southern company georgia power bill pay

generation business, Southern Company is a major source of electricity in the southeastern U.S.. ON THE COVER. Bess Thompson – Georgia Power customer;. Georgia Power is the largest electric subsidiary of Southern Company (NYSE: SO), America's premier energy company. Value, Reliability, Customer. Atlanta-based Southern Company, the parent of Georgia Power, having to pay for the higher construction costs in their monthly bills.

Southern company georgia power bill pay -

Georgia Power announces long delayed Plant Vogtle expansion will continue to be pushed


In a press release today, Georgia Power announced that the long delayed Plant Vogtle expansion will be delayed even further. Unit 3, which has just finished a critical testing cycle, is now expected to be in service in the second quarter of 2022, and Unit 4 in the first quarter of 2023.

The press release acknowledges this is a three-to-four-month delay from the last projected start date. In early June, Georgia Power spokesperson Jeff Wilson told the Chronicle that they expected Unit 3 to be completed in January, and no later than the first quarter of 2022. 

More: Plant Vogtle now delayed until 2022 as costs mount, Georgia Power says

"We continue to learn every day on the project and our work over the last several months, including Hot Functional Testing, is no different," Wilson wrote in an email to the Chronicle on Thursday. "Our new projected schedule includes additional time and resources to complete the remaining work safely, with the highest standards of quality, and to factor in our most recent experiences with productivity and testing activities."

Unit 3 recently finished hot functional testing, where all systems are raised to their functional temperatures. The test was successful, but took longer than expected, which contributed to pushing back the completion dates. Southern Company now anticipates beginning to load fuel for Unit 3 toward the end of this year or early in 2021, and attributes delays on Unit 4 in part to slower workforce recovery after COVID reductions and difficulty retaining skilled labor.

More: Public Service Commission staff testify to mechanical issues, delays at Plant Vogtle

Staff for the Georgia Public Service Commission who reviewed the project posted written testimony in early June that they did not expect the plant to be online before June of next year. At the time, Donald Grace, the vice president of engineering for the Vogtle Monitoring Group, wrote "(the monitoring group) continues to conclude that the company's schedules are unachievable and cannot be relied upon."

Also in the press release, Georgia Power said it expects to spend $9.2 billion on the project. It has already been approved for $7.3 billion by the Georgia Public Service Commission, and plans to pass the next $700 million onto shareholders, not ratepayers. Any spending over the next $7.3 billion will have to be approved by the Public Service Commission before it can be charged to rate payers.

More: How much will Plant Vogtle expansion cost Georgia Power customers? Regulators to decide

"For future, final cost recovery, an open and transparent prudency review is planned near the completion of Unit 4," Wilson wrote. "Of note, there are also special protections in place for customers during construction, including a reduction in the company’s return on investment for the project. Every month of delay in the project equates to an incrementally lower return, which translates to lower bill impacts during construction."

The announcement came the same day as the 2021 Quarter 2 update for Georgia Power's parent company, Southern Company. Earnings for this quarter were $372 million, significantly less than the $612 million in Quarter 2 of last year although the year to date slightly exceeds 2020. According to the press release, earnings were significantly impacted by a $343 million after tax charge, the result of charging $460 million in increased construction costs for Unit 3 and 4 to corporate earnings.

More: With Plant Vogtle nearer to completion, Georgia Power seeks to recoup capital costs

Tom Krause, spokesperson for the Georgia Public Service Commission said they had no updates on the cost increase or delay and are still finalizing the 24 semi-annual Vogtle Construction Monitoring Report.

Last month, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission announced a special inspection of an electrical cable raceway system, a system to route cables that power safety equipment. It is the first time there has been a special inspection at Plant Vogtle, which is the lowest level of reactive inspection the NRC conducts.

On Thursday, NRC spokesperson Dave Gasperson said the team completed its on-site work and the report should be published in August. 

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Источник: https://www.augustachronicle.com/story/news/2021/07/29/georgia-power-plant-vogtle-expansion-delayed-months-southern-company/5414361001/

Georgia Power seeks $235M boost to pay for nuclear plant

ATLANTA (AP) — Georgia Power Co. is asking regulators to let it raise annual rates on customers by $235 million a year as the utility seeks to pay for its share of a huge nuclear project.

The company says the proposal would raise bills for a typical residential customer by about $4 a month. That would mean about a 3% increase over the current typical monthly residential bill of $122.73.

The unit of Atlanta-based Southern Co. filed the request with the Georgia Public Service Commission on Tuesday. The five-member regulatory body is scheduled to vote on the request by November.

Georgia Power owns 46% of two new nuclear reactors at Plant Vogtle east of Augusta. The shareholder-owned utility currently projects it will spend $8.8 billion in capital costs and $3 billion in financing on the project, numbers that could rise as construction delays continue to mount.

Georgia Power’s 2.6 million customers have already paid more than $3.5 billion toward the cost of Vogtle units 3 and 4 under an arrangement that’s supposed to hold down borrowing costs. But rates are still projected to rise more as the nuclear reactors are completed. Georgia Power projects an overall 10% increase in rates, with 3.4% already having happened. Public Service Commission staff members estimate the typical customer will pay $854 in financing costs alone by the time the Vogtle reactors are finished.

