizing in its products. Adjustable bands were introduced using multiple hook and eye closures in the 1930s. By the time World War II ended, most fashion-conscious women in Europe and North America were wearing brassière, and women in Asia, Africa, and Latin America began to adopt it.[3]

1960s–1980s[edit]

Push up bra

Plunge bra

In fall 1963 and spring 1964, the Western fashion trends were dominated by plunging necklines, while the movie goers were charmed by movies like Tom Jones that portrayed "aggressive cleavages". Lingerie and Shapewear manufacturers like Warner Brothers, Gossard, Formfit, and Bali took the opportunity to market plunge bras.[58] A plunge bra covers the nipples and bottom of the breasts while leaving the top part bare making it suitable for low-cut tops and deep V-necks.[51][59] It also has a lower, shorter and narrower center gore that maintains support while increasing cleavage by allowing the gore to drop several inches below the middle of the breasts.[60][61][62][63] Plunge bras comes in different depths that provide great cleavage. Like a push up bra these have some padding and provide support,[59][49] as well as to help push the breasts together and create cleavage.[61] Bali and Vassarette also marketed lace bras that maximized cleavage.[64]

The first push-up bra was created in 1964 by Canadian Louise Poirier and patented for Wonderbra (trademarked in 1935[33]), then owned by Canadelle, a Canadian lingerie company in 1971.[65][66] A push up bra is designed to press the breasts upwards and closer together to give a fuller appearance with help of padded cups,[67] differing from other padded bras in location of the pads.[49] It leaves the upper and inner area of breasts uncovered adding more cleavage.[68] These are available in many designs and every size starting from A to E.[51] Most of the push-up bras have underwires for added lift and support,[51] while the padding is commonly made of foam.[49]

1990s onward[edit]

The Wonderbra brand was acquired, in 1994, by Sara Lee Corporation and, since 2006, licensed to HanesBrands Inc and Sun Capital for different markets.[69][70] It had 54 design elements, including a three-part cup, underwires, a precision-angled back, rigid straps, and removable "cookies".[65] When the push-up plunge bra first appeared in the US market one Wonderbra sold every 15 seconds, driving a first year sale of US$120 million.[65] The bra became one of the most complex pieces of lingerie ever created.[71]

In 1994, supermodel Eva Herzigova's cleavage photographed by Ellen von Unwerth for Wonderbra's controversial advertising campaign Hello Boys helped shape the ideal of women, an experience Herzigova described as "empowering".[72] In 1999, the advertising poster was placed at 10th position in the Poster of the Century competition compiled by trade magazine Campaign. In 2011, it was voted the top advertising campaign of all time in a poll by Outdoor Media Centre, and advertising and marketing portal, and was featured in an exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum.[73] It helped to bring the brand into forefront of the competition for cleavage after 30 years of relative obscurity.[14] On the first Friday of every April in South Africa, brassière marketer Wonderbra sponsors a National Cleavage Day.[74][75]

America's largest lingerie retailer Victoria's Secret was launched by Roy Raymond, a Stanford alumnus, in San Francisco in late 1970s with a similar appeal.[76]Victoria's Secret Angels held its first fashion show at Plaza Hotel in New York in 1995.[77] Even traditional brands, who were producing 1950s style pointy-cups, low-backs, low-fronts and no-straps,[58] like Maidenform joined the competition in 1995.[78] In 1999 the event was first webcast. By 2001, the event was being aired on network television with 12 million viewers for the first broadcast. Other lingerie manufacturers like Frederick's of Hollywood and Agent Provocateur also joined the competition by that time,[77] with the former introducing a design called Hollywood Extreme Cleavage Bra that helped give the impression of a spherical cleavage like augmented breasts that was popularized by stars like Pamela Anderson.[79]

The underwire bra utilizes a wire sewn into the bra fabric and under each cup, from the center gore to under the wearer's armpit. It helps to lift, separate, shape, and support the breasts. These bras use a thin strip of metal, plastic or resin, usually with a nylon coating at both ends.[80][81] Some underwire bra styles also come in soft cup versions.[82] Underwire bras accounted for 60% of the United Kingdom bra market in 2000[83] and 70% in 2005.[84] About 70% of women who wear bras wear a steel underwire bra according to underwear manufacturer industries of New York in 2009.[80] In 2001, 70% (350 million) of the bras sold in the United States were underwire bras.[19][80] In 2005, underwire bras were the fastest growing segment of the market.[85] There has been complaints that underwire bras restrict the flow of blood and lymph fluid around the breasts preventing drainage of toxins, though there has been no evidence of that.[86]

In the next decade, particularly during the COVID-19 lockdowns,[87]bralettes and soft bras started replacing underwired and padded bras,[88] sometimes also serving as an outerwear.[89] At the same time popularity of brands like Victoria's Secret decreased significantly.[90] Because, according to Sarah Shotton, creative director of Agent Provocateur, "Now it’s about the athletic body, health and wellbeing", than "about the male gaze,"[91] while according to independent lingerie designer Araks Yeramyan "It was #MeToo that catapulted the bralette movement into what it is today."[89] Some bralettes still provide plunging designs, light padding, bottom support or significant cleavage.[92][93][94][95]

See also: List of bra designs

Manufacture[edit]

Construction[edit]

A seamstress sews a bra in Puerto Rico

Mass-produced bras are manufactured to fit a prototypical woman standing with both arms at her sides. The design assumes that both breasts are equally sized and symmetrical. Manufacturing a well-fitting bra is a challenge since the garment is supposed to be form-fitting but women's breasts may sag, vary in volume, width, height, shape, and position on the chest.[97][98] Manufacturers make standard bra sizes that provide a "close" fit, however even a woman with accurate measurements can have a difficult time finding a correctly fitted bra because of the variations in sizes between different manufacturers. Some manufacturers create "vanity sizes" and deliberately mis-state the size of their bras in an attempt to persuade women that they are slimmer and more buxom.[99][100]

A bra is one of the most complicated garments to make. A typical design has between 20 and 48 parts, including the band, gore, side panel, cup, apex, neckline, underwire, strap, ring, slider, strap join, and closure. Bras are built on a square frame model. Lingerie designer Chantal Thomass said,

