spirit airlines phone number usa

Number of Guests I understand that this request is only for my flights affected by the Travel Ban Countries listed above. Any other Reservations will. Alternatively, travelers to the United States may provide documentation Cell phone number including country code of passenger or head of. Spirit Airlines is the leading Ultra Low Cost Carrier in the United States, the Caribbean and Latin America. Spirit Airlines fly to 60+ destinations with.

: Spirit airlines phone number usa

Spirit airlines phone number usa
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Spirit airlines phone number usa -

Trip to Orlando from Ohio was delayed for an hour due to the plane arriving late and mechanical issues. Trip to Columbus from Orlando was delayed over an hour for the same reasons. Their seats are miserable and their logistics must be awful.

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Columbus to Orlando
November 2021
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'It looked like a hurricane shelter': Spirit Airlines flight cancellations vex travelers


The summer of major flight woes continues, leaving Spirit Airlines passengers the latest to be stranded.

The Florida-based budget carrier canceled 277 flights Monday, or 36% of its scheduled flights, on top of 165 canceled flights Sunday, according to flight tracker FlightAware. Flight delays are also an issue, with 159 so far Monday and 342 on Sunday.

Passengers reported waiting hours in line for refunds and other customer service help at airports in cities including Orlando and Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Some stranded travelers camped out.

"It looked like a hurricane shelter," passenger Rebecca Osborn said of Spirit's counters at Orlando International Airport.

Spirit Airlines spokesman Erik Hofmeyer blamed the flight cancellations on weather and unspecified operational challenges, a common refrain from airlines including Southwest and American this summer. (American has its own woes Monday, canceling 429 flights, or 14% of scheduled flights, and delaying hundreds more as it struggles to recover from Sunday storms at its massive Dallas hub.)

"We're working around the clock to get back on track in the wake of some travel disruptions over the weekend due to a series of weather and operational challenges," Hofmeyer said via email. "We needed to make proactive cancellations to some flights across the network, but the majority of flights are still scheduled as planned."

Travelers with Spirit flights are urged to check their email and flight status before heading to the airport. McCarran Airport in Las Vegas, where Spirit has been growing, issued an alert via Twitter Monday.

The Association of Flight Attendants-CWA, which represents Spirit's flight attendants, said in a statement that the operational issues were due to weather and technology outages, among other issues. 

What is was not about, the union said: a worker strike, as some have speculated.

"A few news outlets have incorrectly reported that this may be due to a strike. This is not true. There is no flight attendant strike. Crews are not the issue,'' the union said.

Delay, delay, delay and then a Spirit flight cancellation

Osborn and her boyfriend, Eddie Gordon, were trying to get home to Philadelphia after a vacation in San Juan, Puerto Rico. They arrived at the airport around 2 p.m. Sunday for their 5:30 p.m. flight and were greeted with a long flight delay. Then another delay. And another.

"First, they said it was weather, then they said we don't have enough staff," Gordon said.

At midnight, the flight was canceled, and passengers from that flight and others were sent to a chaotic baggage claim area to retrieve their bags.

Gordon wanted a refund for the flight rather than to be rebooked on another Spirit flight and was told the only way to do that was to get in line. He got in the already-snaking line just after midnight.

"There were people everywhere: little kids, old people," Gordon said. "They never came out and gave any type of explanation or offered anything."

Gordon said he didn't emerge from the line until 9:30 a.m. EDT Monday.

Story continues below.

Their refund amount was written on a yellow sticky note attached to one of their boarding passes, but when they received email confirmation from Spirt later Monday they had received vouchers. They already bought tickets on Southwest to fly to Philadelphia on Tuesday.

Hofmeyer said he doesn't know the specifics of Gordon and Osborn's overnight experience but said it seemed "out of the ordinary." Spirit has a variety of ways for travelers to reach the airline, including its reservations center, WhatsApp and text, he said. 

Osborn and Gordon said they tried text and phone and were greeted with long waits or, in the case of the text option, no option to select a refund.

Hold, please:  Airline customer service hold times skyrocket

Hofmeyer said Spirit is adding a chat function on its website to handle flight changes, credits and refunds and said it would be in operation Monday.

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Источник: https://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/airline-news/2021/08/02/spirit-airlines-flights-canceled-orlando-fort-lauderdale/5452896001/

'This is not our proudest moment': Spirit Airlines CEO says more flight cancellations expected this weekend


Spirit Airlines CEO Ted Christie publicly addressed this week's operational meltdown for the first time Thursday, blaming the more than 1,700 flight cancellations on a variety of factors that left it short on pilots and flight attendants as August began.

Bad weather at the end of July, a time when flight crews start to run out of eligible hours to work, caused cancellations and "tipped us over,'' he said. Pilots and flight attendants timed out, leaving the airline with no slack in its system and forcing cancellations.

Things began falling apart for Spirit passengers on Sunday, Aug. 1, and have gotten worse as the week's dragged on. On Tuesday and Wednesday, Spirit canceled more than 60% of its flights. On Thursday, it canceled 449 flights or 56% of its flights, according to flight tracker FlightAware.

Christie said the displaced flight crews were scattered across the country and it takes time to bring them and planes back into position, which is why the airline is resorting to heavy cancellations. Technology outages with crew scheduling didn't help.

"The puzzle ended up getting very complex,'' Christie said. 

The bad news for Spirit passengers: the mess isn't over.

Christie said the airline will continue to cancel a large number of flights "over the next few days,'' with the goal of reducing the number of cancellations heading into next week. By 5:30 p.m. ET Friday, the airline has already canceled 346 flights, about 44% of scheduled flights. 

Airline cancel or delay your flight?: Here's what airlines owe you (and how to get it)

'It looked like a hurricane shelter': Spirit Airlines flight cancellations vex travelers

"We’ve worked hard really over the last five years at both building Spirit and building its reputation,’’ he said. “I think we’re made tremendous strides. This is not our proudest moment and we know that.’’

Christie declined to put a price tag on Spirit's meltdown, saying "the math will come, when the math comes.''

But the budget airline is on the hook for stranded passengers' hotel costs, where applicable, as well as a flood of flight refunds and the cost of rebooking on other airlines.

Spirit generally doesn't rebook stranded passengers on other airlines as a matter of policy. But late Thursday, agents at McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas were furiously booking passengers on Southwest flights to San Diego after Spirit's flight was canceled at the last minute.   

Spirit has also been sending some passengers $50 vouchers for future flights as a gesture of goodwill, though some travelers have told USA TODAY they consider it an insult.

"The intent is to give people something they can use on us in the future,'' Christie said.

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Источник: https://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/airline-news/2021/08/05/spirit-airlines-flight-cancellations-ceo-ted-christie/5508121001/
I finally know why this airline is called Spirit Airlines. First they break your Spirit, then they break your wallet. This was my first and last time flying with this airline. While every decent airline has a 50 pound weight limit for checked bags, dear Spirit here under tiny fine print has a checked bag limit of 40 pounds and also try to charge you an additional fees for any carry on bags. So on top of the 120 dollars I purchased for 2 checked paid I got to pay an additional 100 dollars for them being at 50 pounds. Both trips airplanes ran late on top of a rude Nazi like staff. Planes are tiny and packed to capacity, and seats do not even recline and are super uncomfortable. They charge for everything including wifi and try to scam you in other ways. Please do not fly with company or you will end up paying twice as much for a better quality airline.

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November 2021
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File a Consumer Complaint

Before you contact DOT for help with an air travel problem, you should give the airline a chance to resolve it.  Airlines have trouble-shooters at the airports, usually called Customer Service Representatives, who can take care of many problems on the spot.  They may be able to arrange meals and hotel rooms for stranded passengers, write checks if you’re bumped from your flight, help with baggage issues, and settle other routine claims or complaints.

If you can’t resolve the problem at the airport, you may want to file a complaint with the airline.  DOT requires airlines to acknowledge consumer complaints within 30 days of receiving them and to send consumers written responses addressing these complaints within 60 days of receiving them.  DOT also requires airlines to let consumers know how to complain to them.

It’s often best to email or write to the airline’s consumer office at its corporate headquarters.  DOT requires airlines that fly to, from, or within the United States to state on their websites how and where complaints can be submitted.  There may be a form on the airline’s website for this purpose. 

If you feel that the airline does not resolve the issue to your satisfaction, you may want to file a complaint with DOT.  You may also file a complaint with DOT if you feel that you experienced unlawful discriminatory treatment in air travel by airline employees or the airline’s contractors on the basis of disability or on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex (including gender identity and sexual orientation), religion, or ancestry. 

File a Consumer Complaint button

Safety and Security Complaints

Please note that aviation safety and security complaints are not handled by DOT’s Aviation Consumer Protection Division.

  • If you have a concern about airline safety (airline and airplane safety, emergency exit seating, low-flying aircraft, pilot licensing and related issues), please visit the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) website to report a safety-related issue.
  • If you have a concern about aviation security (passenger screening, the “no-fly” list, the baggage screening process, and related issues), call the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) toll-free at 1-866-289-9673 or email TSA.  For additional information, visit the TSA website.  

Contact Us By Phone or Mail

If you wish to submit a complaint to DOT via written letter, please feel free to do so using the contact information below.  When mailing a letter, please include your full address and phone number as well as complete and accurate information about your trip and the problem you had or are having.

  • Contact us by phone – You may contact DOT by phone at 202-366-2220.  Please know that in order for a case to be processed as a complaint, it must be submitted in writing.
  • Contact us by mail – To contact us by mail, please send your correspondence to the below address.
    • Office of Aviation Consumer Protection
      U.S. Department of Transportation
      1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE
      Washington, DC  20590

How the Complaint Process Works

For Disability and Discrimination Complaints

  • A Transportation Industry Analyst will forward your complaint to the airline, and the airline will be required to respond to you and the DOT. 
  • Once the airline’s response is received, a DOT analyst will review your complaint and the airline’s response to determine if a violation occurred.  After the analyst reviews your case, it will be given to an attorney for review.  Once your case is reviewed by an attorney, an analysis with our findings will be mailed to you.  Please note that due to the volume of cases received, and the thoroughness of this process, it may take some time to fully process your case.

For All Other Complaints

  • A Transportation Industry Analyst will forward your complaint to the airline and the airline will be required to provide you with a response.  The analyst will ask the airline to provide a copy of the response to DOT only if it falls under one of the areas DOT enforces.  The DOT analyst will then review the case to determine whether a violation occurred.  If your complaint does not appear to fall under any of the laws that we enforce, it will still be logged in our database. 
  • Every month, DOT publishes its Air Travel Consumer Report, which contains information about the number of complaints we receive about each airline and what problems people are having.  This report is made available to the public so that consumers and air travel companies can compare the complaint records of individual airlines and tour operators.  In addition to complaints, the report also contains statistics that the airlines file with us on flight delays, cancellations, bumping, mishandled baggage, and other helpful information.

How Do Consumer Complaints Help DOT?

Complaints from consumers help DOT spot problem areas and trends in the airline industry.  Complaints can lead to enforcement action against an airline when a serious violation of the law has occurred.  Complaints may also be the basis for rulemaking actions.