The staff has signaled it will dispute how much Georgia Power can collect, saying in recent testimony that the company should get $125 million.

“Ratepayer bills would be significantly lower under staff’s interpretation,” a staff member and two consultants wrote in testimony filed June 7 in a related Vogtle proceeding.

The project is now projected to cost more than $26 billion for all its owners, including Georgia Power, electric cooperatives and municipal utilities. Most electric customers in Georgia, except those in the northwest corner of the state served by affiliates of the Tennessee Valley Authority, will have to pay for the plant. The Jacksonville Electric Authority and some cooperatives in Alabama and Florida are also obligated to buy electricity from Vogtle.

Ultimately, the five elected Republican commissioners will decide what costs Georgia Power can charge for. However, the current rate proposal covers $2.38 billion in costs that commissioners in 2017 approved as prudently spent. The proposal is actually a rate increase of $369 million, but it’s being offset by a $134 million reduction in the separate rate that the utility is charging to cover construction costs and financing.

The company wants the commission to pre-approve the rate increase to take place the month after unit 3 begins commercial operation. In its rate filing, Georgia Power said new rates would begin Feb. 1, assuming a January start date. However, Public Service Commission staff earlier this month projected the first new reactor wouldn’t begin running until June 2022, adding at least $2 billion to its cost.

Spokesperson Jeff Wilson said that the monthly rate increase would be roughly similar even if Vogtle doesn’t start operations in January.

The reactors, approved in 2012, were initially estimated to cost a total of $14 billion, with the first new reactor originally planned to start generation in 2016. Delays and costs spiraled, especially after the main contractor filed for bankruptcy in 2017. The company and regulators insist that the plant is the best source of future clean and reliable energy for Georgia, despite new delays and costs announced in recent months.

The first new reactor is 98% complete.

Southern Co. recorded a $1.1 billion loss related to Vogtle in 2018, but it’s not clear who will pay for the latest overruns. Georgia Power has said it may seek regulator approval for customers to pay for the latest $800 million in spending.

Georgia Power projects that it will take 60 to 80 years for customers to pay for the new reactors.

___

Follow Jeff Amy on Twitter at http://twitter.com/jeffamy.

Источник: https://apnews.com/article/ga-state-wire-fl-state-wire-al-state-wire-georgia-environment-and-nature-6a0331ea0f7f99b7cac285f20a83a244

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Источник: https://www.georgiapower.com/residential/billing-and-rate-plans/pricing-and-rate-plans/prepay.html

SOUTHERN COMPANY

ATLANTA, Nov. 15, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- With utility scams on the rise, it is more important than ever for customers to be vigilant and know what steps to take to prevent themselves or their families from falling victim.

(PRNewsfoto/Atlanta Gas Light)

Atlanta Gas Light is joining 150 U.S. and Canadian energy companies Nov. 15-19 for Utility Scam Awareness Week, a weeklong annual campaign created by Utilities United Against Scams, to raise awareness of and help educate customers on the tactics used by scammers.

"The safety and well-being of our customers is our top priority," said Pedro Cherry, Atlanta Gas Light president and CEO. "That's why we're partnering with energy companies across the country to educate our communities about this important issue throughout Utility Scam Awareness Week. The first step in protecting our customers from a scam is making them aware of the common tactics that scammers use."

According to the Federal Trade Commission, imposter scams cost consumers more than $3.3 billion in 2020 – an increase of nearly $1.5 billion from 2019.  Nearly $1.2 billion of the losses reported were due to imposter scams.

In recent years, scammers have gotten deceptively creative with increased calls, texts, emails and in-person tactics, contacting electric and gas customers asking for immediate payment to avoid service disconnection.

Atlanta Gas Light strongly encourages customers to stay vigilant of potential scam activity such as:

  • Threats to disconnect their natural gas service – usually within an hour – if payment is not made
  • Requests that payments be made from a single method, such as a debit card, prepaid card, checking account, cryptocurrency or to send funds via a mobile app to make a bill payment
  • Claims they have overpaid, and their banking account or credit card number is needed for a refund
  • Requests to vacate their home so that a meter or other natural gas equipment can be replaced
  • Suggestions through social media that their bill will be covered by a charity after they make a partial payment by way of a wire transfer

Atlanta Gas Light holds itself accountable to customers and the communities it serves, which is why it reminds Georgia marketer customers that it will never contact them regarding their natural gas bill. While Atlanta Gas Light maintains the region's pipeline infrastructure, responds to emergencies and reads meters every month, it does not bill customers directly. Only certified natural gas marketers in Georgia sell natural gas to customers and subsequently bill these customers for their natural gas use.

Customers who suspect or experience fraud should hang up, delete the email or shut the door, then immediately contact local authorities.

In addition, whenever an Atlanta Gas Light field service representative or one of its contractors visits a customer's home or business, they will provide Atlanta Gas Light identification. And, as an additional safety measure to protect customers, anyone who signs up to receive the company's Keep Me Informed appointment status text messages can access a photo of the technician assigned to perform work at their property.