It's a highly technical garment, made of lots of tiny pieces of fabric, with so many sizes to consider for the different cups, etc. It's a garment you wash every day, so the seams and structure need to be extremely robust. It's very different from a piece of clothing; it's in direct contact with the skin, it needs to be super solid.[101]

The primary component offering the most support is a chest band that wraps around the torso. It supports two cups that are usually held in place by two shoulder straps. The chest band is usually closed in the back by a hook and eye fastener, but smaller busted models may be fastened at the front.[102] Sleep bras or athletic bras do not have fasteners and are pulled on over the head and breasts. The section between the cups is called a gore. The section under the armpit where the band joins the cups is called the "back wing".[103]

Bra components, including the cup top and bottom (if seamed), the central, side and back panels, and straps, are cut to manufacturer's specifications. Many layers of fabric may be cut at the same time using computer-controlled lasers or bandsaw shearing devices. The pieces are assembled by piece workers using industrial sewing machines or automated machines. Coated metal hooks and eyes are sewn in by machine and heat processed or ironed into the back ends of the band and a tag or label is attached or printed onto the bra itself.[103] The completed bras are folded (mechanically or manually), and packaged for shipment.[104]

The chest band and cups, not the shoulder straps, are designed to support the weight of women's breasts. Strapless bras rely on an underwire and additional seaming and stiffening panels to support them. The shoulder straps of some sports bras cross over at the back to take the pressure off the shoulders when arms are raised. Manufacturers continually experiment with proprietary frame designs. For example, the Playtex "18-Hour Bra" model utilizes an M-Frame design.[103]

Materials[edit]

Selection of bras in Cairo, Egypt, 2013

Bras were originally made of linen, cotton broadcloth, and twill weaves and sewn using flat-felled or bias-tape seams. They are now made of a variety of materials, including Tricot, Spandex, Spanette, Latex, microfiber, satin, Jacquard, foam, mesh, and lace,[103] which are blended to achieve specific purposes. Spandex, a synthetic fiber with built-in "stretch memory", can be blended with cotton, polyester, or nylon. Mesh is a high-tech synthetic composed of ultra-fine filaments that are tightly knit for smoothness.[103]

Sixty to seventy per cent of bras sold in the UK and US have underwired cups. The underwire is made of metal, plastic, or resin.[105][19] said the antecedents for underwire in bras date to at least 1893, when Marie Tucek of New York City patented a breast supporter, a sort of early push-up bra made of either metal or cardboard and then covered with fabric.[80] Underwire is built around the perimeter of the cup where it attaches to the band, increasing its rigidity to improve support, lift, and separation.[102]

Wirefree or softcup bras have additional seaming and internal reinforcement.

By the late 1970s, wire-free bras were emerging both at Hanky Panky and at Hanro in Switzerland. Cosabella in Italy and Eres (company) [fr] in France followed in the 1980s, as did Eberjey in the 1990s.[106] Others use padding or shaping materials to enhance bust size or cleavage.

Size and fitting[edit]

Main article: Bra size

In most countries, bras come in a band and cup size, such as 34C; 34 is the chest band, or the measurement around the torso directly underneath the breasts, and C is the cup size, which refers to the volume of the breasts. Most bras are offered in 36 sizes; the Triumph "Doreen" comes in 67 sizes, up to 46J.[108]

The cup size varies depending on the band size. A D cup on a 38 band is larger in volume than a D cup on a 34 band, as the volume of a woman's breast increases as her chest band dimension increases.[109] In countries that have adopted the European EN 13402 dress-size standard, the measurement is rounded to the nearest multiple of 5 centimetres (2.0 in).[110][111]

Measuring cup and band size

International manufacturing standards and measurement systems vary widely. Bras are designed for an ideal body, but women's anatomy vary widely. Ten percent of women's breasts are asymmetrical, with the left breast being larger in 62 percent of cases.[112] One woman's breasts may be ptotic and widely spaced, another's might be centered closely on the chest, upright, and very full. As a result, finding a correctly fitting bra is extremely difficult. When women find a bra that appears to fit, they tend to stay with that size, even though they may lose and gain weight.[100][113]

In a survey in the United Kingdom, 60 per cent of over 2,000 women between the ages of 16 to 75 said they had had a bra fitting, and 99 per cent said that fit was the least important factor when selecting a bra.[115] Increased publicity about the issue of poorly fitted bras has increased the number of women seeking a fitting. The UK retailer Marks & Spencer stated that about 8,000 women are fitted for bras in their stores weekly.[116] Despite this, about 80–85 percent of women still wear the wrong bra size.[118]

Bra experts recommend professional bra fittings from the lingerie department of a clothing store or a specialty lingerie store, especially for cup sizes D or larger, and particularly if there has been significant weight gain or loss, or if the wearer is continually adjusting her bra.[108] Women in the UK change their bra size on average six times over their lifetimes.[119]

Bra extension for the band

Signs of a loose bra band include the band riding up the back. If the band causes flesh to spill over the edges, it is too small.[120] A woman can test whether a bra band is too tight or loose by reversing the bra on her torso so that the cups are in the back and then check for fit and comfort.[121] Experts suggest that women choose a band size that fits using the outermost set of hooks. This allows the wearer to use the tighter hooks as the bra stretches during its lifetime.[122]

Styles[edit]

Main article: List of bra designs

Bras may be designed to enhance a woman's breast size, or to create cleavage, or for other aesthetic, fashion, or more practical considerations. Nursing bras are designed to aid breastfeeding.[21] Compression bras, such as sports bras, push against and minimize breast movement, whereas encapsulation bras have cups for support.[123] Breast support may be built into some swimsuits, camisoles and dresses.[124][125]Cancer bras are designed specifically for breast cancer patients who have undergone a mastectomy. The styles provide post-surgical support, and some include pads or pockets for stuffing.

Bras come in a variety of styles, including backless, balconette, convertible, shelf, full cup, full coverage bra, demi-cup, minimizing, padded, plunge, lounge bra, posture, push-up, racerback, sheer, strapless, T-shirt, underwire, unlined, and soft cup.[126]

Culture[edit]

Fashion[edit]

Women's choices about what bra to wear are consciously and unconsciously affected by social perceptions of the ideal female body shape, which changes over time. As lingerie, women wear bras for sex appeal. Bras can also be used to make a social statement as evidenced by Jean-Paul Gaultier's designs and the cone-shaped bra Madonna wore outside her clothing on her Blond Ambition World Tour.