Additional Resources


DOT Relaunches Air Consumer Website

Last updated: Monday, May 10, 2021

Источник: https://www.transportation.gov/airconsumer/file-consumer-complaint

Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

For the DART Light Rail station at the airport, see Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport station. For the nearby Trinity Railway Express station, see CentrePort/DFW Airport station.

Not to be confused with Dulles International Airport.

Airport in Irving serving the Dallas–Fort Worth metro area in Texas, US

Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

DFW airport logo.svg
DFWAirportOverview.jpg
Airport typePublic
OwnerCities of Dallas and Fort Worth
OperatorDFW Airport Board
ServesDallas–Fort Worth metroplex
LocationDallas and Tarrant counties, Texas
OpenedSeptember 23, 1973 (48 years ago) (1973-09-23)
Hub for
Focus city for
Elevation AMSL607 ft / 185 m
Coordinates32°53′49″N097°02′17″W / 32.89694°N 97.03806°W / 32.89694; -97.03806Coordinates: 32°53′49″N097°02′17″W / 32.89694°N 97.03806°W / 32.89694; -97.03806
Websitedfwairport.com
FAA airport diagram
FAA airport diagram
DirectionLength Surface
ft m
13L/31R 9,000 2,743 Concrete
13R/31L 9,301 2,834 Concrete
17L/35R 8,500 2,590 Concrete
17C/35C 13,401 4,085 Asphalt
17R/35L 13,401 4,085 Concrete
18L/36R 13,400 4,085 Concrete
18R/36L 13,400 4,085 Concrete
Passengers39,364,990
Aircraft operations514,702
Cargo871,593.2 tons

Sources: Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport[1]

Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (IATA: DFW, ICAO: KDFW, FAALID: DFW), also known as DFW Airport,[2] is the primary international airport serving the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex area in the U.S. state of Texas. The airport was the fourth-busiest airport by passenger traffic in the world in 2020.

It is the largest hub for American Airlines, which is headquartered near the airport. It is the third-busiest airport in the world by aircraft movements and the fourth-busiest airport in the world by passenger traffic in 2020.[3] It is the ninth-busiest international gateway in the United States and the second-busiest international gateway in Texas.[4][5] American Airlines at DFW is the second-largest single airline hub in the world and the United States, behind Delta's hub at Atlanta.[6] The airport was also a hub for Delta Air Lines until 2005.

Located roughly halfway between the major cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, DFW spills across portions of Dallas and Tarrant counties, and includes portions of the cities of Irving, Euless, Grapevine and Coppell.[7] At 17,207 acres (6,963 hectares; 27 square miles), DFW is larger than the island of Manhattan, and is the second-largest airport by land area in the United States, after Denver International Airport.[8] It has its own post office ZIP Code, 75261, and United States Postal Service city designation ("DFW Airport, TX"), as well as its own police, fire protection, and emergency medical services.[9]

As of November 2021, DFW Airport has service to 260 destinations from 26 scheduled airlines.[10] In surpassing 200 destinations, DFW joined a small group of airports worldwide with that distinction.[11]

History[edit]

Planning[edit]

As early as 1927, before the area had an airport, Dallas proposed a joint airport with Fort Worth. Fort Worth declined the offer and thus each city opened its own airport, Love Field and Meacham Field, each of which had scheduled airline service.

In 1940 the Civil Aeronautics Administration earmarked US$1,900,000 (equivalent to $35,100,000 in 2020) for the construction of a Dallas/Fort Worth Regional Airport. American Airlines and Braniff Airways struck a deal with the city of Arlington to build an airport there, but the governments of Dallas and Fort Worth disagreed over its construction and the project was abandoned in 1942. After World War II, Fort Worth annexed the site and developed it into Amon Carter Field[12] with the help of American Airlines. In 1953 Fort Worth transferred its commercial flights from Meacham Field to the new airport, which was 12 miles (19 km) from Dallas Love Field. In 1960 Fort Worth purchased Amon Carter Field and renamed it Greater Southwest International Airport (GSW) in an attempt to compete with Dallas' airport, but GSW's traffic continued to decline relative to Dallas Love Field. By the mid-1960s Fort Worth was getting 1% of Texas air traffic while Dallas was getting 49%, which led to the virtual abandonment of GSW.

The joint airport proposal was revisited in 1961 after the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) refused to invest more money in separate Dallas and Fort Worth airports. While airline service had steeply declined at both GSW and Meacham, Dallas Love Field was congested and had no more room to expand. Following an order from the federal government in 1964 that it would unilaterally choose a site if the cities could not come to an agreement, officials from the two cities finally agreed on a location for a new regional airport that was north of the near-abandoned GSW and almost equidistant from the two city centers. The land was purchased by the cities in 1966 and construction began in 1969.

Voters went to the polls in cities throughout the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex to approve the new North Texas Regional Airport, which was named after the North Texas Commission that was instrumental in the regional airport coming to fruition. The North Texas Commission formed the North Texas Airport Commission to oversee the planning and construction of the giant airport. Area voters approved the airport referendum and the new North Texas Regional Airport would become a reality.[13] However, many Dallas residents remained satisfied with Love Field, and an attempt to establish an independent Dallas Fort Worth Regional Airport Authority—despite strong backing from the Dallas Chamber of Commerce and Dallas mayor J. Erik Jonsson—failed when Dallas voters rejected the proposal by a narrow margin. After further negotiation, the cities instead established an appointed airport board consisting of seven members from Dallas and four from Fort Worth, and were able to persuade all existing air carriers at Love and GSW to move to the new regional airport.[14][15]

Under the original 1967 airport design, DFW was to have pier-shaped terminals perpendicular to a central highway. In 1968, the design was revised to provide for semicircular terminals, which served to isolate loading and unloading areas from the central highway, and to provide additional room for parking in the middle of each semicircle.[16] The plan proposed thirteen such terminals, but only four were built initially.[17][18]

Opening and operations[edit]

Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (IATA: DFW, ICAO: KDFW, FAA LID: DFW) in 2013

DFW held an open house and dedication ceremony on September 20–23, 1973, which included the first landing of a supersonic Concorde in the United States, an Air France aircraft en route from Caracas to Paris.[16] The attendees at the airport's dedication included former Texas Governor John Connally, Transportation Secretary Claude Brinegar, U.S. Senator Lloyd Bentsen and Texas Governor Dolph Briscoe.[19] The airport opened for commercial service as Dallas/Fort Worth Regional Airport on January 13, 1974, at a cost of $700 million. The first flight to land was American Airlines Flight 341 from New York, which had stopped in Memphis and Little Rock.[20] The name change to Dallas/Fort Worth International did not occur until 1985.

American Airlines is headquartered near DFW and its largest airport.

When it opened, DFW had four terminals, numbered 2W, 2E, 3E and 4E.[17] During its first year of operations, the airport was served by American Airlines, Braniff International Airways, Continental Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Eastern Air Lines, Frontier Airlines, Ozark Air Lines, Rio Airways and Texas International Airlines.[21] The Wright Amendment of 1979 banned long-distance flights into Love Field,[22] leaving Southwest Airlines as Love Field's only jet airline and operating solely as an intrastate air carrier in the state of Texas.[23]

Braniff International Airways was a major operator at DFW in the airport's early years, operating a hub from Terminal 2W with international flights to South America and Mexico from 1974, London from 1978 and Europe and Asia from 1979, before ceasing all operations in 1982.[24] During the Braniff hub era, DFW was one of only four U.S. airports to have scheduled Concorde service; Braniff commenced scheduled Concorde service from Dallas to Washington from 1979 to 1980, using British Airways and Air France aircraft temporarily re-registered to Braniff while flying within the United States. British Airways later briefly flew Concordes to Dallas in 1988 as a substitute for its ordinarily scheduled DC-10 service.[16]

Following airline deregulation, American Airlines (which had already been one of the largest carriers serving the Dallas/Fort Worth area for many years) established its first hub at DFW on June 11, 1981.[25] American finished moving its headquarters from Grand Prairie, Texas, to a building in Fort Worth located on the site of the old Greater Southwest International Airport, near DFW Airport on January 17, 1983; the airline began leasing the facility from the airport, which owns the facility.[26] By 1984, the American hub occupied most of Terminal 3E and part of Terminal 2E.[27] American's hub grew to fill all of Terminal 2E by 1991.[28] American also began long-haul international service from DFW, adding flights to London in 1982 and Tokyo in 1987.[29]

Delta Air Lines also built up a hub operation at DFW, which occupied most of Terminal 4E through the 1990s.[27][28] The Delta hub peaked around 1991, when Delta had a 35% market share at DFW; its share was halved by 2004, after many of its mainline routes were downgraded to more frequent regional jet service in 2003.[30] Delta constructed an satellite terminal in Terminal E in 1988 to accommodate their hub, which was permanently reopened in May 2019 for American Eagle operations.[31][32] Delta closed its DFW hub in 2004 in a restructuring of the airline to avoid bankruptcy, cutting its DFW operation to only 21 flights a day from over 250 and redeploying aircraft to hubs in Cincinnati, Atlanta and Salt Lake City. Prior to the closure, Delta had a 17.3% market share at DFW.[33]

In 1989 the airport authority announced plans to rebuild the existing terminals and add two runways. After an environmental impact study was released the following year, the cities of Irving, Euless and Grapevine sued the airport over its extension plans, a battle that was finally decided (in favor of the airport) by the US Supreme Court in 1994. The seventh runway opened in 1996. The four primary north–south runways (those closest to the terminals) were all lengthened from 11,388 feet (3,471 m) to their present length of 13,400 feet (4,084 m). The first, 17R/35L, was extended in 1996 (at the same time the new runway was constructed) and the other three (17C/35C, 18L/36R and 18R/36L) were extended in 2005. DFW is now the only airport in the world with 4 serviceable paved runways longer than 4,000 metres (13,123 ft).