For more information, visit atlantagaslight.com/fraudprotection.

About Atlanta Gas Light
Atlanta Gas Light is one of four natural gas distribution companies of Southern Company Gas, a wholly owned subsidiary of Southern Company (NYSE: SO). Atlanta Gas Light provides natural gas delivery service to approximately 1.7 million customers in Georgia. In operation since 1856, the company is one of the oldest corporations in the state. For more information, visit atlantagaslight.com.

About Southern Company Gas
Southern Company Gas is a wholly owned subsidiary of Atlanta-based Southern Company (NYSE:SO), America's premier energy company. Southern Company Gas serves approximately 4.3 million natural gas customers through its regulated distribution companies in four states with approximately 666,000 retail customers through its companies that market natural gas. Other businesses include investments in interstate pipelines and ownership and operation of natural gas storage facilities. For more information, visit southerncompanygas.com.

 

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SOURCE Atlanta Gas Light

Источник: https://www.marketscreener.com/quote/stock/SOUTHERN-COMPANY-14441/news/Atlanta-Gas-Light-reminds-customers-to-protect-themselves-against-utility-scams-37033661/

Kemper Scandal Unraveling Southern Company’s Credibility

May 1, 2017 update: Southern Company’s Mississippi Power reported to the SEC today that its Kemper IGCC power plant will be placed in service by the end of May 2017. The delay adds $38 million to the price tag of the power plant.

February 1, 2017 update: Southern Company’s Mississippi Power reported to the SEC on January 31, 2017 that its Kemper IGCC power plant will be placed in service in late February 2017. Mississippi Power projects that an additional $25 million will be expensed due to the inclusion of projected schedule costs through February 28, 2017. The utility company also told the SEC that “any extension of the in-service date beyond February 28, 2017 is currently estimated to result in additional base costs of approximately $25 million to $35 million per month.” Six months ago, President and CEO Tom Fanning told investors and analysts on the 2016 Q2 earning call that “both units A and B of the [Kemper] facility are expected to be fully integrated by the end of September.”

December 2, 2016 update: Southern Company’s Mississippi Power reported to the SEC that it now expects that the Kemper IGCC will be placed in service during January 2017. If this is the case, Mississippi Power will be required to repay approximately $250 million in tax benefits associated with bonus depreciation that is dependent upon placing the Kemper IGCC in service by December 31, 2016. Furthermore, the delay will result in additional base costs of approximately $25 million to $35 million.

November 7, 2016 update: Southern Company’s Mississippi Power delayed the scheduled in-service date of the Kemper facility to December 31, 2016. The announcement occurred on the 100th day from when President and CEO Tom Fanning told investors and analysts on the Q2 earning call (July 27) that Kemper would be in service by the end of September. The delay will cost Southern Company an additional $25 million. If the Kemper plant does not start commercial operation by the end of the year, Mississippi Power will have to return $250 million of tax breaks. The total cost of Kemper is quickly approaching $7 billion.

October 11, 2016 update: Southern Company’s Mississippi Power delayed the scheduled in-service date of the Kemper facility to November 30, from October 31. The delay will cost Southern Company an additional $33 million. Last month, President and CEO Tom Fanning said the public attacks of Kemper are “garbage.” 

August 8, 2016 updateSouthern Company’s Mississippi Power delayed the scheduled in-service date of the Kemper facility to October 31. This revision comes 12 days after President and CEO Tom Fanning told investors and analysts on the Q2 earning call that “both units A and B of the [Kemper] facility are expected to be fully integrated and in service by the end of September.” The delay will cost Southern Company an additional $43 million.


Southern Company has unveiled a new corporate brand. This comes a week after the monopoly utility was the center of a New York Times investigation revealing poor company management and potential fraud, according to a whistleblower and numerous previously undisclosed documents.

In the wake of acquiring the natural gas company, AGL Resources (now called Southern Company Gas), Southern Company President and CEO Tom Fanning said, “Today we are a leading national energy company that is better positioned to deliver real solutions for customers.”

However, the utility giant still is the focus of a Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) investigation, ratepayers are suing the utility alleging fraud, and public officials are upset that the company had been funding climate denial up until last year. Furthermore, customer frustrations in Southern Company territories are bubbling up.  These tensions have led some regulators to more critically examine Southern’s business strategy.

A corporate rebrand will not shield Southern Company from lawsuits, nor likely change the viewpoints of regulators or their customers anytime soon. The company’s mismanagement goes all the way to the executive suite. Indeed, Chairman, President, and CEO of Alabama Power Mark Crosswhite told employees a few years ago, “To be crystal clear, failures of culture are failures of leadership, and I recognize that the leadership team and I are accountable.


Investigations, Lawsuits, Customer Frustrations

The Mississippi Power Kemper power plant endeavor is $4.5 billion over budget and years behind schedule. A “clean coal” power plant that was supposed to be a $2.2 billion project is now projected to cost at least $6.74 billion. The SEC is investigating the management and reporting of the Kemper project as it relates to estimated costs, internal controls over financial reporting, and schedules.