In the 1920s in the United States – the flapper era – the fashion was to flatten the breasts. During the 1940s and 1950s, the sweater girl became fashionable, supported by a bullet bra (known also as a torpedo or cone bra) as worn by Jane Russell and Patti Page.[129] In the early 1960s, smaller breasts gained popularity, and in the late 1990s larger breasts became more fashionable.[116]Iris Marion Young described preferences in the United States in 1990: "round, sitting high on the chest, large but not bulbous, with the look of firmness." This is regarded as contradictory in several ways.

As outerwear, bras in the form of bikini tops in the 1950s became the acceptable public display in modern times. During the 1960s, designers and manufacturers introduced padded and underwire bras. After the Miss America protest in September 1968, manufacturers were concerned that women would stop wearing bras. In response, many altered their marketing and claimed that wearing their bra was like "not wearing a bra".[131] In the 1970s women sought more comfortable and natural-looking bras.[129]

Victoria's Secret commissions a fantasy bra every autumn. In 2003 it hired the jeweller Mouawad to design one containing more than 2500 carats of diamonds and sapphires; valued at US$10 million, it was the world's most valuable bra at the time.[132]

Undergarment as outerwear[edit]

See also: Underwear as outerwear

Sports bras were first invented in 1975. Women wore them under other clothing for the next 25 years.[133] But on 10 July 1999, Brandi Chastain scored the fifth kick in the penalty shootout to give the United States the win over China in the final game of the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup Final. In celebration, she spontaneously whipped off her jersey, exposing her sports bra. Her act is regarded by some as a historical event that boosted wearing sports bras alone.[133][134] From that point forward, sports bras were increasingly worn as outerwear.[135]

Madonna was one of the first to start showing her bra straps, in the late 1980s.[136] A corset she wore as outerwear during her 1990 Blond Ambition World Tour sold for US$52,000 in 2012 at the Christie's Pop Culture auction in London.[137]Versace's autumn 2013 couture collection featured fashions that were open in the front, revealing underwire bras.[138] It became fashionable from the early 1990s to wear clothing that showed bra straps.[139][140][141][142]

Wearing clothes that reveal the bra or straps became so common that Cosmopolitan created guidelines in 2012 on how to expose them. Advice included avoiding plain, flesh-toned, smooth-cup bras, so that the exposure does not appear accidental; making sure the bra is in good condition; and wearing a style that either matches the colour of the outerwear or is dramatically different.[143]

Decreasing Western usage[edit]

While a few women have a medical and surgical need to wear a brassiere, informal surveys have found that many women began wearing bras to be fashionable, to conform to social or maternal pressure, or for physical support. Very few cited comfort as the reason. In fact, many women experience so much discomfort that they remove their bra as soon as they can.[144][3]

In Western society, since the 1960s, there has been a slow but steady trend towards bralessness among a number of women, especially millennials, who have expressed opposition to and are giving up wearing bras.[146] Being seen in public while not wearing a bra has become more acceptable over the past 6 decades, encouraging more women to go without. In 2016, Allure magazine fashion director Rachael Wang wrote, "Going braless is as old as feminism but it seems to be bubbling to the surface more recently as a direct response to Third Wave moments like #freethenipple hashtag campaign, increased trans-visibility like Caitlyn Jenner's Vanity Fair cover ... and Lena Dunham’s show Girls (which features young women often without bras)."[147]

In an online survey for All You magazine in 2013, 25 percent of women reported that they do not wear a bra every day.[148] Surveys have reported that 5–25 per cent of Western women do not wear a bra.[132][149][150] A National No Bra Day was first observed in the United States on 9 July 2011.[151] Women posted on Twitter about the relief they felt when taking off their bra.[152] More than 250,000 people expressed an interest in "attending" the day on a Facebook page.[153] No Bra Day is now observed internationally on 13 October.[132]

A Harris Poll commissioned by Playtex asked more than 1,000 women what they like in a bra. Among the respondents, 67 per cent said they prefer wearing a bra to going braless, while 85 per cent wanted to wear a "shape-enhancing bra that feels like nothing at all." They were split as regards underwire bras: 49 per cent said they prefer underwire bras, the same percentage as those who said they prefer wireless bras. According to underwire manufacturer S & S Industries of New York, who supply bras to Victoria's Secret, Bali, Warner's, Playtex, Vanity Fair, and other labels, about 70 per cent of bra-wearing women wear underwire bras.[80]

Third-world usage[edit]

Bras are not universally worn around the world; in some third-world countries bras may cost up to 10–30 hours of a woman's wages, making them unaffordable to most of the population.[154][155][156] As of 2011[update], women in Fiji needed to pay up to a week's wages for a new bra.[157] Bras are highly prized at second-hand markets in West Africa.[155][156] The Uplift Project provides recycled bras to women in developing countries.[158] Since 2005 they have shipped 330,000, including to Fiji, Vanuatu, Tonga, and Cambodia.[154]

In 2009 Somalia's hard-line Islamic group Al-Shabaab forced women to shake their breasts at gunpoint to see if they were wearing bras, which they called "un-Islamic".[159][160] A resident of Mogadishu whose daughters were whipped said, "The Islamists say a woman's chest should be firm naturally, or flat."[159]

Economic impact[edit]

Consumers spend around $16 billion a year worldwide on bras.[161] In the US during 2012, women owned an average of nine bras and wore six on a regular basis.[161] That increased from 2006, when the average American woman owned six, one of which was strapless, and one in a colour other than white. British women in a 2009 survey reported that they owned an average of 16 bras.[116]

The average bra size among North American women has changed from 34B in 1983 to a 34DD in 2012–2013,[163] and from 36C in 2013 to 36DD in the UK during 2014–2015.[164] The change in bra size has been linked to growing obesity rates, breast implants, increased birth control usage, estrogen mimicking pollutants, the availability of a larger selection of bras, and women wearing better fitting bras.[163][165]