Terminal D, built for international flights, and DFW Skylink, a modern bidirectional people mover system, opened in 2005.[34][35] In September 2014, the largest commercial aircraft in the world, an Airbus A380 owned by Australian airline Qantas made the first arrival at DFW ever by an A380, and was handled at Concourse D.[36]

From 2004 to 2012, DFW was one of two US Army "Personnel Assistance Points" that received US troops returning from wars in Iraq and Afghanistan for rest and recuperation. This ended on March 14, 2012, leaving Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport as the sole Personnel Assistance Point.[37]

Airports Council International (ACI) named DFW Airport the best large airport with more than 40 million passengers in North America for passenger satisfaction in 2016.[38]

In June 2018, DFW Airport opened a fully functioning, free standing emergency room on airport grounds, located in Southgate Plaza near the Airport Headquarters and Rental Car Center. With this opening, the facility became the first actual ER on an airport's property anywhere around the globe.[39]

DFW Airport tentatively completed a $2.7 billion[40] "Terminal Renewal and Improvement Program" (TRIP), which encompassed renovations of three of the original four terminals (A, B, and E). Work on the project began following the conclusion of Super Bowl XLV in February 2011. Terminal A was the first terminal to undergo these renovations, which were completed in January 2017 at a cost of about $1 billion.[41] This was followed by the completion of Terminal E in August 2017 and Terminal B in December 2017. While Terminal C was originally part of the multibillion-dollar renovations, American Airlines in 2014 asked to delay renovations of the terminal. Terminal C is now slated to be renovated along with the project to construct a new terminal, Terminal F, to be completed sometime in 2025.[42]

Future[edit]

On May 20, 2019, DFW airport, along with American Airlines, announced plans to build a 6th terminal. The proposed project is estimated to cost $3–3.5 billion and was expected to finish as soon as 2025.[43] Along with the addition of up to 24 new gates to Terminal F, renovations of Terminal C are planned to take place, as it is the last terminal that has not been updated in recent years.[44] The goal of the new terminal is to "provide the region with the growth it needs to compete with international business centers," according to CEO of DFW Airport, Sean Donohue.[43] However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the timing of the project is currently in flux.[45]

Facilities[edit]

A Skylink train making a stop at Terminal E, next to a Spirit Airlines Airbus A320 at DFW

Terminals[edit]

Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport has five terminals and 184 gates.[10] DFW's terminals are designed to minimize the distance between a passenger's car and airplane, and to reduce traffic around terminals. A consequence of this layout is that connecting passengers have to walk extremely long distances between gates, as there are no shortcuts or moving walkways between the ends of the semicircular terminals. The Skylink connects all five terminals inside the secured area.[35] Terminal Link connects all terminals with a shuttle bus system on the non-secure side.[46] All non-precleared international flights are processed in Terminal D, which also has a gate to support an Airbus A380.[47] All non-American Airlines domestic carriers and pre-cleared flights from Canada use Terminal E.[48]

American Airlines has gates and Admirals Clubs in all 5 terminals, as well as a Flagship Lounge in Terminal D.[49] Delta and United operate a Sky Club and United Club respectively in Terminal E.[50][51] Terminal D contains numerous independent and foreign carrier lounges, including an American Express Centurion Lounge and The Club DFW, affiliated with Priority Pass.[52]Capital One is constructing a lounge scheduled to open in terminal D in 2021.[53]

The Hyatt Regency DFW Airport hotel is directly adjacent to Terminal C, while the 298-room Grand Hyatt DFW Hotel is directly connected to Terminal D.[54][55]

Ground transportation[edit]

The International Parkway Toll Road intersects the airport

Car rental[edit]

A consolidated rental car facility is located at the south end of the airport and connected to all terminals by a dedicated network of shuttle buses.[56] Hosting ten rental car companies, the center was completed in March 2000.[57]

Highways[edit]

The DFW Airport area is served by International Parkway (partially State Highway 97 Spur), which runs through the center of the airport, connecting to Airport Freeway (State Highway 183) on the southern side of the airport and John W. Carpenter Freeway (State Highway 114) on the northern side. International Parkway continues north of State Highway 114, carrying the State Highway 121 designation for a short while until its interchange with the Lyndon B. Johnson Freeway (I-635), where State Highway 121 continues north as the Sam Rayburn Tollway.

Bus services[edit]

Bus routes serving the airport are operated by Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) and Trinity Metro. DART operates route 408 from Downtown Irving/Heritage Crossing Station and Southwestern Medical District/Parkland Station to the Remote South Parking facility, and Trinity Metro operates the TRE Link bus route from CentrePort/DFW Airport station.

Rail transport[edit]

Three rail systems serve the airport: DART Light Rail, TEXRail, and the Trinity Railway Express. DART operates light rail from DFW Airport station located at Terminal A.[58] This provides direct rail service on the Orange Line to Dallas and Las Colinas (with a later extension to DFW Airport North station). TEXRail is a commuter rail service between Terminal B and T&P Station in downtown Fort Worth. DFW Airport is additionally served by the Trinity Railway Express commuter rail line at CentrePort/DFW Airport Station via shuttle bus to the Remote South parking lot. The line serves both downtown Dallas and downtown Fort Worth.

Other facilities[edit]

The facility at 1639 West 23rd Street is located on the airport property and in the City of Grapevine.[59][60][61] Tenants include China Airlines,[62]Lufthansa Cargo,[63] and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.[64]

The DFW Airport Department of Public Safety provides the airport with its own police, fire protection, and emergency medical services.[65]

The DFW International Airport headquarters is located nearby at 2400 Aviation Drive, DFW Airport, TX 75261.[66]

In 1995, the airport opened Founders' Plaza, an observation park dedicated to the founders of DFW Airport. The site offered a panoramic view of the south end of the airport and hosted several significant events, including an employee memorial the day after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and the airport's 30th anniversary celebration in 2004.[67] As part of the perimeter taxiway project, Founders' Plaza was closed in 2007 and moved to a new location surrounding a 50-foot (15 m)-tall beacon on the north side of the airport in 2008. The 6-acre (2.4 ha) plaza features a granite monument and sculpture, post-mounted binoculars, piped-in voices of air traffic controllers and shade pavilions. In 2010, a memorial honoring Delta Air Lines Flight 191 was dedicated at the plaza.[68]

Airlines and destinations[edit]

Passenger[edit]

AirlinesDestinationsRefs
Aeroméxico ConnectMexico City[69]
Air Canada ExpressMontréal–Trudeau, Toronto–Pearson, Vancouver[70]
Air FranceSeasonal:Paris–Charles de Gaulle[71]
Alaska AirlinesPortland (OR), Seattle/Tacoma[72]
American AirlinesAlbuquerque, Amarillo, Aruba, Atlanta, Auckland, Austin, Baltimore, Beijing–Daxing, Belize City, Birmingham (AL), Bogotá, Boise, Boston, Buenos Aires–Ezeiza, Burbank, Calgary, Cancún, Charleston (SC), Charlotte, Chicago–O'Hare, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Colorado Springs, Columbia (SC), Columbus–Glenn, Cozumel, Denver, Des Moines, Destin/Fort Walton Beach, Detroit, Durango (MX), Eagle/Vail, El Paso, Fayetteville/Bentonville, Fort Lauderdale, Fort Myers, Frankfurt, Fresno, Grand Cayman, Grand Rapids, Greensboro, Greenville/Spartanburg, Guadalajara, Guatemala City, Harrisburg, Hartford, Hong Kong, Honolulu, Houston–Intercontinental, Indianapolis, Jackson Hole, Jacksonville (FL), Kahului, Kansas City, Key West, Knoxville, Las Vegas, León/Del Bajío, Liberia (CR), Lima, Little Rock, London–Heathrow, Los Angeles, Louisville, Lubbock, Madison, Madrid (resumes December 16, 2021),[73]McAllen, Memphis, Mexico City, Miami, Midland/Odessa, Milwaukee, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Montego Bay, Monterey (CA), Montrose, Nashville, Newark, New Orleans, New York–JFK, New York–LaGuardia, Norfolk, Oklahoma City, Omaha, Ontario, Orange County, Orlando, Palm Springs, Paris–Charles de Gaulle, Pensacola, Philadelphia, Phoenix–Sky Harbor, Pittsburgh, Portland (OR), Puerto Vallarta, Raleigh/Durham, Reno/Tahoe, Richmond, Roatan, Rome–Fiumicino, Sacramento, St. Louis, St. Thomas, Salt Lake City, San Antonio, San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose (CA), San Jose (CR), San José del Cabo, San Juan, San Salvador, Santiago de Chile, São Paulo–Guarulhos, Sarasota, Savannah, Seattle/Tacoma, Seoul–Incheon, Shanghai–Pudong, Spokane, Tampa, Tel Aviv (begins March 5, 2022),[74]Tokyo–Haneda, Tokyo–Narita, Toronto–Pearson, Tucson, Tulsa, Vancouver, Washington–Dulles, Washington–National, West Palm Beach, Wichita
Seasonal:Amsterdam, Anchorage, Bangor, Bozeman, Dublin, Eugene, Fairbanks, Glacier Park/Kalispell, Gunnison/Crested Butte, Hayden/Steamboat Springs, Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo, Kailua–Kona, Missoula, Montreal–Trudeau, Nassau, Portland (ME), Providenciales, Punta Cana, Rapid City, St. Kitts, St. Lucia–Hewanorra, St. Maarten, San Pedro Sula, Santa Barbara, Santo Domingo–Las Américas, Tegucigalpa
[75]
American EagleAbilene, Aguascalientes, Albuquerque, Alexandria, Amarillo, Asheville, Aspen, Augusta (GA), Bakersfield, Baton Rouge, Beaumont, Billings, Birmingham (AL), Bismarck, Bloomington/Normal, Bozeman, Brownsville, Buffalo, Calgary, Cedar Rapids/Iowa City, Champaign/Urbana, Charleston (SC), Chattanooga, Cheyenne, Chihuahua, Cincinnati, College Station, Colorado Springs, Columbia (MO), Columbus (GA), Corpus Christi, Dayton, Del Rio, Des Moines, Destin/Fort Walton Beach, Durango (CO), El Paso, Eugene, Evansville, Fargo, Fayetteville/Bentonville, Fayetteville (NC), Flagstaff, Fort Smith, Fort Wayne, Gainesville, Garden City, Grand Island, Grand Junction, Grand Rapids, Greensboro, Greenville/Spartanburg, Gulfport/Biloxi, Harlingen, Harrisburg, Houston–Hobby, Houston–Intercontinental, Huntsville, Idaho Falls, Jackson (MS), Jackson Hole, Kansas City, Killeen/Fort Hood, Knoxville, Lafayette, Lake Charles, Laredo, Lawton, León/Del Bajío, Lexington, Little Rock, Long Beach, Longview, Louisville, Lubbock, Madison, Manhattan (KS), McAllen, Memphis, Midland/Odessa, Milwaukee, Missoula, Mobile, Moline/Quad Cities, Monroe, Monterey (CA), Monterrey, Montgomery, Montrose, Morelia, Oaxaca, Oklahoma City, Omaha, Panama City (FL), Pensacola, Peoria, Phoenix–Sky Harbor, Querétaro, Rapid City, Reno/Tahoe, Roswell, St. George (UT), St. Louis, San Angelo, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Potosí, Santa Barbara, Santa Fe, Shreveport, Sioux Falls, South Bend, Springfield (IL), Springfield/Branson, Stillwater, Syracuse, Tallahassee, Texarkana, Toronto–Pearson, Torreón/Gómez Palacio, Tri–Cities (TN), Tulsa, Tyler, Waco, Wichita, Wichita Falls, Wilmington (NC), Yuma, Zacatecas
Seasonal:Acapulco, Burlington (VT), Daytona Beach, Eagle/Vail, Glacier Park/Kalispell, Hermosillo, Hilton Head, Huatulco, Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo, La Paz, Loreto, Manzanillo, Mazatlán, Melbourne/Orlando, Mérida, Montreal–Trudeau, Myrtle Beach, Santa Rosa, Sarasota, Traverse City
[75]
Avianca El SalvadorSan Salvador[76]
Boutique AirCarlsbad (NM)[77]
British AirwaysLondon–Heathrow[78]
Contour AirlinesGreenville (MS)[79]
Delta Air LinesAtlanta, Boston, Detroit, Los Angeles, Minneapolis/St. Paul, New York–JFK, New York–LaGuardia, Salt Lake City[80]
Delta ConnectionCincinnati[80]
Denver Air ConnectionClovis (NM)[81]
EmiratesDubai–International[82]
FinnairHelsinki (begins February 7, 2022)[83][84]
Frontier AirlinesBuffalo (begins April 24, 2022),[85]Cincinnati, Denver, Durango (CO) (begins April 30, 2022),[85]Hartford (begins April 25, 2022),[85]Las Vegas, Miami, Newark, Orlando, Philadelphia, Phoenix–Sky Harbor, San Diego, San Francisco, Tampa
Seasonal:Atlanta, Cancún, Chicago–O'Hare, Nashville, Ontario, Salt Lake City
[86]
IberiaMadrid (begins April 22, 2022)[87][88]
Japan AirlinesTokyo–Haneda, Tokyo–Narita[89]
JetBlueBoston, New York–JFK[90]
Korean AirSeoul–Incheon[91]
LufthansaFrankfurt[92]
QantasSydney[93]
Qatar AirwaysDoha[94]
Southern Airways ExpressEl Dorado (AR), Harrison (AR), Hot Springs[95]
Spirit AirlinesAtlanta, Baltimore, Cancún, Chicago–O'Hare, Detroit, Fort Lauderdale, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Miami, New Orleans, New York–LaGuardia, Orlando, Pensacola, Philadelphia, Phoenix–Sky Harbor, Puerto Vallarta, Tampa
Seasonal:Cleveland, Myrtle Beach, San Diego
[96]
Sun Country AirlinesLas Vegas, Minneapolis/St. Paul
Seasonal:Cancún, Cozumel, Liberia (CR), Montego Bay, Orange County, Palm Springs, Puerto Vallarta, Punta Cana, San José del Cabo
[97]
Turkish AirlinesIstanbul[98]
United AirlinesChicago–O'Hare, Denver, Houston–Intercontinental, Newark, Washington–Dulles[99]
United ExpressChicago–O'Hare, Denver, Houston–Intercontinental, Newark, San Francisco, Washington–Dulles[99]
VivaAerobúsMexico City, Monterrey[100]
VolarisGuadalajara, Mexico City[101]