In March, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) made a preliminary determination that the company violated the Sarbanes-Oxley Act when firing whistleblower Brett Wingo who had alerted Southern Company officials of improper financial reporting. In a letter to Southern Company, an OSHA administrator said the company “has not offered credible evidence” that justified the dismissal of whistleblower Brett Wingo and the treatment of Wingo is a violation of the law.

Also in March, ratepayers filed a lawsuit alleging Mississippi Power violated accountability for “fraud and mismanagement, all the while fleecing the public in the interest of profits… Plaintiffs demand that Defendant Mississippi Power and not the ratepayers bear the responsibility and damages for years of runaway spending, unconscionable excess, incompetence, delay, and mismanagement.”

Additionally, another lawsuit was filed in June against Mississippi Power by Treetop Midstream Services, a Mississippi-based oil company. The oil company is suing Mississippi Power and Southern Company over the cost it incurred for building a $100 million pipeline and other damages. Treetop claims fraudulent misrepresentation, concealment, civil conspiracy and breach of contract by the utility companies. Treetop entered into a contract with Mississippi Power to purchase 30 percent of carbon dioxide captured at Kemper to then be used for enhanced oil recovery in Treetop’s oil fields. Treetop said in its lawsuit that Southern Company intentionally concealed construction delays and forced Treetop to unnecessarily spend nearly $100 million on its pipeline and other equipment, then terminated its agreement with Treetop.

In neighboring Georgia, Southern Company’s subsidiary, Georgia Power is doing little to enhance Southern’s image. Georgia Power’s expansion project of the Vogtle nuclear power plant was projected to cost $6.1 billion, but numerous delays and cost overruns have increased the projected cost by $3 billion. The estimated cost is now over $9.5 billion, and as of earlier this year, approximately $21 billion is the current total cost estimate for the entire Vogtle project. Georgia Power, like Mississippi Power and other utility companies, argued that if the utility was allowed to collect money from their ratepayers to finance the construction of the project, it will ultimately save their customers money in the long-run. But according to PSC expert witnesses, the project is so off-track that any of the purported benefits have been completely negated; roughly 4.5 percent of a 6 percent rate increase for Georgia Power ratepayers is for Vogtle.

The project also resulted in a lawsuit in which contractors Westinghouse and Chicago Bridge & Iron sued Georgia Power over who would pay the increased costs. Southern eventually settled for $350 million. Georgia Power still claims the power plant will deliver “long-term savings for customers.” And now, Georgia Power has asked for another $175 million from ratepayers to study the feasibility of yet another nuclear plant.

Alabama Power Electricity ExpensiveIn Alabama, the elected commissioners have continued to grant Alabama Power the highest return on equity (ROE) in the country at 13.75% (some years it has been as high as 14.5%). The ROE is the only portion of the revenue requirement that a utility ultimately keeps as profit. As a result, Alabama Power customers are paying some of the highest electricity bills in the region. In 2015, WalletHub.com ranked Alabama the state as the 11th most expensive state for energy prices.

This year, Energy Information Administration (EIA) data shows that Alabama residential customers paid 12.42 cents/kWh for the month of April – higher than Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, and Tennessee. Only South Carolina residents pay more for electricity.

Updated on Nov. 7

In Florida, Southern Company was involved through its subsidiary, Gulf Power, in misleading consumers over solar ballot amendments. Instead of voting on an amendment that would have allowed consumers to lease solar panels with limited upfront costs and sell the electricity to their neighbors, Floridians will face the Consumers for Smart Solar amendment. This amendment would preserve the status quo and continue to prevent homeowners or businesses from contracting with solar companies that can install solar for no upfront cost. Gulf Power is the top utility contributor per ratepayer for the Consumers for Smart Solar campaign.

In March, a 4-3 Florida Supreme Court ruling allowed the utility-backed initiative to go on the ballot, but dissenting members of the court including Justice Pariente understood that the ballot language was misleading:

“[T]his proposed constitutional amendment, supported by some of Florida’s major investor-owned electric utility companies, actually seeks to constitutionalize the status quo.

The ballot language is further defective for purporting to grant rights to solar energy consumers that are illusory; and failing, as required, to clearly and unambiguously set forth the chief purpose of the proposed amendment—to maintain the status quo favoring the very electric utilities who are the proponents of this amendment.

This ballot initiative is the proverbial “wolf in sheep’s clothing.”

(Since this blog was published, a Gulf Power-funded Florida think tank staffer essentially admitted that Consumers for Smart Solar’s Yes On 1 campaign was a well-designed ploy.)


Funding Climate Change Denial

On top of all the scandals and public frustrations over Southern Company emerging in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and Mississippi, the utility company was also recently caught funding climate denier Willie Soon, an astrophysicist and climate change denier at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. The funding of Willie Soon has gone on since 2006, and reports from Inside Climate News show that in total, $409,000 has come from Southern Company Services over this time period.

The research Southern Company funded relates to articles in scientific journals that accuse the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change of overstating the negative environmental effects of carbon dioxide emissions and explains that the sun is the contributor to recent climate change. And according to Inside Climate News, “the documents reveal that Soon and Harvard-Smithsonian gave the coal utility company the right to review his scientific papers and make suggestions before they were published. Soon and Harvard-Smithsonian also pledged not to disclose Southern’s role as a funder without permission.”