Bra shirt with built-in breast support (on left), 2015

Bras are made in Asian countries, including Sri Lanka, India, and China. While there has been some social pressure from the anti-sweatshop and anti-globalization movements on manufacturers to reduce use of sweatshop labour, most major apparel manufacturers rely on them directly and indirectly. Prior to 2005, a trade agreement limited textile imports to the European Union and the US. China was exporting US$33.9 billion in textiles and clothing each year to the EU and the US. When those quotas expired on 1 January 2005, the so-called Bra Wars began. Within six months, China shipped 30 million more bras to the two markets: 33 per cent more to the US and 63 per cent more to the EU.[166] As of 2014[update], an average bra cost £29.80.[167] As of 2012[update], Africa imported US$107 million worth of bras, with South Africa accounting for 40 per cent. Morocco was second and Nigeria third, while Mauritius topped purchasing on a per capita basis.[168]

In countries where labour costs are low, bras that cost US$5–7 to manufacture sell for US$50 or more in American retail stores. As of 2006[update], female garment workers in Sri Lanka earned about US$2.20 per day.[166] Similarly, Honduran garment factory workers in 2003 were paid US$0.24 for each $50 Sean John sweatshirt they made, less than one-half of one per cent of the retail price.[169] In 2009, residents in the textile manufacturing city of Gurao in the Guangdong province of China made more than 200 million bras. Children were employed to assemble bras and were paid 0.30 yuan for every 100 bra straps they helped assemble. In one day they could earn 20 to 30 yuan.[170]

Western Feminist opinions[edit]

In 1968 at the feminist Miss America protest, protesters symbolically threw a number of feminine products into a "Freedom Trash Can". These included bras, which were among items the protesters called "instruments of female torture"[172] and accouterments of what they perceived to be enforced femininity. A local news story in the Atlantic City Press erroneously reported that "the bras, girdles, falsies, curlers, and copies of popular women's magazines burned in the 'Freedom Trash Can'".[173] Individuals who were present said that no one burned a bra nor did anyone take off her bra.[172] However, a female reporter (Lindsy Van Gelder) covering the protest drew an analogy between the feminist protesters and Vietnam War protesters who burned their draft cards, and the parallel between protesters burning their draft cards and women burning their bras was encouraged by some organizers including Robin Morgan. "The media picked up on the bra part", Carol Hanisch said later. "I often say that if they had called us 'girdle burners,' every woman in America would have run to join us."[176]

Feminism and "bra-burning" became linked in popular culture.[177][178] The analogous term jockstrap-burning has since been coined as a reference to masculism.[179] While feminist women did not literally burn their bras, some stopped wearing them in protest.[181] The feminist author Bonnie J. Dow has suggested that the association between feminism and bra-burning was encouraged by individuals who opposed the feminist movement. "Bra-burning" created an image that women weren't really seeking freedom from sexism, but were attempting to assert themselves as sexual beings. This might lead individuals to believe, as Susan J. Douglas wrote, that the women were merely trying to be "trendy, and to attract men."[183][184][185] Some feminist activists believe that anti-feminists use the bra burning myth and the subject of going braless to trivialize what the protesters were trying to accomplish at the feminist 1968 Miss America protest and the feminist movement in general.[187][189]

The trope of feminists burning their bras was anticipated by an earlier generation of feminists who called for burning corsets as a step toward liberation. In 1873 Elizabeth Stuart Phelps Ward wrote:

So burn up the corsets! ... No, nor do you save the whalebones, you will never need whalebones again. Make a bonfire of the cruel steels that have lorded it over your thorax and abdomens for so many years and heave a sigh of relief, for your emancipation I assure you, from this moment has begun.

Some feminists began arguing in the 1960s and 1970s that the bra was an example of how women's clothing shaped and even deformed women's bodies to male expectations. Professor Lisa Jardine listened to feminist Germaine Greer talk about bras during a formal college dinner in Newnham College, Cambridge, in 1964 (Greer had become a member of that college in 1962):

At the graduates' table, Germaine was explaining that there could be no liberation for women, no matter how highly educated, as long as we were required to cram our breasts into bras constructed like mini-Vesuviuses, two stitched white cantilevered cones which bore no resemblance to the female anatomy. The willingly suffered discomfort of the Sixties bra, she opined vigorously, was a hideous symbol of female oppression.[191]

Germaine Greer's book The Female Eunuch (1970) became associated with the anti-bra movement because she pointed out how restrictive and uncomfortable a bra could be.[192] "Bras are a ludicrous invention", she wrote, "but if you make bralessness a rule, you're just subjecting yourself to yet another repression."[193]

Susan Brownmiller in her book Femininity (1984) took the position that women without bras shock and anger men because men "implicitly think that they own breasts and that only they should remove bras."

The feminist author Iris Marion Young wrote in 2005 that the bra "serves as a barrier to touch" and that a bra less woman is "deobjectified", eliminating the "hard, pointy look that phallic culture posits as the norm." Without a bra, in her view, women's breasts are not consistently shaped objects but change as the woman moves, reflecting the natural body. Other feminist anti-bra arguments from Young in 2005 include that training bras are used to indoctrinate girls into thinking about their breasts as sexual objects and to accentuate their sexuality. Young also wrote in 2007 that, in American culture, breasts are subject to "[c]apitalist,patriarchal American media-dominated culture [that] objectifies breasts before such a distancing glance that freezes and masters."[195] The academic Wendy Burns-Ardolino wrote in 2007 that women's decision to wear bras is mediated by the "male gaze".