Cargo[edit]

AirlinesDestinations
AeroLogicChicago–O'Hare, Frankfurt
AirBridgeCargoAmsterdam, Chicago–O'Hare, Los Angeles, Moscow–Sheremetyevo
Air China CargoAnchorage, Beijing–Capital, New York–JFK, Shanghai–Pudong
Amazon AirAllentown/Bethlehem, Cincinnati, Ontario, Sacramento, Tampa
AmeriflightAmarillo, Lubbock, Wichita Falls
Amerijet InternationalSacramento
Asiana CargoAtlanta, Chicago–O'Hare, Seattle/Tacoma
ASL Airlines BelgiumAtlanta, Liège
Avianca CargoBogotá
CargojetHamilton, Mexico City, Toronto–Pearson
CargoluxChicago–O'Hare, Houston–Intercontinental, Los Angeles, Luxembourg, Mexico City
Cargolux ItaliaMilan–Malpensa
Cathay Pacific CargoAnchorage, Atlanta, Hong Kong, Houston–Intercontinental, Los Angeles
China Airlines CargoAnchorage, Atlanta, Chicago–O'Hare, Shanghai–Pudong, Taipei–Taoyuan
DHL AviationCincinnati, El Paso, Hong Kong, Los Angeles
Empire AirlinesLubbock
EVA Air CargoAnchorage, Taipei–Taoyuan[102]
FedEx ExpressFort Lauderdale, Greensboro, Indianapolis, Los Angeles, Memphis, Phoenix–Sky Harbor, Seattle/Tacoma
Korean Air CargoAnchorage, Atlanta, Guadalajara
Lufthansa CargoFrankfurt, Guadalajara, Mexico City
MartinaireAbilene, Addison, Amarillo, Fort Worth–Meacham, Lubbock, Oklahoma City, Palestine, Pampa (TX), Shreveport, Temple, Tyler, Wichita Falls
Nippon Cargo AirlinesAnchorage, Chicago–O'Hare, Tokyo–Narita
Qantas FreightBeijing–Capital, Chongqing
Qatar Airways CargoAtlanta, Doha, Liège, Luxembourg, Panama City–Tocumen
Silk Way West AirlinesBaku, Chicago–O'Hare, Hahn
Singapore Airlines CargoAnchorage, Brussels, Chicago–O'Hare, Los Angeles, Seattle/Tacoma, Singapore
UPS AirlinesAlbuquerque, Amarillo, Atlanta, Austin, Boston, Chicago–O'Hare, Chicago/Rockford, Columbia (SC), El Paso, Greenville/Spartanburg, Houston–Intercontinental, Little Rock, Los Angeles, Louisville, Memphis, Miami, Newark, Oakland, Ontario, Orlando, Phoenix–Sky Harbor, Portland (OR), San Antonio, San Bernardino, San Jose (CA), Spokane, Tampa
Seasonal:Hartford, Honolulu, Knoxville, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Philadelphia

Statistics[edit]

Top destinations[edit]

Rank City Passengers Carriers
1 Los Angeles, California854,000 American, Delta, Spirit
2 Las Vegas, Nevada736,000 American, Frontier, Spirit, Sun Country
3 Denver, Colorado690,000 American, Frontier, United
4 Atlanta, Georgia632,000 American, Delta, Spirit
5 Chicago–O'Hare, Illinois585,000 American, Spirit, United
6 Orlando, Florida575,000 American, Frontier, Spirit
7 Phoenix–Sky Harbor, Arizona528,000 American, Spirit
8 Miami, Florida520,000 American, Frontier
9 Charlotte, North Carolina450,000 American
10 Fort Lauderdale, Florida433,000 American, Spirit
Rank Airport Passengers Carriers
1 Cancún, Mexico831,554 American, Spirit, Sun Country
2 London–Heathrow, United Kingdom745,902 American, British Airways
3 Mexico City, Mexico677,464 Aeromexico, American, VivaAerobus, Volaris
4 Tokyo–Narita, Japan449,658 American, Japan Airlines
5 San José del Cabo, Mexico393,601 American, Spirit
6 Toronto–Pearson, Canada363,833 American, Air Canada
7 Frankfurt, Germany304,334 American, Lufthansa
8 Seoul–Incheon, South Korea288,289 American, Korean Air
9 Puerto Vallarta, Mexico270,594 American
10 Vancouver, Canada256,862 Air Canada, American

Airline market share[edit]

Rank Airline Passengers Share
1 American Airlines18,981,000 62.27%
2 Envoy Air4,961,000 16.28%
3 Mesa Airlines2,036,000 6.68%
4 SkyWest Airlines1,394,000 4.57%
5 Spirit Airlines1,285,000 4.21%

Annual traffic[edit]

Year Passengers Year Passengers Year Passengers
199452,642,225200459,446,078201463,522,823
199556,490,845200559,176,265201565,512,163
199658,034,503200660,226,829201665,670,697
199760,488,713200759,786,476201767,092,194
199860,313,000200857,093,187201869,112,607
199960,112,998200956,030,457201975,066,956
200060,687,181201056,905,600202039,364,990
200155,141,763201157,806,918
200252,829,750201258,590,633
200353,252,205201360,436,739

Accidents and incidents[edit]

  • August 2, 1985: Delta Air Lines Flight 191, a Lockheed L-1011 on a Fort Lauderdale–Dallas/Fort Worth–Los Angeles route, crashed near the north end of runway 17R (now 17C) after encountering a severe microburst on final approach; the crash killed 8 of 11 crew members, 128 of 152 passengers on board and one person on the ground.
  • March 24, 1987: The pilot of a MetroflightConvair CV-580, registration number N73107, operating for American Eagle Airlines on a commuter flight bound for Gregg County Airport, lost directional control during a crosswind takeoff. The left-hand wing and propeller struck the runway and the nose landing gear collapsed as the craft slid off the runway and onto an adjacent taxiway; 8 passengers and 3 crew aboard the airliner suffered minor or no injuries. The crash was attributed to the pilot's decision to disregard wind information and take off in weather conditions that exceeded the rated capabilities of the aircraft; the pilot's "overconfidence in [his/her] personal ability" was cited as a contributing factor in the accident report.[106][107]
  • May 21, 1988: An American AirlinesMcDonnell Douglas DC-10-30, registration number N136AA, operating as AA Flight 70 bound for Frankfurt Airport, overran Runway 35L after automatic warning signals prompted the flight crew to initiate a rejected takeoff. The jetliner continued to accelerate for several seconds before slowing, and did not stop until it had run 1,100 feet (335 m) past the runway threshold, collapsing the nose landing gear. 2 crew were seriously injured and the remaining 12 crew and 240 passengers escaped safely; the aircraft was severely damaged and was written off. Investigators attributed the overrun to a shortcoming in the design standards that were used when the DC-10 was built; there had been no requirement to test whether partially worn (as opposed to brand-new) brake pads were capable of stopping the aircraft during a rejected takeoff and 8 of the 10 worn pad sets on N136AA had failed.[108][109]
  • August 31, 1988: Delta Air Lines Flight 1141, a Boeing 727, bound for Salt Lake City International Airport, crashed after takeoff, killing 14 of the 108 people on board and injuring 76 others.
  • April 14, 1993: The pilot of American Airlines Flight 102, a McDonnell Douglas DC-10-30, registration number N139AA, lost directional control during a crosswind landing in rainy conditions after arriving from Honolulu International Airport. The jetliner slid off runway 17L and dug into deep mud, collapsing the nose landing gear and tearing off the left-hand engine and much of the left wing. A fire in the left-hand wheel well was rapidly extinguished by firefighters who arrived almost immediately from the nearby DFW/DPS Fire Station. 2 passengers suffered serious injuries while using the evacuation slides to escape from the steeply tilted fuselage; the remaining 187 passengers and all 13 crew evacuated safely. The aircraft was written off.[110][111][112]
  • October 1, 1993: Martinaire Flight 639, a Cessna 208B Caravancargo aircraft, registration number N9762B, was blown off Runway 17L by jet blast after arriving from Tulsa International Airport, sustaining substantial damage to the left wing. The pilot and sole occupant was not injured. The pilot had disregarded a safety advisory from air traffic control and attempted to taxi behind a McDonnell Douglas MD-11 as it was cleared for takeoff.[113]
  • July 18, 1997: A Cessna 172 allegedly stolen from Sherman Municipal Airport was unlawfully flown at very low altitude across DFW Airport, Fort Worth Alliance Airport, and the landing area at a Bell Helicopter facility, causing significant air traffic disruptions. The unknown pilot then flew the aircraft back to Sherman Municipal and parked it. The Cessna's owner denied flying it that day, and stated that he could not positively identify the incident pilot because several people had access to the aircraft.[114]
  • May 23, 2001: The right main landing gear of an American Airlines Fokker 100, registration number N1419D, operating as AA Flight 1107, collapsed upon landing on runway 17C after a scheduled flight from Charlotte/Douglas International Airport. The pilot was able to maintain directional control and stop the aircraft on the runway. The incident was attributed to metal fatigue caused by a manufacturing flaw in the right main gear; there were no serious injuries to the 88 passengers or 4 crew, but the aircraft was badly damaged and was written off.[115][116][117]

References[edit]