In addition to Southern Company funding of Willie Soon, it was revealed that ExxonMobil was also funding the climate denier.


Relationship with Regulators Changing?

Southern Company and its subsidiaries depend on having relationships with the state commissioners and other state-level public officials to assist them with federal government funding and partnerships, and rate-case hearings. The favorable relationships also guide analysts on Wall Street with credit ratings. However, the winds are starting the change.

This past November, Democrat Cecil Brown won the Central District public service commission race in Mississippi. Brown replaced Republican Lynn Posey, who had been the commission’s strongest supporter of Kemper. Brown voted for the Baseload Act as a lawmaker, which allowed Mississippi Power to collect construction costs while building new power plants, and for a $1 billion bond bill to help pay for Kemper at a lower cost to ratepayers than through traditional power rates. However, Brown ran against Kemper and Mississippi Power. He pledged to “review” the Baseload Act and “ensure Mississippi families are protected from these outrageous costs.”

In Alabama, critics are beginning to wonder if the state commissioners are properly balancing the interests of consumers and shareholders. A 2013 report by David Schlissel and Anna Sommer find that there has not been a publicly contested rate increase case for Alabama Power since 1982 as a result of the commissioners eliminating the public hearings three decades ago because they were lengthy and expensive.

Last December, Michael Churchman, executive director of the Alabama Environmental Council, had an op-ed published in which he writes,

“The Alabama PSC has a uniquely closed and secretive process for a public regulatory body, voting on rate matters without a public hearing and releasing minimal information to the public it serves.

It’s misleading actions like those that make the public mistrust government agencies, especially when they’re supposed to be keeping an eye on utilities.”


Each of these issues proves that Southern Company is no longer a risk-free investment, and a corporate rebrand will not solve any of these problems nor ease their customers’ frustrations.

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Источник: https://www.energyandpolicy.org/southern-company-rebrand/

Georgia Power seeks $235M boost to pay for nuclear plant

ATLANTA (AP) — Georgia Power Co. is asking regulators to let it raise southern company georgia power bill pay rates on customers by $235 million a year as the utility seeks to pay for its share of a huge nuclear project.

The company says the proposal would raise bills for a typical residential customer by about $4 a month. That would mean about a 3% increase over the current typical monthly residential bill of $122.73.

The unit of Atlanta-based Southern Co. filed the request with the Georgia Public Service Commission on Tuesday. The five-member regulatory body is scheduled to vote on the request by November.

Georgia Power owns 46% of two new nuclear reactors at Plant Vogtle east of Augusta. The shareholder-owned utility currently projects it will spend $8.8 billion in capital costs and $3 billion in financing on the project, numbers that could rise as construction delays continue to mount.

Georgia Power’s 2.6 million customers have already paid more than $3.5 billion toward the cost of Vogtle units 3 and 4 under an arrangement that’s supposed to hold down borrowing costs. But rates are still projected to rise more as the nuclear reactors are completed. Georgia Power projects an overall 10% increase in rates, with 3.4% already having happened. Public Service Commission staff members estimate the typical customer will pay $854 in financing costs alone by the time the Vogtle reactors are finished.

The staff has signaled it will dispute how much Georgia Power can collect, saying in recent testimony that the company should get $125 million.

“Ratepayer bills would be significantly lower under staff’s interpretation,” a staff member and two consultants wrote in testimony filed June 7 in a related Vogtle proceeding.

The project is now projected to cost more than $26 billion for all its owners, including Georgia Power, electric cooperatives and municipal utilities. Most electric customers in Georgia, except those in the northwest corner of the state served by affiliates of the Tennessee Valley Authority, will have to pay for the plant. The Jacksonville Electric Authority and some cooperatives in Alabama and First hawaiian bank pearl city are also obligated to buy electricity from Vogtle.

Ultimately, the five elected Republican commissioners will decide what costs Georgia Power can charge for. However, the current rate proposal covers $2.38 billion in costs that commissioners in 2017 approved as prudently spent. The proposal is actually a rate increase of $369 million, but it’s being offset by a $134 million reduction in the separate rate that the utility is charging to cover construction costs and financing.

The company wants the commission to pre-approve the rate increase to take place the month after unit 3 begins commercial operation. In its rate filing, Georgia Power said new rates would begin Feb. 1, assuming a January start date. However, Public Service Commission staff earlier this month projected the first new reactor wouldn’t begin southern company georgia power bill pay until June 2022, adding at least $2 billion southern company georgia power bill pay its cost.

Spokesperson Jeff Wilson said that the monthly rate increase would be roughly similar even if Vogtle doesn’t start operations in January.

The reactors, approved in 2012, were initially estimated to cost a total of $14 billion, southern company georgia power bill pay the first new reactor originally planned to start generation in 2016. Delays and costs spiraled, especially after the main contractor filed for bankruptcy in 2017. The company and regulators insist that the plant is the best source of future clean and reliable energy for Georgia, despite new delays and costs announced in recent months.

The first new reactor is 98% complete.