Health[edit]

Fit[edit]

Many women look forward to the time of day when they can take off their bra.[197]

Some women experience generalized breast discomfort and tenderness from fibrocystic breast changes, and their breast tissue is often described as "lumpy", "rope-like", or "doughy".[198] Doctors often recommend that women wear a well-fitted, supportive bra to help resolve the symptoms.[199][200][201]

Exercise[edit]

Biomechanical studies have demonstrated that, depending on the activity and the size of a woman's breast, when she walks or runs braless, her breasts may move up and down by 4 to 18 centimetres (1.6 to 7.1 in) or more, and also oscillate side to side.[202]

Researchers have also found that as women's breast size increased, they took part in less physical activity, especially vigorous exercise. Few very-large-breasted women jogged, for example. To avoid exercise-related discomfort and pain, medical experts suggest women wear a well-fitted sports bra during activity.[202]

Breast sagging[edit]

Women sometimes wear bras because they mistakenly believe they prevent breasts from sagging (ptosis) as they get older.[203] Physicians, lingerie saleswomen, teen girls, and adult women used to believe that bras were medically required to support breasts. In a 1952 article in Parents' Magazine, Frank H. Crowell wrote that it was important for teen girls to begin wearing bras early. This would prevent sagging breasts, stretched blood vessels, and poor circulation later on.[204]

This belief was based on the incorrect idea that since breasts cannot anatomically support themselves, wearing a brassiere makes a difference as a woman ages.[203][205] Bra manufacturers are careful to claim that bras only affect the shape of breasts while they are being worn.[205][206] The key factors influencing breast ptosis over a woman's lifetime are cigarette smoking, her number of pregnancies, gravity, higher body mass index, larger bra cup size, and significant weight gain and loss.[207][208]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

[edit]

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Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bra

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Pink vest, purple leggings, and graphic Champion hoodie

There's never a bad time for a wardrobe refresh. Just ask Dick's Sporting Goods. For Cyber Monday (read: one day only), they've marked down hundreds of athleisure favorites, with discounts of up to 50 percent. Savings are as low as $9 and include everything from tanks to leggings to even a vest that can be deceptively dressed up.

These deals on top brands even shocked us: We spotted marked-downs from favorites at Nike, Adidas, The North Face, Champion and more! Great stuff for you, and great gifts for anyone on your holiday list.

Shopping early is essential this year. Supply chain issues are aren't getting better and that can really take a toll on delivery. While plenty of items remain in stock, we can't guarantee they will be this evening, so add 'em to that cart ASAP. Scroll on for bestsellers from the 860+ pieces on sale at Dick's!

DSG Performance Tank Top

Black sleeveless shirt

Dick's Sporting Goods' very own in-house brand is one of the best kept secrets in athletic wear. This versatile workout top is down to just $9 from $20!

"I really like this top. It's cute. It's got a tie in the back that makes the fit adjustable, so if you want it loose or tight, it's up to you. I also liked that it was similar to some other styles by more well-known brands," one satisfied fan wrote.

$9 at Dick's Sporting Goods

Calia by Carrie Underwood Yarn Pom Beanie

Navy blue beanie

Did you know singer Carrie Underwood has her own athleisure clothing line? This beanie has a feminine flirty oversize pom-pom on top and makes an adorable gift. "I bought this recently, and I love it! It’s so pretty and soft!" wrote one fan. The price is right for buying in multiples: In navy (shown) it's down to just $10 from $25; the "golden taffy" shade is also on sale, but at a bit less of a discount — down to $15 from $25.

$10 at Dick's Sporting Goods

Under Armour HeatGear High Rise 7/8 Leggings

Purple tights

A high-rise waistband and compression fit will make these Under Armour tights your new favorite workout wear. The color is so vivid, you won't have trouble finding them in your dresser drawer. Says a fan: "I love the fit and length of these leggings. The color is soft and beautiful. There is an actual pocket on the side that’s quite useful. The high waist and no-roll band is perfect!"

$36 at Dick's Sporting Goods

Champion Powerblend Fleece Print Hoodie

Grey hoodie with a pattern featuring the Champion logo

Champion is King of the Sweatshirt for good reason. Its gear fits well, washes well, and feels great on the body. This high-quality hoodie, subtly decorated with the brand's familiar logo, is on sale for a ridonculous 70 percent off. "Great quality and so comfy," wrote one satisfied customer. A winning gift.

$15 at Dick's Sporting Goods

Nike Soccer Short Sleeve T-Shirt

White cropped shirt

Sure, this might be a soccer shirt, but your allegiance to Team USA goes beyond the Summer Games. With the Winter Games a couple months away, consider adding this cotton tee to your patriotic rotation. It's half price right now and also available in gray.

$15 at Dick's Sporting Goods

Nike Yoga Core Collection 7/8 Tights

Pink leggings

Soft fabric not only covers your assets, but it's also stretchy enough to maintain its shape during any pose. There's also a hidden pocket to store a key, card, etc.

"Love these so much. Super stretchy, so I ordered a size down," a satisfied customer advised. "Received lots of compliments when I wore them. A must-buy."

$25 at Dick's Sporting Goods

The North Face Alpz 2.0 Down Vest

Pink vest

A great vest from The North Face at a great price: Enjoy insulation at side panels and zip pockets to store small items. Take it from this happy buyer: "Love, love, love everything about this vest! Fits true to size and is an amazing pale pink. Keeps me warm and has a flattering fit."

$60 at Dick's Sporting Goods

The North Face Patch Pullover Hoodie

You can never go wrong with anything from The North Face. (Photo: Dick's)

Does anything say cozy more than the words "fleece-lined" and "the North Face"? Layer up in this solid piece from one of our favorite brands! It has the makings of a perfect pullover: Roomy hood, kangaroo pocket and a cozy fleece lining.

Said one satisfied shopper: "I bought this about a month and, seriously, it's one of my favorite sweatshirts, its so comfy.... I went up a size for an oversized look, and it's exactly what I was looking for!" This has "perfect gift" written all over it.

$40 at Dick's Sporting Goods

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Источник: https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/dicks-sporting-goods-cyber-monday-sale-150137516.html

In the early 2000s, you probably collected Victoria's Secret's PINK sweats in various colors and wore them around proudly, with the logo on your behind and the gartered hems either rolled up to your calves or tucked into your UGGs. (We've all been there.) Though versions of the pant have been around for years, the original design hasn't been available since it launched in 2002—but that changes now.

Victoria's Secret is re-releasing its famous PINK sweatpants, and they're only available for today (Thursday, September 21). The collegiate-inspired pieces are currently selling for $40 at select stores across the U.S. Locations

If you can't make it today, you'll have a chance to shop an exclusive blinged-out version (pictured above) online at victoriassecret.com/pink on Sunday, September 24 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. shop

To add to the nostalgia, VS also dug into its archives and shared some throwback campaign photos of Miranda Kerr, Elsa Hosk, Behati Prinsloo, and Candice Swanepoel models modeling the loungewear.