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  3. ^"Preliminary World Airport Traffic and Rankings 2013 – High Growth Dubai Moves Up to 7th Busiest Airport". Airports Council International. March 31, 2014. Archived from the original on April 1, 2014. Retrieved August 26, 2015.
  4. ^"U.S. Department of Transportation, Research and Innovative Technology Administration, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Office of Airline Information, T-100 International Segment Data, Special Calculation, September 2010". Bureau of Transportation Statistics. Archived from the original on November 10, 2011. Retrieved August 6, 2011.
  5. ^Bill Hethcock (December 14, 2017). "DFW Airport ranks 9th in international passengers". www.bizjournals.com. Dallas Business Journal. American City Business Journals. Retrieved January 14, 2018.
  6. ^Hoopfer, Evan (May 20, 2019). "Updated: 6th terminal coming to DFW Airport". Dallas Business Journal. Retrieved May 21, 2019.
  7. ^"Passenger Traffic 2010 FINAL". Airports Council International. Archived from the original on May 17, 2013. Retrieved August 6, 2011.
  8. ^FAA Airport Form 5010 for DFWPDF, effective October 12, 2017.
  9. ^"Contact Us". Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. Archived from the original on February 8, 2012. Retrieved July 6, 2012.
  10. ^ abcdefgDFW Airport (April 1, 2018). "DFW Airport By The Numbers". Archived(PDF) from the original on April 12, 2018. Retrieved April 10, 2018.
  11. ^Public Affairs Department (March 7, 2013). "DFW International Airport Reaches Milestone of 200 Nonstop Destinations In Its Mission to Connect The World" (Press release). Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. Archived from the original on September 11, 2015. Retrieved August 26, 2015.
  12. ^Freeman, Paul (January 27, 2012). "Texas – Northeast Fort Worth Area". Abandoned & Little-Known Airfields. Archived from the original on July 16, 2012. Retrieved July 6, 2012.
  13. ^"Our Future Hangs In The Balance – Two Mile Long Terminal Planned". Irving Daily News Special Supplement. Irving Daily News. June 4, 1967.
  14. ^Cooper, William (May 10, 1992). "Love Field controversy should now be shelved forever". The Dallas Morning News. Dallas, Texas.
  15. ^Allen, Eric A. (1990). "Wright Amendment: The Constitutionality and Propriety of the Restrictions on Dallas Love Field, The". Journal of Air Law and Commerce. 55 (4): 1011–1015. Retrieved March 3, 2019.
  16. ^ abcSlotboom, Oscar (2013). Dallas–Fort Worth Freeways: Texas-Sized Ambition(PDF). ISBN . Archived from the original(PDF) on December 11, 2013. Retrieved December 6, 2013.
  17. ^ ab"Dallas Fort Worth International Airport". Texas State Historical Association. June 12, 2010. Archived from the original on December 11, 2013. Retrieved December 4, 2013.
  18. ^"NEVER BUILT: A visionary plan to rebuild DFW - Part 1". A VISUAL HISTORY OF THE WORLD'S GREAT AIRPORTS. Retrieved November 30, 2021.
  19. ^Domeier, Doug (September 23, 1973). "Texas-Sized Airport Dedicated to Youth"(PDF). The Dallas Morning News. Archived from the original(PDF) on December 10, 2013. Retrieved December 6, 2013.
  20. ^Ahles, Andrea (January 11, 2014). "40th anniversary: DFW ready to soar into the future". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Archived from the original on January 3, 2018. Retrieved January 2, 2018.
  21. ^"DFW74intro". Archived from the original on March 23, 2016. Retrieved March 19, 2016.
  22. ^"Wright Amendment of 1979". Aviation Online Magazine. Archived from the original on June 9, 2011. Retrieved July 6, 2012.
  23. ^"DAL79intro". Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved March 19, 2016.
  24. ^Nance, John J. (1984). Splash of Colors The Self Destruction of Braniff International. New York: William Morrow and Company. pp. 80–83. ISBN .
  25. ^"History of American Airlines". American Airlines. Archived from the original on May 26, 2012. Retrieved July 6, 2012.
  26. ^"American Airlines Finishes Moving into Headquarters Monday". Ocala Star-Banner. Associated Press. January 16, 1983. p. 6A. Archived from the original on September 7, 2014. Retrieved July 6, 2012.. Retrieved on August 27, 2009.
  27. ^ ab"Dallas/Fort Worth Regional Airport, November 1984". DepartedFlights.com. Archived from the original on July 15, 2013. Retrieved December 4, 2013.
  28. ^ ab"Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, October 1991". DepartedFlights.com. Archived from the original on July 15, 2013. Retrieved December 4, 2013.
  29. ^"American Airlines Celebrates 25 Years of Service Between Dallas/Fort Worth and Japan" (Press release). American Airlines. PR Newswire. May 21, 2012. Archived from the original on February 12, 2014. Retrieved August 30, 2013.
  30. ^"D/FW braces for Delta restructuring". The Dallas Morning News. August 17, 2004. Archived from the original on July 7, 2013. Retrieved December 10, 2013.
  31. ^Shine, Connor (April 6, 2018). "American Airlines adding 15 regional gates at DFW Airport's Terminal E satellite". Dallas Morning News. Archived from the original on April 8, 2018. Retrieved April 8, 2018.
  32. ^Hoopfer, Evan (May 3, 2019). "American Airlines' major DFW Airport investment comes online". Dallas Business Journal. Retrieved May 2, 2019.
  33. ^"Delta to cut 7,000 jobs, DFW hub". Associated Press. September 9, 2004. Archived from the original on December 12, 2013. Retrieved December 5, 2013.
  34. ^Public Affairs Department (July 18, 2005). "DFW International Airport To Open International Terminal D on July 23"(PDF) (Press release). Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. Archived from the original(PDF) on May 11, 2012. Retrieved August 6, 2011.
  35. ^ abPublic Affairs Department (May 21, 2005). "DFW International Airport Debuts Worlds Largest Airport People Mover System"(PDF) (Press release). Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. Archived from the original(PDF) on July 3, 2015. Retrieved August 6, 2011.
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  37. ^Vaughn, Chris (January 23, 2012). "Soldier Stopovers at DFW Airport to End". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Archived from the original on July 28, 2013. Retrieved July 6, 2012.
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Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dallas/Fort_Worth_International_Airport

Contact Spirit Airlines Customer Service

Spirit Airlines Phone Numbers and Emails

Toll-Free Number:

  • (800) 756-7117

    Us, Canada, Puerto Rico, Us Virgin Islands (Spanish)

Customer Service:

  • (954) 698-0125

    Spirit Vacations

  • (855) 728-3555

Legal:

  • (866) 395-2920

    Privacy Inquiries

Sales:

  • (800) 772-7117

    Us, Canada, Puerto Rico, Us Virgin Islands (English)

  • (800) 756-7117

    Us, Canada, Puerto Rico, Us Virgin Islands (Spanish)

  • (801) 401-2222

    Us, Canada, Puerto Rico, Us Virgin Islands (WhatsApp)

  • +5 064 032 9449

    Costa Rica

  • +5 032 534 8228

    El Salvador

  • +5 022 292 0828

    Guatemala

  • +5 092 940 4422

    Haiti

  • +5 042 544 0300

    Honduras

  • +5 052 278 1149

    Nicaragua

  • +511 641 9131

    Peru

Spirit Airlines Emails:

Customer Service

General Info

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Spirit Airlines Contact Information

Spirit Airlines Online Chat:

Corporate Office Address:

Spirit Airlines, Inc.

2800 Executive Way

Miramar,Florida33025

United States

Other Info (opening hours):

Other Location:

650 SW 34th St,

Fort Lauderdale, FL 33315

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Spirit Airlines Rating Based on 641 Reviews

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Summary of Spirit Airlines Customer Service Calls

8K TOTAL
CALLS

05:03 AVG CALL
DURATION

8% ISSUES
RESOLVED

Top Reasons of Customers Calls

Consumers Call the Most From

Why Do People Call Spirit Airlines Customer Service?

Request for Information Question:

  • “Flight status 1167”
  • “Notice on my ticket that my name is on there twice, need help”
  • “When to request wheelchair to come out and pick me up at the car my flight is 7384 to 6:25 AM going to Myrtle Beach the confirmation number is YEHYSC Mason will have to wait in the car so if someone come out and get me that would be great I'll be rig”

Activation/ Cancellation Question:

  • “Cancelling”
  • “Cancel My fly”
  • “Cancellation”

Return/ Replace Question:

  • “Flight changes”
  • “To change my reservation”
  • “Change flight”

Refund Question:

  • “Refund/credit”
  • “I want a refund on flight since your agent canceled it. We Never asked to cancel”
  • “For a refund for a flight you canceled”

Payments and Charges Question:

  • “Reimbursement for canceled flight”
  • “Got charge for a personal luggage”
  • “Charges”

Product/ Service Question:

  • “Book a flight”
  • “Food vouchers”
  • “Cannot book a flight”

Staff Question:

  • “Worst customer service ever received Discrimination”
  • “Would like to speak to customer service”
  • “Missing bag, rude service”

Shipping and Delivery Question:

  • “Did not recieve my tickets confirmation”
  • “I can't get the info or do anything on the website”
  • “Did not receive confirmation email”

Cards Question:

  • “Instruction on what to do before I fly I bought a ticket already with my credit card”
  • “I received a pre-qualified card”
  • “Credit card”

Account Question:

  • “Account proble”
  • “Cannot access my flight sign in or purchase”
  • “Reset passwordTo reset my password”

Website/ Application Question:

  • “Spirit site is down”
  • “Website not working”
  • “App”

Employment Question:

  • “Verifying a job scam”
  • “Job interview”
  • “Employment”

Other Question:

  • “Nk702”
  • “Bagages”
  • “Book”

About

Top Spirit Airlines Services

Flight, Customer Care, Flight Booking

Top Spirit Airlines Products

Website, Coupon, Free Flight Coupon

Spirit Airlines Pros and Cons

Pros: Cheap, Cheap flight, Cheap flights, Price, No pros

Cons: Horrible customer service, No customer service, Poorly resolved customer concerns, Refuse to refund, Customer service

Summary

Spirit Airlines ULCC Ultra Low Cost Carrier services 56 markets in the United States, Bahamas and Caribbean with 185 flights per day. Among the standard ULCC product features ultra low fares; the largest ULCC network in The Caribbean and Latin America, online check-in, clean, new airplanes, the youngest Airbus fleet in the Americas; deluxe leather seating, etc. Spirit Airlines optional services and products include hotels, cars, vacation packages and cruises; event tickets, golf tee times and tours; travel insurance; onboard beverages and snacks; discounted airport parking; checked baggage and the like. In September 2006 the company became an all-Airbus airline.

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Spirit Airlines is ranked 68 out of 210 in Airlines and Air Transport category

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Источник: https://spirit-airlines.pissedconsumer.com/customer-service.html

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This airline cannot even handle a 2 hour flight professionally. Crew arrived, flight cancelled, passengers not informed, waited 3 hours then sat on runway for one hour because they had no one to load bags into baggage. Missed our car pickup and had to wait in until the next morning and pay an extra $100 for late car pickup. We tried to discuss some form of professional responsibility from this airline but they clearly didn’t care. Fly another airline at all costs. Disgraceful service, never again will we fly this airline

Business
Economy Class
Miami to Laguardia
November 2021
12345
12345
Food & Beverages12345
12345
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Источник: https://www.airlinequality.com/airline-reviews/spirit-airlines/

Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

For the DART Light Rail station at the airport, see Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport station. For the nearby Trinity Railway Express station, see CentrePort/DFW Airport station.