Southern Co. recorded a $1.1 billion loss related to Vogtle in 2018, but it’s not clear who will pay for the latest overruns. Georgia Power has said it may seek regulator approval for customers to pay for the latest $800 million in spending.

Georgia Power projects that it will take 60 to 80 years for customers to pay for the new reactors.

___

Follow Jeff Amy on Twitter at http://twitter.com/jeffamy.

Источник: https://apnews.com/article/ga-state-wire-fl-state-wire-al-state-wire-georgia-environment-and-nature-6a0331ea0f7f99b7cac285f20a83a244

$224M Georgia Power rate hike likely for nuclear plant

ATLANTA -- Georgia Power Co. customers are likely to pay another $224 million a year for the first of two nuclear reactors near Augusta.

The company says the proposal would raise bills for a typical residential customer by about 3%, or $3.78 a month on a bill of $122.73.

The rate increase would start after Unit 3 at Plant Vogtle begins generating electricity. The reactor is now supposed to go into service in June. Customers could be asked to pay substantially more once the fourth reactor begins generating power, now scheduled for sometime in 2023.

A $157 million rate hike, costing a typical residential customer $2.87 a month, is also set to begin on Jan. 1. That's part of a three-year $1.77 billion plan approved by commissioners in 2019. Customers also are likely to see a third separate rate hike, to allow Georgia Power to cover higher fuel costs.

An agreement regarding the first of the new nuclear reactors was filed Wednesday by the company and Public Service Commission staffers who are tasked with protecting consumer interests. It recommends that the company get most of what it originally asked for. Commissioners, who plan to vote on a rate increase in November, aren't bound by the agreement, but such deals are typically very influential.

Georgia Power owns 46% of the two new reactors at Plant Vogtle. The unit of Atlanta-based Southern Co. currently projects it will spend $9.2 billion, with another $3.2 billion in financing costs. Those numbers could rise as construction delays continue to mount.

The Vogtle reactors are currently projected to cost more than $27.8 billion overall, not counting the $3.68 billion that original contractor Westinghouse paid back to the owners after going bankrupt. When approved in 2012, the estimated cost was $14 billion, with the first electricity being generated in 2016.

Other owners include most Georgia electric cooperatives and municipal utilities. Florida’s Jacksonville Electric Authority and some other municipal utilities and cooperatives in Florida and Alabama are also obligated to buy the nuclear power. The Georgia Public Service Commission controls rates only for Georgia Power.

In a Thursday hearing, several witnesses called for delaying or reducing the proposed rate increase.

“Rate increases are never welcome, but the timing of Vogtle 3 could not be worse,” said Jeffry Pollock, a rate consultant who testified on behalf of the Georgia Association of Manufacturers. He proposed delaying part of the increase until the beginning of 2023.

Georgia Power’s 2.6 million customers have already paid more than $3.5 billion toward the cost of Vogtle units 3 and 4 under an arrangement that’s supposed to hold down borrowing costs. But rates are still projected to rise more as the nuclear reactors are completed. Public Service Commission staff members earlier estimated that the typical customer will have paid $854 in financing costs alone by the time the Vogtle reactors are finished.

The latest agreement would allow the company to collect the $224 million a year to pay for $2.1 billion in construction costs that commissioners have already approved as prudent under the deal. Georgia Power had wanted to collect $235 million a year to pay for $2.38 billion in spending, while the staff had originally proposed allowing Georgia Power to collect $125 million.

“Staff now believes that the stipulation is in the best interest of ratepayers and the commission,” staff analyst Steven Roetger said in Wednesday's hearing.

Georgia Power would be able to declare the unit operational once it completes testing and any needed repairs. If the unit proves unreliable or doesn't operate as much as expected after that, the staff and company agreed that the commission could order refunds when it reviews the remaining Unit 4 costs for prudency at the end of the project.

———

Follow Jeff Amy at http://twitter.com/jeffamy.

Источник: https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/224m-georgia-power-rate-hike-nuclear-plant-80582655

PrePay

Benefits & Features

  • Payment flexibility, including the ability to make multiple smaller payments each
    month for the usage you want
  • No deposit, no credit check
  • No reconnect fees
  • Low-balance alerts via text, email or automated phone call
  • Ability to pay off outstanding balance over time with 25% of each payment going towards deferred balance, southern company georgia power bill pay the other 75% toward future electric usage.
  • Online and mobile account management, including the ability to monitor your daily usage
  • Convenient payment locations, including more than 4,000 Authorized Payment Locations such as Kroger, Walmart and Publix

You can sign up over the phone by calling 1-877-506-3905. If you’re a new customer, southern company georgia power bill pay that’s needed is your name, address and Social Security number (SSN), or a picture ID and proof of residency such as a phone bill.

For more information, check out our PrePay frequently asked questions.

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Источник: https://www.georgiapower.com/residential/billing-and-rate-plans/pricing-and-rate-plans/prepay.html

Georgia Power announces long delayed Plant Vogtle expansion will continue to be pushed


In a press release today, Georgia Power announced that the long delayed Plant Vogtle expansion will be delayed even further. Unit 3, which has just finished a critical testing cycle, is now expected to be in service in the second quarter of 2022, and Unit 4 in the first quarter of 2023.