Courtesy Victoria's Secret

Courtesy Victoria's Secret

Courtesy Victoria's Secret

Courtesy Victoria's Secret

Best. #TBT. Ever.

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Источник: https://www.harpersbazaar.com/fashion/trends/a12445118/victorias-secret-pink-sweatpants/

27 Giving Tuesday 2021 deals you can shop to give back

NY Post may be compensated and/or receive an affiliate commission if you buy through our links.

Thanksgiving has come and gone, Black Friday took in-store shopping by storm and Cyber Monday wiped virtual shelves clean. While you can still shop plenty of extended Cyber Monday sales, Giving Tuesday has officially taken the spotlight.

Giving Tuesday, which was founded in 2012, is an independent nonprofit and a global movement that inspires hundreds of millions of people to give, collaborate and celebrate generosity.

This global day of generosity allows us the opportunity to give back to charitable organizations and movements through our shopping habits and The Post is honored to spread the word.

A few of our favorite promotions happening now include Aerie, Tatcha, Allbirds and Everlane’s giveback efforts. Keep reading to get our extensive list of brands participating in Giving Tuesday below.

Aerie, partnering with Feeding America

Aerie, partnering with Feeding America

Today, each Real Rewards member purchase will provide 10 meals* to those in need through Feeding America. Giveback and shop must-haves like Offline leggings and seamless bralettes.

Tatcha, funding school days for girls in Asias and Africa

Tatcha, funding school days for girls in Asias and Africa

The cult-favorite Tatcha brand has created the Beautiful Faces, Beautiful Future program alongside Room to Read to fund over 4.6 million days of school for girls in Asia and Africa. Want to be a part of the movement? Shop bestsellers like the water cream and rice polish.

Chewy, matching Wish List donations

Chewy, matching Wish List donations

Chewy is one of our go-to shops for pets, and for Giving Tuesday, the brand is making an even bigger impact. Simply donate items to your local shelter or rescue by searching through various Wish Lists and adding your chosen products to your donation cart. Check out, and Chewy will match your donation.

Hanes, donating a pair of socks with every order

Hanes, donating a pair of socks with every order

For each purchase between Nov. 30 and Dec. 5, Hanes will donate a pair of socks to organizations helping those in need. Our current favorite buy is this adorable 3-piece sleep set.

Hedley & Bennett, 10% of sales donated to World Central Kitchen

hedley&bennett, 10% of sales donated to World Central Kitchen

Today, 10% of all Hedley & Bennett sales will be donated to World Central Kitchen. Need some shopping suggestions? We love the Gold Poppy apron and this Midnight Blue option.

Allbirds, donating shoes to Soles4Souls

Allbirds, donating shoes to Soles4Souls

The popular shoe brand has partnered with Soles4Souls, to donate lightly used Allbirds to those in need. Trust us when we say giving back has never been so good, as Allbirds are ultra-comfortable and stylish.

State Bags, supporting HELP USA

State Bags, supporting HELP USA

The iconic State Bags brand is giving back this Tuesday by partnering up with HELP USA. “We are beyond honored to work with the HELP USA team in supporting select families from their program in ways they have specifically requested to ensure that the assistance is in fact life-changing… and in the ways they need it most,” said the brand.

Our favorite State Bags product? This everyday Lorimer Fanny Pack.

Thinx, donating portion of profits to puberty and reproduction activism

Thinx, donating portion of profits to puberty and reproduction activism

Thinx has an incredible lineup of absorbent underwear and apparel, but what makes the brand even better is that they donate a portion of their proceeds to support puberty and reproduction activism. We love these moderate absorbency sport undies.

Vitruvi, partnering with Every Mother Counts

Vitruvi, partnering with Every Mother Counts

The gorgeous home diffuser brand has partnered with the watercolor artist Satsuki Shibuya for Giving Tuesday. Here, sales of the limited edition Stone Diffusers will go towards Every Mother Counts, an organization aimed at helping in maternal health.

TOMS, donating 1/3 of their profits

TOMS, donating 1/3 of their profits

Since the beginning of the famous shoe company’s cultivation, TOMS always had generosity at the forefront of their brand promise. Those efforts continue today, and 1/3 of its profits still support many grassroots efforts. If we had to choose a favorite pair of TOMS shoes, it would be the Navi Dress Shoe.

Away, partnering with Global Glimpse

Away, partnering with Global Glimpse

This year, Away is partnering up with Global Glimpse, an organization that has curated a Passport Scholarship Fund for high schoolers to help cover passport costs. Away will not only aid in the direct partnership but will also help guide individuals in the process.

Uncommon Goods, donating through Better To Give program

Uncommon Goods, donating through Better To Give program

Uncommon Goods is a unique brand in that you get to support small businesses while also contributing to various organizations. So far, the brand has donated over $2.6 million, and that number is only increasing. Our top pick from the brand is this beautifully repurposed cotton Sari robe.

Everlane, donating through 100% Human Collection

Everlane, donating through 100% Human Collection

With each purchase from the brand’s 100% Human Collection, Everlane donates 10% of the proceeds. To date, the brand has raised over $1 million, and you too, can be a part of that today.

AUrate, donating books to kids

AUrate, donating books to kids

This fine jewelry brand is big on ethics, giveback and children’s creativity and potential. Therefore, they donate a book directly to school students for every piece of jewelry sold. Not only that, but today, the brand is planting one tree per order as well.

Want to be part of the movement? Shop from their gorgeous lineup here.

ThirdLove, donating products to various girl organizations

ThirdLove, donating products to various girl organizations

The largest donor of undergarments in the U.S. has made the commitment to partner with groundbreaking organizations such as I Support the Girls, Soles4Souls, Good360, and St. Anthony’s. To date, they’ve donated over $40 million of products, and you can now join in.

One of our favorite ThirdLove products is the Prima Cotton Hipster. You’ll thank us later.

Herschel Supply Co., donating 10% of sales Art Start

Herschel Supply Co.

Today, Herschel Supply Co. is donating 10% of its sales to Art Start to support youth art educational systems. Shop their great lineup of gear here.