Not to be confused with Dulles International Airport.

Airport in Irving serving the Dallas–Fort Worth metro area in Texas, US

Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

DFW airport logo.svg
DFWAirportOverview.jpg
Airport typePublic
OwnerCities of Dallas and Fort Worth
OperatorDFW Airport Board
ServesDallas–Fort Worth metroplex
LocationDallas and Tarrant counties, Texas
OpenedSeptember 23, 1973 (48 years ago) (1973-09-23)
Hub for
Focus city for
Elevation AMSL607 ft / 185 m
Coordinates32°53′49″N097°02′17″W / 32.89694°N 97.03806°W / 32.89694; -97.03806Coordinates: 32°53′49″N097°02′17″W / 32.89694°N 97.03806°W / 32.89694; -97.03806
Websitedfwairport.com
FAA airport diagram
FAA airport diagram
DirectionLength Surface
ft m
13L/31R 9,000 2,743 Concrete
13R/31L 9,301 2,834 Concrete
17L/35R 8,500 2,590 Concrete
17C/35C 13,401 4,085 Asphalt
17R/35L 13,401 4,085 Concrete
18L/36R 13,400 4,085 Concrete
18R/36L 13,400 4,085 Concrete
Passengers39,364,990
Aircraft operations514,702
Cargo871,593.2 tons

Sources: Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport[1]

Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (IATA: DFW, ICAO: KDFW, FAALID: DFW), also known as DFW Airport,[2] is the primary international airport serving the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex area in the U.S. state of Texas. The airport was the fourth-busiest airport by passenger traffic in the world in 2020.

It is the largest hub for American Airlines, which is headquartered near the airport. It is the third-busiest airport in the world by aircraft movements and the fourth-busiest airport in the world by passenger traffic in 2020.[3] It is the ninth-busiest international gateway in the United States and the second-busiest international gateway in Texas.[4][5] American Airlines at DFW is the second-largest single airline hub in the world and the United States, behind Delta's hub at Atlanta.[6] The airport was also a hub for Delta Air Lines until 2005.

Located roughly halfway between the major cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, DFW spills across portions of Dallas and Tarrant counties, and includes portions of the cities of Irving, Euless, Grapevine and Coppell.[7] At 17,207 acres (6,963 hectares; 27 square miles), DFW is larger than the island of Manhattan, and is the second-largest airport by land area in the United States, after Denver International Airport.[8] It has its own post office ZIP Code, 75261, and United States Postal Service city designation ("DFW Airport, TX"), as well as its own police, fire protection, and emergency medical services.[9]

As of November 2021, DFW Airport has service to 260 destinations from 26 scheduled airlines.[10] In surpassing 200 destinations, DFW joined a small group of airports worldwide with that distinction.[11]

History[edit]

Planning[edit]

As early as 1927, before the area had an airport, Dallas proposed a joint airport with Fort Worth. Fort Worth declined the offer and thus each city opened its own airport, Love Field and Meacham Field, each of which had scheduled airline service.

In 1940 the Civil Aeronautics Administration earmarked US$1,900,000 (equivalent to $35,100,000 in 2020) for the construction of a Dallas/Fort Worth Regional Airport. American Airlines and Braniff Airways struck a deal with the city of Arlington to build an airport there, but the governments of Dallas and Fort Worth disagreed over its construction and the project was abandoned in 1942. After World War II, Fort Worth annexed the site and developed it into Amon Carter Field[12] with the help of American Airlines. In 1953 Fort Worth transferred its commercial flights from Meacham Field to the new airport, which was 12 miles (19 km) from Dallas Love Field. In 1960 Fort Worth purchased Amon Carter Field and renamed it Greater Southwest International Airport (GSW) in an attempt to compete with Dallas' airport, but GSW's traffic continued to decline relative to Dallas Love Field. By the mid-1960s Fort Worth was getting 1% of Texas air traffic while Dallas was getting 49%, which led to the virtual abandonment of GSW.

The joint airport proposal was revisited in 1961 after the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) refused to invest more money in separate Dallas and Fort Worth airports. While airline service had steeply declined at both GSW and Meacham, Dallas Love Field was congested and had no more room to expand. Following an order from the federal government in 1964 that it would unilaterally choose a site if the cities could not come to an agreement, officials from the two cities finally agreed on a location for a new regional airport that was north of the near-abandoned GSW and almost equidistant from the two city centers. The land was purchased by the cities in 1966 and construction began in 1969.

Voters went to the polls in cities throughout the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex to approve the new North Texas Regional Airport, which was named after the North Texas Commission that was instrumental in the regional airport coming to fruition. The North Texas Commission formed the North Texas Airport Commission to oversee the planning and construction of the giant airport. Area voters approved the airport referendum and the new North Texas Regional Airport would become a reality.[13] However, many Dallas residents remained satisfied with Love Field, and an attempt to establish an independent Dallas Fort Worth Regional Airport Authority—despite strong backing spirit airlines phone number usa the Dallas Chamber of Commerce and Dallas mayor J. Erik Jonsson—failed when Dallas voters rejected the proposal by a narrow margin. After further negotiation, the cities instead established an appointed airport board consisting of seven members from Dallas and four from Fort Worth, and were able to persuade all existing air carriers at Love and GSW to move to the new regional airport.[14][15]

Under the original 1967 airport design, DFW was to have pier-shaped terminals perpendicular to a central highway. In 1968, the design was revised to provide for semicircular terminals, which served to isolate loading and unloading areas from the central highway, and to provide additional room for parking in the middle of each semicircle.[16] The plan proposed thirteen such terminals, but only four were built initially.[17][18]

Opening and operations[edit]

Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (IATA: DFW, ICAO: KDFW, FAA LID: DFW) in 2013

DFW held an open house spirit airlines phone number usa dedication ceremony on September 20–23, 1973, which included the first landing of a supersonic Concorde in the United States, an Air France aircraft en route from Caracas to Paris.[16] The attendees at the airport's dedication included former Texas Governor John Connally, Transportation Secretary Claude Brinegar, U.S. Senator Lloyd Bentsen and Texas Governor Dolph Briscoe.[19] The airport opened for commercial service as Dallas/Fort Worth Regional Airport on January 13, 1974, at a cost of $700 million. The first flight to land was American Airlines Flight 341 from New York, which had stopped in Memphis and Little Rock.[20] The name change to Dallas/Fort Worth International did not occur until 1985.

American Airlines is headquartered near DFW and its largest airport.

When it opened, DFW had four terminals, numbered 2W, 2E, spirit airlines phone number usa and 4E.[17] During its first year of operations, the airport was served by American Airlines, Braniff International Airways, Continental Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Eastern Air Lines, Frontier Airlines, Ozark Air Lines, Rio Airways and Texas International Airlines.[21] The Wright Amendment of 1979 banned long-distance flights into Love Field,[22] leaving Southwest Airlines as Love Field's only jet airline and operating solely as an intrastate air carrier in the state of Texas.[23]

Braniff International Airways was a major operator at DFW in the airport's early years, operating a hub from Terminal 2W with international flights to South America and Mexico from 1974, London from 1978 and Europe and Asia from 1979, before ceasing all operations in 1982.[24] During the Braniff hub era, DFW was one of only four U.S. airports to have scheduled Concorde service; Braniff commenced scheduled Concorde service from Dallas to Washington from 1979 to 1980, using British Airways and Air France aircraft temporarily re-registered to Braniff while flying within the United States. British Airways later briefly flew Concordes to Dallas in 1988 as a substitute for its ordinarily scheduled DC-10 service.[16]

Following airline deregulation, American Airlines (which had already been one of the largest carriers serving the Dallas/Fort Worth area for many years) established its first hub at DFW on June 11, 1981.[25] American finished moving its headquarters from Grand Prairie, Texas, to a building in Fort Worth located on the site of the old Greater Southwest International Airport, near DFW Airport on January 17, 1983; the airline began leasing the facility from the airport, which owns the facility.[26] By 1984, the American hub occupied most of Terminal 3E and part of Terminal 2E.[27] American's hub grew to fill all of Terminal 2E by 1991.[28] American also began long-haul international service from DFW, adding flights to London in 1982 and Tokyo in 1987.[29]

Delta Air Lines also built up a hub operation at DFW, which occupied most of Terminal 4E through the 1990s.[27][28] The Delta hub peaked around 1991, when Delta had a 35% market share at DFW; its share was halved by 2004, after many of its mainline routes were downgraded to more frequent regional jet service in 2003.[30] Delta constructed an satellite terminal in Terminal E in 1988 to accommodate their hub, which was permanently reopened in May 2019 for American Eagle operations.[31][32] Delta closed its DFW hub in 2004 in a restructuring of the airline to avoid bankruptcy, cutting its DFW operation to only 21 flights a day from over 250 and redeploying aircraft to hubs in Cincinnati, Atlanta and Salt Lake City. Prior to the closure, Delta had a 17.3% market share at DFW.[33]

In 1989 the airport authority announced plans to rebuild the existing terminals and add two runways. After an environmental impact study was released the following year, the cities of Irving, Euless and Grapevine sued the airport over its extension plans, a battle that was finally decided (in favor of the airport) by the US Supreme Court in 1994. The seventh runway opened in 1996. The four primary north–south runways (those closest to the terminals) were all lengthened from 11,388 feet (3,471 m) to their present length of 13,400 feet (4,084 m). The first, 17R/35L, was extended in 1996 (at the same time the new runway was constructed) and the other three (17C/35C, 18L/36R and 18R/36L) were extended in 2005. DFW is now the only airport in the world with 4 serviceable paved runways longer than 4,000 metres (13,123 ft).