The press release acknowledges this is a three-to-four-month delay from the last projected start date. In early June, Georgia Power spokesperson Jeff Wilson told the Chronicle that they expected Unit 3 to be completed in January, and no later than the first quarter of 2022. 

More: Plant Vogtle now delayed until 2022 as costs mount, Georgia Power says

"We continue to learn every day on the project and our work over the last several months, including Hot Functional Testing, is no different," Wilson wrote in an email to the Chronicle on Thursday. "Our new projected schedule includes additional time and resources to complete the remaining work safely, with the highest standards of quality, and to factor in our most recent experiences with productivity and testing activities."

Unit 3 recently finished hot functional testing, where all systems are raised to their functional temperatures. The test was successful, but took longer than expected, which contributed to pushing back the completion dates. Southern Company now anticipates beginning to load fuel for Unit 3 toward the end of this year or early in 2021, and attributes delays on Unit 4 in part to slower workforce recovery after COVID reductions and difficulty retaining skilled labor.

More: Public Service Commission staff testify to mechanical issues, delays at Plant Vogtle

Staff for the Georgia Public Service Commission who reviewed the project posted written testimony in early June that they did not expect the plant to be online southern company georgia power bill pay June of next year. At the time, Donald Grace, the vice president of engineering for the Vogtle Monitoring Group, wrote "(the monitoring group) continues to conclude that the company's schedules are unachievable and cannot be relied upon."

Also in the press release, Georgia Power said it expects to spend $9.2 billion on the project. It has already been approved for $7.3 billion by the Georgia Public Service Commission, and plans to pass the next $700 million onto shareholders, not ratepayers. Any spending over the next $7.3 billion will have to rio grande regional hospital careers approved by the Public Service Commission before it can be charged to rate payers.

More: How much will Plant Vogtle expansion cost Georgia Power customers? Regulators to decide

"For future, final cost recovery, an open and transparent prudency review is planned near the completion of Unit 4," Wilson wrote. "Of note, there are also special protections in place for customers during construction, including a reduction in the company’s return on investment for the project. Every month of delay in the project equates to an incrementally lower return, which translates to lower bill impacts during construction."

The announcement came the same day as the 2021 Quarter 2 update for Georgia Power's parent company, Southern Company. Earnings for this quarter were $372 million, significantly less than the $612 million in Quarter 2 of last year although the year to date slightly exceeds 2020. According to the press release, earnings were significantly impacted by a $343 million after tax charge, the result of charging $460 million in increased construction costs for Unit 3 and 4 to corporate earnings.

More: With Plant Vogtle nearer to completion, Georgia Power seeks to recoup capital costs

Tom Krause, spokesperson for the Georgia Public Service Commission said they had no updates on the cost increase or delay and are still finalizing the 24 semi-annual Vogtle Construction Monitoring Report.

Last month, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission announced a special inspection of an electrical cable raceway system, a system to route cables that power safety equipment. It is the first time there has been a special inspection at Plant Vogtle, which is the lowest level of reactive inspection the NRC conducts.

On Thursday, NRC spokesperson Dave Gasperson said the team completed its on-site work and the report should be published in August. 

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Источник: https://www.augustachronicle.com/story/news/2021/07/29/georgia-power-plant-vogtle-expansion-delayed-months-southern-company/5414361001/

Payment Options

Mail Payments

You can mail your payment to:
Georgia Power Payments
96 Annex
Atlanta, Georgia 30396

Note: Please be sure to include your account number with your mailed-in payment. Mailed-in payments may take between 3 to 5 business days to process and post to your account.

Phone

You may submit your payment directly to Georgia Power Company by phone 24 hours a day, seven days a week by calling 1‑888‑660‑5890. Authenticate your account and enter your bank account and routing number to pay using your checking or savings account.

You will have the option to save banking information to make future payments easier and faster, and the option to receive payment confirmation via text message.

To be directed to BillMatrix, a separate company not affiliated with Georgia Power, call 1‑800‑672‑2402 to pay using a credit card or debit card. Be sure to have your Georgia Power account number ready.

Authorized Payment Locations (In Person)

We’ve added more than 4,000 Authorized Payment Locations so you can pay your electric bill when you shop at retailers such as Kroger, Walmart, Dollar General and many others.

For more information click here.

Источник: https://www.georgiapower.com/residential/payment-options.html

Southern Co. announced yesterday that it will shutter roughly 55 percent of its coal fleet by the end of the decade as the company shifts to a net-zero electricity mix.

The closures include units at the nation’s two largest coal-fired power plants, southern company georgia power bill pay well as the previously announced Plant Daniel, one of the last coal generators in Mississippi. The move will reduce the amount of coal on Southern’s system by 80 percent since 2007, company CEO Tom Fanning told Wall Street analysts yesterday.

Atlanta-based Southern — the nation’s third-largest utility — once operated 66 generating units of coal, producing 20,450 megawatts across its Southeastern territory. It now operates 18 units producing 9,799 MW, according to the company. Once these additional units are closed, that figure will fall to roughly 4,300 MW at eight units, Fanning said.