Caraway, donating 10% of purchases to A Sense Of Home

Caraway, donating 10% of purchases to A Sense Of Home

For Giving Tuesday, the ceramic cookware company is partnering with A Sense Of Home to support its mission of preventing homelessness. The brand and organization will help create homes for youth aging out of foster care with donated furniture and home goods. Interested in joining the cause? We recommend the loved cookware set.

Victoria’s Secret Pink, donating $100,000 to a non-profit each Tuesday in December

Victoria's Secret Pink, donating $100,000 to a non-profit each Tuesday in December

Pink has taken Giving Tuesday to a new level and has committed to donating $100,000 to a different non-profit dedicated to mental health each Tuesday throughout the month of December.

Stojo, donating cups to frontline healthcare workers

Stojo, donating cups to frontline healthcare workers

For every order placed today, Stojo will donate a best-selling 12 oz cup to frontline healthcare organizations. And after serving us during one of the most challenging times we’ve ever faced, this is the perfect way to give them thanks. If you’re looking for the perfect shopping recommendation, we love the Milk & Cookies holiday set.

Theory, donating 10% of proceeds

Theory, donating 10% of proceeds

Theory has made the decision to partner alongside INARA, a non-profit that provides life-saving medical services to children in conflict regions, this Giving Tuesday. Simply mention INARA at check-out and 10% of proceeds will go towards the cause.

Awe Inspired, donating 100% of proceeds

Awe Inspired, donating 100% of proceeds

Yes, you read that right. 100% of proceeds are being donated to Awe Inspired’s charity partner NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness). And if you need another reason to drop everything now and shop Awe Inspired, it’s that Taylor Swift is obsessed with their gorgeous Le Duo piece.

Wolven, donating 40% of proceeds to various organizations

Wolven, donating 40% of proceeds to various organizations

As a 1% for the Planet member, Wolven has decided to donate 1% of its annual revenue each year to environmental and community organizations working to protect our planet. This Giving Tuesday is no different, yet Wolven is also offering buyers 40% off sitewide and donating 40% of proceeds to various organizations.

Looking for the perfect giveback option? We recommend the crisscross four-way top.

Lucky Brand, donating $25 for each outerwear item sold

Lucky Brand, donating $25 for each outerwear item sold

Starting Dec. 1 and running through the entire month of December, Lucky Brand will donate $25 for every outerwear item purchased on LuckyBrand.com to Operation Warm, a national nonprofit organization that manufactures brand-new, high-quality coats and shoes for children in need. So start searching for your must-have outerwear like this shawl collar teddy coat.

tentree, donating 10% of sales to American Forests

tentree, donating 10% of sales to American Forests

For Giving Tuesday, tentree is donating 10% of sales to American Forests to support the work they’re doing to plant more trees in our communities. Looking for something to shop? We love the men’s Atlas sweatpants.

Biossance, donating 100% of proceeds from the exclusive set

Biossance, donating 100% of proceeds from the exclusive set

Today only, Biossance will donate 100% of proceeds from their new Oceans Of Change beauty set to Oceana’s ocean-protecting works. The set includes a Squalane + Vitamin C Rose Oil and a Squalane + 10% Vitamin C Dark Spot Serum.

Anthropologie, matching customer donations for CMN Hospital

Anthropologie, matching customer donations for CMN Hospital

Anthropologie has decided to partner with the Children’s Miracle Network Hospital by matching all customer donations up to $100,000. Simply donate and shop to contribute.

Want an in-person way to support? Stop by the brand’s 1 Day Pop-Up in Grand Central Station on Nov. 30.

Liverpool Jeans, donating $1 for each Eco Collection purchase

Liverpool Jeans, donating $1 for each Eco Collection purchase

The luxury fashion line Liverpool Jeans has partnered with Global Green, an organization committed to education and action when it comes to healing our earth. Furthermore, the brand has committed to raising more than $25,000 in support of Global Green. As part of this cause, $1 from every Eco Collection purchase will go towards their goal.

For more online recommendations, check out the New York Post Shopping section.

Источник: https://nypost.com/2021/11/30/15-giving-tuesday-2021-deals-you-can-shop-to-give-back/

Mouni Roy and Jannat Zubair, the two well-known babes from the television industry have spiced it all up in red avatars on social media. The two were spotted looking all fiery hot in red, and you truly can’t miss any!

Mouni shared a picture on Thursday on her Instagram handle, looking all hot in her ruffle deep neck red sequinned gown, teamed with a nude makeup look and celebrity brushed back hairdo.

Jannat Zubair shared a video on her Instagram handle in a red sequinned traditional saree teamed with minimal makeup and matching earrings. However, bright pink lips stole the show.

Credit : Instagram

Also Read: Fashion Stylefile: Vacation Outfit Ideas Coming Straight From Mouni Roy, Bookmark

DivaJannat Zubair RahmaniMouni Royspicy red hot outfit

Источник: https://www.iwmbuzz.com/digital/snippets-digital/mouni-roy-vs-jannat-zubair-rahmani-which-diva-is-your-dream-date-in-a-spicy-red-hot-outfit-ultimate-fan-battle/2021/12/03
Narcity Media

Price: $39.99

Details: This YETI rambler would make a great gift for coffee or tea drinkers who are often on the go. With just a twist, they can unlock the seal and take a sip from any side of the lid. And when the seal is locked? No spills or leaks, whatsoever.

$39.99 On YETI

Bathtub Caddy Tray

Amazon Canada

Price: $46.99

Details: Encourage them to sit back and take a relaxing bath this holiday season with this handy bathtub tray. The arms extend so it'll fit over most bathtubs. It comes with a stand that allows them to rest their tablet or book while they bask in bubbles. You can also pair it with a bathtub pillow for extra comfort.

$46.99 On AMAZON CANADA

Everlasting Lumbar Support Pillow

Amazon Canada

Price: $44.95 ()

Details: Anyone who works in front of a computer knows how uncomfortable sitting for long periods can get. You can do their back (and their posture) a favour by getting them this lumbar pillow for the holidays. Reviewers say it can help to relieve pain, discomfort and fatigue.