Terminal D, built for international flights, and DFW Skylink, a modern bidirectional people mover system, opened in 2005.[34][35] In September 2014, the largest commercial aircraft in the world, an Airbus A380 owned by Australian airline Qantas made the first arrival at DFW ever by an A380, and was handled at Concourse D.[36]

From 2004 to 2012, DFW was one of two US Army "Personnel Assistance Points" that received US troops returning from wars in Iraq and Afghanistan for rest and recuperation. This ended on March 14, 2012, leaving Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport as the sole Personnel Assistance Point.[37]

Airports Council International (ACI) named DFW Airport the best large airport with more than 40 million passengers in North America for passenger satisfaction in 2016.[38]

In June 2018, DFW Airport opened a fully functioning, free standing emergency room on airport grounds, located in Southgate Plaza near the Airport Headquarters and Rental Car Center. With this opening, the facility became the first actual ER on an airport's property anywhere around the globe.[39]

DFW Airport tentatively completed a $2.7 billion[40] "Terminal Renewal and Improvement Program" (TRIP), which encompassed renovations of three of the original four terminals (A, B, and E). Work on the project began following the conclusion of Super Bowl XLV in February 2011. Terminal A was the first terminal to undergo these renovations, which were completed in January 2017 at a cost of about $1 billion.[41] This was followed by the completion of Terminal E in August 2017 and Terminal B in December 2017. While Terminal C was originally part of the multibillion-dollar renovations, American Airlines in 2014 asked to delay renovations of the terminal. Terminal C is now slated to be renovated along with the project to construct a new terminal, Terminal F, to be completed sometime in 2025.[42]

Future[edit]

On May 20, 2019, DFW airport, along with American Airlines, announced plans to build a 6th terminal. The proposed project is estimated to cost $3–3.5 billion and was expected to finish as soon as 2025.[43] Along with the addition of up to 24 new gates to Terminal F, renovations of Terminal C are planned to take place, as it is the last terminal that has not been updated in recent years.[44] The goal of the new terminal is to "provide the region with the growth it needs to compete with international business centers," according to CEO of DFW Airport, Sean Donohue.[43] However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the timing of the project is currently in flux.[45]

Facilities[edit]

A Skylink train making a stop at Spirit airlines phone number usa E, my t mobile com documents to a Spirit Airlines Airbus A320 at DFW

Terminals[edit]

Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport has five terminals and 184 gates.[10] DFW's terminals are designed to minimize the distance between a passenger's car and airplane, and to reduce traffic around terminals. A consequence of this layout is that connecting passengers have to walk extremely long distances between gates, as there are no shortcuts or moving walkways between the ends of the semicircular terminals. The Skylink connects all five terminals inside the secured area.[35] Terminal Link connects all terminals with a shuttle bus system on the non-secure side.[46] All non-precleared international flights are processed in Terminal D, which also has a gate to support an Airbus A380.[47] All non-American Airlines domestic carriers and pre-cleared flights from Canada use Terminal E.[48]

American Airlines has gates and Admirals Clubs in all 5 terminals, as well as a Flagship Lounge in Terminal D.[49] Delta and United operate a Sky Club and United Club respectively in Terminal E.[50][51] Terminal D contains numerous independent and foreign carrier lounges, including an American Express Centurion Lounge and The Club DFW, affiliated with Priority Pass.[52]Capital One is constructing a lounge scheduled spirit airlines phone number usa open in terminal D in 2021.[53]

The Hyatt Regency DFW Airport hotel is directly adjacent to Terminal C, while the 298-room Grand Hyatt DFW Hotel is directly connected to Terminal D.[54][55]

Ground transportation[edit]

The International Parkway Toll Road intersects the airport

Car rental[edit]

A consolidated rental car facility is located at the south end of the airport and connected to all terminals by a dedicated network of shuttle buses.[56] Hosting ten rental car companies, the center was completed in March 2000.[57]

Highways[edit]

The DFW Airport area is served by International Parkway (partially State Highway 97 Spur), which runs through the center of the airport, connecting to Airport Freeway (State Highway 183) on the southern side of the airport and John W. Carpenter Freeway (State Highway 114) on the northern side. International Parkway continues north of State Highway 114, carrying the State Highway 121 designation for a short while until its interchange with the Lyndon B. Johnson Freeway (I-635), where State Highway 121 continues north as the Sam Rayburn Tollway.

Bus services[edit]

Bus routes serving the airport are operated by Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) and Trinity Metro. DART operates route 408 from Spirit airlines phone number usa Irving/Heritage Crossing Station and Southwestern Medical District/Parkland Station to the Remote South Parking facility, and Trinity Metro operates the TRE Link bus route from CentrePort/DFW Airport station.

Rail transport[edit]

Three rail systems serve the airport: DART Light Rail, TEXRail, and the Trinity Railway Express. DART operates light rail from DFW Airport station located at Terminal A.[58] This provides direct rail service on the Orange Line to Dallas and Las Colinas (with a later extension to DFW Airport North station). TEXRail is a commuter rail service between Terminal B and T&P Station in downtown Fort Worth. DFW Airport is additionally served by the Trinity Railway Express commuter rail line at CentrePort/DFW Airport Station via shuttle bus to the Remote South parking lot. The line serves both downtown Dallas and downtown Fort Worth.

Other facilities[edit]

The facility at 1639 West 23rd Street is located on the airport property and in the City of Grapevine.[59][60][61] Tenants include China Airlines,[62]Lufthansa Cargo,[63] and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.[64]

The DFW Airport Department of Public Safety provides the airport with its own police, fire protection, and emergency medical services.[65]

The DFW International Airport headquarters is located nearby at 2400 Aviation Drive, DFW Airport, TX 75261.[66]

In 1995, the airport opened Founders' Plaza, an observation park dedicated to the founders of DFW Airport. The site offered a panoramic view of the south end of the airport and hosted several significant events, including an employee memorial the day after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and the airport's 30th anniversary celebration in 2004.[67] As part of the perimeter taxiway project, Founders' Plaza was closed in 2007 and moved to a new location surrounding a 50-foot (15 m)-tall beacon on the north side of the airport in 2008. The 6-acre (2.4 ha) plaza features a granite monument and sculpture, post-mounted binoculars, piped-in voices of air traffic controllers and shade pavilions. In 2010, a memorial honoring Delta Air Lines Flight 191 was dedicated at the plaza.[68]

Airlines and destinations[edit]

Passenger[edit]

AirlinesDestinationsRefs
Aeroméxico ConnectMexico City[69]
Air Canada ExpressMontréal–Trudeau, Toronto–Pearson, Vancouver[70]
Air FranceSeasonal:Paris–Charles de Gaulle[71]
Alaska AirlinesPortland (OR), Seattle/Tacoma[72]
American AirlinesAlbuquerque, Amarillo, Aruba, Atlanta, Auckland, Austin, Baltimore, Beijing–Daxing, Belize City, Birmingham (AL), Bogotá, Boise, Boston, Buenos Aires–Ezeiza, Burbank, Calgary, Cancún, Charleston (SC), Charlotte, Chicago–O'Hare, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Colorado Springs, Columbia (SC), Columbus–Glenn, Cozumel, Denver, Des Moines, Destin/Fort Walton Beach, Detroit, Durango (MX), Eagle/Vail, El Paso, Fayetteville/Bentonville, Fort Lauderdale, Fort Myers, Frankfurt, Fresno, Grand Cayman, Grand Rapids, Greensboro, Greenville/Spartanburg, Guadalajara, Guatemala City, Harrisburg, Hartford, Hong Kong, Honolulu, Houston–Intercontinental, Indianapolis, Jackson Hole, Jacksonville (FL), Kahului, Kansas City, Key West, Knoxville, Las Vegas, León/Del Bajío, Liberia (CR), Lima, Little Rock, London–Heathrow, Los Angeles, Louisville, Lubbock, Madison, Madrid (resumes December 16, 2021),[73]McAllen, Memphis, Mexico City, Miami, Midland/Odessa, Milwaukee, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Montego Bay, Monterey (CA), Montrose, Nashville, Newark, New Orleans, New York–JFK, New York–LaGuardia, Norfolk, Oklahoma City, Omaha, Ontario, Orange County, Orlando, Palm Springs, Paris–Charles de Gaulle, Pensacola, Philadelphia, Phoenix–Sky Harbor, Pittsburgh, Portland (OR), Puerto Vallarta, Raleigh/Durham, Reno/Tahoe, Richmond, Roatan, Rome–Fiumicino, Sacramento, St. Louis, St. Thomas, Salt Lake City, San Antonio, San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose (CA), San Jose (CR), San José del Cabo, San Juan, San Salvador, Santiago de Chile, São Paulo–Guarulhos, Sarasota, Savannah, Seattle/Tacoma, Seoul–Incheon, Shanghai–Pudong, Spokane, Tampa, Tel Aviv (begins March 5, 2022),[74]Tokyo–Haneda, Tokyo–Narita, Toronto–Pearson, Tucson, Tulsa, Vancouver, Washington–Dulles, Washington–National, West Palm Beach, Wichita
Seasonal:Amsterdam, Anchorage, Bangor, Bozeman, Dublin, Eugene, Fairbanks, Glacier Park/Kalispell, Gunnison/Crested Butte, Hayden/Steamboat Springs, Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo, Kailua–Kona, Missoula, Montreal–Trudeau, Nassau, Portland (ME), Providenciales, Punta Cana, Rapid City, St. Kitts, St. Lucia–Hewanorra, St. Maarten, San Pedro Sula, Santa Barbara, Santo Domingo–Las Américas, Tegucigalpa
[75]
American EagleAbilene, Aguascalientes, Albuquerque, Alexandria, Amarillo, Asheville, Aspen, Augusta (GA), Bakersfield, Baton Rouge, Beaumont, Billings, Birmingham (AL), Bismarck, Bloomington/Normal, Bozeman, Brownsville, Buffalo, Calgary, Cedar Rapids/Iowa City, Champaign/Urbana, Charleston (SC), Chattanooga, Cheyenne, Chihuahua, Cincinnati, College Station, Colorado Springs, Columbia (MO), Columbus (GA), Corpus Christi, Dayton, Del Rio, Des Moines, Destin/Fort Walton Beach, Durango (CO), El Paso, Eugene, Evansville, Fargo, Fayetteville/Bentonville, Fayetteville (NC), Flagstaff, Fort Smith, Fort Wayne, Gainesville, Garden City, Grand Island, Grand Junction, Grand Spirit airlines phone number usa, Greensboro, Greenville/Spartanburg, Gulfport/Biloxi, Harlingen, Harrisburg, Houston–Hobby, Houston–Intercontinental, Huntsville, Idaho Falls, Jackson (MS), Jackson Hole, Kansas City, Killeen/Fort Hood, Knoxville, Lafayette, Lake Charles, Laredo, Lawton, León/Del Bajío, Lexington, Little Rock, Long Beach, Longview, Louisville, Lubbock, Madison, Manhattan (KS), McAllen, Memphis, Midland/Odessa, Milwaukee, Missoula, Mobile, Moline/Quad Cities, Monroe, Monterey (CA), Monterrey, Montgomery, Montrose, Morelia, Oaxaca, Oklahoma City, Omaha, Panama City (FL), Pensacola, Peoria, Phoenix–Sky Harbor, Querétaro, Rapid City, Reno/Tahoe, Roswell, St. George (UT), St. Louis, San Angelo, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Potosí, Santa Barbara, Santa Fe, Shreveport, Sioux Falls, South Bend, Springfield (IL), Springfield/Branson, Stillwater, Syracuse, Tallahassee, Texarkana, Toronto–Pearson, Torreón/Gómez Palacio, Tri–Cities (TN), Tulsa, Tyler, Waco, Wichita, Wichita Falls, Wilmington (NC), Yuma, Zacatecas
Seasonal:Acapulco, Burlington (VT), Daytona Beach, Eagle/Vail, Glacier Park/Kalispell, Hermosillo, Hilton Head, Huatulco, Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo, La Paz, Loreto, Manzanillo, Mazatlán, Melbourne/Orlando, Mérida, Montreal–Trudeau, Myrtle Beach, Santa Rosa, Sarasota, Traverse City
[75]
Avianca El SalvadorSan Salvador[76]
Boutique AirCarlsbad (NM)[77]
British AirwaysLondon–Heathrow[78]
Contour AirlinesGreenville (MS)[79]
Delta Air LinesAtlanta, Boston, Detroit, Los Angeles, Minneapolis/St. Paul, New York–JFK, New York–LaGuardia, Salt Lake City[80]
Delta ConnectionCincinnati[80]
Denver Air ConnectionClovis (NM)[81]
EmiratesDubai–International[82]
FinnairHelsinki (begins February 7, 2022)[83][84]
Frontier AirlinesBuffalo (begins April 24, 2022),[85]Cincinnati, Denver, Durango (CO) (begins April 30, 2022),[85]Hartford (begins April 25, 2022),[85]Las Vegas, Miami, Newark, Orlando, Philadelphia, Phoenix–Sky Harbor, San Diego, San Francisco, Tampa
Seasonal:Atlanta, Cancún, Chicago–O'Hare, Nashville, Ontario, Salt Lake City
[86]
IberiaMadrid (begins April 22, 2022)[87][88]
Japan AirlinesTokyo–Haneda, Tokyo–Narita[89]
JetBlueBoston, New York–JFK[90]
Korean AirSeoul–Incheon[91]
LufthansaFrankfurt[92]
QantasSydney[93]
Qatar AirwaysDoha[94]
Southern Airways ExpressEl Dorado (AR), Harrison (AR), Hot Springs[95]
Spirit AirlinesAtlanta, Baltimore, Cancún, Chicago–O'Hare, Detroit, Fort Lauderdale, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Miami, New Orleans, New York–LaGuardia, Orlando, Pensacola, Philadelphia, Phoenix–Sky Harbor, Puerto Vallarta, Tampa
Seasonal:Cleveland, Myrtle Beach, San Diego
[96]
Sun Country AirlinesLas Vegas, Minneapolis/St. Paul
Seasonal:Cancún, Cozumel, Liberia (CR), Montego Bay, Orange County, Palm Springs, Puerto Vallarta, Punta Cana, San José del Cabo
[97]
Turkish AirlinesIstanbul[98]
United AirlinesChicago–O'Hare, Denver, Houston–Intercontinental, Newark, Washington–Dulles[99]
United ExpressChicago–O'Hare, Denver, Houston–Intercontinental, Newark, San Francisco, Washington–Dulles[99]
VivaAerobúsMexico City, Monterrey[100]
VolarisGuadalajara, Mexico City[101]