The coal shutdowns stem from federal wastewater regulations for power plant discharges, which can contain high levels of toxic chemicals like mercury, arsenic, nitrogen and selenium.

Alabama Power and Georgia Power, which are Southern subsidiaries, filed documents signaling their plans with state environmental agencies on Oct. 13 regarding the effluent limitation guidelines. Company executives said earlier this year that all but two of its coal plants comply with those rules (Energywire, May 27).

Electric companies across the country were required to tell EPA last month whether they will spend money to keep southern company georgia power bill pay coal units running, close them or do enough upgrades to meet the federal standards so they can operate roughly 10 percent of the time.

The move comes as Southern aims to reach corporate goals for net-zero emissions by 2050. It has hit its target to cut emissions in half a southern company georgia power bill pay earlier. Separately, the Biden administration has called on the power sector to decarbonize by 2035.

Environmental and consumer advocates also have been pressing utilities such as Southern to remove fossil fuels from their power grids and replace the electricity with a combination of renewables and storage.

House Democrats, meanwhile, continue to push for the Senate’s support of a $1.7 trillion reconciliation package, which contains a wide range of tax incentives for clean energy, including renewables and nuclear, in hopes of achieving the president’s goal.

In an interview, Fanningsaid his company is “constantly engaged” in developments on the congressional infrastructure and reconciliation packages, noting the “enormous push and pull of public policy on both sides of the aisle.”

“Both of those [bills] obviously have tactical impacts to the electric utility industry, whether it’s the specific initiative to promote this transition to a net-zero future,” Fanning told E&E News. “Also I would say that ideas that relate to customer bills are particularly important to us.”

State environmental and utility regulators in Alabama and Georgia must sign off on the company’s plans. Georgia Power will include more details about its long-term energy projections in an integrated resource plan filed next January. Alabama Power will follow suit in a similar planning process next fall.

Georgia Power plans to remove roughly 3,000 MW of coal in the state, including two of the four units at Plant Bowen and one at Plant Scherer, which is the largest coal plant in the country. Once that unit at Plant Scherer closes by 2025, the amount of electricity from coal at that power plant will be cut in half.

Separately, Florida Power & Light Co. and Jacksonville, Fla.’s electric company, JEA, agreed earlier this year to shutter the unit that they jointly own at Scherer by 2022 (Energywire, June 30, 2020).

Georgia Power is a minority owner of Scherer’s first two units. The main owners are Oglethorpe Power Corp.; the Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia; and the city of Dalton, Ga.

“We kind of have to follow what the majority owner wants to do there,” Fanning said.

New Plant Vogtle battle

Alabama Power’s transition will turn the once coal-heavy electric company into one that runs mostly on natural gas and nuclear power. The utility plans to remove roughly 3,000 MW of coal, including four units at Plant Gaston and one at Plant Barry. A separate unit at Plant Gaston and Barry will convert to run on natural gas.

Also, the utility’s Greene County natural gas steam generator plant will close in 2025 and 2026, according to yesterday’s announcement. That power plant is jointly owned by Alabama Power and Mississippi Power, which said earlier this year it will exit its 40 percent portion of Greene County as part of its plans to remove roughly 950 MW of fossil fuels from its generating fleet (Energywire, April 19).

On the conference call, Fanning also discussed Southern’s high-profile nuclear project, Plant Vogtle. Georgia Power last week said the schedule for Vogtle’s reactors has slipped another three months, and yesterday Southern said it would write off $197 million after taxes for those rising capital costs, which are now roughly $9.5 billion.

In documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission yesterday, Southern said delays past that time will cost roughly $25 million a month southern company georgia power bill pay the first reactor and $15 million a month for the second.

Additionally, a battle may be brewing over how much each of Vogtle’s four owners must pay for the project’s rising costs. At issue is how Georgia Power and the public power utilities that are Vogtle’s co-owners are interpreting an ownership agreement signed in September 2018.

At that time, Southern and Georgia Power agreed to take on more risk should Vogtle’s construction costs rise above certain thresholds (Energywire, Sept. 27, 2018).

Now, Georgia Power and the owners do not agree on two things: whether west valley college tutoring center reached that monetary benchmark and how much COVID-19-related costs played a role.

Georgia Power has said that benchmark starts at $18.38 billion and that the estimated project costs haven’t reached that level, according to yesterday’s SEC filing. The other owners disagree, arguing that costs through Sept. 30 have triggered certain provisions of the 2018 ownership agreement, including first independent bank portland oregon that could cost Georgia Power $350 million.

The owners agreed on Oct. 29 to “clarify the process.” Fanning declined to elaborate to analysts and to E&E News.

“We certainly have an opinion on what all that means, and they have raised recently a difference of opinion,” he said, declining to say whether it’s all or some of the other developers that do not agree.

Vogtle’s original price tag was $14 billion. Southern company georgia power bill pay stemming from a litany of vendor and contractor problems have pushed the amount to more than $28 billion.

Источник: https://www.eenews.net/articles/nations-3rd-largest-utility-to-shut-down-half-of-coal-fleet/

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