$44.95 On AMAZON CANADA

Love & Lore Alpine Mittens

Indigo

Price: $19.47 ()

Details: These ultra-soft mittens have a sherpa lining, so they'll keep their hands extra toasty. They come in six colours including pink and steel blue.

$19.47 On INDIGO

10-Inch Ring Light With Mini Tripod Stand & Phone Holder

Amazon Canada

Price: $39.17

Details: If you know someone who wants to get into content creation, gift them this best-selling ring light. It comes on an adjustable tripod stand with a rotatable clamp for phones up to 4.5 inches wide. It has warm, cool and daylight colour settings with ten levels of brightness to choose from. It also comes with a Bluetooth remote that'll allow them to control their phone's camera from a distance.

$36.17 On AMAZON CANADA

Palm Reader Jewelry Stand

Amazon Canada

Price: $25.99

Details: Bewitch them with this cute palm reader jewelry stand this holiday season. They can stack their favourite bands and drape their go-to bracelets and necklaces on it.

$25.99 From AMAZON CANADA

Handheld Milk Frother

Amazon Canada

Price: $22.89

Details: What are the holidays without warm and frothy beverages? Let them take their chai tea lattes and homemade cappuccinos to the next level with this handy-dandy milk frother.

$22.89 From AMAZON CANADA

Simons Solid Flannel Sheet Set

Simons

Price: $45+

Details: They won't have any trouble sleeping in over the holidays with this ultra-plush flannel sheet set. It comes with one flat sheet, one fitted sheet, and one or two pillowcases, depending on the size you choose. It's available in four colours and in twin to king sizes for mattresses up to 16-inches thick.

$45+ On SIMONS

Salad Bowl & Matching Servers

Simons

Details: This set makes the perfect gift, but they're sold separately in case you only want to buy one or the other. You can get the salad servers for just $6.99 (originally $9.50) and the salad bowl for $16.99 (originally $24).

$6.99+ On SIMONS

Jade Roller & Gua Sha Set

Amazon Canada

Price: $24.95

Details: This is an easy gift to give to just about anyone with any semblance of a skincare routine. It comes with a gua sha stone and roller that they can use for a little at-home spa time. You might want to pair it with a bottle of their favourite face oil, too, like jojoba or rosehip seed.

$24.95 On AMAZON CANADA

Eternal Foliage Ramekins Set

Simons

Price: $18

Details: If you know someone who can't resist home decor, get them this versatile set of four gorgeous ramekins. They can use them in the kitchen for snacks or sauces, but they can also use them to stash jewelry, makeup, or other bits and bobs in, too.

$18 On SIMONS

Источник: https://www.narcity.com/16-cute-cozy-pj-sets-youll-want-to-live-in-all-winter-long
Narcity Media

Price: $39.99

Details: This YETI rambler would make a great gift for coffee or tea drinkers who are often on the go. With just a twist, they can unlock the seal and take a sip from any side of the lid. And when the seal is locked? No spills or leaks, whatsoever.

$39.99 On YETI

Bathtub Caddy Tray

Amazon Canada

Price: $46.99

Details: Encourage them to sit back and take a relaxing bath this holiday season with this handy bathtub tray. The arms extend so it'll fit over most bathtubs. It comes with a stand that allows them to rest their tablet or book while they bask in bubbles. You can also pair it with a bathtub pillow for extra comfort.

$46.99 On AMAZON CANADA

Everlasting Lumbar Support Pillow

Amazon Canada

Price: $44.95 ()

Details: Anyone who works in front of a computer knows how uncomfortable sitting for long periods can get. You can do their back (and their posture) a favour by getting them this lumbar pillow for the holidays. Reviewers say it can help to relieve pain, discomfort and fatigue.

$44.95 On AMAZON CANADA

Love & Lore Alpine Mittens

Indigo

Price: $19.47 ()

Details: These ultra-soft mittens have a sherpa lining, so they'll keep their hands extra toasty. They come in six colours including pink and steel blue.

$19.47 On INDIGO

10-Inch Ring Light With Mini Tripod Stand & Phone Holder

Amazon Canada

Price: $39.17

Details: If you know someone who wants to get into content creation, gift them this best-selling ring light. It comes on an adjustable tripod stand with a rotatable clamp for phones up to 4.5 inches wide. It has warm, cool and daylight colour settings with ten levels of brightness to choose from. It also comes with a Bluetooth remote that'll allow them to control their phone's camera from a distance.

$36.17 On AMAZON CANADA

Palm Reader Jewelry Stand

Amazon Canada

Price: $25.99

Details: Bewitch them with this cute palm reader jewelry stand this holiday season. They can stack their favourite bands and drape their go-to bracelets and necklaces on it.

$25.99 From AMAZON CANADA

Handheld Milk Frother

Amazon Canada

Price: $22.89

Details: What are the holidays without warm and frothy beverages? Let them take their chai tea lattes and homemade cappuccinos to the next level with this handy-dandy milk frother.

$22.89 From AMAZON CANADA

Simons Solid Flannel Sheet Set

Simons

Price: $45+

Details: They won't have any trouble sleeping in over the holidays with this ultra-plush flannel sheet set. It comes with one flat sheet, one fitted sheet, and one or two pillowcases, depending on the size you choose. It's available in four colours and in twin to king sizes for mattresses up to 16-inches thick.

$45+ On SIMONS

Salad Bowl & Matching Servers

Simons

Details: This set makes the perfect gift, but they're sold separately in case you only want to buy one or the other. You can get the salad servers for just $6.99 (originally $9.50) and the salad bowl for $16.99 (originally $24).

$6.99+ On SIMONS

Jade Roller & Gua Sha Set

Amazon Canada

Price: $24.95

Details: This is an easy gift to give to just about anyone with any semblance of a skincare routine. It comes kohls pay online bill a gua sha stone and roller that they can use for a little at-home spa time. You might want to pair it with a bottle of their favourite face oil, too, like jojoba or rosehip seed.

$24.95 On AMAZON CANADA

Eternal Foliage Home depot bill pay number Set

Simons

Price: $18

Details: If you know someone who can't resist home decor, get them this versatile set of four gorgeous ramekins. They can use them in the kitchen for snacks or sauces, but they can also use them to stash jewelry, makeup, or other bits and bobs in, too.

$18 On SIMONS