Cargo[edit]

AirlinesDestinations
AeroLogicChicago–O'Hare, Frankfurt
AirBridgeCargoAmsterdam, Chicago–O'Hare, Los Angeles, Moscow–Sheremetyevo
Air China CargoAnchorage, Beijing–Capital, New York–JFK, Shanghai–Pudong
Amazon AirAllentown/Bethlehem, Cincinnati, Ontario, Sacramento, Tampa
AmeriflightAmarillo, Lubbock, Wichita Falls
Amerijet InternationalSacramento
Asiana CargoAtlanta, Chicago–O'Hare, Seattle/Tacoma
ASL Airlines BelgiumAtlanta, Liège
Avianca CargoBogotá
CargojetHamilton, Mexico City, Toronto–Pearson
CargoluxChicago–O'Hare, Spirit airlines phone number usa, Los Angeles, Luxembourg, Mexico City
Cargolux ItaliaMilan–Malpensa
Cathay Pacific CargoAnchorage, Atlanta, Hong Kong, Houston–Intercontinental, Los Angeles
China Airlines CargoAnchorage, Atlanta, Chicago–O'Hare, Shanghai–Pudong, Taipei–Taoyuan
DHL AviationCincinnati, El Paso, Hong Kong, Los Angeles
Empire AirlinesLubbock
EVA Air CargoAnchorage, Taipei–Taoyuan[102]
FedEx ExpressFort Lauderdale, Greensboro, Indianapolis, Los Angeles, Memphis, Phoenix–Sky Harbor, Seattle/Tacoma
Korean Air CargoAnchorage, Atlanta, Guadalajara
Lufthansa CargoFrankfurt, Guadalajara, Mexico City
MartinaireAbilene, Addison, Amarillo, Fort Worth–Meacham, Lubbock, Oklahoma City, Palestine, Pampa (TX), Shreveport, Temple, Tyler, Wichita Falls
Nippon Cargo AirlinesAnchorage, Chicago–O'Hare, Tokyo–Narita
Qantas FreightBeijing–Capital, Chongqing
Qatar Airways CargoAtlanta, Doha, Liège, Luxembourg, Panama City–Tocumen
Silk Way West AirlinesBaku, Chicago–O'Hare, Hahn
Singapore Airlines CargoAnchorage, Brussels, Chicago–O'Hare, Los Angeles, Seattle/Tacoma, Singapore
UPS AirlinesAlbuquerque, Amarillo, Atlanta, Austin, Boston, Chicago–O'Hare, Chicago/Rockford, Columbia (SC), El Paso, Greenville/Spartanburg, Houston–Intercontinental, Little Rock, Los Angeles, Louisville, Memphis, Miami, Newark, Oakland, Ontario, Orlando, Phoenix–Sky Harbor, Portland (OR), San Antonio, San Bernardino, San Jose (CA), Spokane, Tampa
Seasonal:Hartford, Honolulu, Knoxville, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Philadelphia

Statistics[edit]

Top destinations[edit]

Rank City Passengers Carriers
1 Los Angeles, What is a daily interest savings account American, Delta, Spirit
2 Las Vegas, Nevada736,000 American, Frontier, Spirit, Sun Country
3 Denver, Colorado690,000 American, Frontier, United
4 Atlanta, Georgia632,000 American, Delta, Spirit
5 Chicago–O'Hare, Illinois585,000 American, Spirit, United
6 Orlando, Florida575,000 American, Frontier, Spirit
7 Phoenix–Sky Harbor, Arizona528,000 American, Spirit
8 Miami, Florida520,000 American, Frontier
9 Charlotte, North Carolina450,000 American
10 Fort Lauderdale, Spirit airlines phone number usa American, Spirit
Rank Airport Passengers Carriers
1 Cancún, Mexico831,554 American, Spirit, Sun Country
2 London–Heathrow, United Kingdom745,902 American, British Airways
3 Mexico City, Mexico677,464 Aeromexico, American, VivaAerobus, Volaris
4 Tokyo–Narita, Japan449,658 American, Japan Airlines
5 San José del Cabo, Mexico393,601 American, Spirit
6 Toronto–Pearson, Canada363,833 American, Air Canada
7 Frankfurt, Germany304,334 American, Lufthansa
8 Seoul–Incheon, South Korea288,289 American, Korean Air
9 Puerto Vallarta, Mexico270,594 American
10 Vancouver, Canada256,862 Air Canada, American

Airline market share[edit]

Rank Airline Passengers Share
1 American Airlines18,981,000 62.27%
2 Envoy Air4,961,000 16.28%
3 Mesa Airlines2,036,000 6.68%
4 SkyWest Airlines1,394,000 4.57%
5 Spirit Airlines1,285,000 4.21%

Annual traffic[edit]

Year Passengers Year Passengers Year Passengers
199452,642,225200459,446,078201463,522,823
199556,490,845200559,176,265201565,512,163
199658,034,503200660,226,829201665,670,697
199760,488,713200759,786,476201767,092,194
199860,313,000200857,093,187201869,112,607
199960,112,998200956,030,457201975,066,956
200060,687,181201056,905,600202039,364,990
200155,141,763201157,806,918
200252,829,750201258,590,633
200353,252,205201360,436,739

Accidents and incidents[edit]

  • August 2, 1985: Delta Air Lines Flight 191, a Lockheed L-1011 on a Fort Lauderdale–Dallas/Fort Worth–Los Angeles route, crashed near the north end of runway 17R (now 17C) after encountering a severe microburst on final approach; the crash killed 8 of 11 crew members, 128 of 152 passengers on board and one person on the ground.
  • March 24, 1987: The pilot of a MetroflightConvair CV-580, registration number N73107, operating for American Eagle Airlines on a commuter flight bound for Gregg County Airport, lost directional control during a crosswind takeoff. The left-hand wing and propeller struck the runway and the nose landing gear collapsed as the craft slid off the runway and onto an adjacent taxiway; 8 passengers and 3 crew spirit airlines phone number usa the airliner suffered minor or no injuries. The crash was attributed to the pilot's decision to disregard wind information and take off in weather conditions that exceeded the rated capabilities of the aircraft; the pilot's "overconfidence in [his/her] personal ability" was cited as a contributing factor in the accident report.[106][107]
  • May 21, 1988: An American AirlinesMcDonnell Douglas DC-10-30, registration number N136AA, operating as AA Flight 70 bound for Frankfurt Airport, overran Runway 35L after automatic warning signals prompted the flight crew to initiate a rejected takeoff. The jetliner continued to accelerate for several seconds before slowing, and did not stop until it had run 1,100 feet (335 m) past the runway threshold, collapsing the nose landing gear. 2 crew were seriously injured and the remaining 12 crew and 240 passengers escaped safely; the aircraft was severely damaged and was written off. Investigators attributed the overrun to a shortcoming in the design standards that were used when the DC-10 was built; there had been no requirement to test whether partially worn (as opposed to brand-new) brake pads were capable of stopping the aircraft during a rejected takeoff and 8 of the 10 worn pad sets on N136AA had failed.[108][109]
  • August 31, 1988: Delta Air Lines Flight 1141, a Boeing 727, bound for Salt Lake City International Airport, crashed after takeoff, killing 14 of the 108 people on board and injuring 76 others.
  • April 14, 1993: The pilot of American Airlines Flight 102, a McDonnell Douglas DC-10-30, registration number N139AA, lost directional control during a crosswind landing in rainy conditions after arriving from Honolulu International Airport. The jetliner slid off runway 17L and dug into deep mud, collapsing the nose landing gear and tearing off the left-hand engine and much of the left wing. A fire in the left-hand wheel well was rapidly extinguished by firefighters who arrived almost immediately from the nearby DFW/DPS Fire Station. 2 passengers suffered serious injuries while using the evacuation slides to escape from the steeply tilted fuselage; the remaining 187 passengers and all 13 crew evacuated safely. The aircraft was written off.[110][111][112]
  • October 1, 1993: Martinaire Flight 639, a Cessna 208B Caravancargo aircraft, registration number N9762B, was blown off Runway 17L by jet blast after arriving from Tulsa International Airport, sustaining substantial damage to the left wing. The pilot and sole occupant was not injured. The pilot had disregarded a safety advisory from air traffic control and attempted to taxi behind a McDonnell Douglas MD-11 as it was cleared for takeoff.[113]
  • July 18, 1997: A Cessna 172 allegedly stolen from Sherman Municipal Airport was unlawfully flown at very low altitude across DFW Airport, Fort Worth Alliance Airport, and the landing spirit airlines phone number usa at a Bell Helicopter facility, causing significant air traffic disruptions. The unknown pilot then flew the aircraft back to Sherman Municipal and parked it. The Cessna's owner denied flying it that day, and stated that he could not positively identify the incident pilot because several people had access to the aircraft.[114]
  • May 23, 2001: The right main landing gear of an American Airlines Fokker 100, registration number N1419D, operating as AA Flight 1107, collapsed upon landing on runway 17C after a scheduled flight from Charlotte/Douglas International Airport. The pilot was able to maintain directional control and stop the aircraft on the runway. The incident was attributed to metal fatigue caused by a manufacturing flaw in the right main gear; there were no serious injuries to the 88 passengers or 4 crew, but the aircraft was badly damaged and was written off.[115][116][117]

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Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dallas/Fort_Worth_International_Airport
3 December, 2021 Topics: Alert, Messages for U.S. Citizens, U.S. Citizen Services